Over 40% of Americans don’t have $1,000 for an emergency — here’s how to save for the unexpected

Emergencies happen all the time, but many Americans aren’t prepared for them, and specifically for how much they can cost. Not having enough money in your emergency fund, or not having an emergency fund at all, could seriously set you back. Here’s why having an emergency fund is important, and how to save the money you need. Depending on your expenses, and the size of your family, the exact amount you need for your emergency fund will vary. “The destination is enough to cover six months worth of


Emergencies happen all the time, but many Americans aren’t prepared for them, and specifically for how much they can cost.
Not having enough money in your emergency fund, or not having an emergency fund at all, could seriously set you back.
Here’s why having an emergency fund is important, and how to save the money you need.
Depending on your expenses, and the size of your family, the exact amount you need for your emergency fund will vary.
“The destination is enough to cover six months worth of
Over 40% of Americans don’t have $1,000 for an emergency — here’s how to save for the unexpected Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: ivana pino, natalia lusinski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unexpected, need, expenses, family, heres, fund, mcbride, 1000, emergency, americans, save, having, cover, dont, money, saving


Over 40% of Americans don't have $1,000 for an emergency — here's how to save for the unexpected

Emergencies happen all the time, but many Americans aren’t prepared for them, and specifically for how much they can cost. Only 41% of U.S. adults have enough savings to cover an $1,000 emergency room visit, for example, or car repair, according to a recent survey from Bankrate of 1,015 adults. Of those surveyed, 16% said they would finance an emergency with a credit card. These kinds of crises are actually common: Twenty-eight percent of adults or their close family members experienced one in the past year, and the average cost was a whopping $3,518. Not having enough money in your emergency fund, or not having an emergency fund at all, could seriously set you back. You could fall behind on bills because paying off an unexpected expense takes precedence, or have to take on credit card debt. “The lack of progress on the percentage of Americans that could pay an unplanned expense of a thousand dollars out of savings is alarming,” says Greg McBride, chief financial analyst for Bankrate. “Successful saving is all about the habit. If you don’t have the habit, you’re setting up a big roadblock for yourself,” says McBride. “People are probably hemmed in by high expenses and stagnant income that constrains their ability to save.” Here’s why having an emergency fund is important, and how to save the money you need.

How much money you need in an emergency fund

Ideally, you should have enough saved to cover six months’ worth of basic living expenses including rent, groceries, and utilities, in the event that you need some extra cash, McBride says. You may also want to consider the kinds of accidents that could happen in the near future and how you’d handle them. The average visit to an emergency room costs about $1,109 for out-of-pocket expenses, according to a 2019 report from TransUnion Healthcare, which included patients who are commercially insured, those who receive Medicare, and those who self-paid. Replacing the brakes on your car could set you back $500, according to Auto Service Costs. Depending on your expenses, and the size of your family, the exact amount you need for your emergency fund will vary. Where a single 22-year-old may be able to stretch $1,000 in the event of an emergency, the same may not be true for a family of five. The most important thing, says McBride, is to begin saving whatever you can. “There’s the destination, and then there’s the starting point,” he says. “The destination is enough to cover six months worth of expenses, and that in itself is a moving target.”

How to start saving


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: ivana pino, natalia lusinski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unexpected, need, expenses, family, heres, fund, mcbride, 1000, emergency, americans, save, having, cover, dont, money, saving


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Discover it Cash Back vs. Chase Freedom: Which is the better 5% cash-back card?

But which 5% cash-back card should you choose: Discover it® Cash Back or Chase Freedom®? The Chase Freedom® charges a 3% fee on foreign transactions, whereas the Discover it® Cash Back has no foreign transaction fees. Though the Chase Freedom® has a longer 0% intro interest period, you can get dinged on the foreign transactions fees. Winner: Chase Freedom®, since travel redemption made via Chase Ultimate Rewards® can receive 25% or 50% more value if you also have a Chase Sapphire Preferred or Ch


But which 5% cash-back card should you choose: Discover it® Cash Back or Chase Freedom®?
The Chase Freedom® charges a 3% fee on foreign transactions, whereas the Discover it® Cash Back has no foreign transaction fees.
Though the Chase Freedom® has a longer 0% intro interest period, you can get dinged on the foreign transactions fees.
Winner: Chase Freedom®, since travel redemption made via Chase Ultimate Rewards® can receive 25% or 50% more value if you also have a Chase Sapphire Preferred or Ch
Discover it Cash Back vs. Chase Freedom: Which is the better 5% cash-back card? Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: elizabeth gravier, alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, better, fee, card, chase, purchases, discover, cashback, cash, bonus, activate, freedom, categories


Discover it Cash Back vs. Chase Freedom: Which is the better 5% cash-back card?

Discover and Chase are the two most popular card issuers offering 5% cash-back cards, which gives savvy spenders opportunity to maximize their earnings in rotating categories. If the cards’ bonus categories match up with your spending, it can be smart to take advantage of these cards. The rewards you earn during those periods could outweigh what you’d receive using a flat-rate card that only earns 1% to 2% cash back year-round. But which 5% cash-back card should you choose: Discover it® Cash Back or Chase Freedom®? Below, CNBC Select reviews both cards to help you choose the one that provides the most benefit for your spending habits.

Overview

Discover it Cash Back vs Chase Freedom Discover it® Cash Back Chase Freedom® Annual fee $0 $0 Variable APR 13.49% to 24.49% 16.49% to 25.24% Intro APR 0% for first 14 months 0% for first 15 months Rewards 5% cash back at different places each quarter after you activate bonus categories (on up to $1,500 in purchases, then 1%). Plus, unlimited 1% cash back on all other purchases. 5% cash back on up to $1,500 in combined purchases in bonus categories each quarter you activate (then 1%), 1% cash back on all other purchases Welcome bonus At the end of your first year, Discover automatically matches all the cash back you earned $200 cash back after you spend $500 on purchases in your first 3 months from account opening

Annual fee

There is no annual fee for either the Discover it® Cash Back or Chase Freedom®. Both cards charge a 3% intro balance transfer fee and up to 5% fee on future balance transfers (see terms). While both cards have no annual fee, the introductory 0% APR for each card lasts for different periods of time. The Discover it® Cash Back offers a 0% APR for the first 14 months on purchases and balance transfers (then 13.49% to 24.49% variable APR), while the Chase Freedom® offers a competitive 0% APR for the first 15 months on purchases and balance transfers (then 16.49% to 25.24% variable APR). The Chase Freedom® charges a 3% fee on foreign transactions, whereas the Discover it® Cash Back has no foreign transaction fees. The Discover it® Cash Back also automatically waives your first late payment fee. Winner: It depends on what you’re looking for. Though the Chase Freedom® has a longer 0% intro interest period, you can get dinged on the foreign transactions fees. Customers with the Discover it® Cash Back avoid those foreign transaction fees and also benefit from no late payment fee the first time you miss a bill.

Welcome bonus

Both cards come with strong welcome bonus offers: Discover it® Cash Back: Discover automatically matches all the cash back you earned at the end of your first year. There is no limit to how much Discover will match. Chase Freedom®: Earn $200 cash back after you spend $500 on purchases in your first three months from opening an account. (That’s like earning 40% back.) Winner: Discover it® Cash Back, since there is no minimum spending requirement for the welcome bonus.

