Trump asks why ‘beleaguered’ Sessions isn’t investigating Clinton

In a morning tweet, Trump questioned why congressional and intelligence committees and the “beleaguered” Sessions are not probing what he called Hillary Clinton’s “crimes and Russia relations.” Last week, Trump criticized Sessions for recusing himself from the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and whether the Trump campaign colluded with the Kremlin. Last week, Sessions said he had no plans to leave the job. Trump has repeatedly lashed out and tried to shift the focus to C


In a morning tweet, Trump questioned why congressional and intelligence committees and the “beleaguered” Sessions are not probing what he called Hillary Clinton’s “crimes and Russia relations.” Last week, Trump criticized Sessions for recusing himself from the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and whether the Trump campaign colluded with the Kremlin. Last week, Sessions said he had no plans to leave the job. Trump has repeatedly lashed out and tried to shift the focus to C
Trump asks why ‘beleaguered’ Sessions isn’t investigating Clinton Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-24  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, special, clinton, lashed, isnt, beleaguered, schiff, trump, week, russia, asks, investigating, clintons, campaign, sessions, called


Trump asks why ‘beleaguered’ Sessions isn't investigating Clinton

President Donald Trump publicly chastised Attorney General Jeff Sessions again Monday, criticizing him for not seeking an investigation of the president’s former campaign opponent.

In a morning tweet, Trump questioned why congressional and intelligence committees and the “beleaguered” Sessions are not probing what he called Hillary Clinton’s “crimes and Russia relations.”

Last week, Trump criticized Sessions for recusing himself from the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and whether the Trump campaign colluded with the Kremlin. Trump told The New York Times that he would not have appointed Sessions if he had known he would step back from the probe.

Last week, Sessions said he had no plans to leave the job.

Trump has repeatedly lashed out and tried to shift the focus to Clinton amid his frustration with federal and congressional investigations into whether the Trump campaign coordinated with Moscow. He has called the probe, led by special counsel and former FBI Director Robert Mueller, a politically charged “witch hunt.”

The man Trump has picked to lead the FBI, Christopher Wray, has disputed that assertion.

Trump on Monday also lashed out at Rep. Adam Schiff of California, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, which is investigating Moscow’s role. He called Schiff “sleazy” and “totally biased” and accused him of using Russia as an excuse for Democrats’ performance in the election.

In a tweet, Schiff responded to Trump, saying that the problem is “how often [Trump watches] TV, and that [his] comments and actions are beneath the dignity of the office.”

Last year, the Justice Department declined to charge Clinton or her associates for Clinton’s handling of classified information while at the State Department. As a candidate, Trump threatened to appoint a special prosecutor to look into Clinton’s actions.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-24  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, special, clinton, lashed, isnt, beleaguered, schiff, trump, week, russia, asks, investigating, clintons, campaign, sessions, called


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Hiring smooth-talking Scaramucci as a mouthpiece won’t pull the White House out of its rut

In a normal administration, this could be the week that the White House stages a comeback. President Donald Trump just hired smooth-talking, well-liked former hedge fund executive Anthony “Mooch” Scaramucci to take control of a dysfunctional White House communications operation. Scaramucci, blocked from multiple attempts at other White House jobs, could wind up being a shrewd hire. Now Priebus is chief of staff in name only, lacking any major allies or real authority in the White House. Bannon i


In a normal administration, this could be the week that the White House stages a comeback. President Donald Trump just hired smooth-talking, well-liked former hedge fund executive Anthony “Mooch” Scaramucci to take control of a dysfunctional White House communications operation. Scaramucci, blocked from multiple attempts at other White House jobs, could wind up being a shrewd hire. Now Priebus is chief of staff in name only, lacking any major allies or real authority in the White House. Bannon i
Hiring smooth-talking Scaramucci as a mouthpiece won’t pull the White House out of its rut Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-24  Authors: ben white, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, wont, pull, house, bannon, staff, white, president, rut, priebus, smoothtalking, west, week, trump, mouthpiece, things, scaramucci, hiring


Hiring smooth-talking Scaramucci as a mouthpiece won't pull the White House out of its rut

In a normal administration, this could be the week that the White House stages a comeback.

President Donald Trump just hired smooth-talking, well-liked former hedge fund executive Anthony “Mooch” Scaramucci to take control of a dysfunctional White House communications operation. The president is hitting the road to honor American soldiers in West Virginia and Ohio. The Senate is set to vote on one of Trump’s biggest campaign promises: repealing Obamacare.

But this is not a normal administration. And this is not likely to be the week that things get back on track.

