Hillary Clinton: How to pick yourself up after a devastating fail

But it’s not always so public as the election was for Secretary Hillary Clinton, who in November lost the presidency to Donald Trump. And yet Friday, Clinton appeared in front of the Wellesley College Class of 2017 and delivered a confident, and at times political, commencement speech. “You may have heard that things didn’t exactly go the way I planned,” she says. Clinton found inspiration to continue moving forward by spending time with those she loves and reminding herself of her own purpose.


But it’s not always so public as the election was for Secretary Hillary Clinton, who in November lost the presidency to Donald Trump. And yet Friday, Clinton appeared in front of the Wellesley College Class of 2017 and delivered a confident, and at times political, commencement speech. “You may have heard that things didn’t exactly go the way I planned,” she says. Clinton found inspiration to continue moving forward by spending time with those she loves and reminding herself of her own purpose.
Hillary Clinton: How to pick yourself up after a devastating fail Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: catherine clifford, photo darren mccollester, -hillary clinton, former us secretary of state
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, hillary, fail, wellesley, clinton, pick, using, trumpand, times, 2017, truly, devastating, class, things, way


Hillary Clinton: How to pick yourself up after a devastating fail

In honor of graduation season, CNBC Make It is rolling out the speeches and pieces of advice that America’s leaders are most excited to share with the Class of 2017. Follow along using the hashtag #MakeItNewGrads.

When you are truly pushing your limits, failure is inevitable. But it’s not always so public as the election was for Secretary Hillary Clinton, who in November lost the presidency to Donald Trump.

And yet Friday, Clinton appeared in front of the Wellesley College Class of 2017 and delivered a confident, and at times political, commencement speech.

“You may have heard that things didn’t exactly go the way I planned,” she says. “But you know what? I’m doing okay.”

Clinton found inspiration to continue moving forward by spending time with those she loves and reminding herself of her own purpose.

“I’ve gotten to spend time with my family, especially my amazing grandchildren,” she says. “But here’s what helped most of all: remembering who I am, where I come from and what I believe.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: catherine clifford, photo darren mccollester, -hillary clinton, former us secretary of state
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, hillary, fail, wellesley, clinton, pick, using, trumpand, times, 2017, truly, devastating, class, things, way


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Google is reportedly launching yet another venture group to invest in A.I.

Google has established a new organization to invest in artificial intelligence startups, according to a new report. The new effort shows Google taking its experience with venture capital and applying it to AI, a type of computing that it has been increasingly using across its applications. The new organization will be separate from Google parent company Alphabet’s funding activity within GV (formerly Google Ventures) and CapitalG (formerly Google Capital), Axios reported on Friday. Google itself


Google has established a new organization to invest in artificial intelligence startups, according to a new report. The new effort shows Google taking its experience with venture capital and applying it to AI, a type of computing that it has been increasingly using across its applications. The new organization will be separate from Google parent company Alphabet’s funding activity within GV (formerly Google Ventures) and CapitalG (formerly Google Capital), Axios reported on Friday. Google itself
Google is reportedly launching yet another venture group to invest in A.I. Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: jordan novet, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, company, type, thesis, launching, capital, google, invest, group, using, ai, ventures, organization, venture, reportedly


Google is reportedly launching yet another venture group to invest in A.I.

Google has established a new organization to invest in artificial intelligence startups, according to a new report. The new effort shows Google taking its experience with venture capital and applying it to AI, a type of computing that it has been increasingly using across its applications.

The new organization will be separate from Google parent company Alphabet’s funding activity within GV (formerly Google Ventures) and CapitalG (formerly Google Capital), Axios reported on Friday. Google itself has also made venture investments on its own.