Rewards

Both the Discover it® Cash Back and Chase Freedom® credit cards provide 5% cash back on eligible purchases in rotating categories on up to a $1,500 quarterly maximum. Cardholders must enroll each quarter to activate bonus categories at the select merchants. Both Chase and Discover allow you to save activation reminders to your calendar and set up email alerts to help you remember to enroll. After you reach the $1,500 spending limit, you get 1% back on all other purchases. If you maximize your spending in these bonus categories, you could earn $75 cash back each quarter on top of the 1% cash back you earn in all the other categories. Since the reward rate for each card is the same, the bonus categories offered may help you choose which card to sign up for. Discover released its full 2020 cash-back calendar in late December 2019, allowing cardholders to plan their spending months in advance. But Chase has only announced the bonus cash-back categories for the first quarter of 2020. The remaining categories will be released throughout the year. Discover cash-back bonus categories for 2020: January to March (activate now): grocery stores (excluding Target and Walmart), Walgreens and CVS April to June (activate starting Feb. 1): gas stations, Uber, Lyft and wholesale clubs July to September (activate starting May 1): restaurants and PayPal October to December (activate starting Aug. 1): Amazon.com, Target.com and Walmart.com Chase Freedom cash-back categories for 2020: January to March (activate by March 14): gas stations, select streaming services* and internet, cable and phone services April to June (activate starting March 15): TBA July to September (activate starting June 15): TBA October to December (activate starting Sep. 15): TBA *Eligible streaming services include: Disney+, Netflix, Hulu, Sling, Vudu, FuboTV, Apple Music, SiriusXM, Pandora, Spotify, YouTube and ESPN+. So far in 2020, Discover and Chase both included common spending categories, such as gas stations, in their calendars. Plus, Discover included grocery stores and restaurants, and it’s yet to be announced if Chase will, too. In 2019, Chase included grocery stores but not restaurants. CNBC Select worked with the location intelligence firm Esri, who provided us with a sample annual spending budget of $21,852. We used this sample budget to break down how much money you could earn (less than annual fee) if you optimized using each card over the course of five years. Calculations also assume you take full advantage of the welcome bonus. The budget includes six main categories: groceries ($5,019), gas ($2,394), dining out ($3,365), travel ($2,154), utilities ($4,959) and general purchases ($3,961). We found you could earn an estimated $2,088 over five years with the Discover it® Cash Back versus $1,892 with the Chase Freedom®. While the five-year estimates we’ve included are derived from a budget similar to the average American’s spending, you may earn a higher or lower return depending on your consumer habits. Winner: Discover it® Cash Back, since you earn $196 more in rewards over the course of five years and you know the card’s bonus categories ahead of time.

Redemption

Rewards earned on these two cards can be redeemed in similar ways. There is no minimum to redeem cash back for either card and, as long as your account is open, the rewards don’t expire. For Discover, you can redeem your rewards at any time for statement credits, gift cards, merchandise and more. For Chase, your rewards can also be transferred to a Chase Ultimate Rewards® card, such as the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card, which allows you to redeem rewards for travel through the Ultimate Rewards portal and receive 25% more value. Winner: Chase Freedom®, since travel redemption made via Chase Ultimate Rewards® can receive 25% or 50% more value if you also have a Chase Sapphire Preferred or Chase Sapphire Reserve®.

Added perks

Chase’s recently rolled out added benefits, so Chase Freedom® cardholders can take advantage of 5% cash back on Lyft purchases through March 2022, making this a competitive card for anyone who frequently takes rideshares. The Chase Freedom® also offers a three-month complimentary DashPass membership, then a 50% discount for the next nine months, through DoorDash. While Discover it® Cash Back offers identity alerts to its cardholders at no cost, Chase Freedom® cardholders can benefit from purchase protection and extended warranty protection. Winner: Chase Freedom®, if you are someone who would take advantage of Lyft rides and food delivery through DoorDash.

Bottom line

Discover it® Cash Back Apply Now Rewards 5% cash back at different places each quarter after you activate bonus categories (on up to $1,500 in purchases, then 1%). Plus, unlimited 1% cash back on all other purchases.

Welcome bonus At the end of your first year, Discover automatically matches all the cash back you earned

Annual fee $0

Intro APR 0% for the first 14 months on purchases and balance transfers

Regular APR 13.49% to 24.49% variable on purchases and balance transfers

Balance transfer fee 3% intro balance transfer fee, up to 5% fee on future balance transfers (see terms)*

Foreign transaction fee None

Credit needed Excellent/Good

*See our methodology, terms apply. read more On Discover’s secure site

Chase Freedom® Learn More Rewards 5% cash back on up to $1,500 in combined purchases in bonus categories each quarter you activate (then 1%), 1% cash back on all other purchases

Welcome bonus $200 cash back after you spend $500 on purchases in your first 3 months from account opening

Annual fee $0

Intro APR 0% for the first 15 months on purchases and balance transfers

Regular APR 16.49% to 25.24% variable on purchases and balance transfers

Balance transfer fee 3% intro balance transfer fee when you transfer a balance during the first 60 days your account is open, with a $5 minimum. After, 5% ($5 minimum).

Foreign transaction fee 3%

Credit needed Excellent/Good

See our methodology, terms apply. read more Information about the Chase Freedom® Card has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the card prior to publication.

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the CNBC Select editorial staff’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any third party.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: elizabeth gravier, alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, better, fee, card, chase, purchases, discover, cashback, cash, bonus, activate, freedom, categories


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5 tips for making money in real estate from an Indiana couple bringing in $2,000 a month

It’s also the reality for Indiana couple Greg and Holly Johnson, both 40, who net an average $2,000 per month in rental income from two homes. “We plan to use our rental income as part of our retirement plan,” says Holly, who writes about personal finance on her blog, Club Thrifty. Though it hasn’t always been easy, Holly says she has learned a great deal, and she shared her best advice for anyone who is considering buying a rental property. But, as they learned when they purchased a second prop


It’s also the reality for Indiana couple Greg and Holly Johnson, both 40, who net an average $2,000 per month in rental income from two homes.
“We plan to use our rental income as part of our retirement plan,” says Holly, who writes about personal finance on her blog, Club Thrifty.
Though it hasn’t always been easy, Holly says she has learned a great deal, and she shared her best advice for anyone who is considering buying a rental property.
But, as they learned when they purchased a second prop
5 tips for making money in real estate from an Indiana couple bringing in $2,000 a month Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: emily glover, susan roane
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, month, mortgage, landlords, tips, holly, johnsons, bringing, indiana, rate, making, rental, 2000, interest, property, real, estate, income, renters, money, couple


5 tips for making money in real estate from an Indiana couple bringing in $2,000 a month

Real estate is often touted as one of the most reliable investments, and the prospect of earning passive income from a tenant while a property appreciates is appealing. It’s also the reality for Indiana couple Greg and Holly Johnson, both 40, who net an average $2,000 per month in rental income from two homes. The money allowed them to pay off one home “extremely early” and double up on payments for the second house, which is on track to be paid off within five years. “We plan to use our rental income as part of our retirement plan,” says Holly, who writes about personal finance on her blog, Club Thrifty. This was all possible because they purchased their first home in their 20s with a bigger goal to become landlords. Though it hasn’t always been easy, Holly says she has learned a great deal, and she shared her best advice for anyone who is considering buying a rental property.

1. Get familiar with specific taxes and fees

The Johnsons’ first rental property was also their first home; they were allowed to purchase it with a 3% down payment and get a lower interest rate. But, as they learned when they purchased a second property intending to rent it out, they needed a more robust 20% down, and the interest rate was higher. They were also surprised to learn that property tax caps in Indiana are double for rental properties. Because Holly knew the market in her hometown, she was still confident that rental income would offset monthly expenses. However, landlords operating in areas they don’t know as well may be in for a financial loss if they can’t charge enough to cover payments.

Video by Jason Armesto

2. Communication with tenants is key

It’s fairly standard for landlords to run background and credit checks. Holly is just as interested in what she can read between the lines from these reports, though. “I mostly do this to ensure renters are being truthful on their applications,” she says. “Our longest term renters don’t have excellent credit, but they were very straightforward about it. I appreciated their honesty and we’ve had a wonderful experience with them.”

3. Expect emergency expenses at the worst times

When it comes to homeownership, expect the unexpected, they say — especially when renters are involved. “We had a renter do about $5,000 worth of damage on one of our properties several years ago,” Holly says. “We had to replace all the flooring, all the interior doors in the home, a giant window on the front of the home, and more when they moved out.” Having a separate fund with the equivalent of 3 to 6 months of rent reserved — essentially, a emergency fund for the business — allowed the Johnsons to cover the expenses without dipping into their personal bank accounts.

