SoftBank to invest $1 billion for a 6% stake in payments firm Wirecard

SoftBank will invest 900 million euros ($1 billion) into German fintech firm Wirecard, as part of a strategic partnership on digital payments. Wirecard said Wednesday that it will raise the capital by issuing convertible bonds with a maturity of five years, selling them exclusively to SoftBank. The notes will convert to an almost 6% stake in the firm. It’s part of a tie-up between the two on digital payments, according to Wirecard. SoftBank will help the firm — which ousted Commerzbank from Germ


SoftBank will invest 900 million euros ($1 billion) into German fintech firm Wirecard, as part of a strategic partnership on digital payments. Wirecard said Wednesday that it will raise the capital by issuing convertible bonds with a maturity of five years, selling them exclusively to SoftBank. The notes will convert to an almost 6% stake in the firm. It’s part of a tie-up between the two on digital payments, according to Wirecard. SoftBank will help the firm — which ousted Commerzbank from Germ
SoftBank to invest $1 billion for a 6% stake in payments firm Wirecard Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: ryan browne, alexander pohl, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, softbank, wirecard, technologies, strengthening, billion, payments, tieup, partnership, digital, stake, expand, firm, invest, subject


SoftBank to invest $1 billion for a 6% stake in payments firm Wirecard

SoftBank will invest 900 million euros ($1 billion) into German fintech firm Wirecard, as part of a strategic partnership on digital payments.

Wirecard said Wednesday that it will raise the capital by issuing convertible bonds with a maturity of five years, selling them exclusively to SoftBank.

The notes will convert to an almost 6% stake in the firm. The deal is still subject to the approval of Wirecard shareholders.

It’s part of a tie-up between the two on digital payments, according to Wirecard. SoftBank will help the firm — which ousted Commerzbank from Germany’s blue-chip DAX index last year — expand to Japan and South Korea.

“In SoftBank we have found a partner that shares both our passion for new technologies and drive to spearhead the latest innovations, all on a global scale,” Wirecard Chief Executive Markus Braun said in a statement.

“In addition, through this potential partnership, we will expand our reach and products to the East Asian markets, thereby further strengthening our position in Asia.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: ryan browne, alexander pohl, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, softbank, wirecard, technologies, strengthening, billion, payments, tieup, partnership, digital, stake, expand, firm, invest, subject


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Makyajart Toptan Kozmetik


Makyajart Toptan Kozmetik Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, toptan, makyajart, kozmetik



Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, toptan, makyajart, kozmetik


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Five of YouTube’s biggest markets in the world are in Asia

Each morning, the “Beyond the Valley” newsletter brings you all the latest from the vast, dynamic world of tech – outside the Silicon Valley. According to Vidyasagar, the first two markets in the world that turned to mobile ahead of desktop consumption of videos were actually Japan and South Korea. “Over the last few years, what we’ve seen in markets like India is truly astounding,” he said. We, last year, saw nearly a very, very high triple digit growth on mobile — on top of that very high volu


Each morning, the “Beyond the Valley” newsletter brings you all the latest from the vast, dynamic world of tech – outside the Silicon Valley. According to Vidyasagar, the first two markets in the world that turned to mobile ahead of desktop consumption of videos were actually Japan and South Korea. “Over the last few years, what we’ve seen in markets like India is truly astounding,” he said. We, last year, saw nearly a very, very high triple digit growth on mobile — on top of that very high volu
Five of YouTube’s biggest markets in the world are in Asia Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, regulatory, mobile, biggest, youtube, markets, nearly, users, tools, india, world, youtubes, tiktok, asia


Five of YouTube's biggest markets in the world are in Asia

By signing up for newsletters, you are agreeing to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy .

Each morning, the “Beyond the Valley” newsletter brings you all the latest from the vast, dynamic world of tech – outside the Silicon Valley.

YouTube has more than a billion users worldwide.

According to Vidyasagar, the first two markets in the world that turned to mobile ahead of desktop consumption of videos were actually Japan and South Korea. But others are catching up, he added.

