US Treasury yields tick higher ahead of comments from Fed’s Powell

Trump warns Iran not to fight the US: ‘That will be the official…Trump’s threat, posted on Twitter, comes amid rising international tensions in the Middle East as the U.S. has dispatched a carrier strike group and bomber task force to the… Politicsread more


Trump warns Iran not to fight the US: ‘That will be the official…Trump’s threat, posted on Twitter, comes amid rising international tensions in the Middle East as the U.S. has dispatched a carrier strike group and bomber task force to the… Politicsread more
US Treasury yields tick higher ahead of comments from Fed’s Powell Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, twitter, higher, comments, rising, tensions, posted, strike, thepoliticsread, tick, warns, yields, ahead, trump, powell, task, threat, treasury, feds


US Treasury yields tick higher ahead of comments from Fed's Powell

Trump warns Iran not to fight the US: ‘That will be the official…

Trump’s threat, posted on Twitter, comes amid rising international tensions in the Middle East as the U.S. has dispatched a carrier strike group and bomber task force to the…

Politics

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, twitter, higher, comments, rising, tensions, posted, strike, thepoliticsread, tick, warns, yields, ahead, trump, powell, task, threat, treasury, feds


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Goldman Sachs in talks to buy B&B Hotels from PAI Partners

Trump warns Iran not to fight the US: ‘That will be the official…Trump’s threat, posted on Twitter, comes amid rising international tensions in the Middle East as the U.S. has dispatched a carrier strike group and bomber task force to the… Politicsread more


Trump warns Iran not to fight the US: ‘That will be the official…Trump’s threat, posted on Twitter, comes amid rising international tensions in the Middle East as the U.S. has dispatched a carrier strike group and bomber task force to the… Politicsread more
Goldman Sachs in talks to buy B&B Hotels from PAI Partners Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, twitter, rising, tensions, bb, partners, strike, thepoliticsread, posted, warns, hotels, task, pai, trump, buy, threat, sachs, goldman, talks


Goldman Sachs in talks to buy B&B Hotels from PAI Partners

Trump warns Iran not to fight the US: ‘That will be the official…

Trump’s threat, posted on Twitter, comes amid rising international tensions in the Middle East as the U.S. has dispatched a carrier strike group and bomber task force to the…

Politics

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20
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Understanding Chemical-Biological Interaction

What is a new in 2017? PASS Refined comprises biological activities that are the most important for medicinal chemists, pharmacologists and doctors. We are working on the integration of our predictive services, to allow you either select the set of activities of interest or to get prediction of all activities/properties in one click. One will be able to choose:


What is a new in 2017? PASS Refined comprises biological activities that are the most important for medicinal chemists, pharmacologists and doctors. We are working on the integration of our predictive services, to allow you either select the set of activities of interest or to get prediction of all activities/properties in one click. One will be able to choose:
Understanding Chemical-Biological Interaction Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, activities, interaction, chemicalbiological, services, working, pharmacologists, understanding, predictive, prediction, refined, select, medicinal, set


What is a new in 2017?

PASS Refined comprises biological activities that are the most important for medicinal chemists, pharmacologists and doctors.

We are working on the integration of our predictive services, to allow you either select the set of activities of interest or to get prediction of all activities/properties in one click. One will be able to choose:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, activities, interaction, chemicalbiological, services, working, pharmacologists, understanding, predictive, prediction, refined, select, medicinal, set


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‘Game of Thrones’ finale left water bottles in key scene, further inciting diehard fans

Jim Cramer: ‘Your portfolio should have as little exposure to…”As long as President [Donald] Trump believes that the Chinese are the ones who pay the price, he’s going to keep taking a hard-line approach to these negotiations,” Cramer…Mad Money with Jim Cramerread more


Jim Cramer: ‘Your portfolio should have as little exposure to…”As long as President [Donald] Trump believes that the Chinese are the ones who pay the price, he’s going to keep taking a hard-line approach to these negotiations,” Cramer…Mad Money with Jim Cramerread more
‘Game of Thrones’ finale left water bottles in key scene, further inciting diehard fans Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, water, price, finale, scene, jim, ones, taking, president, diehard, toas, negotiations, trump, game, pay, fans, left, portfolio, key, inciting, thrones


