How to decode expiration dates — and make your groceries last longer

But you can curb how much you discard — and in turn, how much you spend on groceries. The trick is to understand expiration dates, so you know when it’s actually necessary to fling that milk into the trash can. Food date labels became the norm in the 1970s, but there’s no federal regulation that says manufacturers have to include expiration dates on the packaging. Shoppers’ lack of education about expiration dates can cause problems, says Elizabeth Balkan, the food waste director of the Natural


But you can curb how much you discard — and in turn, how much you spend on groceries. The trick is to understand expiration dates, so you know when it’s actually necessary to fling that milk into the trash can. Food date labels became the norm in the 1970s, but there’s no federal regulation that says manufacturers have to include expiration dates on the packaging. Shoppers’ lack of education about expiration dates can cause problems, says Elizabeth Balkan, the food waste director of the Natural
How to decode expiration dates — and make your groceries last longer Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: aditi shrikant, sofia pitt, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, sell, food, product, groceries, longer, throwing, sale, expiration, dates, long, date, decode


How to decode expiration dates — and make your groceries last longer

Americans toss out almost a pound of food per day, according to a 2018 study. But you can curb how much you discard — and in turn, how much you spend on groceries. The trick is to understand expiration dates, so you know when it’s actually necessary to fling that milk into the trash can.

Food date labels became the norm in the 1970s, but there’s no federal regulation that says manufacturers have to include expiration dates on the packaging. (The lone exception: infant formula.) The language was never streamlined, which is why you see a mix of “best by,” “sell by,” and “use by” while you’re shopping.

Shoppers’ lack of education about expiration dates can cause problems, says Elizabeth Balkan, the food waste director of the Natural Resources Defense Council. “Those who have no intention of being wasteful in their consumption habits end up throwing things away because there is massive confusion,” she says.

The USDA defines these three kinds of expiration dates:

Use by: This is the “last date recommended for the use of the product while at peak quality.”

This is the “last date recommended for the use of the product while at peak quality.” Sell by: This is “how long to display the product for sale for inventory management.”

This is “how long to display the product for sale for inventory management.” Best by: This is when a product will be of “best flavor or quality.”

None of these dates indicate how safe it is to eat the labeled food. So instead of throwing out your purchases on what is essentially an arbitrary date, try these expert-approved tips for making your food last as long as possible so you can save money in the long run.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: aditi shrikant, sofia pitt, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, sell, food, product, groceries, longer, throwing, sale, expiration, dates, long, date, decode


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Why a tech war could endanger autonomous and connected cars

If you think the U.S.-China trade war is a problem for smartphones and 5G, spare a thought for autonomous and connected cars. Tech players still believe innovation will solve all problems, but what if “Make America Great Again” trumps tech? The smartphone has emerged as the central connected device and is unlikely to be knocked off its perch by more connected devices. But the biggest connected device in the future, at least by size, will be the car. Imagine a self-driving car with chips and sens


If you think the U.S.-China trade war is a problem for smartphones and 5G, spare a thought for autonomous and connected cars. Tech players still believe innovation will solve all problems, but what if “Make America Great Again” trumps tech? The smartphone has emerged as the central connected device and is unlikely to be knocked off its perch by more connected devices. But the biggest connected device in the future, at least by size, will be the car. Imagine a self-driving car with chips and sens
Why a tech war could endanger autonomous and connected cars Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: karen tso
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, security, huawei, smartphones, trade, car, war, cars, incar, ibm, thought, autonomous, endanger, connected, tech


Why a tech war could endanger autonomous and connected cars

If you think the U.S.-China trade war is a problem for smartphones and 5G, spare a thought for autonomous and connected cars.

U.S. bipartisan lawmakers are considering a money pot for small and rural wireless network operators to rip out Huawei and ZTE equipment where there is a security risk. This has promoted Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei to consider licensing the company’s 5G technology — from hardware to software and chip designs — to a U.S. firm to alleviate security concerns.

