‘Stacking Benjamins’ host: How a couple paid off $330,000 in 5 years and more stories of conquering debt

If you’re working to make your money dreams a reality, these achievements can seem momentous, even intimidating. Tai and Talaat McNeelyTheir goal: To pay off their house early to give themselves the freedom to make life changes without debt holding them down. What they achieved: They paid off $330,000 worth of mortgage debt in five years and are now a debt-free family living in a paid-off home. Their key strategy: They used weekends and evenings to work side hustles like mystery shopping, focus


If you’re working to make your money dreams a reality, these achievements can seem momentous, even intimidating.
Tai and Talaat McNeelyTheir goal: To pay off their house early to give themselves the freedom to make life changes without debt holding them down.
What they achieved: They paid off $330,000 worth of mortgage debt in five years and are now a debt-free family living in a paid-off home.
Their key strategy: They used weekends and evenings to work side hustles like mystery shopping, focus
‘Stacking Benjamins’ host: How a couple paid off $330,000 in 5 years and more stories of conquering debt Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: joe saul-sehy, melanie lockert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, money, host, stacking, used, grossman, strategy, car, debt, 330000, working, conquering, worth, benjamins, couple, paid


'Stacking Benjamins' host: How a couple paid off $330,000 in 5 years and more stories of conquering debt

The internet is awash in financial success stories. If you’re working to make your money dreams a reality, these achievements can seem momentous, even intimidating. Some people you read about do come from trust-fund money or have held a high-paying job, but what I’ve learned from more than eight years hosting ‘The Stacking Benjamins Podcast’ is that most of the people who have accomplished their money goals are just like you. Here are three stories that will remind you that you too can achieve incredible results.

Tai and Talaat McNeely

Their goal: To pay off their house early to give themselves the freedom to make life changes without debt holding them down. What makes them like the rest of us: They were raising three kids on one income. What they achieved: They paid off $330,000 worth of mortgage debt in five years and are now a debt-free family living in a paid-off home. This allows them to run their company His & Her Money full time. Their key strategy: They used weekends and evenings to work side hustles like mystery shopping, focus group participation, blogging, and holding garage sales. The money from the sales of toys, shoes, old clothes, and furniture that they no longer used went toward paying down their mortgage. Their biggest lesson: “We didn’t allow ourselves to make any excuses, no matter how valid they may have been,” they told me.

Amanda L. Grossman

Courtesy Amanda L. Grossman

Her goal: To pay off her and her husband’s $59,492 in student, car, and engagement ring debt so Grossman could quit her day job and pursue her passion of writing about personal finance on her site Frugal Confessions full time. What makes her like the rest of us: Grossman graduated in 2005 with student loans of $36,000. She has never earned more than $43,000 a year. Now a parent, she is raising her son while working from home on her online business. What she achieved: She completely paid off her debt. As an added bonus, Grossman and her husband paid cash for their car and a home foundation repair that cost more than $7,000, as well as their wedding, an 11-day trip to Austria (the plane tickets were a gift). Her key strategy: Keep a tight lid on expenses. By working from home, Grossman says that she has been able to reduce her child care expenses by not having to hire outside help. While she wouldn’t call herself as an extreme couponer, Amanda says she learned how to create a tight budget and stack coupons to afford more with less money. In the personal finance community, this is a strategy called The Drugstore Game, and it involves using both manufacturer and store coupons to pay the lowest prices. She also recommends the free grocery savings lists from the site Coupon Mom. When the Grossman’s purchased their home, they used the $8,000 first-time homebuyer tax credit that the government offered from 2008 to 2010 as part of the postrecession stimulus package. At the time, she had $14,000 in savings. After they put a down payment on the house, they used $7,000 of the $8,000 credit to pay off her husband’s car loan. Her biggest lesson: “What we have accomplished has taken sacrifice. I think more sacrifice than people realize, or want to acknowledge,” said Grossman. “But I can 100% say, and my husband would agree, that those sacrifices were worth it.”