Video by David Fang

4. Paying off the mortgage should be a priority

The Johnsons decided to throw their profits back into their one rental that still has a mortgage. By taking an aggressive approach, they are minimizing interest payments: “This mortgage is currently on a fixed rate loan at 4.95% APR, so we’re saving approximately that amount by prepaying.” Having a fully paid mortgage also gives them a financial buffer to clean a rental or make repairs during the gap between tenants.

5. Make decisions on homes with your head, not heart


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: emily glover, susan roane
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, month, mortgage, landlords, tips, holly, johnsons, bringing, indiana, rate, making, rental, 2000, interest, property, real, estate, income, renters, money, couple


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Asia stocks fall as coronavirus death toll rises in China

Stocks in Asia declined in Thursday morning trade as the death toll rises in China due to a mysterious pneumonia-like virus. Japanese trade data released Thursday showed exports falling more than expected in December. Japanese exports for December fell 6.3% in December as compared to a year before, data from country’s Ministry of Finance data showed. Meanwhile, shares in Australia declined in morning trade, with the S&P/ASX 200 falling about 0.3%. Investor sentiment has taken a hit this week as


Stocks in Asia declined in Thursday morning trade as the death toll rises in China due to a mysterious pneumonia-like virus.
Japanese trade data released Thursday showed exports falling more than expected in December.
Japanese exports for December fell 6.3% in December as compared to a year before, data from country’s Ministry of Finance data showed.
Meanwhile, shares in Australia declined in morning trade, with the S&P/ASX 200 falling about 0.3%.
Investor sentiment has taken a hit this week as
Asia stocks fall as coronavirus death toll rises in China Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, death, china, index, mysterious, exports, rises, fall, falling, trade, asia, morning, declined, stocks, coronavirus, health, toll, data, showed


Asia stocks fall as coronavirus death toll rises in China

Stocks in Asia declined in Thursday morning trade as the death toll rises in China due to a mysterious pneumonia-like virus.

The Nikkei 225 in Japan slipped 0.75% in early trade while the Topix index also shed 0.54%.

Japanese trade data released Thursday showed exports falling more than expected in December. Japanese exports for December fell 6.3% in December as compared to a year before, data from country’s Ministry of Finance data showed. That was far lower than expectations of a 4.2% decrease expected by economists in a Reuters poll.

South Korea’s Kospi also saw losses as it declined 0.52%.

Meanwhile, shares in Australia declined in morning trade, with the S&P/ASX 200 falling about 0.3%. Investors will await the release of employment data in the country for December, set to be out at about 8:30 a.m. HK/SIN.

Overall, the MSCI Asia ex-Japan index traded around 0.1% lower.

Investor sentiment has taken a hit this week as the mysterious coronavirus that has infected hundreds in China spreads. The World Health Organization postponed a decision Wednesday over whether to declare the disease a global health emergency.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, death, china, index, mysterious, exports, rises, fall, falling, trade, asia, morning, declined, stocks, coronavirus, health, toll, data, showed


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I have 10 credit cards — here’s how I manage them and how I decide when to open a new one

Ever since I began writing about credit cards three years ago, the number of credit cards in my wallet has steadily increased. While I’m nowhere near extreme credit card optimizers who have over 30 credit cards, 10 cards is still well above the national average of four. Check your credit score Once I decide that opening a new credit card is in my best interest, I check my credit score. There are dozens of free credit score resources available to help you pinpoint what credit range you fall into,


Ever since I began writing about credit cards three years ago, the number of credit cards in my wallet has steadily increased.
While I’m nowhere near extreme credit card optimizers who have over 30 credit cards, 10 cards is still well above the national average of four.
Check your credit score Once I decide that opening a new credit card is in my best interest, I check my credit score.
There are dozens of free credit score resources available to help you pinpoint what credit range you fall into,
I have 10 credit cards — here’s how I manage them and how I decide when to open a new one Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: alexandria white, elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, heres, open, score, bonus, card, sapphire, decide, credit, rewards, cards, month, manage, annual, travel


I have 10 credit cards — here's how I manage them and how I decide when to open a new one

The author, Alexandria White, on a recent trip to Arizona that was made more affordable with the right credit cards.

Ever since I began writing about credit cards three years ago, the number of credit cards in my wallet has steadily increased. I recently hit double digits when I opened my tenth credit card, the Chase Sapphire Reserve®. While I’m nowhere near extreme credit card optimizers who have over 30 credit cards, 10 cards is still well above the national average of four. There’s no perfect answer to how many credit cards should you have, as long as you’re responsible about paying off your balance on time and in full each month. I opt to open more credit cards when I see a need — that may be financing upcoming purchases, booking travel at a discount or taking advantage of a generous welcome bonus. There are numerous ways to go about choosing the best credit card and below, I detail my process for choosing and managing multiple credit cards.

How I manage 10 credit cards

When to open a new credit card

Credit cards benefits to look out for

What to do before applying for a credit card

How to manage multiple bill payments

When to open a new credit card

There’s no single best time to open a credit card, but there are various life events and expenses that pop up that can be good opportunities to apply for new one. I consider various factors before I hit the ‘apply now’ button on any credit card application. Here are some questions I ask myself: Why do I want to open a credit card? I’ve opened new cards because I wanted to finance large purchases, earn a generous welcome bonus for a future trip and earn top-notch rewards.

I’ve opened new cards because I wanted to finance large purchases, earn a generous welcome bonus for a future trip and earn top-notch rewards. What new perks will this card offer? Some cards offer annual credits, trip protection and high rewards rates that make them beneficial. (More on these benefits later.)

Some cards offer annual credits, trip protection and high rewards rates that make them beneficial. (More on these benefits later.) Is the annual fee worthwhile? Some credit cards have annual fees upwards of $550 and spending that much on a card doesn’t make sense for everyone. Most of my cards have no annual fee or fees under $100, but there are situations where I calculated a high annual fee to be worthwhile. If you find an annual fee to be worthwhile initially, it’s OK to reevaluate the cost down the line if something changes, such as the Chase Sapphire Reserve® increasing its annual fee to $550. Read more: Here’s why I plan to cancel my Chase Sapphire Reserve

Credit cards benefits to look out for

Before you apply for a credit card, consider perks that add value. That may be high rewards rates, no interest periods or unique statement credits. When I search for cards, I always look for new benefits that aren’t offered by my current roster of cards. Better rewards rates Over the past year, my fixed expenses have changed, which caused an increase in the amount I spend on groceries, gas and transit each month. This made me reconsider the cards I use for those expenses. Previously, I used the American Express® Gold Card for those expenses, since it earns 4X Membership Rewards® points at U.S. supermarkets (on up to $25,000 per year in purchases, then 1X). But I decided to move those expenses to the Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express, which offers a higher rewards rate of 6% cash back at U.S. supermarkets on up to $6,000 per year in purchases (then 1%), 3% cash back at U.S. gas stations and on transit (including parking, tolls, trains). Here’s how much more I earn in rewards from transferring those expenses to my Blue Cash Preferred Card, considering these spending habits: Groceries: $400 per month, $4,800 annually

$400 per month, $4,800 annually Gas: $50 per month, $600 annually

$50 per month, $600 annually Transit (tolls, parking, train): $225 per month, $2,700 annually

Estimated rewards earned American Express® Gold Card Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express Groceries $192 $288 Gas $6 $18 Transit $27 $81 Total $225 $387