Scaramucci, blocked from multiple attempts at other White House jobs, could wind up being a shrewd hire. He was affable from the podium on Friday and did a mostly smooth job on the Sunday news shows. But behind the scenes, his hiring shows just how messed up the West Wing really is.

Chief of Staff Reince Priebus and top strategist Steve Bannon tried desperately to block the hire. Priebus didn’t want another top advisor who reports directly to the president. Bannon didn’t want another “globalist” allied with National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn and the president’s daughter Ivanka and son-in-law Jared Kushner.

Now Priebus is chief of staff in name only, lacking any major allies or real authority in the White House. Bannon is said by White House insiders to be sulking, bitter and considering quitting.

And Scaramucci, for all his charismatic delivery, made pretty clear over the weekend that his number one job is flattering and appeasing his boss. In an extraordinary moment on CNN’s “State of the Union,” the new communications director spoke directly to his most important viewer: “If I said some things about him when I was working for another candidate, Mr. Trump, Mr. President, I apologize for that. Can we move on off of that?”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-24  Authors: ben white, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, wont, pull, house, bannon, staff, white, president, rut, priebus, smoothtalking, west, week, trump, mouthpiece, things, scaramucci, hiring


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Self-made billionaire Mark Cuban says learning to hustle as a kid helped him succeed

Self-made billionaire Mark Cuban, the owner of the NBA’s Dallas Mavericks and former co-owner of Broadcast.com, credits learning to do one thing at an early age for his success over the years: his ability to hustle. His father, surrounded by a group of his friends, scoffed and told Cuban that his current sneakers were fine. His father replied, “when you have your own job and you have your own money you can buy a pair of shoes.” One of his father’s friends told Cuban that he could make some money


Self-made billionaire Mark Cuban, the owner of the NBA’s Dallas Mavericks and former co-owner of Broadcast.com, credits learning to do one thing at an early age for his success over the years: his ability to hustle. His father, surrounded by a group of his friends, scoffed and told Cuban that his current sneakers were fine. His father replied, “when you have your own job and you have your own money you can buy a pair of shoes.” One of his father’s friends told Cuban that he could make some money
Self-made billionaire Mark Cuban says learning to hustle as a kid helped him succeed Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-24  Authors: ruth umoh, tony rivetti
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, father, shoes, learning, selling, selfmade, kid, pair, cuban, garbage, friends, helped, billionaire, told, going, mark, hustle, succeed, money


Self-made billionaire Mark Cuban says learning to hustle as a kid helped him succeed

Self-made billionaire Mark Cuban, the owner of the NBA’s Dallas Mavericks and former co-owner of Broadcast.com, credits learning to do one thing at an early age for his success over the years: his ability to hustle.

“I was hustling in everything I did,” says Cuban at the OZY Festival this month. “Whatever it took, I was willing to do it.”

The “Shark Tank” star, 58, says his upward trajectory began at age 12 when he asked his father for a new pair of basketball shoes. His father, surrounded by a group of his friends, scoffed and told Cuban that his current sneakers were fine.

Unhappy with that answer, Cuban continued to ask for new shoes. His father replied, “when you have your own job and you have your own money you can buy a pair of shoes.”

One of his father’s friends told Cuban that he could make some money from him by selling boxes of garbage bags, which Cuban accepted.

“My first business was going door to door selling garbage bags,” says Cuban at the festival. “Who’s going to say to no a 12-year-old kid, right?”

From there, he continued to hustle, which led to more lucrative opportunities: Cuban says he began collecting stamps, then started giving dance lessons and even opened a bar on the campus of Indiana University, all before he turned 21.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-24  Authors: ruth umoh, tony rivetti
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, father, shoes, learning, selling, selfmade, kid, pair, cuban, garbage, friends, helped, billionaire, told, going, mark, hustle, succeed, money


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This ‘ugly’ chart is about to get even uglier: Trader

The dollar index is on a two-week losing streak, and some strategists expect further downside. When asked if he would buy the U.S. dollar at this juncture, given its beaten-down condition, Crossing Wall Street blog editor Eddy Elfenbein said, “I’m not, and I’ve got to say, it is an ugly chart, and I think it’s going to get even uglier.” “The dollar seems to go down a little bit just about every single day,” he said Friday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation.” On Monday, the dollar index was trading at 93.


