Top-rated financial advisor Andy Chase on the best investment for 2017

Stocks remain the best place to invest in 2017 and beyond, as compelling valuations show the market has further room to run, according to Morgan Stanley Private Wealth Management’s Andy Chase, who oversees more than $20 billion in assets for investors. “I look at stocks as the only asset class, frankly, that hasn’t had price inflation. He was selected by Barron’s in 2016 as the top financial advisor in the United States, after a 30-year career in wealth management. In this exclusive strategy ses


Stocks remain the best place to invest in 2017 and beyond, as compelling valuations show the market has further room to run, according to Morgan Stanley Private Wealth Management’s Andy Chase, who oversees more than $20 billion in assets for investors.
“I look at stocks as the only asset class, frankly, that hasn’t had price inflation.
He was selected by Barron’s in 2016 as the top financial advisor in the United States, after a 30-year career in wealth management.
In this exclusive strategy ses
Top-rated financial advisor Andy Chase on the best investment for 2017 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-01-26  Authors: giovanny moreano
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wealth, stocks, investment, best, advisor, financial, 2017, chase, think, exclusive, workpro, value, inning, valuations, toprated, andy


Top-rated financial advisor Andy Chase on the best investment for 2017

Stocks remain the best place to invest in 2017 and beyond, as compelling valuations show the market has further room to run, according to Morgan Stanley Private Wealth Management’s Andy Chase, who oversees more than $20 billion in assets for investors.

“If you don’t have the guts to be entirely in real estate, which I think is more in the eighth or ninth inning, I think stocks are still in the third or fourth inning, which nobody is talking about because I think multiples should be much, much higher,” Chase told CNBC PRO.

“I look at stocks as the only asset class, frankly, that hasn’t had price inflation. It’s actually extremely cheap relative to bonds,” Chase added.

He was selected by Barron’s in 2016 as the top financial advisor in the United States, after a 30-year career in wealth management.

In this exclusive strategy session hosted by CNBC’s Mike Santoli, Chase reveals his approach to investing and also discusses:

Where to find value in the stock market.

How to make sense of the investment landscape under Trump.

His favorite portfolio allocations for the months ahead.

Active vs. passive investing.

Whether ‘robo-advisors’ work.

PRO subscribers can also read the entire transcript of the exclusive interview below.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-01-26  Authors: giovanny moreano
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wealth, stocks, investment, best, advisor, financial, 2017, chase, think, exclusive, workpro, value, inning, valuations, toprated, andy


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Credit Suisse’s Michael Mauboussin on spotting market inefficiencies to beat the market

Michael Mauboussin, head of global financial strategies at Credit Suisse and author of four books on investing, joined CNBC’s Mike Santoli for an exclusive strategy session on how investors can outperform the market by spotting trading inefficiencies. One of those inefficiencies includes finding overly bullish or overly bearish sentiment in a security, which often reflects herd mentality and causes investors to put down their guard. They’re all uniformly bullish. They’re all uniformly bearish. I


Michael Mauboussin, head of global financial strategies at Credit Suisse and author of four books on investing, joined CNBC’s Mike Santoli for an exclusive strategy session on how investors can outperform the market by spotting trading inefficiencies.
One of those inefficiencies includes finding overly bullish or overly bearish sentiment in a security, which often reflects herd mentality and causes investors to put down their guard.
They’re all uniformly bullish.
They’re all uniformly bearish.
I
Credit Suisse’s Michael Mauboussin on spotting market inefficiencies to beat the market Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-01-19  Authors: giovanny moreano
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mauboussin, beat, investors, bullish, michael, bearish, overly, suisses, inefficiencies, exclusive, theyre, transcript, trading, uniformly, market, credit, spotting


Credit Suisse's Michael Mauboussin on spotting market inefficiencies to beat the market

Michael Mauboussin, head of global financial strategies at Credit Suisse and author of four books on investing, joined CNBC’s Mike Santoli for an exclusive strategy session on how investors can outperform the market by spotting trading inefficiencies.