By making this switch, I earn approximately $162 more in rewards each year, which is enough to cover the Blue Cash Preferred card’s $95 annual fee and my gas expenses for one month (see rates and fees). 0% interest periods A 0% APR credit card can provide up to 21 months of interest-free financing on new purchases, balance transfers or both. This allows you to get out of debt or finance new purchases over time without incurring interest charges. Most cards limit 0% APR offers to when you open the card, but some cards may provide occasional promotions. For example, I received a 0% APR for seven months on one of my cards four years after opening it. This interest-free period helped my pay for a class over time. Welcome bonus If you want to earn increased rewards during your first few months from account opening, a card offering a generous welcome bonus can be a great asset. I opened the Chase Sapphire Reserve® and received a welcome bonus of 50,000 bonus points after spending $4,000 on purchases in the first three months from account opening. This bonus is worth up to $750 toward travel when redeemed through Chase Ultimate Rewards®, thanks to points receiving 50% more value. While a welcome bonus is a great way to maximize rewards, you shouldn’t open a credit card solely based on bonus. If you decide a new card is worthwhile, consider opening a card with a welcome bonus when you have large expenses to charge to the card. You don’t want to spend over budget just to get the bonus. Statement credits Travel rewards credit cards often provide annual statement credits that help you save on airline fees, hotels, car rentals, food and more. Cards with these perks often come with annual fees, but they can be offset in part if you take full advantage of the statement credits. I have two cards that offer annual credits: the Sapphire Reserve and Amex Gold card. The Sapphire Reserve offers an annual $300 travel credit, which can be used on hotel bookings, airfare, transit and more, plus a credit toward a Global Entry ($100) or TSA PreCheck application fee ($85) every four years. The Amex Gold offers an annual $100 airline fee credit (for incidentals like seat upgrades and in-flight refreshments) and a $120 dining credit ($10 per month) for food at eligible restaurants, like Shake Shack and The Cheesecake Factory. I make sure to use the full value of the credits to offset the cost of each card — even if that means stopping by Shake Shack to grab coffee for ‘free.’ Travel perks Rewards credit cards often come with various travel benefits that include car rental insurance, baggage delay insurance, airport lounge access and exclusive offers at hotels. These perks can provide peace of mind when you travel and save you money. I saved over $350 on vacation last year by using my Amex Gold card’s travel perks, which include the airline fee credit and special perks at The Hotel Collection. I booked my hotel via American Express Travel and chose a resort in The Hotel Collection, which provided me with complimentary daily breakfast for two (up to $25 per person) and a $100 resort credit.

What to do before applying for a credit card

Review upcoming life decisions A new credit application can temporarily ding your credit score about five points. If you’re planning on applying for a mortgage or auto loan, it may be in your best interest to hold off on new credit card applications until after those actions are complete. Your credit score typically bounces back in a few months, so if an auto loan or mortgage is a ways off, it can be okay to apply for a credit card now. Check your credit score Once I decide that opening a new credit card is in my best interest, I check my credit score. There are dozens of free credit score resources available to help you pinpoint what credit range you fall into, including CreditWise from Capital One and Experian’s free credit score site. I use both services to check my credit score weekly since both provide different types of credit scores (VantageScore and FICO score, respectively). Since lenders use FICO scores in 90% of lending decisions, I opt for checking my Experian FICO score prior to credit card applications. The score you receive can influence what cards you may qualify for. For example, the Chase Sapphire Reserve® requires excellent credit — though that doesn’t mean you’re guaranteed approval if you have excellent credit or that you’ll be declined with good credit. When I checked my score before applying, I had a 759 credit score, which is in line with the very good credit score range (740 to 799) according to Experian. (Find out what is a good credit score.) I was approved for the Sapphire Reserve with a score that falls below the excellent credit range. Check your qualification odds Another step I sometimes take is filling out prequalification forms, which performs a soft pull of your credit without hurting your score. Prequalification helps you gauge which cards you have a good chance at qualifying for, though it’s not a surefire sign you’ll be approved. When I filled out Chase’s prequalification form, no credit card offers came up, but that’s not the end of the line — I still applied for the Sapphire Reserve and got approved. (Note that no two applications are the same, and you may or may not be approved for cards, regardless of prequalification forms.) Remove any credit freezes After I settle on a credit card, I unfreeze my credit reports since I instituted credit freezes with all three bureaus (Experian, Equifax and TransUnion) after the Equifax hack in 2017. You can’t apply for new credit when there’s a credit freeze in place, so make sure you temporarily lift it before you submit an application. Wait an hour after the lift is requested to apply. According to the FTC, if you unfreeze online or by phone, the credit bureau must lift it within one hour. I always wait an hour and have never run into an issue. Be proactive: Freeze your credit reports now

How to manage multiple bill payments

Ten credit cards is a lot to manage. I have 10 different bills with various due dates, balances, minimum payments and APRs. Here’s how I manage all these terms and ensure I submit payments on time without driving myself crazy. Set up autopay as a safety net While autopay is an option that can streamline bill payments, I don’t rely on it. I have it set up for two of my 10 cards, but only as a safety net. I prefer to make credit card bill payments manually. Set reminders I have 10 recurring reminders on my phone for when bills are due each month. I list the abbreviated card name and the due date. Once I pay off my bill, I check off the payment reminder. I also set payment reminders with my card issuer. These alert me when my statement is ready and again when my bill is due in 10 days. Change bill due dates Many credit cards allow you to change your due date, and I take advantage of this feature. You can adjust the due dates to when you get paid to make things easier. Personally, I have due dates divided into the beginning, middle and end of the month. I try to make the due dates the same day for all credit cards from the same issuer. For example, I have two Amex cards and made the due dates on the same day. Then I can just go in and pay both bills at the same time every month. Always pay on time and in full Payment history is the most important factor of your credit score, which makes it key to always pay at least your minimum payment on time. I always pay off my credit cards in full — except on a 0% APR card that I’m using to finance a purchase. But even then, I have a plan on what I need to pay each month to ensure I have no balance when the interest-free period ends. This helps me maintain good payment history and a low utilization rate (which is the total amount of credit you’re using compared to your total credit limit). For rates and fees of the American Express® Gold Card, click here. For rates and fees of the Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express, click here.

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the CNBC Select editorial staff’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any third party.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: alexandria white, elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, heres, open, score, bonus, card, sapphire, decide, credit, rewards, cards, month, manage, annual, travel


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Discover it Cash Back review: Earn 5% cash back for a limited time at grocery stores and Walgreens, CVS

Discover it® Cash Back Apply Now Rewards 5% cash back at different places each quarter after you activate bonus categories (on up to $1,500 in purchases, then 1%). If you maximize your spending in these categories, you could earn $75 cash back each quarter on top of the 1% cash back you earn in all the other categories. Now until March, you can earn 5% cash back at grocery stores (excluding Target and Walmart), Walgreens and CVS. Activation for the next quarter’s bonus categories starts Feb. 1,


Discover it® Cash Back Apply Now Rewards 5% cash back at different places each quarter after you activate bonus categories (on up to $1,500 in purchases, then 1%).
If you maximize your spending in these categories, you could earn $75 cash back each quarter on top of the 1% cash back you earn in all the other categories.
Now until March, you can earn 5% cash back at grocery stores (excluding Target and Walmart), Walgreens and CVS.
Activation for the next quarter’s bonus categories starts Feb. 1,
Discover it Cash Back review: Earn 5% cash back for a limited time at grocery stores and Walgreens, CVS Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: elizabeth gravier, alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, discover, balance, categories, stores, earn, grocery, limited, bonus, review, walgreens, cvs, fee, purchases, rewards, cash


Discover it Cash Back review: Earn 5% cash back for a limited time at grocery stores and Walgreens, CVS

Discover it® Cash Back Apply Now Rewards 5% cash back at different places each quarter after you activate bonus categories (on up to $1,500 in purchases, then 1%). Plus, unlimited 1% cash back on all other purchases.

Welcome bonus At the end of your first year, Discover automatically matches all the cash back you earned

Annual fee $0

Intro APR 0% for the first 14 months on purchases and balance transfers

Regular APR 13.49% to 24.49% variable on purchases and balance transfers

Balance transfer fee 3% intro balance transfer fee, up to 5% fee on future balance transfers (see terms)*

Foreign transaction fee None

Credit needed Excellent/Good

*See our methodology, terms apply. Pros Cash-back program

No annual fee

No fee charged on purchases made outside the U.S.