The dollar index is on a two-week losing streak, and some strategists expect further downside. When asked if he would buy the U.S. dollar at this juncture, given its beaten-down condition, Crossing Wall Street blog editor Eddy Elfenbein said, “I’m not, and I’ve got to say, it is an ugly chart, and I think it’s going to get even uglier.” “The dollar seems to go down a little bit just about every single day,” he said Friday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation.” On Monday, the dollar index was trading at 93.
This ‘ugly’ chart is about to get even uglier: Trader Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-24  Authors: rebecca ungarino, matt cardy, getty images, anthony kwan, bloomberg, kazuhiro nogi, afp, miguelmalo, source, lawrence mcdonald
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, euro, trading, currency, buy, dollar, ugly, wrote, verrone, trader, uglier, index, strategists, think, chart


This 'ugly' chart is about to get even uglier: Trader

The dollar index is on a two-week losing streak, and some strategists expect further downside.

The index, which measures the value of the U.S. dollar relative to a basket of foreign currencies, including the euro, fell Friday to its lowest level since June 2016. The slide came as the euro surged against the greenback and a string of negative news flowed out of Washington early in the session.

When asked if he would buy the U.S. dollar at this juncture, given its beaten-down condition, Crossing Wall Street blog editor Eddy Elfenbein said, “I’m not, and I’ve got to say, it is an ugly chart, and I think it’s going to get even uglier.”

“The dollar seems to go down a little bit just about every single day,” he said Friday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation.” He said last week’s weakness was due in part to the euro’s strength following remarks from European Central Bank President Mario Draghi.

Draghi did not mention “the strength of the euro as being a problem, sort of like the dog that did not bark, and when central bankers give a green light, traders are in the habit of following along. I think it is going to continue to get worse for the dollar and then, of course, we have a Fed meeting coming our way next week,” Elfenbein said.

Higher interest rates typically tend to increase the value of that country’s currency relative to that of foreign currencies. But that’s not always the case, said Chris Verrone, head of technical analysis for Strategas Research Partners.

“In five of the last six times the Fed has raised rates, you’ve seen the dollar go lower, not higher,” Verrone said Friday on “Trading Nation.” “So this price action really hasn’t been that abnormal from what history tells us should happen. I think the question here is, tactically, do we set up for a bounce? Look to 92.5, 93 for support in the near term.”

On Monday, the dollar index was trading at 93.91, and has declined more than 8 percent this year.

Verrone believes the dollar’s sell-off is close to being overdone, and would neither buy nor sell it right now.

“I would be hesitant in saying ‘go out and buy it,’ just yet,” he said. “I think, best case, you get tactical bounce. It’s too hard to time, too hard to play for.”

In a note to clients Friday, Brown Brothers Harriman global currency strategists wrote that the dollar is “very much unloved.”

“The apparent stabilization of the political situation in Europe, and sustained pace of above trend growth contrasts with the US, where the political situation leaves much to be desired and the economy is uninspiring. The President’s agenda of deregulation, tax reform, and infrastructure that had fueled the last leg up of the dollar’s multi-year rally is now doubted, and those dollar gains have been unwound,” the currency strategists wrote in the note entitled, “Dollar Licks Wounds as News Stream Doesn’t Improve.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-24  Authors: rebecca ungarino, matt cardy, getty images, anthony kwan, bloomberg, kazuhiro nogi, afp, miguelmalo, source, lawrence mcdonald
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, euro, trading, currency, buy, dollar, ugly, wrote, verrone, trader, uglier, index, strategists, think, chart


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Younger business travelers tote own list of ‘must-haves’

And there may be no industry more poised to take advantage of disruptive millennial trends than the field of business travel. In 2016 global business travel spend increased 3.5 percent and approached nearly $1.3 trillion, according to the latest report from the Global Business Travel Association. Growth is expected to continue accelerating by an average of 6.5 percent each year until 2021. For millennials, the last of whom will be entering the workforce in the next five years or so, business fli


And there may be no industry more poised to take advantage of disruptive millennial trends than the field of business travel. In 2016 global business travel spend increased 3.5 percent and approached nearly $1.3 trillion, according to the latest report from the Global Business Travel Association. Growth is expected to continue accelerating by an average of 6.5 percent each year until 2021. For millennials, the last of whom will be entering the workforce in the next five years or so, business fli
Younger business travelers tote own list of ‘must-haves’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-24  Authors: zachary basu, dreampictures blend images, getty images, -dan ruch, founder, ceo of rocketrip
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, workforce, tote, watch, musthaves, list, travel, business, millennial, twice, report, millennials, likely, younger, travelers, spend


Younger business travelers tote own list of 'must-haves'

Millennials, for better or worse, are disruptors. And there may be no industry more poised to take advantage of disruptive millennial trends than the field of business travel.

In 2016 global business travel spend increased 3.5 percent and approached nearly $1.3 trillion, according to the latest report from the Global Business Travel Association. Growth is expected to continue accelerating by an average of 6.5 percent each year until 2021.