One of those inefficiencies includes finding overly bullish or overly bearish sentiment in a security, which often reflects herd mentality and causes investors to put down their guard.

“So everyone seems to be on the same side of a ship. They’re all uniformly bullish. They’re all uniformly bearish. And that becomes much more sort of a sociological or social psychological component,” Mauboussin said.

In this extensive conversation, Mauboussin, who has taught at Columbia Business School since 1993, also discusses:

The benefits of active management.

How established money managers and institutions approach investing.

Some of the common mistakes retail investors make and how to avoid them.

His outlook for the hedge fund industry.

PRO subscribers can also read the entire transcript of the exclusive interview below.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-01-19  Authors: giovanny moreano
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mauboussin, beat, investors, bullish, michael, bearish, overly, suisses, inefficiencies, exclusive, theyre, transcript, trading, uniformly, market, credit, spotting


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Njoftim…!


Njoftim…! Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-01-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, njoftim



Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-01-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, njoftim


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Seth Masters, who correctly called the bull market, says returns will be harder to come by ahead

Seth Masters, who oversees $80 billion in assets at Bernstein Private Wealth Management, predicts U.S. market returns will be much more difficult to achieve in the years ahead. “After now about six or seven years of a very healthy equity market recovery, U.S. stocks are no longer cheap,” Masters said. “It’s going to be a little tougher to get good returns and manage risk in the years ahead. When you have stronger equity returns outside the U.S., but possibly weaker currencies, you need to have p


Seth Masters, who oversees $80 billion in assets at Bernstein Private Wealth Management, predicts U.S. market returns will be much more difficult to achieve in the years ahead.
“After now about six or seven years of a very healthy equity market recovery, U.S. stocks are no longer cheap,” Masters said.
“It’s going to be a little tougher to get good returns and manage risk in the years ahead.
When you have stronger equity returns outside the U.S., but possibly weaker currencies, you need to have p
Seth Masters, who correctly called the bull market, says returns will be harder to come by ahead Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-01-12  Authors: giovanny moreano
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wealth, seth, ahead, investors, equity, weaker, correctly, come, bull, masters, harder, returns, called, need, valuations, market, strategies


Seth Masters, who correctly called the bull market, says returns will be harder to come by ahead

Seth Masters, who oversees $80 billion in assets at Bernstein Private Wealth Management, predicts U.S. market returns will be much more difficult to achieve in the years ahead.

“After now about six or seven years of a very healthy equity market recovery, U.S. stocks are no longer cheap,” Masters said. “Profit margins at U.S. companies remain at very elevated levels. It’s hard to see how you get huge earnings growth or much more valuation expansion here in the U.S.”

In contrast, Masters believes investors will need to turn their attention overseas for opportunities where better valuations and higher-growth potential still exists.

“It’s going to be a little tougher to get good returns and manage risk in the years ahead. It was easier when the dollar was strong just to stay here at home. When you have stronger equity returns outside the U.S., but possibly weaker currencies, you need to have pretty nuanced strategies to take advantage of that,” he said.

Masters famously predicted in 2012 that the Dow Jones industrial average would rise to 20,000 by 2018, a forecast that caused a stir because the blue-chip benchmark was around only 12,500 at the time.

In an extensive strategy session with CNBC’s Mike Santoli, Masters reveals his outlook for 2017 and discusses:

How investors should position their portfolios in the months ahead

The investment principles that could drive returns in 2017

Equity allocations by region, and where to find opportunities

Investment lessons for every market participant

Fixed income strategies and how to protect one’s portfolio against unexpected market swings.