Generous welcome bonus Cons Bonus categories must be activated each quarter

Cash-back program limits 5% cash-back earnings to $1,500 a quarter

Fee charged on balance transfers Estimated rewards earned after 1 year: $696

$696 Estimated rewards earned after 5 years: $2,088 Rewards totals incorporate the cash back earned from the welcome bonus read more Apply Now On Discover’s secure site

Discover it Cash Back review

Rewards Additional benefits Fees Bottom line

Rewards

Like the Chase Freedom®, the Discover it® Cash Back offers 5% cash back in rotating categories on up to $1,500 in combined purchases after you activate the bonus every quarter. After you reach the limit, it’s 1% on all purchases. If you maximize your spending in these categories, you could earn $75 cash back each quarter on top of the 1% cash back you earn in all the other categories. Now until March, you can earn 5% cash back at grocery stores (excluding Target and Walmart), Walgreens and CVS. Activation for the next quarter’s bonus categories starts Feb. 1, 2020. This card has a unique welcome bonus where Discover automatically matches all the cash back you earned at the end of your first year. There is no limit to how much Discover will match. CNBC Select calculated how many rewards the average American can earn if they optimize the way they use their Discover it Cash Back. We worked with the location intelligence firm Esri, who provided us with a sample annual spending budget of $21,852. The budget includes six main categories: groceries ($5,019), gas ($2,394), dining out ($3,365), travel ($2,154), utilities ($4,959) and general purchases ($3,961). Here’s a breakdown of how much cash back you can roughly earn in each category, annually: Groceries: $100.38

$100.38 Gas: $47.88

$47.88 Dining out: $67.30

$67.30 Travel: $21.54

$21.54 Utilities: $49.59

$49.59 General purchases: $61.31

$61.31 Total: $348 Cardholders can earn an estimated $696 in cash back the first year (including the cash back from the welcome bonus) and a total of $2,088 over five years. The cash back doesn’t expire and you can redeem your rewards at any time for statement credits, gift cards, merchandise and more.

Additional benefits

The Discover it® Cash Back offers a competitive 0% APR for the first 14 months on purchases and balance transfers (then 13.49% to 24.49% variable APR). Its contactless tap-to-pay technology makes it fast and easy to pay at millions of places. This card also automatically waives your first late payment fee but don’t make missing payments a habit. Beyond the additional fees, you risk damaging your credit score and potentially paying a higher penalty interest rate. (Check out CNBC Select’s steps you can take to prevent late payments.)

Fees

The Discover it® Cash Back card has no annual fee and no foreign transaction fee. There is a 3% intro balance transfer fee and up to 5% fee on future balance transfers (see terms).

Bottom line

Our methodology

To determine which credit cards offer the best value, CNBC Select analyzed 234 of the most popular credit cards available in the U.S. We compared each card on a range of features, including rewards, welcome bonus, introductory and standard APR, balance transfer fee and foreign transaction fees, as well as factors such as required credit and customer reviews when available. We also considered additional perks, the application process and how easy it is for the consumer to redeem points. CNBC Select teamed up with location intelligence firm Esri. The company’s data development team provided the most up-to-date and comprehensive consumer spending data based on the 2018 Consumer Expenditure Surveys from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. You can read more about their methodology here. Esri’s data team created a sample annual budget of approximately $21,852 in retail spending. This budget is comprised of the most common spending categories, including groceries ($5,019), gas ($2,394), dining out ($3,365), travel ($2,154), utilities ($4,959) and general purchases ($3,961). General purchases include items such as housekeeping supplies, clothing, personal care products, prescription drugs and vitamins, and other vehicle expenses. CNBC Select used this budget to estimate how much the average consumer would save over the course of a year, two years and five years, assuming they would attempt to maximize their rewards potential by earning all welcome bonuses offered and using the card for all applicable purchases. All rewards total estimations are net the annual fee. While the five-year estimates we’ve included are derived from a budget similar to the average American’s spending, you may earn a higher or lower return depending on your shopping habits. Information about the Chase Freedom® and Alliant Cashback Visa® Signature Credit Card has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the cards prior to publication.

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the CNBC Select editorial staff’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any third party.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: elizabeth gravier, alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, discover, balance, categories, stores, earn, grocery, limited, bonus, review, walgreens, cvs, fee, purchases, rewards, cash


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The right side hustles helped a zookeeper and her spouse pay off $98,000 in debt in under 3 years

Steffa wanted to quit and stay home instead, but there was a problem: She and CJ were also $205,000 in debt. Before she quit, the Mantillas vowed to pay off their $40,000 in non-mortgage debt. “Basically, we never said ‘no’ to anything because we figured we could afford it,” Steffa realized. Steffa Mantilla personal finance blogger, zookeeperAny overtime or extra commission money earned by CJ went towards the debt as well. Courtesy Steffa Mantilla”When we paid off the debt — everything except th


Steffa wanted to quit and stay home instead, but there was a problem: She and CJ were also $205,000 in debt.
Before she quit, the Mantillas vowed to pay off their $40,000 in non-mortgage debt.
“Basically, we never said ‘no’ to anything because we figured we could afford it,” Steffa realized.
Steffa Mantilla personal finance blogger, zookeeperAny overtime or extra commission money earned by CJ went towards the debt as well.
Courtesy Steffa Mantilla”When we paid off the debt — everything except th
The right side hustles helped a zookeeper and her spouse pay off $98,000 in debt in under 3 years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: ben jay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spouse, mortgage, pet, job, debt, paid, zookeeper, realized, 98000, right, pay, helped, steffa, hustles, budget


The right side hustles helped a zookeeper and her spouse pay off $98,000 in debt in under 3 years

Steffa Mantilla started out in the bird department at Chicago’s Brookfield Zoo before reaching her goal of becoming a senior cheetah keeper at the Houston Zoo. But in 2017, after 11 years as a zookeeper, the job had begun to take its toll. Mantilla’s earnings had remained nearly stagnant over the course of her career, the hours were terrible, and she wasn’t interested in moving up to a management position and limiting her work with animals. She made about $15/hour as a zookeeper in Houston, or about $1,800 each month, which was just $2.50/hour more than she earned at her first real job in at the Brookfield Zoo. Her husband CJ earns about $70,000 annually as a medical device sales rep, plus bonuses for hitting sales quotas, which can add thousands of dollars onto their joint income. With the baby on the way, they were also expecting to pay $900/month on child care. Steffa wanted to quit and stay home instead, but there was a problem: She and CJ were also $205,000 in debt. They had a $165,000 mortgage, a $26,000 car loan, $12,000 in student loans, and iPhones purchased on a payment plan for $2,000. They made a $1,200 mortgage payment every month but were treading water otherwise: They never added to the load but they didn’t reduce it either. Before she quit, the Mantillas vowed to pay off their $40,000 in non-mortgage debt. They were able to not only achieve their goal, but exceed it: Two and a half years later, the couple has paid off $98,000, including every last penny of their non-mortgage debt, thanks to Steffa’s smart choice of side hustles and some strategic cutbacks. Here’s how they made it happen.

Steffa Mantilla with Cleo (left) and with her son and husband, CJ (right). Courtesy Steffa Mantilla

The strategy: Prioritize, and start a lucrative side hustle

Once Steffa decided to leave her job in 2017, she and CJ sat down to overhaul their budget. A review of their household budget revealed that they spent an average of $800 each month at restaurants and about $600 on groceries, as well as hundreds more on “lots of expensive outings.” They also highlighted one-time expenses that were beyond their means, such as the $20,000 they spent on a week-long trip to Africa. “Basically, we never said ‘no’ to anything because we figured we could afford it,” Steffa realized. They reduced these expenses, since they feared entirely eliminating them outright would be too big of a lifestyle adjustment to maintain. “One thing we realized was that we couldn’t make our budget superstrict or we wouldn’t stick with it,” says Mantilla. They “budgeted for one or two restaurants a week.” By cutting back on dining out and planning meals and grocery purchases instead, which they coordinated through an app, Steffa and her husband were able to free up about $1,800 in their budget each month, which they put toward paying off their debts.