“Over the last few years, what we’ve seen in markets like India is truly astounding,” he said. “India today has nearly 85% of its volume consumed through mobile devices. We, last year, saw nearly a very, very high triple digit growth on mobile — on top of that very high volume.”

The same is true for Southeast Asia, in markets like Thailand and Indonesia, he added.

That said, in recent years, social platforms like YouTube and others have come under regulatory scrutiny to monitor the spread of hate speech, misinformation and other kinds of banned content on their platforms.

In India, for example, a state court ordered the federal government to ban the popular Chinese video sharing app TikTok, saying it was encouraging pornography, Reuters reported. TikTok has been downloaded by nearly 300 million users so far in India, and the ban puts more than 250 jobs at risk, according to the news agency.

To live up to regulatory standards, companies like YouTube and social networking giant Facebook use a variety of tools, including artificial intelligence, to detect the presence of controversial materials on their sites.

Vidyasagar said both YouTube and Google have invested extensively in technologies like machine learning and in people, as well as implemented tools and policies, to meet regulatory standards.

“We need a mix of both machine and human interference to come together here,” he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, regulatory, mobile, biggest, youtube, markets, nearly, users, tools, india, world, youtubes, tiktok, asia


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Employees keep ‘ghosting’ their job offers — and Gen Zs are leading the charge

Many of us have faced excruciating silence while waiting to hear back from a prospective employer, only to wind up hearing nothing at all. But now, the tables could be turning as more and more job applicants leave hopeful employers in the lurch. According to Randstad’s study of 1,202 U.S. managers and employees, more than a third (43 percent) of Gen Z employees — those aged 22 and under — say they’ve accepted a job but then bailed on the offer. That figure dips to 26 percent for millennials (tho


Many of us have faced excruciating silence while waiting to hear back from a prospective employer, only to wind up hearing nothing at all. But now, the tables could be turning as more and more job applicants leave hopeful employers in the lurch. According to Randstad’s study of 1,202 U.S. managers and employees, more than a third (43 percent) of Gen Z employees — those aged 22 and under — say they’ve accepted a job but then bailed on the offer. That figure dips to 26 percent for millennials (tho
Employees keep ‘ghosting’ their job offers — and Gen Zs are leading the charge Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: karen gilchrist, -jim link, chief human resources officer for randstad north a
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, job, managers, leading, aged, offer, zs, charge, xers, employees, accepted, ghosting, younger, gen, offers


Employees keep 'ghosting' their job offers — and Gen Zs are leading the charge

Many of us have faced excruciating silence while waiting to hear back from a prospective employer, only to wind up hearing nothing at all.

But now, the tables could be turning as more and more job applicants leave hopeful employers in the lurch.

New research from recruitment firm Randstad suggests that as many as two-thirds (66 percent) of U.S. managers have been snubbed by candidates who initially accepted a job offer, only to retract it — or disappear entirely — ahead of their start date. That practice was dubbed “ghosting” after gaining notoriety in the realm of online dating.

And it’s not just senior employees who are calling the shots. In fact, younger staff are leading the charge.

According to Randstad’s study of 1,202 U.S. managers and employees, more than a third (43 percent) of Gen Z employees — those aged 22 and under — say they’ve accepted a job but then bailed on the offer. That figure dips to 26 percent for millennials (those aged 23-38) and Gen X-ers (those aged 39-54). For baby boomers — or those between the age of 55 and 74, it falls to 13 percent.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: karen gilchrist, -jim link, chief human resources officer for randstad north a
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, job, managers, leading, aged, offer, zs, charge, xers, employees, accepted, ghosting, younger, gen, offers


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Hong Kong ‘Occupy’ leaders sentenced to jail for pro-democracy protests

Ranging in age from their 30s to 70s, the nine defendants span generations of Hong Kong citizens who have been agitating for full democracy. In Taiwan’s capital Taipei, youthful supporters rallied to denounce the convictions and growing pressure from Beijing on both their self-ruled island and Hong Kong. “Occupy Central is not a crime,” they chanted, as well as the “The Hong Kong government is unjustified.” “The fact that you care about Hong Kong means you care about your own fate. “Your support


