The FBI and Apple are poised for another battle over unlocking iPhones

Apple and the FBI are again poised for a disagreement over whether law enforcement should be able to count on tech makers to provide them access to the devices of criminal suspects. The slow-burning dispute has heated up in recent years, with Attorney General William Barr and top FBI officials asking for greater access to consumer technology, even as encryption and privacy controls grow stronger. The FBI sued Apple in California Central District Court. Apple fought the suit, arguing that breakin


Apple and the FBI are again poised for a disagreement over whether law enforcement should be able to count on tech makers to provide them access to the devices of criminal suspects.
The slow-burning dispute has heated up in recent years, with Attorney General William Barr and top FBI officials asking for greater access to consumer technology, even as encryption and privacy controls grow stronger.
The FBI sued Apple in California Central District Court.
Apple fought the suit, arguing that breakin
The FBI and Apple are poised for another battle over unlocking iPhones Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, officials, encryption, phone, users, apple, unlocking, tech, fbi, security, battle, poised, privacy, shooting, iphones


The FBI and Apple are poised for another battle over unlocking iPhones

Apple and the FBI are again poised for a disagreement over whether law enforcement should be able to count on tech makers to provide them access to the devices of criminal suspects. The FBI wants access to the phone of Mohammad Alshamrani, who is suspected of killing three people in a shooting spree on a Navy base in Pensacola, Florida, on Dec. 6. FBI General Counsel Dana Boente said in a letter shared with NBC News that officials have sought help getting information from the encrypted device from other agencies as well as third-party vendors in foreign countries. Apple has responded by saying it is working with officials on the matter.

Attorney General William Barr, December 10, 2019. Al Drago | Reuters

But the issues would appear to set up a privacy and security debate that has pitted tech companies against the U.S. Justice Department for several years. The slow-burning dispute has heated up in recent years, with Attorney General William Barr and top FBI officials asking for greater access to consumer technology, even as encryption and privacy controls grow stronger. Tweet

A long-simmering debate

Although the FBI and tech companies have been at odds over encryption for more than a decade, the dispute came to a head after another mass shooting. The Justice Department asked Apple to create software that would allow law enforcement officials to unlock the phone of the prime suspects in the San Bernardino, California, shooting that killed 14 people in 2015. The FBI sued Apple in California Central District Court. Apple fought the suit, arguing that breaking its encryption would put all users at privacy risk, and won an initial hearing. But the FBI eventually dropped the suit in 2016 after finding a third-party vendor — long rumored to be Israeli security company NSO Group — to help unlock the device. “The government is asking Apple to hack our own users and undermine decades of security advancements that protect our customers — including tens of millions of American citizens — from sophisticated hackers and cybercriminals,” the company said at the time. “The same engineers who built strong encryption into the iPhone to protect our users would, ironically, be ordered to weaken those protections and make our users less safe.” The FBI later said the phone yielded no information relevant to the case, though it had said the passcode was needed to, in part, search for co-conspirators who may be planning further attacks. Later in 2016, Apple also updated security on its devices to prevent government snooping.

The official seal of the Federal Bureau of Investigation is seen on an iPhone’s camera screen outside the J. Edgar Hoover headquarters on Feb. 23, 2016, in Washington, D.C. Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, officials, encryption, phone, users, apple, unlocking, tech, fbi, security, battle, poised, privacy, shooting, iphones


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