One thing we realized was that we couldn’t make our budget superstrict or we wouldn’t stick with it. Steffa Mantilla personal finance blogger, zookeeper

Any overtime or extra commission money earned by CJ went towards the debt as well. Devoting that money exclusively to debt payments and living entirely on CJ’s salary also allowed them to evaluate whether it would be feasible for her to quit. Once all the adjustments were made and they committed to a monthly budget, they realized that, if Steffa left her job, they’d only be $500 short of what they needed to make ends meet and keep up with their mortgage payments. With years of professional experience handling animals, pet sitting was an obvious way to make up the difference. The Rover account Steffa set up after quitting quickly built enough of a client base to earn $500/month taking care of cats and walking dogs. “I could market it pretty easily, to hire a former zookeeper to take care of your pet,” she says.

The celebration: Fancy dinner and, soon, a vacation

In two and a half years, the Mantillas have paid off about $98,000 in debt: They wiped out all $40,000 of their non-mortgage debt and then paid down $40,000 of the mortgage. More recently, they paid an additional $18,000 toward the mortgage with money from CJ’s bonuses. They still have $107,000 left on the mortgage, but they’re on track to pay it down over the next three years. Since quitting her full-time job, Steffa’s monthly earnings total about $500, with about $250 to $300 coming from a few regular pet sitting clients and another $250 from affiliate marketing on her personal finance blog, Plantsonify. The biggest payoff, however, is that working as a freelance pet sitter has allowed her to achieve a work-life balance that’s sustainable for her. Steffa’s son is able to accompany her on her pet visits, and she’s in-demand enough to accept only clients with cats and small to medium-sized dogs.

Courtesy Steffa Mantilla

“When we paid off the debt — everything except the mortgage — the celebration was, ‘Yay, now we have a baby! And I can stay at home!'” says Steffa. “We just went out to dinner, we didn’t do anything supercrazy. And then we were basically superexhausted for the next few months with the baby.” The main goal right now is to pay off the house. Once that’s done, they’re hoping to take an international vacation. Spain is on their list of potential destinations.

The opportunity: Saving for retirement


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: ben jay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spouse, mortgage, pet, job, debt, paid, zookeeper, realized, 98000, right, pay, helped, steffa, hustles, budget


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Best credit cards for good credit in 2020

The Citi® Double Cash Card is a straightforward rewards card that offers one of the best flat-rate cash-back programs. Unlike many balance transfer cards that charge a 3% to 5% fee per transfer, this card has no balance transfer fee. Check out CNBC Select’s best 0% APR credit cards. Check out CNBC Select’s best no annual fee credit cards. Information about the Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card, Chase Freedom®, Amex EveryDay® Credit Card, and Wells Fargo Propel American Express® Card has


The Citi® Double Cash Card is a straightforward rewards card that offers one of the best flat-rate cash-back programs.
Unlike many balance transfer cards that charge a 3% to 5% fee per transfer, this card has no balance transfer fee.
Check out CNBC Select’s best 0% APR credit cards.
Check out CNBC Select’s best no annual fee credit cards.
Information about the Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card, Chase Freedom®, Amex EveryDay® Credit Card, and Wells Fargo Propel American Express® Card has
Best credit cards for good credit in 2020 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: alexandria white, elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cash, fee, best, rewards, balance, apr, good, cards, card, transfer, purchases, bonus, 2020, credit


Best credit cards for good credit in 2020

Best credit cards for good credit

Best for Travel

Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card Learn More Rewards 5X miles on hotel and rental cars booked through Capital One Travel℠, 2X miles per dollar on every other purchase, plus 10X miles on thousands of hotels on hotels.com/venture (through January 2020)

Welcome bonus 50,000 bonus miles once you spend $3,000 on purchases within the first 3 months from account opening

Annual fee $0 first year, then $95

Intro APR N/A for purchases and balance transfers

Regular APR 17.49% to 24.74% variable on purchases and balance transfers

Balance transfer fee 3% for promotional APR offers; none for balances transferred at regular APR

Foreign transaction fee None

Credit needed Excellent/Good

See our methodology, terms apply. Pros Annual fee is waived the first year

10X miles at hotels.com/venture through January 2020

Global Entry or TSA PreCheck application fee credit up to $100 every 4 years Cons No introductory APR

There’s a $95 annual fee after the first year Estimated rewards earned after 1 year: $988

$988 Estimated rewards earned after 5 years: $2,805 *Rewards totals incorporate the miles earned from the welcome bonus. When we calculated the first year returns for the Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card, we assumed the cardholder would spend $572 a year on hotel rooms booked via hotels.com/venture. Since the 10X miles offer is only valid through January 2020, we assumed 5X miles for hotel purchases for years 2 through 5. You may earn a higher or lower return depending on your travel spending habits. read more Learn More Information about the Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the card prior to publication.

Who’s this for? The Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card offers the best rewards rate on select hotel purchases: Earn 10X miles per $1 spent on thousands of hotels booked on hotels.com/venture through January 2020 (if you spend $500 on the site, you earn 5,000 miles). If you’re looking to take a trip soon, this is a great way to maximize the amount of miles you can earn. This card also earns 5X miles on hotel and rental cars booked through Capital One Travel℠ and 2X miles per dollar spent on all other spending, which is a great flat rate. While Venture does come with a $95 annual fee, it’s waived during the first year. And $95 is low compared to some other rewards cards, with some annual fees up to $550. In addition to rewards, every four years cardholders receive a credit for a Global Entry or TSA PreCheck application, up to $100. If you travel often, this is a great perk that can save you time and money. This card has no foreign transaction fees and comes with a bunch of additional travel perks, such as travel accident insurance, 24-hour travel assistance services and an auto rental collision damage waiver. Check out CNBC Select’s best travel credit cards.

Best for Cash Back

Citi® Double Cash Card Apply Now Rewards 2% cash back: 1% on all purchases and an additional 1% after you pay your credit card bill

Welcome bonus No current offer

Annual fee $0

Intro APR 0% for the first 18 months on balance transfers; N/A for purchases

Regular APR 15.49% to 25.49% variable on purchases and balance transfers

Balance transfer fee 3%, minimum $5

Foreign transaction fee 3%

Credit needed Excellent/Good

See our methodology, terms apply. Pros 2% cash back on all purchases

Simple cash-back program that doesn’t require activation or spending caps

One of the longest intro periods for balance transfers at 18 months Cons No welcome bonus, so you can’t maximize rewards during the first few months of card opening

Minimum cash-back redemption of $25

3% fee charged on purchases made outside the U.S. Estimated rewards earned after 1 year: $437

$437 Estimated rewards earned after 5 years: $2,185 read more Apply Now On Citi’s secure site

Who’s this for? The Citi® Double Cash Card is a straightforward rewards card that offers one of the best flat-rate cash-back programs. Cardholders earn 2% cash back on all purchases — 1% when you make a purchase and an additional 1% when you pay your credit card bill. There is no limit to the amount of cash back you can earn, and you don’t have to worry about activating bonus categories. Cash back can be redeemed for a statement credit or direct deposit. This card is also a good choice for debt consolidation: There’s a 0% APR for the first 18 months on balance transfers (then 15.49% to 25.49% variable APR). Just make sure you transfer balances within four months from account opening. There is a 3% balance transfer fee (minimum $5), which can be outweighed by the amount you save on interest if you make a plan to pay off the balance transfer during the intro period. Check out CNBC Select’s best cash-back credit cards.