Google chief executive Sundar Pichai in the past year has started positioning the company as being “AI first” as opposed to being “mobile first.” Having an investment group focusing on that does make sense given that thesis.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: jordan novet, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, company, type, thesis, launching, capital, google, invest, group, using, ai, ventures, organization, venture, reportedly


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Amazon doesn’t understand why you don’t understand why Amazon is opening bookstores

But Amazon Books chief Jennifer Cast insisted in an interview with Recode on Thursday that, while the above-mentioned aspects play some role in the new initiative, they are not the focus at all. “It’s called Amazon Books, and so books are the reason that we opened this store: To be a great bookstore for our customers,” Cast replied. Cast did allow that the stores are indeed a good place to show off Amazon gadgets, even if it’s not the main attraction. Still, the Amazon Books initiative, she insi


But Amazon Books chief Jennifer Cast insisted in an interview with Recode on Thursday that, while the above-mentioned aspects play some role in the new initiative, they are not the focus at all. “It’s called Amazon Books, and so books are the reason that we opened this store: To be a great bookstore for our customers,” Cast replied. Cast did allow that the stores are indeed a good place to show off Amazon gadgets, even if it’s not the main attraction. Still, the Amazon Books initiative, she insi
Amazon doesn’t understand why you don’t understand why Amazon is opening bookstores Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: jason del rey
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, initiative, help, books, understand, stores, store, dont, bookstores, discover, amazon, opening, doesnt, gadgets, prime, selling


Amazon doesn’t understand why you don’t understand why Amazon is opening bookstores

Ever since Amazon opened its first physical bookstore in late 2015, there’s been a question burning through industry circles: This retail initiative can’t really be about selling good old-fashioned books. In a store. In 2017. Can it? Alexa, tell me this is a joke.

Instead, one common guess from analysts and reporters — myself included — was that these stores must really be about selling Amazon gadgets like Alexa-powered Echo devices, since those are the future (and since they are, in fact, on display in these shops).

Another hypothesis has been that the stores serve as a slick on-ramp to sign people up for Prime memberships, since Prime is the center of the Amazon business flywheel, and members pay lower prices for books in these stores than non-Prime members do.

But Amazon Books chief Jennifer Cast insisted in an interview with Recode on Thursday that, while the above-mentioned aspects play some role in the new initiative, they are not the focus at all.

More From Recode:

More manufacturing jobs came back to the US than left last year

Read Mark Zuckerberg’s full commencement address at Harvard

Mark Zuckerberg called on Harvard’s graduates to help save the environment and cure all disease

“Books are our heart,” she said during a launch event for Amazon’s first New York City store. “Jeff [Bezos] loves books. Most of our company loves books and so the mission of Amazon.com, the purpose was to help customers find, discover and buy books online. And what we realized was that we had 20 years of data — about why customers buy, how they buy, what they read, how they read and why they’re reading it — that could make a physical bookstore just a different and better place to discover books. So that’s what we wanted to do.”

What about all those gadgets at the front of the store? Those aren’t the real focus?

“It’s called Amazon Books, and so books are the reason that we opened this store: To be a great bookstore for our customers,” Cast replied.

But you must also like that this is a way to convert shoppers into new Prime members?

“That is not the mission of our store, to be a Prime feeder,” she added.

Cast did allow that the stores are indeed a good place to show off Amazon gadgets, even if it’s not the main attraction. She always acknowledged that the store will help with Prime sign-ups, though not at any significant scale (“We are so little; we only have seven stores”).

Still, the Amazon Books initiative, she insisted, is mainly about creating a new — and old — way for people to discover great books.

That’s still hard to believe, coming from the same company that wants to patent warehouses that float in the sky. I’ll admit, my skeptical eyebrow doesn’t want to come back down. But Amazon is full of surprises and — maybe, just maybe — selling books on dead trees inside a mall is the latest one.

—By Jason Del Rey, Recode.net.

CNBC’s parent NBCUniversal is an investor in Recode’s parent Vox, and the companies have a content-sharing arrangement.