'Game of Thrones' finale left water bottles in key scene, further inciting diehard fans

Jim Cramer: ‘Your portfolio should have as little exposure to…

“As long as President [Donald] Trump believes that the Chinese are the ones who pay the price, he’s going to keep taking a hard-line approach to these negotiations,” Cramer…

Mad Money with Jim Cramer

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, water, price, finale, scene, jim, ones, taking, president, diehard, toas, negotiations, trump, game, pay, fans, left, portfolio, key, inciting, thrones


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‘I don’t need cash’ — but the Ryanair CEO wants Boeing to pay for 737 Max delivery delays

Ryanair CEO Michael O’Leary told CNBC on Monday he is confident that Boeing’s grounded 737 Maxes will resume flights this summer. For the airline, the addition of 737 Max jets had been projected to have added 1 million new passengers this summer alone. “We’re having a discussion with Boeing” about getting financial compensation for the delays, O’Leary said on “Squawk Box.” Boeing’s fleet of Maxes was grounded worldwide in March after the second crash in five months involving the model. The FAA’s


Ryanair CEO Michael O’Leary told CNBC on Monday he is confident that Boeing’s grounded 737 Maxes will resume flights this summer. For the airline, the addition of 737 Max jets had been projected to have added 1 million new passengers this summer alone. “We’re having a discussion with Boeing” about getting financial compensation for the delays, O’Leary said on “Squawk Box.” Boeing’s fleet of Maxes was grounded worldwide in March after the second crash in five months involving the model. The FAA’s
‘I don’t need cash’ — but the Ryanair CEO wants Boeing to pay for 737 Max delivery delays Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, summer, delivery, ceo, maxes, delays, ryanair, need, grounded, added, pay, dont, told, cash, crashes, 737, wants, airline, max, oleary


'I don't need cash' — but the Ryanair CEO wants Boeing to pay for 737 Max delivery delays

Ryanair CEO Michael O’Leary told CNBC on Monday he is confident that Boeing’s grounded 737 Maxes will resume flights this summer. But he said the grounding after two deadly crashes has hurt business.

Europe’s largest discount airline, which ordered 135 Max 200 models with the option for 75 more, had been expecting to receive its first five between April and June but now expects them to be flying by November.

For the airline, the addition of 737 Max jets had been projected to have added 1 million new passengers this summer alone.

“We’re having a discussion with Boeing” about getting financial compensation for the delays, O’Leary said on “Squawk Box.” “I don’t need cash,” he added, saying he wants movement on pricing. CFO Neil Sorahan told Reuters they plan to discuss “modest compensation.”

Boeing’s fleet of Maxes was grounded worldwide in March after the second crash in five months involving the model. The crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed a combined 346 people. Anti-stall software is suspected in the crashes.

The Federal Aviation Administration has come under fire as people questioned the agency’s oversight. The FAA’s internal probe of the 737 Max approval process reportedly found senior agency officials failed to review crucial assessments of the flight-control system.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, summer, delivery, ceo, maxes, delays, ryanair, need, grounded, added, pay, dont, told, cash, crashes, 737, wants, airline, max, oleary


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That $367 million Mega Millions jackpot comes with big tax bite

Eyeballing that Mega Millions jackpot? After more than two months of twice-weekly drawings with no one matching all six numbers, the top prize has climbed to $367 million for Tuesday night’s drawing. The last jackpot won was on March 12, for $50 million. However, the top marginal tax rate of 37% means owing a lot more to the IRS at tax time. State taxes typically are due, as well.


Eyeballing that Mega Millions jackpot? After more than two months of twice-weekly drawings with no one matching all six numbers, the top prize has climbed to $367 million for Tuesday night’s drawing. The last jackpot won was on March 12, for $50 million. However, the top marginal tax rate of 37% means owing a lot more to the IRS at tax time. State taxes typically are due, as well.
That $367 million Mega Millions jackpot comes with big tax bite Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, million, typically, comes, tax, millions, 367, prize, withwhether, withheld, winners, bite, big, won, jackpot, uncle, mega, taxes


That $367 million Mega Millions jackpot comes with big tax bite

Eyeballing that Mega Millions jackpot? Good ol’ Uncle Sam is, too.