The Chinese overture seems logical at least for autos, if roadblocks are to be avoided in the next generation of autos where connectivity will be more important than horsepower.

In-car connectivity requires collaboration but that industry-wide, borderless cooperation is under threat. Even if Beijing and Washington achieve a trade resolution, and that’s questionable with rising heat around impeachment leading up to the presidential race in 2020, then a tech deal is thought to be more elusive. Tech players still believe innovation will solve all problems, but what if “Make America Great Again” trumps tech?

The smartphone has emerged as the central connected device and is unlikely to be knocked off its perch by more connected devices. But the biggest connected device in the future, at least by size, will be the car. Imagine a self-driving car with chips and sensors to safely navigate roads, running on open digital platforms and utilizing smartphones to bring user preferences to a connected car, just like the connected home.

The in-car experience will become king, according to a recent IBM study called Automotive 2030. IBM predicts 15% of new cars sold could be fully autonomous by the end of the next decade, and less time driving will turn the focus to the digital in-car experience.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: karen tso
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, security, huawei, smartphones, trade, car, war, cars, incar, ibm, thought, autonomous, endanger, connected, tech


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Hong Kong protesters take to the streets on China’s National Day

Demonstrators march through the streets of Hong Kong as China celebrates its National Day. Outside, two helicopters were seen flying across the harbor, carrying the Chinese national flag and Hong Kong flag. Hong Kong usually hosts celebratory events for the PRC’s anniversary, but this year the fireworks and festivities were cancelled. The turmoil was sparked by a now withdrawn bill that would have enabled extraditions to mainland China from Hong Kong. Under the colonial government, some Hong Kon


Demonstrators march through the streets of Hong Kong as China celebrates its National Day. Outside, two helicopters were seen flying across the harbor, carrying the Chinese national flag and Hong Kong flag. Hong Kong usually hosts celebratory events for the PRC’s anniversary, but this year the fireworks and festivities were cancelled. The turmoil was sparked by a now withdrawn bill that would have enabled extraditions to mainland China from Hong Kong. Under the colonial government, some Hong Kon
Hong Kong protesters take to the streets on China’s National Day Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kong, streets, violent, protesters, china, seen, british, started, national, day, chinas, hong


Hong Kong protesters take to the streets on China's National Day

Demonstrators march through the streets of Hong Kong as China celebrates its National Day.

Hong Kong Police fired tear gas to disperse a crowd in a residential area on Tuesday afternoon as people take to the streets after their request to assemble was denied by authorities.

Early Tuesday, local politicians gathered inside the Convention and Exhibition Centre in Wan Chai to observe the flag-raising ceremony. Outside, two helicopters were seen flying across the harbor, carrying the Chinese national flag and Hong Kong flag.

Oct. 1 marks the 70th anniversary of the People’s Republic of China. While Beijing is expected to showcase its largest military parade yet, the special administrative region also has the day off as a national holiday.

The city’s embattled leader Carrie Lam is in Beijing to celebrate the National Day. Hong Kong usually hosts celebratory events for the PRC’s anniversary, but this year the fireworks and festivities were cancelled.

Hong Kong, a former British colony, returned to China’s rule in 1997. Since the handover, the region has operated under the “one country, two systems” principle that gives its citizens some legal and economic freedoms not given in mainland China.

Over the weekend, the Asia financial hub saw violent clashes on its streets, the latest in Hong Kong’s biggest political crisis since the handover.

The city has been engulfed by 18 consecutive weeks of mass demonstrations. While those protests initially started as peaceful marches, there have been an increasing number of violent clashes. The turmoil was sparked by a now withdrawn bill that would have enabled extraditions to mainland China from Hong Kong.

People have started to gather in the streets in Hong Kong ahead of the official rally, which is said to start at 1 pm, local time.