For millennials, the last of whom will be entering the workforce in the next five years or so, business flights are expected to account for 50 percent of total travel spend by 2020. By that time, spending by baby boomers, a generation that remains an airline favorite for their steadfast brand loyalty, will shrink to 16 percent.

More from Out of Office:

Newest hotel rooms designed with millennial guests in mind

The best and worst airports for summer travel

When an airline trip feels like a flight back in time

That means airlines and travel companies — at least those that don’t want to be playing catchup over the next few years — need to start catering more to the preferences of the millennial consumer.

Millennials are twice as likely as baby boomers to want to travel for business. But they want to travel in comfort: Millennial fliers are 60 percent more likely to upgrade for extra legroom, according to a report by the Boston Consulting Group. And as one might expect from history’s first ever-connected generation, they are four times more likely to pay for Wi-Fi, twice as likely to watch downloads on mobile devices and 60 percent more likely to watch in-flight entertainment.

But don’t be fooled. Millennials, especially those who are just entering the workforce, aren’t high rollers — they’re value hunters. They want to get the best bang for their buck at the moment of purchase. That’s why millennials are far more likely to cash in on a flight deal or turn to their social networks for hotel advice than enter a long-term loyalty program.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-24  Authors: zachary basu, dreampictures blend images, getty images, -dan ruch, founder, ceo of rocketrip
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, workforce, tote, watch, musthaves, list, travel, business, millennial, twice, report, millennials, likely, younger, travelers, spend


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Investor confidence and America’s status as the world’s economic leader are at risk under Trump

Investor confidence and America’s status as the world’s economic leader are at risk under Trump 5 Hours Ago | 00:41During his final term as Federal Reserve chairman, Alan Greenspan noted an impediment stifling economies in the former Soviet Union: “legal chaos, rampant criminality, and widespread corruption” reminiscent of the American Wild West. There’s no sign of direct economic consequences yet, but as he strains the justice system at home and upends American commitments abroad, Trump poses t


Investor confidence and America’s status as the world’s economic leader are at risk under Trump 5 Hours Ago | 00:41During his final term as Federal Reserve chairman, Alan Greenspan noted an impediment stifling economies in the former Soviet Union: “legal chaos, rampant criminality, and widespread corruption” reminiscent of the American Wild West. There’s no sign of direct economic consequences yet, but as he strains the justice system at home and upends American commitments abroad, Trump poses t
Investor confidence and America’s status as the world’s economic leader are at risk under Trump Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-24  Authors: john harwood
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, investor, leader, international, american, abroad, americas, economic, president, trump, status, worlds, system, zoellick, trumps, confidence, risk


Investor confidence and America's status as the world's economic leader are at risk under Trump

Investor confidence and America’s status as the world’s economic leader are at risk under Trump 5 Hours Ago | 00:41

During his final term as Federal Reserve chairman, Alan Greenspan noted an impediment stifling economies in the former Soviet Union: “legal chaos, rampant criminality, and widespread corruption” reminiscent of the American Wild West.

“Market economies,” Greenspan concluded, “require a rule of law.”

Suddenly, the words and actions of President Donald Trump are raising questions about that principle here. After attacking the judiciary over his travel ban earlier this year and firing the FBI director investigating his campaign, the president has warned Special Counsel Robert Mueller about his inquiry, ripped his own attorney general and mused about issuing pre-emptive pardons.

There’s no sign of direct economic consequences yet, but as he strains the justice system at home and upends American commitments abroad, Trump poses two kinds of risks.

One is to investor confidence in the United States. So far, booming markets have shrugged off momentary sensations, such as the disclosure that his son and campaign chairman sought information to damage Hillary Clinton from a Russian lawyer and Russian spy.

“The right trade has been to ignore political developments,” said Mohamed El-Erian, chief economist for Allianz. But El-Erian warns that “a major shock” could rattle that trade.

Whether Trump himself could administer that shock — say, by firing Mueller and ending the Russia investigation altogether — would depend on how the Republican-controlled Congress reacts. Lawmakers could accept those actions, or challenge a president of their party.

The other risk is to benefits America derives from its status as the world’s economic leader. Trump has already unsettled leaders of other advanced economies by casting doubt on the nation’s international commitments.

The steadiness of the American political system is what has kept the dollar the world’s reserve currency throughout the post World War II era and kept the U.S. the most consistent safe haven for global investment. That, in turn, has assured American businesses ready access to capital, and the federal government an entree to inexpensive financing of budget deficits.

“Most international observers I’ve encountered are deeply concerned by Trump’s lack of interest in — or even disdain for — the 70-year-old international system that the U.S. led in creating and then adapting,” said Robert Zoellick, who served both Presidents Bush in roles including deputy White House chief of staff, deputy secretary of State, and U.S. trade representative before spending five years as president of the World Bank.