After more than two months of twice-weekly drawings with no one matching all six numbers, the top prize has climbed to $367 million for Tuesday night’s drawing. The last jackpot won was on March 12, for $50 million.

Of course, the advertised amount isn’t what winners end up with.

Whether they take the prize as an annuity spread out over three decades or as an immediate, reduced lump sum, 24% is withheld for federal taxes. However, the top marginal tax rate of 37% means owing a lot more to the IRS at tax time. State taxes typically are due, as well.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, million, typically, comes, tax, millions, 367, prize, withwhether, withheld, winners, bite, big, won, jackpot, uncle, mega, taxes


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Judge rules against Trump in lawsuit to block Democrats’ subpoena for financial records

A federal judge ruled against President Donald Trump on Monday in a lawsuit to block a subpoena from House Democrats for information about his finances. Trump, speaking outside the White House shortly after the ruling came down, called the decision “crazy” and vowed to appeal it. “As far as the financials are concerned,” Trump said, “It’s totally the wrong decision [by an] Obama-appointed judge.” Trump’s lawyers sued in Washington, D.C., federal court to block that subpoena, writing that Democra


A federal judge ruled against President Donald Trump on Monday in a lawsuit to block a subpoena from House Democrats for information about his finances. Trump, speaking outside the White House shortly after the ruling came down, called the decision “crazy” and vowed to appeal it. “As far as the financials are concerned,” Trump said, “It’s totally the wrong decision [by an] Obama-appointed judge.” Trump’s lawyers sued in Washington, D.C., federal court to block that subpoena, writing that Democra
Judge rules against Trump in lawsuit to block Democrats’ subpoena for financial records Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20  Authors: kevin breuninger jacob pramuk, kevin breuninger, jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, congress, legislative, block, house, president, lawyers, democrats, subpoena, lawsuit, trump, judge, financial, trumps, court, rules, records, mehta


Judge rules against Trump in lawsuit to block Democrats' subpoena for financial records

A federal judge ruled against President Donald Trump on Monday in a lawsuit to block a subpoena from House Democrats for information about his finances. U.S. District Court Judge Amit Mehta strongly endorsed Congress’ broad authority to investigate the president, striking a blow to arguments made by Trump’s legal team. Trump, speaking outside the White House shortly after the ruling came down, called the decision “crazy” and vowed to appeal it. “As far as the financials are concerned,” Trump said, “It’s totally the wrong decision [by an] Obama-appointed judge.” Mehta wrote in a 41-page memorandum opinion that while “there are limits on Congress’s investigative authority … those limits do not substantially constrain Congress.” The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee subpoenaed accounting firm Mazars in April, requesting financial documents and related materials from Trump, his trust and a handful of his businesses. Trump’s lawyers sued in Washington, D.C., federal court to block that subpoena, writing that Democrats had “declared all-out political war” against Trump.

While Trump’s lawyers had argued that the committee’s subpoena did not have a legitimate legislative purpose — and was therefore invalid — Mehta took a more liberal view. “So long as Congress investigates on a subject matter on which ‘legislation could be had,'” then Congress is acting within the bounds of the U.S. Constitution, the judge wrote. “President Trump cannot block the subpoena to Mazars.” The Democrat-led committee argued that the requested financial documents will help it strengthen ethics and disclosure laws and their penalties, as well as assisting in making sure that the president does not violate the emoluments clause of the Constitution. “These are facially valid legislative purposes, and it is not for the court to question whether the Committee’s actions are truly motivated by political considerations,” Mehta wrote. In a hearing in May, the president’s lawyers argued that the Democrats’ actions fell far afield of Congress’ legitimate oversight functions as a legislative body. But Mehta questioned that argument, suggesting in the hearing that many historic congressional investigations — including the Watergate probe — might be considered invalid by the standard Trump’s lawyers were asserting. House Oversight Chairman Elijah Cummings, D-Md., praised the decision as a “resounding victory for the rule of law” in a statement Monday evening. “The court recognized the basic, but crucial fact that Congress has authority to conduct investigations as part of our core function under the Constitution,” Cummings said. “The court rejected President Trump’s repeated claim that congressional investigations serve no ‘legislative function’ — a baseless argument made in response to multiple investigations by the House of Representatives.” Democrats in Congress have issued requests to Trump and dozens of other figures in his orbit for records on a variety of subjects, including the president’s finances, his 2016 campaign and his inauguration committee. Some of their areas of inquiry also stem from the findings made public in special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Russian election meddling, possible obstruction of justice and possible conspiracy between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin. Some of those requests have led to subpoenas — all of which Trump has vowed to fight.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20  Authors: kevin breuninger jacob pramuk, kevin breuninger, jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, congress, legislative, block, house, president, lawyers, democrats, subpoena, lawsuit, trump, judge, financial, trumps, court, rules, records, mehta