Some protesters have been seen holding up signs saying “Not My National Day, Proud to be British since 1841” outside the British consulate in Admiralty.

Under the colonial government, some Hong Kong citizens were given a British National overseas passport but it does not grant holders full U.K. citizenship rights.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kong, streets, violent, protesters, china, seen, british, started, national, day, chinas, hong


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China is not the only one that has to change its business practices, says Yale’s Stephen Roach

The U.S. — and other countries — has complained about the difficulties of doing business in China, but the Asian economic giant is not the only one that should change its practices, according to a prominent economist. America, too, has to re-examine the way it’s engaging with China right now to address those complaints, said Stephen Roach, a senior fellow at Yale University. “I think we need to make some big changes in the way we do business together. I hesitate to say all the onus of change jus


The U.S. — and other countries — has complained about the difficulties of doing business in China, but the Asian economic giant is not the only one that should change its practices, according to a prominent economist. America, too, has to re-examine the way it’s engaging with China right now to address those complaints, said Stephen Roach, a senior fellow at Yale University. “I think we need to make some big changes in the way we do business together. I hesitate to say all the onus of change jus
China is not the only one that has to change its business practices, says Yale’s Stephen Roach Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: yen nee lee saheli roy choudhury, yen nee lee, saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, roach, china, business, way, asian, yale, practices, whos, stephen, change, asia, yales


China is not the only one that has to change its business practices, says Yale's Stephen Roach

The U.S. — and other countries — has complained about the difficulties of doing business in China, but the Asian economic giant is not the only one that should change its practices, according to a prominent economist.

America, too, has to re-examine the way it’s engaging with China right now to address those complaints, said Stephen Roach, a senior fellow at Yale University. Concerns that foreign businesses have raised about China include being forced to transfer technology to their Chinese partners and government subsidies for state-owned enterprises that distort competition.

“I think we need to make some big changes in the way we do business together. I hesitate to say all the onus of change just fall on China,” Roach, who’s also a former chairman for Morgan Stanley Asia, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Asia” on Tuesday.

He added that instead of using threats to force China to change its trade and business practices, the U.S. may find it more effective to negotiate a bilateral investment treaty with the Asian country.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: yen nee lee saheli roy choudhury, yen nee lee, saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, roach, china, business, way, asian, yale, practices, whos, stephen, change, asia, yales


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This chart shows why the holidays are becoming less important to retailers

The holiday season is less and less important for retailers, as more shopping moves online, according to a new study. For comparison, Coresight said total retail sales over the past three months climbed 4.1%, from the same three-month period a year ago. The firm called out “the ongoing trend of holiday shopping becoming less important to key retailers.” It said the holiday season accounted for almost 24% of all retailers’ sales in the late 1990s, but is closer to 21% today. Holiday sales have dr


The holiday season is less and less important for retailers, as more shopping moves online, according to a new study. For comparison, Coresight said total retail sales over the past three months climbed 4.1%, from the same three-month period a year ago. The firm called out “the ongoing trend of holiday shopping becoming less important to key retailers.” It said the holiday season accounted for almost 24% of all retailers’ sales in the late 1990s, but is closer to 21% today. Holiday sales have dr
This chart shows why the holidays are becoming less important to retailers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, holidays, chart, season, important, trend, holiday, thanksgiving, retail, coresight, online, sales, retailers, shows, shopping


This chart shows why the holidays are becoming less important to retailers

The holiday season is less and less important for retailers, as more shopping moves online, according to a new study.

Coresight Research said Tuesday it’s calling for a 4% increase in U.S. retail sales this November and December, which isn’t as robust as some estimates already out there. For comparison, Coresight said total retail sales over the past three months climbed 4.1%, from the same three-month period a year ago.

The firm called out “the ongoing trend of holiday shopping becoming less important to key retailers.” It said the holiday season accounted for almost 24% of all retailers’ sales in the late 1990s, but is closer to 21% today. And Coresight is expecting that percentage to continue to shrink.