Ranging in age from their 30s to 70s, the nine defendants span generations of Hong Kong citizens who have been agitating for full democracy. In Taiwan’s capital Taipei, youthful supporters rallied to denounce the convictions and growing pressure from Beijing on both their self-ruled island and Hong Kong. “Occupy Central is not a crime,” they chanted, as well as the “The Hong Kong government is unjustified.” “The fact that you care about Hong Kong means you care about your own fate. “Your support
Hong Kong ‘Occupy’ leaders sentenced to jail for pro-democracy protests Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: justin chin, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sentenced, prodemocracy, jail, suspended, seen, occupy, protests, leaders, chinese, kong, months, hong, chan, sentences, sentencing


Hong Kong 'Occupy' leaders sentenced to jail for pro-democracy protests

A court in Hong Kong handed down prison sentences of up to 16 months Wednesday to eight leaders of massive 2014 pro-democracy protests on charges of public nuisance offenses.

The sentences are seen as an effort by the government of the semi-autonomous Chinese territory to draw a line under the protests amid pressure from Beijing.

Ranging in age from their 30s to 70s, the nine defendants span generations of Hong Kong citizens who have been agitating for full democracy. The defendants had all pleaded not guilty, calling the prosecutions politically motivated.

Three protest leaders were given 16 months, one of them suspended for two years, two received eights months in prison and two were given suspended eight-month sentences. Another was ordered to perform 200 hours of community service. One other defendant, Tanya Chan, had her sentencing postponed because of the need to undergo surgery.

It was not immediately clear if they planned to appeal.

“Thank you for the sentencing,” Raphael Wong, given eight months, told Judge Johnny Chan. “Our determination on fighting for genuine universal suffrage will not change.”

While the charges carried potential sentences of up to seven years, they were still seen as unusually harsh by activists in what they called an attempt to intimidate them into silence.

“The long sentences send a chilling warning to all that there will be serious consequences for advocating for democracy,” said Maya Wang, Hong Kong-based chief researcher for China at Human Rights Watch.

“The Beijing and Hong Kong authorities appear intent on eliminating the only pocket of freedoms on Chinese soil,” Wang said. She cited a law against booing the Chinese national anthem and moves to amend the extradition law that could see suspects sent to China where they’d be unlikely to receive a fair trial.

Supporters and family members applauded the defendants as they entered the courtroom, then stood outside sobbing after the hearing before breaking into chants.

Those convicted included law professor Benny Tai, retired sociology professor Chan Kin-man and pastor Chu Yiu-ming, who all received 16 months though Chu’s was suspended for two years. The others include two current and one former lawmaker, two student leaders and a political activist.

Chan, who will be sentenced June 10, said prior to the hearing that she hadn’t lost faith in what the movement stood for. “Although it’s an uphill battle, it’s not easy, it’s time for us to make sure that we are strong enough to face different kind of challenges,” Chan said.

The nine were leaders of the “Occupy Central” campaign, which was organized as a nonviolent sit-in that became known as the “Umbrella Movement” after a symbol of defiance against police adopted by the street protests.

Protesters demanded the right to freely nominate candidates for Hong Kong’s leader who would then be elected by all of the territory’s roughly 5 million voters. However, they failed to win any concessions from the government, and Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam was chosen in 2017 from among a slate of candidates approved by Beijing and elected by a 1,200- member pro-China electoral body.

Hong Kong, a former British colony, was handed over to Chinese rule in 1997 under an agreement in which China promised the city could retain its own laws, economic system and civil rights for 50 years.

However, Chinese President and Communist Party leader Xi Jinping has been seen as extending his crackdown on civil liberties to Hong Kong, drawing criticism from commercial and legal associations as well as political, human rights and media groups.

“In the verdict, the judge commented we are naive, believing that by having a occupy movement we can attain democracy. But what is more naive than believing in one country two systems?” Chan Kin-man said before the sentences were issued.

In Taiwan’s capital Taipei, youthful supporters rallied to denounce the convictions and growing pressure from Beijing on both their self-ruled island and Hong Kong.