Watch: Inside Amazon’s brick-and-mortar store


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: jason del rey
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, initiative, help, books, understand, stores, store, dont, bookstores, discover, amazon, opening, doesnt, gadgets, prime, selling


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Billionaire to young people interested in business: ‘Get your MBA’

For many young professionals, including recent graduates from the class of 2017, summer is a perfect time to hunker down and decide what career move to make next. If you’re debating whether or not to get a Master of Business Administration, billionaire Tilman Fertitta has some advice for you. “Let me just say this,” the hospitality mogul says, speaking in a 2016 interview with CNBC, “God gave me a gift of understanding business. Getting an MBA can come with a steep price tag. Only about 11 perce


For many young professionals, including recent graduates from the class of 2017, summer is a perfect time to hunker down and decide what career move to make next. If you’re debating whether or not to get a Master of Business Administration, billionaire Tilman Fertitta has some advice for you. “Let me just say this,” the hospitality mogul says, speaking in a 2016 interview with CNBC, “God gave me a gift of understanding business. Getting an MBA can come with a steep price tag. Only about 11 perce
Billionaire to young people interested in business: ‘Get your MBA’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: marguerite ward, hero images, getty images, jin lee, bloomberg
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, company, mba, getting, young, advanced, 2016, business, summer, billionaire, fertitta, god, interested, gift


Billionaire to young people interested in business: 'Get your MBA'

For many young professionals, including recent graduates from the class of 2017, summer is a perfect time to hunker down and decide what career move to make next.

That may mean figuring out what type of job you want, finding a summer internship, taking the next step at your company, switching jobs or pursuing an advanced degree.

If you’re debating whether or not to get a Master of Business Administration, billionaire Tilman Fertitta has some advice for you.

“Let me just say this,” the hospitality mogul says, speaking in a 2016 interview with CNBC, “God gave me a gift of understanding business.

“But if God didn’t give you that gift and you want to be an entrepreneur and you want to be a business person, go get your MBA,” says Fertitta, CEO of Fertitta Entertainment, the company behind Morton’s The Steakhouse, Bubba Gump Shrimp and Golden Nugget casinos.

Going back to school can be a difficult decision. Getting an MBA can come with a steep price tag. Tuition at top schools can reach north of $60,000 per year in addition to lost wages while away from the workforce. Only about 11 percent of people age 25 to 34 end up getting an advanced degree, according to a 2016 U.S. Census report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: marguerite ward, hero images, getty images, jin lee, bloomberg
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, company, mba, getting, young, advanced, 2016, business, summer, billionaire, fertitta, god, interested, gift


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Why your 401(k) can be a cash drain

But what about saving too much for retirement and ending up “401(k) rich and cash poor”? These model savers later run into a cash crunch because of unexpected expenses, ballooning lifestyle costs or miscalculations. Most personal finance pros advise U.S. workers to save as much as they can by stashing money in 401(k) retirement accounts, which lower taxable income and shelter investment earnings from the IRS. But there’s a downside to tying up too much cash in these accounts: it could leave you


But what about saving too much for retirement and ending up “401(k) rich and cash poor”? These model savers later run into a cash crunch because of unexpected expenses, ballooning lifestyle costs or miscalculations. Most personal finance pros advise U.S. workers to save as much as they can by stashing money in 401(k) retirement accounts, which lower taxable income and shelter investment earnings from the IRS. But there’s a downside to tying up too much cash in these accounts: it could leave you
Why your 401(k) can be a cash drain Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: adam shell, h armstrong roberts, getty images, bloomberg
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, cash, accounts, workers, unexpected, drain, ogorek, retirement, saving, theres, financial, 401k


Why your 401(k) can be a cash drain

Everyone’s heard of stretching to buy a McMansion and becoming “house poor.” But what about saving too much for retirement and ending up “401(k) rich and cash poor”?

Don’t snicker.

It can and does happen — often to investors with both good savings habits and good intentions for their financial future. These model savers later run into a cash crunch because of unexpected expenses, ballooning lifestyle costs or miscalculations.

Most personal finance pros advise U.S. workers to save as much as they can by stashing money in 401(k) retirement accounts, which lower taxable income and shelter investment earnings from the IRS. But there’s a downside to tying up too much cash in these accounts: it could leave you without enough money for unexpected bills.