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Uber, Lyft and Pinterest prove that private investors are sucking up all the value

In 2016, Alex Mittal of FundersClub wrote that today’s top tech companies are raising gobs of private cash, “leaving the bulk of returns out of public investors’ reach.” These are the very people that benefit from companies who stay private longer while their valuations skyrocket, because they’re the early investors. Over the last two-plus years, public investors have gotten consumer brands with big names but few gains. There’s still little pressure for start-ups to change their approach because


In 2016, Alex Mittal of FundersClub wrote that today’s top tech companies are raising gobs of private cash, “leaving the bulk of returns out of public investors’ reach.” These are the very people that benefit from companies who stay private longer while their valuations skyrocket, because they’re the early investors. Over the last two-plus years, public investors have gotten consumer brands with big names but few gains. There’s still little pressure for start-ups to change their approach because
Uber, Lyft and Pinterest prove that private investors are sucking up all the value Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-18  Authors: ari levy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pinterest, companies, gains, investors, uber, value, ipo, billion, sucking, prove, private, venture, capital, public, lyft


Uber, Lyft and Pinterest prove that private investors are sucking up all the value

Dara Khosrowshahi, chief executive officer of Uber Technologies Inc., speaks on a webcast during the company’s initial public offering (IPO) on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., on Friday, May 10, 2019. Michael Nagle | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Nobody in Silicon Valley should be surprised by Uber’s disappointing IPO. Or Lyft’s. Experts have been predicting this type of performance for years. Marc Andreessen called “the effective death of the IPO” in 2014 and said that with high-flying tech companies staying private longer, “gains from the growth accrue to the private investor, not the public investor.” Fred Wilson of Union Square Ventures told CNBC the following year that these late-stage IPOs mean “all of the gains are captured among a very small cohort of people.” In 2016, Alex Mittal of FundersClub wrote that today’s top tech companies are raising gobs of private cash, “leaving the bulk of returns out of public investors’ reach.” These are the very people that benefit from companies who stay private longer while their valuations skyrocket, because they’re the early investors. They get to ride the valuation up from the millions to $10 billion, $20 billion or $50 billion and then sell their shares to the masses of public market investors who are thirsting for the next Amazon or Google. They were the ones warning us about the emerging Uber-Lyft problem. And they were right. Over the last two-plus years, public investors have gotten consumer brands with big names but few gains. Snap has lost about one-third of its value since its 2017 IPO, while Dropbox and Spotify are up just slightly from their debuts last year. Uber and Lyft have dropped. After falling 13% on Friday on a bad earnings report, Pinterest is back to where it was trading in its first few days in April. “Maybe we made a mistake in having these unicorns sucking in huge amounts of private capital and delaying their IPOs,” said Duncan Davidson, a partner at venture firm Bullpen Capital, in an interview this week. “Maybe we’d be better off having these puppies go public earlier like we used to.”