Steven Donovan


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: joe saul-sehy, melanie lockert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, money, host, stacking, used, grossman, strategy, car, debt, 330000, working, conquering, worth, benjamins, couple, paid


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Shibuya: Discover the beating heart of Tokyo


Shibuya: Discover the beating heart of Tokyo Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tokyo, shibuya, discover, heart, beating


Shibuya: Discover the beating heart of Tokyo


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tokyo, shibuya, discover, heart, beating


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Can employers see your credit score? How to prepare for what they actually see when they run a credit check

While your next employer may take a look at your credit history, unlike lenders, they cannot see your credit score (or your credit account numbers). Your credit report vs. your credit scoreFirst, let’s break down the difference between your credit report and your credit score. Your credit report details your credit history, including any credit card account information, your balances, your available credit and your payment history. A good credit score means you’re a good credit risk (more likely


While your next employer may take a look at your credit history, unlike lenders, they cannot see your credit score (or your credit account numbers).
Your credit report vs. your credit scoreFirst, let’s break down the difference between your credit report and your credit score.
Your credit report details your credit history, including any credit card account information, your balances, your available credit and your payment history.
A good credit score means you’re a good credit risk (more likely
Can employers see your credit score? How to prepare for what they actually see when they run a credit check Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: elizabeth gravier, alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, check, score, actually, card, report, job, history, employer, employers, prepare, youre, credit, run


Can employers see your credit score? How to prepare for what they actually see when they run a credit check

Applying for a new job means perfecting your resume, writing a cover letter and preparing for an interview. But there’s something else you should work on before submitting your next job application: your credit. According to a 2018 HR.com report sponsored by the National Association of Background Screeners (NABS), 95% of companies conduct some type of background check on potential employees — 16% pull credit or financial checks on all job candidates and almost one-third do credit checks on some candidates. While your next employer may take a look at your credit history, unlike lenders, they cannot see your credit score (or your credit account numbers). This is one of the most common myths about credit scores. But it’s worth knowing what employers can see when they do a credit check.

Your credit report vs. your credit score

First, let’s break down the difference between your credit report and your credit score. Your credit report details your credit history, including any credit card account information, your balances, your available credit and your payment history. Your credit score is a 3-digit number that basically sums up that information into a rating. A good credit score means you’re a good credit risk (more likely to repay a loan), whereas a low credit score means you’re a poor credit risk.

Why would a potential employer look at your credit?

More than half of employers conduct background checks during the hiring process only, and the No. 1 reason (at 86%) is to protect their employees and customers, says the 2018 HR.com report. For security purposes, the credit report can be used to verify someone’s identity, background and education, to prevent theft or embezzlement and to see the candidate’s previous employers (especially if there is missing employment experience on a resume). For employers, it is a big picture snapshot of how a potential candidate handles their responsibilities. “Credit reports indicate whether or not you’re responsible,” financial expert John Ulzheimer, formerly of FICO and Equifax, tells CNBC Select. “And, they also indicate if you’re in financial distress. These are attributes that are important to employers. For example, would you want to hire someone in your accounting department who can’t manage their own obligations?” If an employer is running a credit check on you, it is most likely only after they already made a decision to hire you, and it is usually the last thing they check. Since pulling credit checks cost employers both time and money (many outsource to a third-party company), credit checks aren’t necessarily used to weed out a big pool of potential applicants and not all applicants will have their credit checked. Employers are more likely to run a credit check for candidates applying for financial roles within a company or any position that requires handling of money (such as accountants or retail roles).

What do employers see when checking your credit?

“They see largely what a lender sees, except for your credit score,” Ulzheimer says. (Employers also don’t see your date of birth.) Since a lot of the credit report data that lenders and employers see is the same, employers have access to a comprehensive background report that includes, in addition to your credit history, your past employment, insurance and legal activity. Though prospective employers don’t see your credit score in a credit check, they do see your open lines of credit (such as mortgages), outstanding balances, auto or student loans, foreclosures, late or missed payments, any bankruptcies and collection accounts.

Does an employer credit check hurt your credit score?

Your credit score won’t be affected by a potential employer conducting a credit check on you. “An employment inquiry is treated like a soft inquiry,” Ulzheimer says. “Not visible to other parties (other than you) and not considered in credit scoring systems.” According to the 2018 HR.com report, employers typically assess applicants based on their long-term credit history — four to seven years overall — unlike lenders. That means if there is a big discrepancy from a few years ago, an employer may still ask you about it even if your most recent credit history is healthy.

What are your legal rights as a job applicant?

Thanks to the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), employers can’t go checking your credit history behind your back. They must have written consent before pulling an applicant’s credit history. “Unlike every other credit reporting scenario, you must be given a separate notice indicating the employer is going to pull your credit reports,” Ulzheimer says. “And you have to give overt written permission.” In some states, there are specific restrictions when it comes to employers using credit information for employment decisions.

How can you prepare for a credit check by a potential employer?