PRO subscribers can also read the entire transcript of the exclusive interview below.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-01-12  Authors: giovanny moreano
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wealth, seth, ahead, investors, equity, weaker, correctly, come, bull, masters, harder, returns, called, need, valuations, market, strategies


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9 Phrases Smart People Refuse To Use In Conversation

Verbal slip-ups often occur because we say things without knowledge of the subtle implications they carry. To that end, there are some phrases that emotionally intelligent people are careful to avoid in casual conversation. Instead say: Simply point out what the other person did that’s a problem for you. Instead say: When you say it again, see what you can do to convey the message in a clearer and more interesting manner. Instead say: “I’m sorry.”


Verbal slip-ups often occur because we say things without knowledge of the subtle implications they carry.
To that end, there are some phrases that emotionally intelligent people are careful to avoid in casual conversation.
Instead say: Simply point out what the other person did that’s a problem for you.
Instead say: When you say it again, see what you can do to convey the message in a clearer and more interesting manner.
Instead say: “I’m sorry.”
9 Phrases Smart People Refuse To Use In Conversation Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-01-11  Authors: dr travis bradberry
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youre, social, things, refuse, instead, way, tired, phrase, conversation, luck, say, smart, phrases, person


9 Phrases Smart People Refuse To Use In Conversation

We’ve all said things that people interpreted much differently than we thought they would. These seemingly benign comments lead to the awful feeling that only comes when you’ve planted your foot firmly into your mouth. Verbal slip-ups often occur because we say things without knowledge of the subtle implications they carry. Understanding these implications requires social awareness—the ability to pick up on the emotions and experiences of other people. TalentSmart has tested the emotional intelligence (EQ) of more than a million people and discovered that social awareness is a skill in which many of us are lacking. More from Travis Bradberry:

Core beliefs of great bosses

Overcoming these challenges will make you more successful

How To Crush Your Goals In2017 We lack social awareness because we’re so focused on what we’re going to say next—and how what other people are saying affects us — that we completely lose sight of other people. This is a problem because people are complicated. You can’t hope to understand someone until you focus all of your attention in his or her direction. The beauty of social awareness is that a few simple adjustments to what you say can vastly improve your relationships with other people. To that end, there are some phrases that emotionally intelligent people are careful to avoid in casual conversation. The following are the worst offenders. You should avoid them at all costs. “You look tired.” Tired people are incredibly unappealing — they have droopy eyes and messy hair, they have trouble concentrating, and they’re as grouchy as they come. Telling someone he looks tired implies all of the above and then some.

Lindsay Wengler | Getty Images

Instead say: “Is everything okay?” Most people ask if someone is tired because they’re intending to be helpful (they want to know if the other person is okay). Instead of assuming someone’s disposition, just ask. This way, he can open up and share. More importantly, he will see you as concerned instead of rude.

“You always…” or “You never…” No one always or never does anything. People don’t see themselves as one-dimensional, so you shouldn’t attempt to define them as such. These phrases make people defensive and closed off to your message, which is a really bad thing because you likely use these phrases when you have something important to discuss. Instead say: Simply point out what the other person did that’s a problem for you. Stick to the facts. If the frequency of the behavior is an issue, you can always say, “It seems like you do this often” or “You do this often enough for me to notice.” “As I said before…” We all forget things from time to time. This phrase makes it sound as if you’re insulted at having to repeat yourself, which is hard on the recipient (someone who is genuinely interested in hearing your perspective). Getting insulted over having to repeat yourself suggests that either you’re insecure or you think you’re better than everyone else (or both!). Few people who use this phrase actually feel this way. Instead say: When you say it again, see what you can do to convey the message in a clearer and more interesting manner. This way they’ll remember what you said. “Good luck.” This is a subtle one. It certainly isn’t the end of the world if you wish someone good luck, but you can do better because this phrase implies that they need luck to succeed.

L. Cremascoli | Getty Images

Instead say: “I know you have what it takes.” This is better than wishing her luck because suggesting that she has the skills needed to succeed provides a huge boost of confidence. You’ll stand out from everyone else who simply wishes her luck.