Best Welcome Bonus

Chase Freedom® Learn More Rewards 5% cash back on up to $1,500 in combined purchases in bonus categories each quarter you activate (then 1%), 1% cash back on all other purchases

Welcome bonus $200 cash back after you spend $500 on purchases in your first 3 months from account opening

Annual fee $0

Intro APR 0% for the first 15 months on purchases and balance transfers

Regular APR 16.49% to 25.24% variable on purchases and balance transfers

Balance transfer fee 3% intro balance transfer fee when you transfer a balance during the first 60 days your account is open, with a $5 minimum. After, 5% ($5 minimum).

Foreign transaction fee 3%

Credit needed Excellent/Good

See our methodology, terms apply. Pros No annual fee

Long intro 0% APR period for purchases and balance transfers

Rewards can be transferred to a Chase Ultimate Rewards card

Generous welcome bonus

Opportunity to earn up to 5% cash back in select categories upon activation Cons Bonus categories must be activated each quarter

Cash-back program limits 5% cash-back earnings to $1,500 a quarter

3% fee charged on foreign transactions Estimated rewards earned after 1 year: $538

$538 Estimated rewards earned after 5 years: $1,892 Rewards totals incorporate the cash back earned from the welcome bonus read more Learn More Information about the Chase Freedom® Card has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the card prior to publication.

Who’s this for? The Chase Freedom® offers a generous $200 cash back after you spend $500 on purchases in your first three months from account opening. That’s like earning 40% cash back. The $500 spending requirement is very low compared to other credit cards that may require upwards of $4,000. This card has a rotating cash-back program: Earn 5% cash back on up to $1,500 in combined purchases in bonus categories each quarter you activate (then 1%) and 1% cash back on all other purchases. The bonus categories for January through March include: gas stations, select streaming services and internet, cable and phone services. Check out the 2020 Chase Freedom cash-back calendar. The Chase Freedom® has no annual fee and offers a competitive 0% APR for the first 15 months on purchases and balance transfers (then 16.74% to 25.49% variable APR). This allows you to pay for large purchases over time without incurring interest. Check out CNBC Select’s best credit card welcome bonuses.

Best 0% APR Period

Amex EveryDay® Credit Card Learn More Rewards 2X Membership Rewards® points at U.S. supermarkets on up to $6,000 per year in purchases (then 1X), 1X Membership Rewards® points per dollar spent on all other purchases

Welcome bonus Earn 10,000 Membership Rewards® points after you make $1,000 in purchases in your first 3 months

Annual fee $0

Intro APR 0% for the first 15 months on purchases and balance transfers

Regular APR 14.49% to 25.49% variable APR

Balance transfer fee $0

Foreign transaction fee 2.7%

Credit needed Excellent/Good

See rates and fees and our methodology, terms apply. Pros 15 months of no interest on balance transfers

No balance transfer fee

No annual fee

Rewards program and welcome bonus, which is rare among no-fee balance transfer cards

20% extra point bonus when you make 20 or more purchases in a billing period Cons 2.7% foreign transaction fee

Balances must be transferred within 60 days from account opening Transfer timeline: Balances must be transferred within 60 days from account opening

Balances must be transferred within 60 days from account opening Estimated total fees and interest on debt repayment: $452 read more Learn More Information about the Amex EveryDay® Credit Card has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the card prior to publication.

Who’s this for? If you want to maximize savings with a balance transfer or pay for new purchases over time, consider the Amex EveryDay® Credit Card, which offers a 0% APR for the first 15 months on purchases and balance transfers (then 14.49% to 25.49% variable APR). This is a longer-than-average intro period, providing extra time for you to pay off debt when you make sizable monthly payments toward your balance. All balance transfers must take place within the first 60 days from account opening to qualify for the introductory period. Unlike many balance transfer cards that charge a 3% to 5% fee per transfer, this card has no balance transfer fee. If you transfer $5,000 to this card, you’d avoid the $150 fee that you’d pay if you had a card with a 3% balance transfer fee. (See more on how to make the most of a balance transfer.) This card also has no annual fee and a rewards program: Earn 2X Membership Rewards® points at U.S. supermarkets on up to $6,000 per year in purchases (then 1X) and 1X Membership Rewards® points per dollar spent on all other purchases. And when you make 20 or more purchases in a billing period you receive 20% extra points. Cardholders can also take advantage of premium Amex perks, including discounts at select merchants via Amex Offers, car rental loss and damage insurance, free two-day shipping at select online retailers with ShopRunner and cell phone protection. Check out CNBC Select’s best 0% APR credit cards.

Best for No Annual Fee

Wells Fargo Propel American Express® Card Learn More Rewards 3X points on dining out and ordering in; gas, rideshares and transit; flights, hotels, homestays and car rentals; and popular streaming services. 1X points on all other purchases

Welcome bonus 20,000 bonus points when you spend $1,000 in purchases in the first 3 months

Annual fee $0

Intro APR 0% APR for 12 months on purchases and balance transfers

Regular APR 15.49% to 27.49% variable

Balance transfer fee Introductory fee of either $5 or 3% of the amount of each balance transfer, whichever is greater, for 120 days from account opening. After that, up to 5% for each balance transfer, with a minimum of $5

Foreign transaction fee None

Credit needed Excellent/Good

See our methodology, terms apply. Pros No annual fee

No fee charged on purchases made outside the U.S.

0% APR for the first 12 months on purchases and balance transfers

No blackout dates on air travel when redeemed through Go Far Rewards Cons Minimum reward redemption amount of 2,500 points

Balance transfers incur a 3% fee ($5 minimum) Estimated rewards earned after 1 year: $572

$572 Estimated rewards earned after 5 years: $2,059 Rewards totals incorporate the points earned from the welcome bonus read more Learn More Information about the Wells Fargo Propel American Express® Card has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the card prior to publication.

Who’s this for? The Wells Fargo Propel American Express® Card is a well-rounded card that offers unlimited 3X points per dollar spent on dining out, ordering in, travel and a number of streaming services, including Apple Music, Hulu, Netflix and Spotify Premium — all for no annual fee. Frequent travelers will like this card because it gives you points not just on flights and hotels but also car rentals, homestays and ridesharing services. There are no blackout dates on flights booked through Go Far® Rewards, and there are no foreign transaction fees. There’s also an impressive welcome bonus for a no annual fee card: Earn 20,000 points after you spend $1,000 within the first three months. That’s the equivalent to $200 in cash back. The additional perks geared toward travelers are also worth noting: Cardholders can take advantage of lost luggage reimbursement, car rental loss and damage insurance, roadside assistance and 24/7 travel and emergency assistance. This card also provides a year of no interest on purchases and balance transfers. (After the introductory period there’s a 15.74% to 27.74% variable APR.) If you have expected upcoming expenses that you want to pay for over time, or you’re looking to consolidate debt, the Wells Fargo Propel American Express® Card can help you finance debt without incurring interest charges. Check out CNBC Select’s best no annual fee credit cards.

Best credit cards for good credit Best for… Credit card Travel Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card Cash back Citi® Double Cash Card Welcome bonus Chase Freedom® 0% APR period Amex EveryDay® Credit Card No annual fee Wells Fargo Propel American Express® Card

Our methodology

To determine which credit cards offer the best value, CNBC Select analyzed 234 of the most popular credit cards available in the U.S. We compared each card on a range of features, including rewards, welcome bonus, introductory and standard APR, balance transfer fee and foreign transaction fees, as well as factors such as required credit and customer reviews when available. We also considered additional perks, the application process and how easy it is for the consumer to redeem points. CNBC Select teamed up with location intelligence firm Esri. The company’s data development team provided the most up-to-date and comprehensive consumer spending data based on the 2018 Consumer Expenditure Surveys from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. You can read more about their methodology here. Esri’s data team created a sample annual budget of approximately $21,852 in retail spending. This budget is comprised of the most common spending categories, including groceries ($5,019), gas ($2,394), dining out ($3,365), travel ($2,154), utilities ($4,959) and general purchases ($3,961). General purchases include items such as housekeeping supplies, clothing, personal care products, prescription drugs and vitamins, and other vehicle expenses. CNBC Select used this budget to estimate how much the average consumer would save over the course of a year, two years and five years, assuming they would attempt to maximize their rewards potential by earning all welcome bonuses offered and using the card for all applicable purchases. All rewards total estimations are net the annual fee. While the five-year estimates we’ve included are derived from a budget similar to the average American’s spending, you may earn a higher or lower return depending on your shopping habits. For rates and fees of the Amex EveryDay® Credit Card, click here. Information about the Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card, Chase Freedom®, Amex EveryDay® Credit Card, and Wells Fargo Propel American Express® Card has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the cards prior to publication.