Since employers are mainly checking to see any patterns or habits of mismanaging money when they conduct a credit check, the best way to prepare is to know what your credit report says before applying to any job (no matter the position). “You certainly don’t want to be surprised when you go apply for a job to learn something negative is on your credit reports,” Ulzheimer says. “I always advise people who are job hunting to get a good idea of what your credit reports looks like well in advance. And, be able to explain any negative entries.” Every year, you’re entitled to one free credit report from each of the main credit bureaus — Experian, Equifax and TransUnion. You can access these reports for free at annualcreditreport.com, which is authorized by federal law. We recommend you don’t access all three reports at the same time, but instead space one report out every four months. If you have a Capital One credit card, such as the Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card or Capital One® Savor® Cash Rewards Credit Card, you may have come across CreditWise (which is open to everyone, even if you’re not a Capital One cardholder). CreditWise provides access to your free TransUnion credit report. Keep in mind that while employers can legally pull your credit report, it’s one of many factors that go into getting hired for a new job. But there is a simple way to appear just as good on your credit report as you do in your job interview: Make sure you always pay your bills on time. Information about the Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card and Capital One® Savor® Cash Rewards Credit Card has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the card prior to publication.

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the CNBC Select editorial staff’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any third party.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: elizabeth gravier, alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, check, score, actually, card, report, job, history, employer, employers, prepare, youre, credit, run


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Delta Amex credit cards relaunch with new benefits and limited-time bonus offers

American Express relaunched all seven Delta SkyMiles® credit cards today, Jan. 30, 2020, with new rewards, perks and limited-time welcome bonuses worth up to 100,000 miles, depending on the card you open. All Delta Amex cards also received a sleek new design. And the Delta SkyMiles Platinum and Reserve American Express cards will now be made from metal. Despite the annual fees increasing by up to $100 on select cards, new and existing cardholders can benefit from quicker ways to earn miles. CNBC


American Express relaunched all seven Delta SkyMiles® credit cards today, Jan. 30, 2020, with new rewards, perks and limited-time welcome bonuses worth up to 100,000 miles, depending on the card you open.
All Delta Amex cards also received a sleek new design.
And the Delta SkyMiles Platinum and Reserve American Express cards will now be made from metal.
Despite the annual fees increasing by up to $100 on select cards, new and existing cardholders can benefit from quicker ways to earn miles.
CNBC
Delta Amex credit cards relaunch with new benefits and limited-time bonus offers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, select, delta, relaunch, skymiles, bonus, customer, tells, benefits, american, welcome, amex, offers, express, earn, credit, cards, limitedtime


Delta Amex credit cards relaunch with new benefits and limited-time bonus offers

American Express relaunched all seven Delta SkyMiles® credit cards today, Jan. 30, 2020, with new rewards, perks and limited-time welcome bonuses worth up to 100,000 miles, depending on the card you open. All Delta Amex cards also received a sleek new design. And the Delta SkyMiles Platinum and Reserve American Express cards will now be made from metal.

The relaunch comes following more than a year of research and customer feedback. “It’s all about putting the customer at the center: listening to them, responding to them and making sure that we deliver even more value and better experience through these credit cards,” Sandeep Dube, SVP of customer engagement and loyalty at Delta and CEO of Delta Vacations, tells CNBC Select.

Despite the annual fees increasing by up to $100 on select cards, new and existing cardholders can benefit from quicker ways to earn miles.

“Customers have the ability to really earn rewards even faster than they have been able to earn in the past,” Eva Reda, EVP and GM of global partnership and product development at American Express, tells CNBC Select.

CNBC Select has all the details you need to know about the welcome offers and new card changes.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, select, delta, relaunch, skymiles, bonus, customer, tells, benefits, american, welcome, amex, offers, express, earn, credit, cards, limitedtime


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Brexit is happening tonight: Here’s how we got here, and what comes next

In the European Parliament on Wednesday, a majority of the Members of the European Parliament (MEP) ratified the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement by 621 votes to 49 after an emotional debate in the chamber. Others, such as lifelong Brexit campaigner Nigel Farage, a familiar antagonist in the European Parliament who once led the U.K. Independence Party (whose popularity was a factor behind holding an EU referendum in 2016) told the Parliament: “I know you’re going to miss us.” The bloc agreed to exten


In the European Parliament on Wednesday, a majority of the Members of the European Parliament (MEP) ratified the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement by 621 votes to 49 after an emotional debate in the chamber.
Others, such as lifelong Brexit campaigner Nigel Farage, a familiar antagonist in the European Parliament who once led the U.K.
Independence Party (whose popularity was a factor behind holding an EU referendum in 2016) told the Parliament: “I know you’re going to miss us.”
The bloc agreed to exten
Brexit is happening tonight: Here’s how we got here, and what comes next Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brexit, european, tonight, deal, comes, parliament, johnson, vote, political, happening, party, heres