Holiday sales have dropped the most over the years, as a percent of annual sales, for jewelry chains, the study found. That’s followed by sporting goods stores and then general merchandise stores.

The ease of online shopping throughout the year, with constant deal days, has accelerated this trend. Amazon’s Prime Day in July, for example, has led to more retailers like Target, Walmart and Kohl’s offering steep discounts on toys, apparel and electronics during the summer, in a bid to stay competitive. That pulls shoppers’ dollars forward and away from November and December.

Coresight is calling for a little more than 23% of all non-food retail sales to take place online this holiday season, up 200 basis points from in 2018.

The one issue retailers should we wary of — if this trend tracked by Coresight holds true — is ending up with too much inventory on their hands after the holiday season, if they’re planning to sell more than what ends up being the case. That could force companies to use heavy markdowns in January to clear the shelves and clothing racks. This weighs on profit margins at the start of the New Year.

A late Thanksgiving this year, falling on Nov. 28, means there are six fewer days between Thanksgiving and Christmas than in 2018. In fact, 2019 is the shortest possible holiday calendar scenario, Coresight noted in Tuesday’s report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, holidays, chart, season, important, trend, holiday, thanksgiving, retail, coresight, online, sales, retailers, shows, shopping


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EU trade official says Europe ‘must stand up for itself’ in aircraft subsidy fight with US

European Commissioner designate for Trade Phil Hogan arrives for his hearing at the European Parliament on September 30, 2019, in Brussels, Belgium. Thierry Monasse | Getty ImagesThe European Union’s next chief of trade policy said the United States is not yet “in a position” to engage on proposals to end aircraft subsidies. The complex dispute around aircraft subsidies is a case in point: It’s finally nearing an end after almost 15 years of WTO back and forth. The first half of it focused on ai


European Commissioner designate for Trade Phil Hogan arrives for his hearing at the European Parliament on September 30, 2019, in Brussels, Belgium. Thierry Monasse | Getty ImagesThe European Union’s next chief of trade policy said the United States is not yet “in a position” to engage on proposals to end aircraft subsidies. The complex dispute around aircraft subsidies is a case in point: It’s finally nearing an end after almost 15 years of WTO back and forth. The first half of it focused on ai
EU trade official says Europe ‘must stand up for itself’ in aircraft subsidy fight with US Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: willem marx
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fight, ruling, trade, official, stand, european, products, subsidy, aircraft, europe, wto, tariffs, subsidies, states


EU trade official says Europe 'must stand up for itself' in aircraft subsidy fight with US

European Commissioner designate for Trade Phil Hogan arrives for his hearing at the European Parliament on September 30, 2019, in Brussels, Belgium. Thierry Monasse | Getty Images

The European Union’s next chief of trade policy said the United States is not yet “in a position” to engage on proposals to end aircraft subsidies. It comes as policymakers on both sides of the Atlantic prepare for a World Trade Organization (WTO) ruling that could empower President Donald Trump’s administration to impose billions of dollars of new tariffs on European products — ranging from civilian aircraft to cheese and handbags. Outgoing EU Commissioner for Agriculture, Phil Hogan of Ireland, told lawmakers at a European parliamentary hearing in Brussels that if the U.S. were to impose tariffs, Europe “has to stand up for itself” and should identify American products that could be targeted for retaliatory levies. Hogan is nearing confirmation as the EU’s new trade commissioner for the world’s largest trading bloc. Hogan demanded updates to the WTO that could help avoid trade dispute resolutions driven by the “law of the jungle,” and promised to work toward a “positive, balanced and a more mutually beneficial partnership with the U.S.” He also insisted that it “takes two to tango.” His exchanges with legislators highlight the challenge facing a new European Commission under President-elect Ursula von der Leyen, Jean-Claude Juncker’s successor. Von der Leyen’s new team seeks to underpin and strengthen a multilateral and global framework designed to tackle thorny issues ranging from trade to security, at a time when the current White House seems intent on undermining parts of the rules-based international system that so many senior European officials hold dear. The complex dispute around aircraft subsidies is a case in point: It’s finally nearing an end after almost 15 years of WTO back and forth.