“It’s up to you.” or “Whatever you want.” While you may be indifferent to the question, your opinion is important to the person asking (or else he wouldn’t have asked you in the first place). Instead say: “I don’t have a strong opinion either way, but a couple things to consider are…” When you offer an opinion (even without choosing a side), it shows that you care about the person asking. “Well at least I’ve never ___.” This phrase is an aggressive way to shift attention away from your mistake by pointing out an old, likely irrelevant mistake the other person made (and one you should have forgiven her for by now). Instead say: “I’m sorry.” Owning up to your mistake is the best way to bring the discussion to a more rational, calm place so that you can work things out. Admitting guilt is an amazing way to prevent escalation. “Wow, you’ve lost a ton of weight!” Once again, a well-meaning comment, in this case a compliment, creates the impression that you’re being critical. Telling someone that she has lost a lot of weight suggests that she used to look fat or unattractive.

nazdravie | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-01-11  Authors: dr travis bradberry
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youre, social, things, refuse, instead, way, tired, phrase, conversation, luck, say, smart, phrases, person


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Charles Schwab’s chief strategist Liz Ann Sonders sees ‘slow melt-up’ in 2017

Liz Ann Sonders, who sets the tone for $2.7 trillion of investors’ assets as chief investment strategist at Charles Schwab, shares her investment outlook for 2017 during an extensive strategy session with CNBC’s Mike Santoli. “If you look at the improvement in the economic data, it predated the election. So I think some of this move reflects the economic data and earnings data having already approved at this point,” she said. She said just as in 2016, there could be a “slow melt-up” for stocks t


Liz Ann Sonders, who sets the tone for $2.7 trillion of investors’ assets as chief investment strategist at Charles Schwab, shares her investment outlook for 2017 during an extensive strategy session with CNBC’s Mike Santoli.
“If you look at the improvement in the economic data, it predated the election.
So I think some of this move reflects the economic data and earnings data having already approved at this point,” she said.
She said just as in 2016, there could be a “slow melt-up” for stocks t
Charles Schwab’s chief strategist Liz Ann Sonders sees ‘slow melt-up’ in 2017 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-01-10  Authors: giovanny moreano
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, economic, data, meltup, chief, investment, investors, liz, strategist, think, sense, outlook, value, schwabs, slow, ann, sonders, charles, sees


Charles Schwab's chief strategist Liz Ann Sonders sees 'slow melt-up' in 2017

Liz Ann Sonders, who sets the tone for $2.7 trillion of investors’ assets as chief investment strategist at Charles Schwab, shares her investment outlook for 2017 during an extensive strategy session with CNBC’s Mike Santoli.

“I don’t put all the credit on the results of the election for the rally in the stock market,” said Sonders, who thinks a solid foundation for stocks was already in place given the positive trend in economic data and a bottom in corporate earnings.

“If you look at the improvement in the economic data, it predated the election. So that the bottom in, say, the Economic Surprise Index put out by Citigroup, occurred in mid-October. So I think some of this move reflects the economic data and earnings data having already approved at this point,” she said.

She said just as in 2016, there could be a “slow melt-up” for stocks this year, and investors can profit from it by seeking value strategies.

“Fundamentally, I think value makes sense, just don’t put blinders on in terms of where you find that value,” Sonders said.

Other topics they discussed include:

Her favorite sectors and asset allocations for 2017

The investment strategies that make most sense for investors

Investor sentiment measures and what those metrics show

Market valuations, her outlook for earnings, yields and fixed income

PRO members can also read the entire transcript of the exclusive interview below.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-01-10  Authors: giovanny moreano
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, economic, data, meltup, chief, investment, investors, liz, strategist, think, sense, outlook, value, schwabs, slow, ann, sonders, charles, sees


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Self-made millionaire: Forget skipping Starbucks. Here are 5 real ways to get rich

I can promise you that will not get rich by skipping your daily latte. Look, if you don’t have income, then there is no money to save. Don’t let anyone give you the idea that you need to skip your Starbucks coffee and save $5 a day and that will somehow turn into a fortune. If you are serious about getting rich, you need to get your mind focused on income. A man told me once, “The best way you can help people in need is to not be someone in need.”