A good chunk of the capital at the later stage has come from firms like T. Rowe Price and Fidelity, who normally buy public stocks but moved into the private markets in recent years so as not miss out on all the value creation. Since they’re already shareholders it’s hard to get them to buy more when it’s time to take the company public. “A lot of the prime public investors you’d want in your stock after the IPO already own the stock,” said Iris Choi, a partner at early-stage venture firm Floodgate who previously worked in investment banking at Goldman Sachs. “What is their incentive to actually buy at the IPO?” Of course, it’s still too soon to come to any conclusions about where Uber, Lyft and others will be trading months or years down the line. Investors can point to Facebook’s miserable kickoff in May 2012, and the fact that it lost half its value over the next three months before rebounding. Now shareholders who bought in at the IPO and held have seen their investments quintuple. There was plenty of skepticism surrounding Google’s lofty valuation in 2004, but buy-and-holders are up 2,800%. However, if you’re banking on a similar result from this new class, consider two important factors: Facebook and Google are outliers.

They were profitable at the time of their IPOs.

‘Unit economics really do matter’

With the latest crop of consumer offerings, public investors are being asked to pick up where the venture community left off and continue to subsidize cash-burning growth while the companies seek to prove they can morph into sustainable long-term businesses. Investors are balking. “The big lesson everybody in Silicon Valley learned is unit economics really do matter,” Davidson said. So what happens from here? There’s still little pressure for start-ups to change their approach because private capital is so plentiful. SoftBank’s Vision Fund, which has poured billions into Uber, WeWork and other capital-heavy businesses, is only planning to get bigger. Venture fundraising hit a record $55.5 billion last year, according to the National Venture Capital Association, and those firms have to put their capital to work. In the first quarter of 2019, five “mega-funds” (over $500 million) closed, the NVCA said, and more prominent firms are in the process of raising $1 billion or more. These funds are increasingly willing to put some of their cash into secondaries, buying shares from founders who can lock in a portion of their riches while steering clear of quarterly earnings and the scrutiny of public markets. “Mega-funds are creating challenges with the oversupply of capital, and it’s reducing discipline in operating companies,” said Robert Mittendorf, who invests in health-tech companies at Norwest Venture Partners. “We forget out here that operating results are more important than the amount of capital raised. We should be applauding operating performance more.” It’s certainly not all gloom and doom. Enterprise software companies continue to reward public investors. Videoconferencing company Zoom, which is profitable, has more than doubled from its IPO price in April and has even generated substantial gains for investors who missed the initial pop. PagerDuty has also more than doubled, and Fastly, whose technology helps companies more quickly deliver online content, surged 50% in its debut on Friday.

Source: CNBC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-18  Authors: ari levy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pinterest, companies, gains, investors, uber, value, ipo, billion, sucking, prove, private, venture, capital, public, lyft


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Apple CEO Tim Cook: ‘If you love what you do, you will never work a day in your life’ is ‘total crock’

Then work won’t be work. So says Apple CEO Tim Cook. And though Cook may love the work he does, he also certainly works hard. The Apple CEO gets up before 4 a.m. each day, he told Axios in November. See also:Apple CEO Tim Cook to the class of 2019: ‘My generation has failed you’Apple CEO Tim Cook: ‘The world is full of cynics and you have to tune them out’Apple CEO Tim Cook: ‘Don’t work for money … you will never be happy’


Then work won’t be work. So says Apple CEO Tim Cook. And though Cook may love the work he does, he also certainly works hard. The Apple CEO gets up before 4 a.m. each day, he told Axios in November. See also:Apple CEO Tim Cook to the class of 2019: ‘My generation has failed you’Apple CEO Tim Cook: ‘The world is full of cynics and you have to tune them out’Apple CEO Tim Cook: ‘Don’t work for money … you will never be happy’
Apple CEO Tim Cook: ‘If you love what you do, you will never work a day in your life’ is ‘total crock’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-18  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tim, total, day, ceo, told, work, apple, steve, wont, cook, crock, tools, love, life


Apple CEO Tim Cook: 'If you love what you do, you will never work a day in your life' is 'total crock'

Find what you love. Do what you love. Then work won’t be work.

It sounds too good to be true. Because it is. So says Apple CEO Tim Cook.

“There is a saying that if you do what you love, you will never work a day in your life,” Cook said Saturday in his commencement speech at Tulane University in New Orleans, La., at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome.