The issue centers on competing allegations from Washington and Brussels that the two parties’ largest civilian airliner manufacturers, Boeing and Airbus respectively, benefited from and failed to reform tax concessions and state subsidies that the WTO previously prohibited. A three-person WTO arbitration tribunal is expected to rule this week on the value of trade countermeasures that will be available to the United States if it seeks to impose them on the EU for the decades of “launch aid.” The WTO has said that aid helped Airbus compete unfairly with Boeing when it came to worldwide aircraft sales.

USTR proposal

Back in April, the U.S. Trade Representative’s office proposed a long list of EU products that could potentially face tariffs once the arbitration ruling is formally adopted by the WTO’s de facto governing council, known as the Dispute Settlement Board, no later than October 28th. His office had suggested that the U.S. suffered harm worth $11 billion, thanks to EU subsidies, and requested WTO approval to impose tariffs of up to 100% on EU goods, worth a roughly similar amount. The Europeans had objected to that estimate, and as a consequence, the final amount must be determined by the WTO-appointed arbitrators.

That list of potential tariff targets was split into two parts and included products worth a total of about $25 billion to provide the administration with options. The first half of it focused on aircraft and aircraft parts that were manufactured in four EU member states, the U.K., Spain, Germany and France. British and German government representatives have not responded ahead of the WTO ruling. Spain’s Ministry of Industry and Trade told CNBC it would be not be commenting on the matter, while the French Finance Minister’s office told CNBC it would be an “interesting day” when the WTO publishes its decision. The list’s second half included a vast array of products that could come from any of the EU’s 28 member states, ranging from fruit jellies to yogurt, knives to handbags.

I don’t think that it’s in anybody’s interests to start raising tariffs right now. Luisa Santos BusinessEurope

European titans like Danone, Nestle and LVMH, which are wholly unrelated to the aircraft subsidy complaint against Airbus, could face costly trade barriers as a consequence. “It will have a huge impact across different sectors,” says Luisa Santos, director of international relations at Europe’s largest business lobbying organization, BusinessEurope. “It’s not going to be positive.” The USTR’s office did not respond to a CNBC request for comment about its potential response, although back in April U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer issued a statement saying the U.S. would “respond immediately when the WTO issues its finding.”

‘Dialogue and cooperation’

But a remarkably similar WTO arbitration ruling, predicated on the favorable tax treatment and federal research financing that aided Boeing in contravention of WTO rules, is expected to permit the EU to take its own countermeasures against the U.S. in just a few months’ time.

The only reason that the U.S. would strike now is to put pressure on the EU, and maybe get something out of the EU. Luisa Santos BusinessEurope


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: willem marx
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fight, ruling, trade, official, stand, european, products, subsidy, aircraft, europe, wto, tariffs, subsidies, states


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Credit Suisse clears CEO in spying probe, COO Bouee to go

A Swiss flag flies over a sign of Swiss bank Credit Suisse on May 8, 2014 in Bern. Credit Suisse on Tuesday cleared Chief Executive Tidjane Thiam in an internal investigation into the botched surveillance of the bank’s former wealth management head Iqbal Khan in a probe that cost Thiam’s right-hand man his job. Chief Operating Officer Pierre-Olivier Bouee resigned after the investigation by the Homburger law firm found he alone initiated observation of Khan, who abruptly left in July and later j