Brexit is happening tonight: Here's how we got here, and what comes next

MEPs of the European Parliament, some holding hands, rise to sing ‘Auld Lang Syne’ following a historic vote on the Brexit agreement at a session of the European Parliament that paves the way for an “orderly” departure of the United Kingdom from the EU, on January 29, 2020 in Brussels, Belgium. Sean Gallup

The U.K. will leave the EU on Friday evening after 47 years of membership, marking one of the biggest political and economic shifts in modern Europe. Brexit brings about the end of a tumultuous three-and-a-half year departure process that has caused turmoil in the U.K.’s political establishment, economic uncertainty and heightened tensions between the U.K. and the EU, its largest single trading partner as a bloc. The departure on January 31 at 11 p.m. London time will mark the start of a “transition period” in which the U.K. remains a member of the single market and customs union, but begins negotiations with the EU in the hope of striking a free trade deal. The U.K. government has set an ambitious (and some say, unviable) deadline of the end of 2020 in which a deal must be reached, otherwise it could confront a “no deal” scenario and would have to revert to the World Trade Organization trading rules, putting up trade barriers with the EU in a move likely to damage both the U.K. and EU economies. In the European Parliament on Wednesday, a majority of the Members of the European Parliament (MEP) ratified the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement by 621 votes to 49 after an emotional debate in the chamber. There were hugs and tears as pro-EU, British MEPs gave their final speeches to the Parliament stating their hopes for the U.K. to one day return to the EU. Others, such as lifelong Brexit campaigner Nigel Farage, a familiar antagonist in the European Parliament who once led the U.K. Independence Party (whose popularity was a factor behind holding an EU referendum in 2016) told the Parliament: “I know you’re going to miss us.”

How did we get to this?

On June 23, 2016, the British people went to the polls in a vote on whether the U.K. should remain a member of the EU. To much of the country’s shock — even, it appeared, to politicians like current Prime Minister Boris Johnson who campaigned to leave the bloc — 51.9% of Brits voted to leave the EU with 48.1% voting to remain in the economic and political bloc. Although the political earthquake brought about by the vote was unexpected, euroskepticism was rife in the country in the decades and immediate years leading up to the referendum, partly fueled by an anti-EU tabloid press in the U.K., the rise of the U.K. Independence Party led by Nigel Farage and an increase in populist sentiment. A migration crisis in Europe in the run-up to the 2016 vote, fears over the possible accession of Turkey to the EU and a desire among many Brits to contain immigration also played a part in the vote. There were also more intangible factors such as Britain being an island, separated from its continental neighbors and of somehow, someway, being ‘different.’ Reeling from the vote and the resignation of then Prime Minister David Cameron immediately after the referendum result, the government under Theresa May took the U.K. until March 29, 2017 to trigger “Article 50,” beginning what was meant to be a two-year countdown to the U.K. formally leaving the EU.

In the meantime, the EU and U.K. struck a Brexit deal, or “Withdrawal Agreement” but it had still not been approved by a majority of the British Parliament in March 2019 and May was forced to ask the EU to extend the withdrawal date deadline. The bloc agreed to extend the deadline to October 31, 2019 but with her Brexit deal rejected three times by Parliament, May was all but forced to step down as party leader. That prompted a leadership race with the ruling Conservative Party and the election of Brexit-supporting Johnson in July. Johnson went back to Brussels and renegotiated parts of the Brexit deal, but his deal was also rejected by Parliament and Johnson, threatening to take the U.K. out of the EU by October 31 “come what may” was forced to ask for another extension from the EU, until January 31, 2020 … Keeping up?!

What happens next?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brexit, european, tonight, deal, comes, parliament, johnson, vote, political, happening, party, heres


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European stocks begin to stabilize after torrid week; UK set to leave EU today

European stocks traded slightly higher on Friday as investors look for signals that China has managed to contain the rapidly spreading coronavirus which has roiled global markets throughout the week. The pan-European Stoxx 600 added 0.3% early in the session, with travel and leisure stocks rising 0.8% to lead gains as most sectors entered positive territory. The coronavirus death toll has now hit 213 with confirmed cases rising to 9,692, according to Chinese health officials, while the World Hea


European stocks traded slightly higher on Friday as investors look for signals that China has managed to contain the rapidly spreading coronavirus which has roiled global markets throughout the week.
The pan-European Stoxx 600 added 0.3% early in the session, with travel and leisure stocks rising 0.8% to lead gains as most sectors entered positive territory.
The coronavirus death toll has now hit 213 with confirmed cases rising to 9,692, according to Chinese health officials, while the World Hea
European stocks begin to stabilize after torrid week; UK set to leave EU today Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, torrid, european, leave, today, set, health, gains, stocks, global, london, rising, stabilize, coronavirus, week


European stocks begin to stabilize after torrid week; UK set to leave EU today

European stocks traded slightly higher on Friday as investors look for signals that China has managed to contain the rapidly spreading coronavirus which has roiled global markets throughout the week.