China has demanded Taiwan agree to its claim to the island as Chinese territory, to be annexed by force if necessary, and accept a “one country, two systems,” framework for governing along the lines of that in place in Hong Kong.

“Occupy Central is not a crime,” they chanted, as well as the “The Hong Kong government is unjustified.”

“The fact that you care about Hong Kong means you care about your own fate. I think this is very important,” Tien-chi Martin-Liao, a member of Independent Chinese PEN Center, said in an address following the sentencing hearing.

“Your support will be felt in the hearts of those persecuted in Hong Kong, and those who live there,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: justin chin, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sentenced, prodemocracy, jail, suspended, seen, occupy, protests, leaders, chinese, kong, months, hong, chan, sentences, sentencing


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‘Very unlikely’ for Brexit to be resolved by May 22: Professor

‘Very unlikely’ for Brexit to be resolved by May 22: Professor3 Hours AgoJonathan Portes of King’s College London discusses Brexit and the political future of U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May.


‘Very unlikely’ for Brexit to be resolved by May 22: Professor3 Hours AgoJonathan Portes of King’s College London discusses Brexit and the political future of U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May.
‘Very unlikely’ for Brexit to be resolved by May 22: Professor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, professor, professor3, unlikely, political, uk, 22, prime, portes, resolved, brexit, minister, theresa


'Very unlikely' for Brexit to be resolved by May 22: Professor

‘Very unlikely’ for Brexit to be resolved by May 22: Professor

3 Hours Ago

Jonathan Portes of King’s College London discusses Brexit and the political future of U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, professor, professor3, unlikely, political, uk, 22, prime, portes, resolved, brexit, minister, theresa


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Saudi Arabia beheads 37 for terrorism crimes, most of them minority Shiites

Saudi Arabia on Tuesday beheaded 37 Saudi citizens, most of them minority Shiites, in a mass execution across the country for alleged terrorism-related crimes. The executions were likely to stoke further regional and sectarian tensions between rivals Saudi Arabia and Iran. Saudi dissident Ali Al-Ahmed, who runs the Gulf Institute in Washington, identified 34 of those executed as Shiites based on the names announced by the Interior Ministry. At least 14 others executed were convicted of violent o


Saudi Arabia on Tuesday beheaded 37 Saudi citizens, most of them minority Shiites, in a mass execution across the country for alleged terrorism-related crimes. The executions were likely to stoke further regional and sectarian tensions between rivals Saudi Arabia and Iran. Saudi dissident Ali Al-Ahmed, who runs the Gulf Institute in Washington, identified 34 of those executed as Shiites based on the names announced by the Interior Ministry. At least 14 others executed were convicted of violent o
Saudi Arabia beheads 37 for terrorism crimes, most of them minority Shiites Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: bandar algaloud, anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, beheads, crimes, executed, security, shiite, islamic, saudi, executions, convicted, terrorism, arabia, mass, shiites, 37, minority


Saudi Arabia beheads 37 for terrorism crimes, most of them minority Shiites

Saudi Arabia on Tuesday beheaded 37 Saudi citizens, most of them minority Shiites, in a mass execution across the country for alleged terrorism-related crimes. It also publicly pinned the executed body and severed head of a convicted Sunni extremist to a pole as a warning to others.

The executions were likely to stoke further regional and sectarian tensions between rivals Saudi Arabia and Iran.

Saudi dissident Ali Al-Ahmed, who runs the Gulf Institute in Washington, identified 34 of those executed as Shiites based on the names announced by the Interior Ministry.

“This is the largest mass execution of Shiites in the kingdom’s history,” he said.

Amnesty International also confirmed the majority of those executed were Shiite men. The rights group said they were convicted “after sham trials” that relied on confessions extracted through torture.

It marked the largest number of executions in a single day in Saudi Arabia since Jan. 2, 2016, when the kingdom executed 47 people for terrorism-related crimes in what was the largest mass execution carried out by Saudi authorities since 1980.