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the CNBC Select editorial staff’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any third party.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: alexandria white, elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cash, fee, best, rewards, balance, apr, good, cards, card, transfer, purchases, bonus, 2020, credit


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Trump demands Apple unlock iPhones: ‘They have the keys to so many criminals and criminal minds’

President Donald Trump, in a CNBC interview Wednesday, stepped up his pressure over Apple’s refusal to unlock iPhones for authorities in criminal cases. And I’m very strong on it,” Trump told “Squawk Box” co-host Joe Kernen from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Trump told CNBC he’s helped Apple a lot. Trump told CNBC on Wednesday: “They could have given us that information. “You’re dealing with drug lords and you’re dealing with terrorists, and if you’re dealing with murderers, I


President Donald Trump, in a CNBC interview Wednesday, stepped up his pressure over Apple’s refusal to unlock iPhones for authorities in criminal cases.
And I’m very strong on it,” Trump told “Squawk Box” co-host Joe Kernen from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.
Trump told CNBC he’s helped Apple a lot.
Trump told CNBC on Wednesday: “They could have given us that information.
“You’re dealing with drug lords and you’re dealing with terrorists, and if you’re dealing with murderers, I
Trump demands Apple unlock iPhones: ‘They have the keys to so many criminals and criminal minds’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apple, unlock, minds, demands, criminals, criminal, keys, told, trump, youre, waivers, cook, dealing, president, iphones


Trump demands Apple unlock iPhones: 'They have the keys to so many criminals and criminal minds'

President Donald Trump, in a CNBC interview Wednesday, stepped up his pressure over Apple’s refusal to unlock iPhones for authorities in criminal cases.

“Apple has to help us. And I’m very strong on it,” Trump told “Squawk Box” co-host Joe Kernen from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. “They have the keys to so many criminals and criminal minds, and we can do things.”

Apple CEO Tim Cook has been credited with being able to work with the president and his administration in a way other Silicon Valley companies have stumbled. In November, Cook toured Apple’s Austin campus with Trump.

Trump told CNBC he’s helped Apple a lot.

“I’ve given them waivers, because it’s a great company, but it made a big difference.” The president was referring to waivers from tariffs put on Chinese-made imports in the trade war between Washington and Beijing.

Last week, Trump slammed Apple for declining the government’s request to unlock password-protected iPhones used by the shooter who killed three people in December at the Pensacola, Florida, Naval Air Station before being fatally shot.

In a statement, Apple said it provided gigabytes of information to law enforcement related to the Pensacola case but that it would not build a “backdoor” or specialized software to give law enforcement elevated access.

Trump told CNBC on Wednesday: “They could have given us that information. It would have been very helpful.”

The president said he’s not concerned about his relationship with Cook or Apple because the stakes are so high.

“You’re dealing with drug lords and you’re dealing with terrorists, and if you’re dealing with murderers, I don’t care,” Trump said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apple, unlock, minds, demands, criminals, criminal, keys, told, trump, youre, waivers, cook, dealing, president, iphones


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Stocks making the biggest moves premarket: J&J, Moderna, Netflix, Boeing, IBM, Xerox & more

Check out the companies making headlines before the bell:Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) – Johnson & Johnson reported quarterly profit of $1.88 per share, 1 cent a share above estimates. Fifth Third (FITB) – The bank reported quarterly profit of 96 cents per share, well above the consensus estimate of 72 cents a share. Netflix (NFLX) – Netflix added 8.76 million paying global subscribers during the fourth quarter, more than the 7.6 million that analysts had expected. IBM (IBM) – IBM reported quarterly p


Check out the companies making headlines before the bell:Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) – Johnson & Johnson reported quarterly profit of $1.88 per share, 1 cent a share above estimates.
Fifth Third (FITB) – The bank reported quarterly profit of 96 cents per share, well above the consensus estimate of 72 cents a share.
Netflix (NFLX) – Netflix added 8.76 million paying global subscribers during the fourth quarter, more than the 7.6 million that analysts had expected.
IBM (IBM) – IBM reported quarterly p
Stocks making the biggest moves premarket: J&J, Moderna, Netflix, Boeing, IBM, Xerox & more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: peter schacknow
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, johnson, making, ibm, moves, netflix, xerox, cents, premarket, quarterly, stocks, estimates, share, revenue, moderna, profit, boeing, reported, million


Stocks making the biggest moves premarket: J&J, Moderna, Netflix, Boeing, IBM, Xerox & more

Check out the companies making headlines before the bell:

Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) – Johnson & Johnson reported quarterly profit of $1.88 per share, 1 cent a share above estimates. Revenue was slightly below forecasts. J&J’s bottom line was helped by strength in medical devices and improved profitability in its consumer business.

Moderna (MRNA) – The drugmaker said it is working with health officials on a potential vaccine to address the current coronavirus threat. The virus has caused nine deaths, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has confirmed the first U.S. case.

Fifth Third (FITB) – The bank reported quarterly profit of 96 cents per share, well above the consensus estimate of 72 cents a share. Revenue also came in above estimates. Strong fee revenue was among factors boosting Fifth Third’s results.

Netflix (NFLX) – Netflix added 8.76 million paying global subscribers during the fourth quarter, more than the 7.6 million that analysts had expected. The video streaming service did note increased competition in the United States, however, and that it will become more intense globally after Walt Disney’s (DIS) Disney+ service launches across Europe in March.

Boeing (BA) – Boeing remains on watch after falling 3.3% Wednesday. The jet maker’s stock fell after it said that it now estimates a mid-2020 return for its grounded 737 Max jet.

IBM (IBM) – IBM reported quarterly profit of $4.71 per share, 2 cents a share above estimates. Revenue also came in better than Street forecasts and broke a five-quarter streak of year-over-year declines. IBM also gave better-than-expected full-year 2020 earnings guidance.

United Airlines (UAL) – UAL beat estimates by 2 cents a share, with quarterly profit of $2.67 per share. The airline’s revenue was very slightly above expectations. United’s performance came despite numerous flight cancellations resulting from the grounding of Boeing’s 737 Max jet.

Toyota (TM) – Toyota said it would recall 3.4 million vehicles globally due to an electronic defect that could prevent airbags from deploying in a crash.

Xerox (XRX) – Xerox plans to nominate up to 11 directors to the board of computer and printer maker HP Inc. (HPQ), according to The Wall Street Journal, as it tries to move its unsolicited $33 billion takeover bid for HP forward.

Tesla (TSLA) – Tesla crossed the $100 billion market cap threshold in off-hours trading. A number of stock option bonuses for CEO Elon Musk will trigger if the market cap stays at $100 billion or more for an average of one month and six months.

Intel (INTC) – Intel named Medtronic (MDT) CEO Omar Ishrak as its new independent chairman effective immediately, after Andy Bryant stepped down from that role at the chipmaker earlier this month.

Apple (AAPL) – A new low-cost Apple iPhone will go into mass production in February, according to people familiar with the plan who spoke to Bloomberg.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: peter schacknow
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, johnson, making, ibm, moves, netflix, xerox, cents, premarket, quarterly, stocks, estimates, share, revenue, moderna, profit, boeing, reported, million


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