Here are the unanswered questions about the deadly plane crash in Iran

Rescue workers on Wednesday combed through wreckage of Kyiv-bound Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 on Tuesday. Because the crash occurred during heightened tensions between Iran and the U.S. information about the flight may remain scarce. It can sometimes take investigators more than a year to determine the cause of a plane crash and getting information about the deadly incident has become more complicated. Under international law, the country where the crash occurred controls the inves


Rescue workers on Wednesday combed through wreckage of Kyiv-bound Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 on Tuesday.
Because the crash occurred during heightened tensions between Iran and the U.S. information about the flight may remain scarce.
It can sometimes take investigators more than a year to determine the cause of a plane crash and getting information about the deadly incident has become more complicated.
Under international law, the country where the crash occurred controls the inves
Here are the unanswered questions about the deadly plane crash in Iran Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-08  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deadly, international, ukraine, occurred, unanswered, states, boeing, plane, questions, united, crash, safety, iranian, iran


Here are the unanswered questions about the deadly plane crash in Iran

A colleague of one of the flight crew members of the Ukrainian 737-800 plane that crashed on the outskirts of Tehran, lights candles at a memorial inside Borispil international airport outside Kyiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2020.

Rescue workers on Wednesday combed through wreckage of Kyiv-bound Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 on Tuesday.

What brought down the plane isn’t yet certain, but some aviation safety experts and pilots called several aspects of the incident unusual. Because the crash occurred during heightened tensions between Iran and the U.S. information about the flight may remain scarce.

All 176 people — 167 passengers and nine crew — on the Boeing 737-800 — were killed when it crashed two minutes after takeoff from Tehran. Video shared on social media showed what appeared to be the plane on fire, falling to the ground in a fireball outside of the Iranian capital.

The plane was not the 737 Max model that was grounded in March last year after two fatal crashes, but it adds to attention on Boeing, which is scrambling to contain the fallout from those incidents.

The crash occurred hours after Iran launched retaliatory missile strikes on U.S. positions in Iraq for the killing of Gen. Qasem Soleimani, timing that prompted speculation that a stray Iranian missile may have downed the passenger plane, but as of Wednesday evening, there was no evidence to support that. Airlines began avoiding airspace in the region, taking other routes due to the conflict.

It can sometimes take investigators more than a year to determine the cause of a plane crash and getting information about the deadly incident has become more complicated. Iranian officials said they won’t hand over a recovered black box from the crash site to the U.S. or to Boeing for review.

Under international law, the country where the crash occurred controls the investigation. Boeing, the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board, because the plane was manufactured in the United States, would generally participate.

“The United States will continue to follow this incident closely and stands prepared to offer Ukraine all possible assistance,” Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said in a statement Wednesday. “The United States calls for complete cooperation with any investigation into the cause of the crash.”

Boeing offered its condolences to the victims and said it is “ready to assist in any way needed.”

If Iranian officials withhold data, “they’re not going to be trusted in our eyes and whatever they say without giving us the data, we’re not going to believe,” said John Goglia, former member of the U.S. National Transportion Safety Board.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-08  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deadly, international, ukraine, occurred, unanswered, states, boeing, plane, questions, united, crash, safety, iranian, iran


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