Among those executed three years ago were four Shiites, including prominent Shiite cleric Nimr al-Nimr, whose death sparked protests from Pakistan to Iran and the ransacking of the Saudi Embassy in Tehran. Saudi-Iran ties have not recovered and the embassy remains shuttered.

King Salman ratified by royal decree Tuesday’s mass execution and that of 2016. The king, who has empowered his son Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, has asserted a bolder and more decisive leadership style than previous monarchs since ascending to the throne in 2015.

The kingdom and its Sunni-led Arab allies have also been emboldened by U.S. President Donald Trump’s unwavering dedication to pressuring Iran’s Shiite clerical leadership, which includes his decision to pull out of a nuclear agreement with Iran and re-impose punishing sanctions to cripple its economy.

Al-Ahmed described Tuesday’s executions as a politically motivated message to Iran.

“This is political,” he said. “They didn’t have to execute these people, but it’s important for them to ride the American anti-Iranian wave.”

The Interior Ministry’s statement said those executed had adopted extremist ideologies and formed terrorist cells with the aim of spreading chaos and provoking sectarian strife. It said the individuals had been found guilty according to the law and ordered executed by the Specialized Criminal Court in Riyadh, which specializes in terrorism trials, and the country’s high court.

The individuals were found guilty of attacking security installations with explosives, killing a number of security officers and cooperating with enemy organizations against the interests of the country, the Interior Ministry said.

The statement was carried across state-run media, including the Saudi news channel al-Ekhbariya. The statement read on the state-run news channel opened with a verse from the Quran that condemns attacks that aim to create strife and disharmony and warns of great punishment for those who carry out such attacks.

Al-Ahmed said among those executed was Shiite religious leader Sheikh Mohammed al-Attiyah, whose charges included seeking to form a sectarian group in the western city of Jiddah. Al-Ahmed said the sheikh publicly spoke of the need to work closely with Saudi Arabia’s Sunni majority and would lead small prayer groups among Shiites.

In a speech he gave in 2011 under then King Abdullah, the sheikh was quoted as saying that frank and open dialogue between Sunnis and Shiites could help strengthen Saudi unity. He urged patience and expressed hope in a national dialogue that had taken place among Shiite dissidents and Sunni leaders.

“As long as we live in the same country, we have no choice but to accept one another and live with one another, no matter the degree of difference between us,” he said.

Amnesty International said 11 of the men were convicted of spying for Iran and sentenced to death after a “grossly unfair trial.” At least 14 others executed were convicted of violent offences related to their participation in anti-government demonstrations in Shiite-populated areas of Saudi Arabia between 2011 and 2012.

Among those put to death was a young man convicted of a crime that took place when he was 16 years-old, said Amnesty.

Saudi Arabia’s supreme council of clerics, who are all ultraconservative Sunnis, said the executions were carried out in accordance with Islamic law.

The Interior Ministry said the body of one of the executed men — Khaled bin Abdel Karim al-Tuwaijri — was publicly pinned to a pole. The statement did not say in which city of Saudi Arabia the public display took place.

He appears to have been convicted as a Sunni militant, though the government did not give a detailed explanation of the charges against each individual executed.

The government defends such executions as a powerful tool for deterrence.

Saudi analysts and pro-government writers brought in to discuss the executions on al-Ekhbariya said they are a powerful sign that the country’s leadership will not hesitate to use the full might of the judicial system to punish Saudis who seek to disrupt the kingdom’s security.

Those executed hailed from Riyadh, Mecca, Medina and Asir, as well as Shiite Muslim populated areas of the Eastern Province and Qassim. The executions also took place in those various regions.

It brings the number of people executed since the start of the year to around 100, according to official announcements. Last year, the kingdom executed 149 people, most of them drug smugglers convicted of non-violent crimes, according to Amnesty’s most recent figures.

Executions are traditionally carried out after midday prayers. Public displays of the bodies of executed men last for around three hours until late afternoon prayers, with the severed head and body hoisted to the top of a pole overlooking a main square.

This latest mass execution comes days after four Islamic State gunmen were killed by Saudi security forces while trying to attack a security building north of the capital, Riyadh.