More from USA Today:

Five reasons not to ‘sell in May and go away’

Trump worries lower Dow by nearly 373 points

Is Wall Street’s lack of fear a reason to be fearful?

“Oftentimes investors box themselves in — in terms of future financial options — by worshiping solely at the altar of tax-deferred retirement accounts,” says Tony Ogorek, founder of Buffalo-based Ogorek Wealth Management.

The error over-savers make is failing to put their finances through a stress test. By imagining your own financial crisis, you learn whether your cash flow is sufficient to cover expenses without tapping your retirement savings. And that knowledge is crucial because there’s a heavy penalty for borrowing from your 401(k). Most accounts charge a 10% early-withdrawal penalty for people belowage 59 1/2.

“The main mistake,” Ogorek says, “is not doing a realistic assessment of what your cash needs could be under various scenarios.”

Of course, the bigger retirement crisis is Americans not saving enough, or not at all. Only about one-third of workers are saving in a 401(k) or a similar plan, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: adam shell, h armstrong roberts, getty images, bloomberg
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, cash, accounts, workers, unexpected, drain, ogorek, retirement, saving, theres, financial, 401k


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Google co-founder Sergey Brin is reportedly building a gigantic $100 million blimp

Google co-founder Sergey Brin is spending between $100 million and $150 million to build an enormous blimp, which will be the biggest aircraft in the world when finished, according to a new report in The Guardian. The blimp, as first reported by Bloomberg, is under construction at a giant hangar in the Nasa Ames airfield near Google headquarters in Mountain View, California. That company was listed in Google’s 2017 proxy as a lessor of part of the Ames hangar. The blimp will be almost 200 meters


Google co-founder Sergey Brin is spending between $100 million and $150 million to build an enormous blimp, which will be the biggest aircraft in the world when finished, according to a new report in The Guardian. The blimp, as first reported by Bloomberg, is under construction at a giant hangar in the Nasa Ames airfield near Google headquarters in Mountain View, California. That company was listed in Google’s 2017 proxy as a lessor of part of the Ames hangar. The blimp will be almost 200 meters
Google co-founder Sergey Brin is reportedly building a gigantic $100 million blimp Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: matt rosoff, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, company, million, blimp, gigantic, building, google, guardian, ames, cofounder, sergey, report, air, 100, reportedly, brin, yacht


Google co-founder Sergey Brin is reportedly building a gigantic $100 million blimp

Google co-founder Sergey Brin is spending between $100 million and $150 million to build an enormous blimp, which will be the biggest aircraft in the world when finished, according to a new report in The Guardian.

The blimp, as first reported by Bloomberg, is under construction at a giant hangar in the Nasa Ames airfield near Google headquarters in Mountain View, California. Google signed a 60-year lease for $1.1 billion in 2014, through a subsidiary called Planetary Ventures, and is working with an engineer named Alan Weston, who’s employed by a company controlled by Brin’s family known as LTA (“lighter than air”) Research and Exploration. That company was listed in Google’s 2017 proxy as a lessor of part of the Ames hangar.

The blimp will be almost 200 meters (656 feet) long, the Guardian reports, and will go on humanitarian missions to remote locations as well as serving as an “air yacht” for Brin and his family.

Read the full Guardian report here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: matt rosoff, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, company, million, blimp, gigantic, building, google, guardian, ames, cofounder, sergey, report, air, 100, reportedly, brin, yacht


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Five must-watch videos: Bitcoin’s epic run, a first-look at Amazon’s bookstore and a SpaceX rival blasts off

RocketLab just nailed its orbital rocket launch Thursday, 25 May 2017 | 12:41 PM ET | 01:18A new spaceflight start-up fired off a 3-D printed rocket into orbit from a launch pad in New Zealand on Thursday. The company, called RocketLab, is focusing on smaller, cheaper and disposable rockets that can carry small payloads. Its successful launch marks another entry into the private spaceflight industry.