I can promise you that will not get rich by skipping your daily latte. Look, if you don’t have income, then there is no money to save. Don’t let anyone give you the idea that you need to skip your Starbucks coffee and save $5 a day and that will somehow turn into a fortune. If you are serious about getting rich, you need to get your mind focused on income. A man told me once, “The best way you can help people in need is to not be someone in need.”
Self-made millionaire: Forget skipping Starbucks. Here are 5 real ways to get rich Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-01-05  Authors: grant cardone, sebastian derungs, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investing, real, millionaire, skip, starbucks, income, money, ways, youre, skipping, forget, help, rich, save, selfmade, need


Self-made millionaire: Forget skipping Starbucks. Here are 5 real ways to get rich

Too many people out there are offering ridiculous ideas on how you can become rich. Many of those ideas are about cutting back.

I can promise you that will not get rich by skipping your daily latte.

Look, if you don’t have income, then there is no money to save. Don’t let anyone give you the idea that you need to skip your Starbucks coffee and save $5 a day and that will somehow turn into a fortune.

Maybe you can skip spending $5 at Starbucks every day and save $10,000 over the next five years, but if you think $10,000 is going to change your life, you’re not just broke, you’re being stupid. Of course you should spend less than you earn, but if you make $50,000 a year with a couple of kids, what money is there left over to save?

If you are serious about getting rich, you need to get your mind focused on income. Increase your income enough and you will be able to save something substantial.

Here are five non-fiction tips you can use that will actually get you to millionaire status:

1. Invest in you

Successful people invest time, energy, and money in improving themselves. A man told me once, “The best way you can help people in need is to not be someone in need.” Help yourself out so you are in a position to help someone else out. This means investing in yourself to become great at something.

I invested in sales training when I was 25. That made my income-producing ability skyrocket. Investing in yourself is the best investment you can make.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-01-05  Authors: grant cardone, sebastian derungs, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investing, real, millionaire, skip, starbucks, income, money, ways, youre, skipping, forget, help, rich, save, selfmade, need


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The world’s best places to retire in 2017

Over recent years, crime and insecurity across the border have made headlines—and yes, there are parts of Mexico we don’t recommend. Most doctors have received at least part of their training in the U.S. or Europe…and many speak English,” Jason says. “The cost of living in Mexico allows me to live a fun life on my Social Security check,” says San Francisco-native Jack Bramy. “I live well here on Social Security. You can show monthly income from Social Security or a pension.


Over recent years, crime and insecurity across the border have made headlines—and yes, there are parts of Mexico we don’t recommend. Most doctors have received at least part of their training in the U.S. or Europe…and many speak English,” Jason says. “The cost of living in Mexico allows me to live a fun life on my Social Security check,” says San Francisco-native Jack Bramy. “I live well here on Social Security. You can show monthly income from Social Security or a pension.
The world’s best places to retire in 2017 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-01-03  Authors: international living, steve allen, brand x pictures, getty images, lisastrachan
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, weather, best, qualify, worlds, 2017, mexico, social, rent, youre, places, living, recent, mexican, security, retire


The world's best places to retire in 2017

Mexico has always offered arguably the easiest transition to expat life around: Low-cost, conveniently close, friendly locals and plenty of expats—Mexico offers an appealing balance of exotic foreign culture and familiar First-World lifestyle.

Over recent years, crime and insecurity across the border have made headlines—and yes, there are parts of Mexico we don’t recommend. But this is a big country…and while the mainstream media may bash Mexico, we’ve actually noticed a trend of people gravitating there. Seasoned expats, folks who have lived in countries like Costa Rica, Ecuador, and Belize, are moving to Mexico.