“At Apple, I learned that is a total crock,” Cook said.

Rather, when you find a job you are passionate about, you will work hard, but you won’t mind doing so, Cook says.

“You will work harder than you ever thought possible, but the tools will feel light in your hands,” Cook says.

Cook joined Apple at the behest of the iconic entrepreneur Steve Jobs.

He was inspired to be part of the larger purpose behind the products.

“In 1998, Steve Jobs convinced me to leave Compaq behind to join a company that was on the verge of bankruptcy. They made computers, but at that moment at least, people weren’t interested in buying them. Steve had a plan to change things. And I wanted to be a part of it,” Cook said.

“I wasn’t just about the iMac or the iPod or everything that came after. It was about the values that brought these inventions to life. The idea that putting powerful tools in the hands of everyday people helps unleash creativity and moves humanity forward,” Cook says.

And though Cook may love the work he does, he also certainly works hard.

The Apple CEO gets up before 4 a.m. each day, he told Axios in November.

“I like to take the first hour and go through user comments and things like this that sort of focus on the external people that are so important to us,” Cook told Axios. “And then I go to the gym and work out for an hour because it keeps my stress at bay.”

See also:

Apple CEO Tim Cook to the class of 2019: ‘My generation has failed you’

Apple CEO Tim Cook: ‘The world is full of cynics and you have to tune them out’

Apple CEO Tim Cook: ‘Don’t work for money … you will never be happy’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-18  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tim, total, day, ceo, told, work, apple, steve, wont, cook, crock, tools, love, life


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Grumpy Cat, the face of thousands of internet memes, has died

Internet celebrity Grumpy Cat, the face of countless memes, has died at the age of 7, her owners confirmed Friday. The official Grumpy Cat Twitter account announced that she died on Tuesday due to complications from a recent urinary tract infection. “Grumpy Cat has helped millions of people smile around the world — even when times were tough,” the statement said. Such was Grumpy Cat’s fame that her owners began a full-time publicity operation to fulfill demand for personal appearances. The offic


Internet celebrity Grumpy Cat, the face of countless memes, has died at the age of 7, her owners confirmed Friday. The official Grumpy Cat Twitter account announced that she died on Tuesday due to complications from a recent urinary tract infection. “Grumpy Cat has helped millions of people smile around the world — even when times were tough,” the statement said. Such was Grumpy Cat’s fame that her owners began a full-time publicity operation to fulfill demand for personal appearances. The offic
Grumpy Cat, the face of thousands of internet memes, has died Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: patrick smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, internet, fact, face, died, unusual, owners, official, cats, memes, thousands, grumpy, fame, cat


Grumpy Cat, the face of thousands of internet memes, has died

Internet celebrity Grumpy Cat, the face of countless memes, has died at the age of 7, her owners confirmed Friday.

Grumpy Cat — real name Tardar Sauce — shot to fame as a figurehead of online culture thanks to her permanent frown apparently signalling displeasure at anything and everything.

The official Grumpy Cat Twitter account announced that she died on Tuesday due to complications from a recent urinary tract infection.

“Grumpy Cat has helped millions of people smile around the world — even when times were tough,” the statement said.

Grumpy’s rise to fame began when the brother of her owner, Tabatha Bundesen, posted a picture to Reddit in 2012. It was later remixed and turned into thousands of memes on social media sites, with captions such as: “I HAD FUN ONCE… IT WAS AWFUL.”

The cat’s unusual appearance was not in fact due to her temperament but an unusual combination of an underbite and feline dwarfism, a form of genetic mutation.

Bundesen always maintained that Grumpy was in fact very pleasant and playful.

Such was Grumpy Cat’s fame that her owners began a full-time publicity operation to fulfill demand for personal appearances.

She appeared at the SXSW festival and on several commercials.

The official Grumpy Cat shop lists 883 items for sale, including books, T-shirts, calendars and temporary tattoos.

And in 2013, the Bundesens launched Grumppucino, a branded coffee drink.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: patrick smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, internet, fact, face, died, unusual, owners, official, cats, memes, thousands, grumpy, fame, cat


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