The pan-European Stoxx 600 added 0.3% early in the session, with travel and leisure stocks rising 0.8% to lead gains as most sectors entered positive territory.

The coronavirus death toll has now hit 213 with confirmed cases rising to 9,692, according to Chinese health officials, while the World Health Organization on Thursday declared the outbreak a global health emergency. The U.S. also confirmed its first human-to-human transmission.

Asian stocks mostly rose on Friday afternoon as Chinese manufacturing data met expectations, with Japan’s Nikkei 225 leading gains which were contained by concerns over the coronavirus and its potential impact on the global economy.

Friday is a landmark day for Europe as the U.K. is set to officially leave the European Union at 11:00 p.m. London time, ending a 3 1/2 year exit process, but beginning an 11-month transitional period, during which time British and European leaders will attempt to hash out a new trade agreement.

Both S&P and Moody’s warned on Thursday that Britain’s credit rating would be under pressure if a post-Brexit trading relationship limits U.K. access to the European single market.

Air France KLM suspended flights to China on Thursday due to the coronavirus concerns, joining the likes of British Airways and Lufthansa.

On the data front, investors will have an eye on euro zone fourth-quarter GDP and January inflation figures due for publication at 10:00 a.m. London time.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, torrid, european, leave, today, set, health, gains, stocks, global, london, rising, stabilize, coronavirus, week


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Two key Republican senators reveal how they’ll vote on Trump impeachment witnesses

WASHINGTON — Two key Republican senators announced their positions on the inclusion of additional witnesses in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. Retiring Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee said he would vote against any proposals for further witnesses. Therefore, I will vote in support of the motion to allow witnesses and documents to be subpoenaed,” Collins said in a statement. That vote, which is expected to occur Friday, marks a pivotal moment in the impeachment proceedings that


WASHINGTON — Two key Republican senators announced their positions on the inclusion of additional witnesses in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump.
Retiring Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee said he would vote against any proposals for further witnesses.
Therefore, I will vote in support of the motion to allow witnesses and documents to be subpoenaed,” Collins said in a statement.
That vote, which is expected to occur Friday, marks a pivotal moment in the impeachment proceedings that
Two key Republican senators reveal how they’ll vote on Trump impeachment witnesses Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: christina wilkie kevin breuninger, christina wilkie, kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reveal, additional, witnesses, president, impeachment, alexander, democrats, trump, republican, sen, key, theyll, trial, senators, vote


Two key Republican senators reveal how they'll vote on Trump impeachment witnesses

WASHINGTON — Two key Republican senators announced their positions on the inclusion of additional witnesses in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump.

Retiring Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee said he would vote against any proposals for further witnesses. In a statement, Alexander surprisingly appeared to say he believed the Democrats had proven their case, but that the president’s actions did not meet the standard for an impeachable offense.

“It was inappropriate for the president to ask a foreign leader to investigate his political opponent and to withhold United States aid to encourage that investigation,” Alexander said in his statement. “When elected officials inappropriately interfere with such investigations, it undermines the principle of equal justice under the law. But the Constitution does not give the Senate the power to remove the president from office and ban him from this year’s ballot simply for actions that are inappropriate.”

“There is no need for more evidence to prove something that has already been proven, and that does not meet the United States Constitution’s high bar for an impeachable offense,” Alexander wrote.

Alexander’s Republican colleague, Sen. Susan Collins of Maine broke the other way, announcing late Thursday night that she will vote to admit additional evidence in the trial.

“We have heard the cases argued and the questions answered … I believe hearing from certain witnesses would give each side the opportunity to more fully and fairly make their case, resolve any ambiguities, and provide additional clarity. Therefore, I will vote in support of the motion to allow witnesses and documents to be subpoenaed,” Collins said in a statement.

On balance, Alexander’s no vote may have dealt a mortal blow to Democrats’ hopes of calling more witnesses in Trump’s trial, chief among them, former National Security Advisor John Bolton.