A Swiss flag flies over a sign of Swiss bank Credit Suisse on May 8, 2014 in Bern. Credit Suisse on Tuesday cleared Chief Executive Tidjane Thiam in an internal investigation into the botched surveillance of the bank’s former wealth management head Iqbal Khan in a probe that cost Thiam’s right-hand man his job. Chief Operating Officer Pierre-Olivier Bouee resigned after the investigation by the Homburger law firm found he alone initiated observation of Khan, who abruptly left in July and later j
Credit Suisse clears CEO in spying probe, COO Bouee to go Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coo, bouee, clears, observation, investigation, ceo, credit, spying, bank, homburger, tidjane, suisse, probe, swiss, khan, iqbal


Credit Suisse clears CEO in spying probe, COO Bouee to go

A Swiss flag flies over a sign of Swiss bank Credit Suisse on May 8, 2014 in Bern.

Credit Suisse on Tuesday cleared Chief Executive Tidjane Thiam in an internal investigation into the botched surveillance of the bank’s former wealth management head Iqbal Khan in a probe that cost Thiam’s right-hand man his job.

Chief Operating Officer Pierre-Olivier Bouee resigned after the investigation by the Homburger law firm found he alone initiated observation of Khan, who abruptly left in July and later joined arch-rival UBS.

“The Board of Directors considers that the mandate for the observation of Iqbal Khan was wrong and disproportionate and has resulted in severe reputational damage to the bank,” Switzerland’s second-biggest bank said in a statement.

“The Homburger investigation did not identify any indication that the CEO had approved the observation of Iqbal Khan nor that he was aware of it prior to September 18, 2019, after the observation had been aborted,” the bank said.

Two big shareholders had said they wanted Tidjane, architect of a sweeping three-year revamp at the bank he joined in 2015, to stay unless it was shown he broke the law.

Credit Suisse launched the enquiry to find out the circumstances that led to a confrontation in Zurich on Sept. 17 between Khan and private detectives that Credit Suisse had hired to tail him.

“Neither the Homburger investigation nor the observation of Iqbal Khan identified any evidence that Iqbal Khan had attempted to poach employees or clients away from Credit Suisse, contrary to his contractual obligations,” it said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coo, bouee, clears, observation, investigation, ceo, credit, spying, bank, homburger, tidjane, suisse, probe, swiss, khan, iqbal


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China’s Xi: ‘No force can stop the Chinese people and the Chinese nation’

BEIJING — Chinese President Xi Jinping said Tuesday in a speech commemorating the 70th anniversary of the Chinese Communist Party’s rule that no force could sway China’s development. “There is no force that can shake the foundation of this great nation,” Xi said in Mandarin, according to an official translation broadcast through state media. “No force can stop the Chinese people and the Chinese nation forging ahead.” “Long live the great Communist Party of China. And long live the great Chinese


BEIJING — Chinese President Xi Jinping said Tuesday in a speech commemorating the 70th anniversary of the Chinese Communist Party’s rule that no force could sway China’s development. “There is no force that can shake the foundation of this great nation,” Xi said in Mandarin, according to an official translation broadcast through state media. “No force can stop the Chinese people and the Chinese nation forging ahead.” “Long live the great Communist Party of China. And long live the great Chinese
China’s Xi: ‘No force can stop the Chinese people and the Chinese nation’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stop, chinese, live, china, nation, great, translation, communist, force, speech, chinas


China's Xi: 'No force can stop the Chinese people and the Chinese nation'

BEIJING — Chinese President Xi Jinping said Tuesday in a speech commemorating the 70th anniversary of the Chinese Communist Party’s rule that no force could sway China’s development.

“There is no force that can shake the foundation of this great nation,” Xi said in Mandarin, according to an official translation broadcast through state media. “No force can stop the Chinese people and the Chinese nation forging ahead.”

Xi did not specifically mention any other country by name, and emphasized that China would pursue peaceful development.