After all, there’s a reason over 1 million Americans call Mexico home. The cost of living is great—expats report living well for as little as $1,200 a month—and has gotten even better with the weakening of the peso against the dollar in recent years. Your dollars now buy nearly 50% more pesos than they did just a few short years ago. The weak peso also means you can pick up great-value real estate (to buy or rent) for even less than you could a few years ago—an apartment that cost $1,300 to rent in 2014 costs $980 now. Those dollars also go even further when it comes to Mexican healthcare. You can get healthcare that’s even better quality than what you’re used to and for one half to one third the price to boot.

According to IL’s Roving Latin America Editor Jason Holland, who lives on the Riviera Maya, there are first-rate hospitals throughout the country—every major city has one. “Even paying cash at private facilities costs a fraction of what it would in the U.S. Most doctors have received at least part of their training in the U.S. or Europe…and many speak English,” Jason says.

English is widely spoken in popular expat spots like Lake Chapala and the Riviera Maya. This makes it easy for you to fit right in. And heck, you can drive down, or fly home for as little as $200 round-trip—so getting home is convenient.

This proximity also makes it an ideal destination for snowbird living, perfect for escaping from the worst of the winter weather. And the diverse selection of climates spread out across this massive country, ranging from hot weather on the beach to spring-like in the highlands, means you’re guaranteed to find weather that’s perfect for you.

“The cost of living in Mexico allows me to live a fun life on my Social Security check,” says San Francisco-native Jack Bramy. Living half a block from the beach in Puerto Vallarta, Jack’s not scrimping. “There are great restaurants and tons of cool bars on the malecón (promenade). My rent is $575 a month for a two-bedroom apartment with a great modern bathroom and nice kitchen.”

If you prefer to live in the Colonial Highlands, there are the picturesque historic towns like San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, and Ajijic on Lake Chapala.

Chicago native Steve Garcia, 67, has lived in Guanajuato for four years. “I live well here on Social Security. My expenses are $1,200 a month, including rent. I have a two-bedroom house with a terraced garden,” says Steve. “With the dollar going up I’ve got 50% more to spend.”

After you become a legal resident of Mexico, which is quite easy to qualify for, you can also take advantage of its retiree benefits. Those over 60 get discounts on airline and bus tickets, medical care, museum entrance fees, and much more.

“I love my senior discount card,” says expat Marty Kramer who lives in Playa del Carmen. “All Mexican citizens, including resident expats, can get one when they turn 60. With it, I get discounts on almost everything: healthcare, public transportation, groceries, restaurants, hotels, and even some airlines. It’s up to the business how much of a discount they offer, but it’s usually around 10%.”

If you acquire official residence in Mexico, you can get an INAPAM Card—and all the discounts that come with it. These can range from 5% up to 50%. And recent changes in the law now provide an easier and faster path than ever to permanent Mexican residence.

Most retirees qualify for residence by showing they have the funds to support themselves. And—also unusually—Mexico gives you two ways to qualify. You can show monthly income from Social Security or a pension. Alternatively, you can use assets, such as funds in a savings or investment account, to qualify. You don’t need to transfer these assets to Mexico; you only need to prove that you have them.

“Life here is easy and relaxed,” says IL Mexico editor Glynna Prentice. “And also rich and complex in sensations and experiences. People are friendly and welcoming, their warmth as genuine as the Mexican sun. And roots are deep.

“Whether you’re looking at the mighty ruins of Teotihuacan, the face of a local Maya vendor, or the cool patio of a Spanish colonial hacienda, you sense a depth of history and tradition around you.

“Mexico isn’t perfect—no place is. But its flaws pale when weighed against the vividness of life here.”

For more insight from CNBC contributors, follow @CNBCopinion on Twitter.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-01-03  Authors: international living, steve allen, brand x pictures, getty images, lisastrachan
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, weather, best, qualify, worlds, 2017, mexico, social, rent, youre, places, living, recent, mexican, security, retire


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