That vote, which is expected to occur Friday, marks a pivotal moment in the impeachment proceedings that have dogged Trump for months. On Wednesday, Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, signaled that he would vote with the Democrats.

With Collins and Romney both yesses, and Alexander a no, it remained unclear late Thursday whether Democrats would be able to convince the minimum of four GOP senators required to approve the new witnesses and documents.

Alaska Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski has yet to say how she plans to vote. And until the vote happens, there remains a longshot possibility that other Republicans might surprise their colleagues and break with their party and vote with the Democrats.

If Democrats can convince four senators to join them in supporting witnesses, the trial could proceed for weeks or months longer as new battles arise over testimony from key witnesses, such as Bolton and acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney.

But if the GOP-majority chamber votes not to allow that new content, then the trial could quickly proceed to a final vote on whether to acquit Trump or remove him from office — possibly as soon as next week, when the president is set to deliver his State of the Union Address.

The House voted to impeach Trump last month on articles of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Democrats accuse Trump of withholding nearly $400 million in congressionally appropriated military aid to Ukraine while pressuring the country to announce probes into former Vice President Joe Biden and his son, as well as a debunked conspiracy theory about 2016 election interference.

House Democrats and defense lawyers made final arguments Thursday for more than nine hours on the eve of Friday’s crucial vote on additional evidence and witnesses.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: christina wilkie kevin breuninger, christina wilkie, kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reveal, additional, witnesses, president, impeachment, alexander, democrats, trump, republican, sen, key, theyll, trial, senators, vote


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US Treasury yields rise after briefly sending a recession signal

U.S. Treasury yields rose on Friday morning as traders continued to digest comments from Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell and monitor the outbreak of the coronavirus. ET, the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves inversely to price, was higher at around 1.5837%, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was higher at 2.0465%. TreasurysChina’s National Health Commission confirmed on Friday that there have been 9,692 confirmed cases of the coronavirus, with 213 deaths.


U.S. Treasury yields rose on Friday morning as traders continued to digest comments from Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell and monitor the outbreak of the coronavirus.
ET, the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves inversely to price, was higher at around 1.5837%, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was higher at 2.0465%.
TreasurysChina’s National Health Commission confirmed on Friday that there have been 9,692 confirmed cases of the coronavirus, with 213 deaths.
US Treasury yields rise after briefly sending a recession signal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: matt clinch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yields, outbreak, treasury, coronavirus, federal, yield, note, higher, curve, health, reserve, recession, sending, rise, signal, briefly


US Treasury yields rise after briefly sending a recession signal

U.S. Treasury yields rose on Friday morning as traders continued to digest comments from Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell and monitor the outbreak of the coronavirus. At around 2:00 a.m. ET, the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves inversely to price, was higher at around 1.5837%, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was higher at 2.0465%.

Treasurys

China’s National Health Commission confirmed on Friday that there have been 9,692 confirmed cases of the coronavirus, with 213 deaths. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognized the deadly pneumonia-like virus as a global health emergency on Thursday, citing concern that the outbreak continues to spread to other countries with weaker health systems. Markets have been spooked by the outbreak, with investors trying to assess the potential economic fallout. On Thursday, the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note dipped below the three-month Treasury rate briefly, inverting part of the yield curve that the Federal Reserve watches closely. The so-called yield curve inversion has been a strong sign since 1950 that a recession is coming in the next 12 months.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: matt clinch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yields, outbreak, treasury, coronavirus, federal, yield, note, higher, curve, health, reserve, recession, sending, rise, signal, briefly


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US futures point to mixed open

U.S. stock index futures were mixed Friday morning. ET, Dow futures dipped 9 points, indicating a negative open of more than 23 points. China’s National Health Commission confirmed on Friday that there have been 9,692 confirmed cases of the coronavirus, with 213 deaths. WHO’s designation was made to help the United Nations health agency mobilize financial and political support to contain the outbreak. ET, marking one of the biggest political and economic shifts in modern Europe.


U.S. stock index futures were mixed Friday morning.
ET, Dow futures dipped 9 points, indicating a negative open of more than 23 points.
China’s National Health Commission confirmed on Friday that there have been 9,692 confirmed cases of the coronavirus, with 213 deaths.
WHO’s designation was made to help the United Nations health agency mobilize financial and political support to contain the outbreak.
ET, marking one of the biggest political and economic shifts in modern Europe.
US futures point to mixed open Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, point, market, economic, open, mixed, futures, health, spread, political, virus, points


US futures point to mixed open

U.S. stock index futures were mixed Friday morning.