RocketLab just nailed its orbital rocket launch Thursday, 25 May 2017 | 12:41 PM ET | 01:18A new spaceflight start-up fired off a 3-D printed rocket into orbit from a launch pad in New Zealand on Thursday. The company, called RocketLab, is focusing on smaller, cheaper and disposable rockets that can carry small payloads. Its successful launch marks another entry into the private spaceflight industry.
Five must-watch videos: Bitcoin’s epic run, a first-look at Amazon’s bookstore and a SpaceX rival blasts off Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: jeff morganteen, chris ratcliffe, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, blasts, rocket, thursdaythe, firstlook, smaller, spacex, small, rocketlab, epic, bitcoins, launch, rival, run, bookstore, spaceflight, mustwatch, startup, successful, zealand, videos


Five must-watch videos: Bitcoin's epic run, a first-look at Amazon's bookstore and a SpaceX rival blasts off

RocketLab just nailed its orbital rocket launch Thursday, 25 May 2017 | 12:41 PM ET | 01:18

A new spaceflight start-up fired off a 3-D printed rocket into orbit from a launch pad in New Zealand on Thursday.

The company, called RocketLab, is focusing on smaller, cheaper and disposable rockets that can carry small payloads.

Its successful launch marks another entry into the private spaceflight industry.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: jeff morganteen, chris ratcliffe, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, blasts, rocket, thursdaythe, firstlook, smaller, spacex, small, rocketlab, epic, bitcoins, launch, rival, run, bookstore, spaceflight, mustwatch, startup, successful, zealand, videos


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What guests actually give at weddings

Wedding gift-giving habits also vary by region, according to a separate report by Bankrate.com. In the Northeast, guests are particularly generous. Nearly one-third said their typical gift is at least $200, compared with just 13 percent of everyone else. It’s perfectly acceptable to factor in the total cost when considering how much to give, said Rosemary Caligiuri, managing director of United Capital in Langhorne, Pennsylvania. When you say yes, you are saying yes to a lot of additional costs,


Wedding gift-giving habits also vary by region, according to a separate report by Bankrate.com. In the Northeast, guests are particularly generous. Nearly one-third said their typical gift is at least $200, compared with just 13 percent of everyone else. It’s perfectly acceptable to factor in the total cost when considering how much to give, said Rosemary Caligiuri, managing director of United Capital in Langhorne, Pennsylvania. When you say yes, you are saying yes to a lot of additional costs,
What guests actually give at weddings Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, typical, yes, likely, bankrate, vary, gift, weddings, wedding, actually, united, guests, total, west


What guests actually give at weddings

Wedding gift-giving habits also vary by region, according to a separate report by Bankrate.com. In the Northeast, guests are particularly generous. Nearly one-third said their typical gift is at least $200, compared with just 13 percent of everyone else. Bankrate polled 1,000 adults in early April.

Northeasterners are also more likely to give cash or a check, while those in the South and West are more likely to buy a gift off the registry, Bankrate said.

These days, the amount you spend should have less to do with where you live or what kind of wedding you are attending, and more to do with your own budget and feelings about the couple, experts said.

“In terms of how much you should give, whatever you think is appropriate and can realistically afford is what you should go for,” said Sarah Berger, Bankrate’s personal finance analyst.

It’s perfectly acceptable to factor in the total cost when considering how much to give, said Rosemary Caligiuri, managing director of United Capital in Langhorne, Pennsylvania. “Being a guest at a wedding is a financial obligation. When you say yes, you are saying yes to a lot of additional costs, especially if it’s far away.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, typical, yes, likely, bankrate, vary, gift, weddings, wedding, actually, united, guests, total, west


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A woman who spent $41,000 on Amazon highlights a critical money lesson

Chances are you’ll find there are ways you could cut back. Once you find ways to trim your spending, invest that extra money so it’ll grow over time. Since stumbling upon her Amazon order history in 2014, Mrs. BITA has changed her habits drastically. In 2017 so far, she’s placed nine orders on the site for a total of $255. Don’t miss: You might be spending twice as much money as you think you are online shopping