“Long live the great Communist Party of China. And long live the great Chinese People!” Xi concluded his speech, which lasted for less than 10 minutes.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stop, chinese, live, china, nation, great, translation, communist, force, speech, chinas


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Treasury yields rise amid cautious trade optimism

China is not the only one that has to change its practices:… The U.S. also has to re-look the way it’s engaging with China to address its complaints, said Stephen Roach, a senior fellow at Yale University. Politicsread more


China is not the only one that has to change its practices:… The U.S. also has to re-look the way it’s engaging with China to address its complaints, said Stephen Roach, a senior fellow at Yale University. Politicsread more
Treasury yields rise amid cautious trade optimism Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, universitypoliticsread, relook, roach, trade, china, rise, fellow, yale, way, cautious, treasury, amid, senior, stephen, practicesthe, yields, optimism


Treasury yields rise amid cautious trade optimism

China is not the only one that has to change its practices:…

The U.S. also has to re-look the way it’s engaging with China to address its complaints, said Stephen Roach, a senior fellow at Yale University.

Politics

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: elliot smith
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Two out of three UK business leaders think tech skills matter more than math and science

vgajic | Getty ImagesMore than two-thirds (68%) of UK business leaders believe employees with technology skills such as coding and cybersecurity are more valuable than those who understand traditional subjects such as math and science. A poll of 502 Information Technology (IT) decision makers from different UK firms found that 53% did not think children were taught enough tech specialisms at school. Cybersecurity was the most in-demand specialism, with 79% citing it as the preferred tech skill,


vgajic | Getty ImagesMore than two-thirds (68%) of UK business leaders believe employees with technology skills such as coding and cybersecurity are more valuable than those who understand traditional subjects such as math and science. A poll of 502 Information Technology (IT) decision makers from different UK firms found that 53% did not think children were taught enough tech specialisms at school. Cybersecurity was the most in-demand specialism, with 79% citing it as the preferred tech skill,
Two out of three UK business leaders think tech skills matter more than math and science Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, skills, leaders, twothirds, business, matter, survey, specialisms, cwjobs, technology, think, science, cybersecurity, tech, math


Two out of three UK business leaders think tech skills matter more than math and science

vgajic | Getty Images

More than two-thirds (68%) of UK business leaders believe employees with technology skills such as coding and cybersecurity are more valuable than those who understand traditional subjects such as math and science. A poll of 502 Information Technology (IT) decision makers from different UK firms found that 53% did not think children were taught enough tech specialisms at school. The survey, carried out by Censuswide on behalf of tech jobs board CWJobs, also found three-quarters (73%) of employers felt tech education needed to happen at either primary or secondary school level. “If the UK introduces students to tech at an early stage and highlights the diversity of the careers it can lead to, then we can equip them for the future,” said Dominic Harvey, director at CWJobs, in the report released Tuesday. “It will also help plug that much-publicized skills gap found in the tech sector currently,” he added.

Cybersecurity top rated tech skill

The CWJobs ‘More Than Code’ report referred to another survey from consultancy Deloitte which said that nearly two-thirds (62%) of UK business executives said their tech talent pool did not have the capability to deliver their digital strategy. This was placed as a backdrop to its own research which revealed 63% of business leaders would hire someone with a tech specialism over a candidate without one, in order to futureproof their company. A similar amount said they would opt for employing the tech-savvy candidate so that they would be able to train others (64%) or offer bosses the chance to learn themselves (62%). Cybersecurity was the most in-demand specialism, with 79% citing it as the preferred tech skill, ahead of data analytics and business intelligence. However, cloud computing was most common among employees’ existing tech skills (44%), ahead of cybersecurity (43%). “The UK is facing a skills crisis and those with tech specialisms on their CV are being sought after by all companies, now more than ever,” Harvey commented. “What’s clear is that learning a tech skill isn’t just something that’s relevant for one role or one industry, but the entire UK workforce needs to be embracing it if the country is to remain competitive on the world stage.”

Side-step into the ‘dream’ industries


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, skills, leaders, twothirds, business, matter, survey, specialisms, cwjobs, technology, think, science, cybersecurity, tech, math


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