At around 2:30 a.m. ET, Dow futures dipped 9 points, indicating a negative open of more than 23 points. Futures on the S&P and Nasdaq were pointing in opposite directions.

The pre-market moves come as market participants try to assess the potential economic impact of China’s fast-spreading coronavirus.

China’s National Health Commission confirmed on Friday that there have been 9,692 confirmed cases of the coronavirus, with 213 deaths.

The World Health Organization (WHO) recognized the deadly pneumonia-like virus as a global health emergency on Thursday, citing concern that the outbreak continues to spread to other countries with weaker health systems.

WHO’s designation was made to help the United Nations health agency mobilize financial and political support to contain the outbreak.

The virus, which was first discovered in the Chinese city of Wuhan, has now spread to at least 18 other countries.

Elsewhere, the U.K. is due to officially leave the European Union at 6 p.m. ET, marking one of the biggest political and economic shifts in modern Europe.

The world’s fifth-largest economy will enter into a “transition period” immediately thereafter, in which the U.K. remains a member of the single market and customs unions, but kicks off negotiations with the bloc in the hope of striking a free trade deal.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, point, market, economic, open, mixed, futures, health, spread, political, virus, points


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Coronavirus live updates: China says death toll hits 213, confirmed cases rise to 9,692

The country now has 14 confirmed cases. 9:20 am: Italy discovers first coronavirus casesThe first two coronavirus cases have been confirmed in Italy, according to the country’s health ministry, adding that they are Chinese tourists. 8 am: China says death toll hits 213, cases rise to 9,692China’s National Health Commission said there have been an additional 43 deaths and 1,982 new confirmed cases, as of the end of Thursday. That brings the country’s total to 213 deaths and 9,692 confirmed cases,


The country now has 14 confirmed cases.
9:20 am: Italy discovers first coronavirus casesThe first two coronavirus cases have been confirmed in Italy, according to the country’s health ministry, adding that they are Chinese tourists.
8 am: China says death toll hits 213, cases rise to 9,692China’s National Health Commission said there have been an additional 43 deaths and 1,982 new confirmed cases, as of the end of Thursday.
That brings the country’s total to 213 deaths and 9,692 confirmed cases,
Coronavirus live updates: China says death toll hits 213, confirmed cases rise to 9,692 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: weizhen tan evelyn cheng, weizhen tan, evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, outbreak, coronavirus, till, feb, confirmed, airlines, hits, cases, live, death, hubei, flights, rise, updates, toll


Coronavirus live updates: China says death toll hits 213, confirmed cases rise to 9,692

This is a live blog. Please check back for updates. All times below in Beijing time.

4:25 pm: The latest on airlines suspending China flights

These are the airlines which have suspended all flights to China amid the outbreak: Air France (Until Feb. 9), British Airways (until end February), Air Seoul, Egyptair, Lion Air, Lufthansa (till end February), Swiss Airlines (till end February) and Austrian Airlines (till end February), Kenya Airways (till further notice) and Vietjet (effective Feb. 1). Airlines which suspended some flights, or reduced capacity: – Singapore Airlines: reduced capacity on flights to Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Chengdu, Xiamen and Chongqing. – American Airlines: suspended flights from Los Angeles to Bejing and Shanghai from Feb. 9 to March 27. – Delta Airlines: reducing flights to 21 a week from 42, from Feb. 1 to April 30. – Cathay Pacific: progressively reducing capacity to and from mainland China by 50% or more, from Jan. 30 till end March. – Finnair: suspended flights to Nanjing and Beijing until end March. – Turkish Airlines: reducing frequency of flights to Beijing, Guangzhou, Shanghai and Xian from Feb. 5 to Feb. 29.

2:30 pm: Shanghai imposes face mask purchase limit

The Shanghai government announced that from Sunday onward, residents must register to buy face masks. Each household will be initially limited to buying five masks.

2:25 pm: China sends chartered planes to bring home Hubei residents from overseas

The Chinese government will send chartered planes to bring back Hubei residents who are overseas, according to state media, citing the country’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs. That’s in view of the “practical difficulties” that residents in Wuhan or Hubei — the epicenter of the outbreak — have been encountering overseas, the ministry said, according to the report. In the latest update, it has dispatched two planes to fly back Wuhan citizens from Bangkok, Thailand, and Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia, according to a Reuters report.

1:00 pm: Pakistan suspends all China flights

Pakistan has suspended all flights into and from China immediately, until Feb. 2, according to a Reuters report.