Chances are you’ll find there are ways you could cut back. Once you find ways to trim your spending, invest that extra money so it’ll grow over time. Since stumbling upon her Amazon order history in 2014, Mrs. BITA has changed her habits drastically. In 2017 so far, she’s placed nine orders on the site for a total of $255. Don’t miss: You might be spending twice as much money as you think you are online shopping
A woman who spent $41,000 on Amazon highlights a critical money lesson Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: kathleen elkins, mike segar, cnbc, rashawn colton
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, ways, money, amazon, writesno, 41000, habits, 2017, youll, think, spent, critical, spending, twice, woman, highlights, lesson


A woman who spent $41,000 on Amazon highlights a critical money lesson

Here’s how much you should save at every age Tuesday, 21 Feb 2017 | 10:02 AM ET | 00:55

If you have no idea how much of your money is going towards subscriptions, coffee or Amazon, it may be time to find out, especially since you could be spending twice as much as you think you are online.

Try recording each and every purchase you make for a couple of months by keeping a spreadsheet on your computer or using an app such as Mint, Personal Capital or Level Money. Chances are you’ll find there are ways you could cut back.

Don’t stop there. Once you find ways to trim your spending, invest that extra money so it’ll grow over time.

Since stumbling upon her Amazon order history in 2014, Mrs. BITA has changed her habits drastically. In 2017 so far, she’s placed nine orders on the site for a total of $255. “Barring one, everything on the list is a consumable — exciting stuff like dog food, toilet paper, soap, shampoo, diapers, tea and toothpaste,” she writes.

No matter how egregious your habits are, once you recognize them, you can always change them, she says: “Even the most immense amounts of stupidity are not necessarily permanent, nor fatal.”

Don’t miss: You might be spending twice as much money as you think you are online shopping


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: kathleen elkins, mike segar, cnbc, rashawn colton
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, ways, money, amazon, writesno, 41000, habits, 2017, youll, think, spent, critical, spending, twice, woman, highlights, lesson


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E-Trade finds more millennnials are taking up options trading

E-Trade Financial found a surprising demographic group has been getting into options trading: millennials. The online brokerage firm found that 40 percent of millennials with online trading accounts trade options at least once a month, whereas just 25 percent of their Generation X counterparts partake in options trading so frequently, according to a survey released Thursday. Jon Najarian, co-founder of the Najarian Family Office, said millennials might find the fast-paced nature of options tradi


E-Trade Financial found a surprising demographic group has been getting into options trading: millennials. The online brokerage firm found that 40 percent of millennials with online trading accounts trade options at least once a month, whereas just 25 percent of their Generation X counterparts partake in options trading so frequently, according to a survey released Thursday. Jon Najarian, co-founder of the Najarian Family Office, said millennials might find the fast-paced nature of options tradi
E-Trade finds more millennnials are taking up options trading Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: fred imbert, ariel skelley, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, online, trading, finds, million, group, millennials, financial, digital, millennnials, najarian, etrade, options, taking


E-Trade finds more millennnials are taking up options trading

E-Trade Financial found a surprising demographic group has been getting into options trading: millennials.

The online brokerage firm found that 40 percent of millennials with online trading accounts trade options at least once a month, whereas just 25 percent of their Generation X counterparts partake in options trading so frequently, according to a survey released Thursday.

“Millennials are digital natives,” Steve Claussen, vice president of trader strategy at E-Trade Financial, said in a release. “And within this context it’s understandable why this group may also be the most active options traders, as today there are a great many digital tools that make options trading easier to understand than ever before.”

Jon Najarian, co-founder of the Najarian Family Office, said millennials might find the fast-paced nature of options trading appealing, “unlike stocks, which can be like glaciers.”

Options trading has exploded over the past decade. The average daily volume for options trading rose from 11.4 million in 2007 to 16.5 million in 2017, according to data from The Options Clearing Corp. That represents a 45 percent increase.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: fred imbert, ariel skelley, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, online, trading, finds, million, group, millennials, financial, digital, millennnials, najarian, etrade, options, taking


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