It also comes on the heels of Sri Lanka’s Easter Day attacks that killed over 300 people, including two Saudi nationals. The attack was claimed by the Islamic State group.

Local affiliates of the Islamic State group and Saudis inspired by its ideology launched several attacks in Saudi Arabia between 2014 and 2016, killing dozens of people, including security officers and Shiite worshipers. The last major attempted attack is believed to have been two years ago.

The group, like al-Qaida in the past, has sought to undermine the Al Saud royal family’s legitimacy, which is rooted in part in its claim to implement Islamic Shariah law and to be the protectors of Islam’s most sacred sites in Mecca and Medina that are at the center of hajj.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: bandar algaloud, anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, beheads, crimes, executed, security, shiite, islamic, saudi, executions, convicted, terrorism, arabia, mass, shiites, 37, minority


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This self-driving start-up wants to do more than just deliver groceries to your doorstep

Users who download the AutoX app on their mobile phones can place orders for fresh produce and other goods. The company’s aim is to “democratize autonomy” and make self-driving cars universally applicable in areas such as logistics, transportation and delivery, according to Jianxiong Xiao, founder and CEO at AutoX. “For us, we’re creating an (artificial intelligence) platform,” Xiao told told CNBC’s Martin Soong on Tuesday. Those vehicles can transport human beings (and) can do delivery of goods


Users who download the AutoX app on their mobile phones can place orders for fresh produce and other goods. The company’s aim is to “democratize autonomy” and make self-driving cars universally applicable in areas such as logistics, transportation and delivery, according to Jianxiong Xiao, founder and CEO at AutoX. “For us, we’re creating an (artificial intelligence) platform,” Xiao told told CNBC’s Martin Soong on Tuesday. Those vehicles can transport human beings (and) can do delivery of goods
This self-driving start-up wants to do more than just deliver groceries to your doorstep Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, xiao, platform, selfdriving, wants, delivery, told, power, goods, cars, autox, groceries, doorstep, startup, deliver, vehicles


This self-driving start-up wants to do more than just deliver groceries to your doorstep

AutoX CEO: We want to ‘democratize’ self-driving cars 12:58 AM ET Tue, 23 April 2019 | 02:41

Self-driving cars are still a relatively new concept that’s being tested, but one start-up, AutoX, is thinking ahead and looking for different ways autonomous vehicles can be used.

Last year, the company launched a grocery delivery pilot program in San Jose, California. Users who download the AutoX app on their mobile phones can place orders for fresh produce and other goods. Those items will be delivered to them by one of AutoX’s driverless cars.

The company’s aim is to “democratize autonomy” and make self-driving cars universally applicable in areas such as logistics, transportation and delivery, according to Jianxiong Xiao, founder and CEO at AutoX.

“For us, we’re creating an (artificial intelligence) platform,” Xiao told told CNBC’s Martin Soong on Tuesday.

“That can power different vehicles. Those vehicles can transport human beings (and) can do delivery of goods,” he said at the Credit Suisse Global Supertrends Conference in Singapore. “We’re not choosing the vertical segment, but we’re providing the AI platform that can power all these self-driving cars.”

AutoX has raised around $43 million in funds, according to Crunchbase data. It includes an investment from China’s Dongfeng Motor Group.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, xiao, platform, selfdriving, wants, delivery, told, power, goods, cars, autox, groceries, doorstep, startup, deliver, vehicles


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The money advice every millennial needs to hear

The money advice every millennial needs to hear6 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. CNBC Make It took to the streets to find out millennials’ biggest money questions before presenting them to the experts.


The money advice every millennial needs to hear6 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. CNBC Make It took to the streets to find out millennials’ biggest money questions before presenting them to the experts.
The money advice every millennial needs to hear Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, streets, hear, took, money, enabled, advice, browser, try, questions, millennial, view, site, flash, needs


The money advice every millennial needs to hear

The money advice every millennial needs to hear

6 Hours Ago

To view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again.

CNBC Make It took to the streets to find out millennials’ biggest money questions before presenting them to the experts.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, streets, hear, took, money, enabled, advice, browser, try, questions, millennial, view, site, flash, needs


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