12:30 pm: Japan raises infectious disease advisory warning for China

Japan’s Prime Ministry Shinzo Abe said Friday that the government is raising its infectious disease advisory level for the whole of China to 2, which means citizens should avoid non-urgent trips to the country. It has already told its citizens not to take any trips to China’s Hubei, the epicenter of the virus outbreak. The government earlier also said it would refuse entry to anyone who is infected. The country now has 14 confirmed cases.

11:50 am: SK Hynix says prolonged outbreak could threaten chip production

Top chipmaker SK Hynix warned that a prolonged coronavirus outbreak could pose a threat to its chip production, and said it would bring down its annual investment after it announced a sharp fall in quarterly profit on Friday. It said it is preparing a contingency plan

10:00 am: US raises travel warning advisory for China to level 4

The U.S. Department of State raised its travel advisory for China from Level 3 to Level 4, which means “do not travel to China.” That came just days after it changed its alert level to 3 on Monday, which means “reconsider travel to China due to the novel coronavirus.” “Travelers should be prepared for travel restrictions to be put into effect with little or no advance notice. Commercial carriers have reduced or suspended routes to and from China,” the notice said. “Those currently in China should consider departing using commercial means. The Department of State has requested that all non-essential U.S. government personnel defer travel to China in light of the novel coronavirus.”

10:00 am: UK, South Korean citizens evacuate from Wuhan

A plane carrying 83 U.K. citizens and 27 foreign nationals left the virus epicenter of Wuhan after a delay on Thursday, according to a Reuters report citing the U.K. embassy in China. A flight carrying 368 South Koreans from Wuhan also returned to Seoul earlier in the morning. Five new cases in the country were confirmed on Friday, bringing the total to 11.

9:30 am: China issues recommendation to cancel marriage registrations on Feb. 2

China’s Ministry of Civil Affairs announced Friday morning it recommends localities to cancel marriage registrations on Feb. 2, a popular date among couples as it was deemed to be auspicious. The ministry also recommended funeral agencies take precautions in handling remains of patients infected with the coronavirus.

9:20 am: Italy discovers first coronavirus cases

The first two coronavirus cases have been confirmed in Italy, according to the country’s health ministry, adding that they are Chinese tourists. A day earlier, India and the Philippines confirmed their first cases. Italy has also blocked all flights into and out of China.

8:15 am: China’s Shandong province delays start of work

China’s Shandong province told companies not to go back to work until Feb. 10, in a bid to tackle the spread of the coronavirus. Shandong joins other provinces and cities in delaying the start of work. Hubei authorities have announced that businesses are not to resume work till midnight on Feb. 13. Shanghai, Beijing, Chongqing, Anhui, Fujian, Guangdong, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Yunnan, Suzhou, Inner Mongolia and Zhejiang told businesses not to resume work till midnight on Feb. 9.

8 am: China says death toll hits 213, cases rise to 9,692

China’s National Health Commission said there have been an additional 43 deaths and 1,982 new confirmed cases, as of the end of Thursday. That brings the country’s total to 213 deaths and 9,692 confirmed cases, the government said. All times below in Eastern time.

5:35 pm: Hubei province reports 42 additional deaths

The Hubei Province Health Commission on Thursday reported an additional 42 deaths along with an additional 1,220 confirmed cases of coronavirus in the region as of Jan. 30. That brings the total to 204 deaths and 5,806 cases in the province.

3:52 pm: Pilots union files suit to halt American Airlines flights to China

The union that represents American Airlines’ pilots said Thursday it’s suing American Airlines to halt service to China amid the coronavirus outbreak, which has killed more than 170 people in China and infected more than 8,000 around the world. The Allied Pilots Association represents “15,000 professional pilots who fly for American Airlines,” according to its site. The suit seeks a temporary restraining order that, the APA said, would halt all American Airlines service between the U.S. and China.

12:37 pm: First human-to-human transmission of coronavirus confirmed in US

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Illinois public health officials confirmed Thursday the nation’s first person-to-person transmission of the coronavirus. The new patient is the spouse of the Chicago woman who brought the infection back from Wuhan, China, the epicenter of the outbreak, Illinois health officials said during a CDC press briefing. The transmission makes the U.S. at least the fifth country where the infection is now spreading through human-to-human contact.

2:43 pm: WHO declares global health emergency


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: weizhen tan evelyn cheng, weizhen tan, evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, outbreak, coronavirus, till, feb, confirmed, airlines, hits, cases, live, death, hubei, flights, rise, updates, toll


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