Nor are such concerns limited to observers abroad. Zoellick noted that the American president “has now assaulted courts, the intelligence agencies, and the Department of Justice,” among others.

“Maybe the military is safe, at least with [Defense Secretary James] Mattis,” he concluded. “The core question for America-watchers abroad, and I think for Americans, is how the American system and society cope with Trump.”

An erosion of that asset would open opportunities for other economic powers to take advantage. One of them is China, which aims to fill the void created by Trump’s abandonment of the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

It’s not clear that any other nation has the ability or willingness to embrace America’s traditional role as international problem-solver of last resort on challenges including security, public health or humanitarian relief. That, in turn, could impose costs on Americans by damaging the global economy.

One near-term test will be the president’s willingness and ability to work with Congress to deliver an increase in the federal debt limit later this year. Failing to do so could imperil the unique credit-worthiness the U.S. enjoys.

Congressional Republicans have displayed a reluctance to take that step, and the White House lacks a clear strategy. Trump’s own budget director has asserted that the administration can prioritize debt payments in a crisis.

“The impression abroad is that the U.S. is less dependable,” El-Erian said. “What you’re seeing is an erosion of the trust that underpins the multilateral system.”

The threats Trump has signaled to traditional notions of the rule of law represent the other side of the same coin. As new evidence emerged over the weekend about the Trump campaign’s interactions with representatives of Russia, the president asserted via Twitter to his “complete power to pardon.”

“He sees ‘loyalty’ as a personal matter — not to American institutions, rule of law, the Constitution, and traditions,” Zoellick said. “The U.S. presidents I’ve known, or read about, viewed the presidency as larger than themselves. I don’t believe Trump does.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-24  Authors: john harwood
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, investor, leader, international, american, abroad, americas, economic, president, trump, status, worlds, system, zoellick, trumps, confidence, risk


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Small businesses split over Republican health plans

Sarah McCarthy, 39, a talent agent in Los Angeles, said President Barack Obama’s health care law allowed her to start her own business. She now employs a part-time assistant and earns enough to pay the full cost of her health insurance. She fears that the health care law’s elimination would force her or her husband, a self-employed photographer, to work at a large company to gain affordable health coverage for them and their two daughters. The divide also points to an unexpected outgrowth of the


Sarah McCarthy, 39, a talent agent in Los Angeles, said President Barack Obama’s health care law allowed her to start her own business. She now employs a part-time assistant and earns enough to pay the full cost of her health insurance. She fears that the health care law’s elimination would force her or her husband, a self-employed photographer, to work at a large company to gain affordable health coverage for them and their two daughters. The divide also points to an unexpected outgrowth of the
Small businesses split over Republican health plans Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-24  Authors: stacy cowley, andrew seng, the new york times, andrew mangum
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, coverage, affordable, small, care, split, businesses, law, act, plans, smallbusiness, republican, group, health, owners, insurance


Small businesses split over Republican health plans

Small-business owners have been some of the most vocal opponents of the Affordable Care Act. One trade group fought the overhaul all the way to the Supreme Court.

But for many solo entrepreneurs and freelancers, the seeming collapse of the Senate’s efforts to repeal and replace the law came as a relief.

Sarah McCarthy, 39, a talent agent in Los Angeles, said President Barack Obama’s health care law allowed her to start her own business. She opened her company in 2013, and for the first two years, her income was low enough that she qualified for subsidized coverage through the state exchange started after the law. That allowed her to put more money into building her business. She now employs a part-time assistant and earns enough to pay the full cost of her health insurance.

More from New York Times:

When mom and pop can’t sell the farm (or in this case, the theme park)

A new lure for spa customers? A salt cave

Is this the woman who will save Uber?

She fears that the health care law’s elimination would force her or her husband, a self-employed photographer, to work at a large company to gain affordable health coverage for them and their two daughters.

“Being able to buy health insurance that didn’t completely break us financially was key to our ability to take the risk and become entrepreneurs,” Ms. McCarthy said.

Her opposition highlights a growing schism about the Affordable Care Act among small-business owners — a split exposed as Republicans have pursued reversing much of the law in recent months. The divide also points to an unexpected outgrowth of the Republican agenda in Washington: As lawmakers pushed their plans, public support for the Affordable Care Act grew from new corners.

With so many forces aligned in opposition to the Senate’s proposed changes, the views of small-business owners have not been a decisive factor. But the enthusiasm that a growing number are voicing for the health care law weakened the argument, often cited by Republicans, that small businesses had been harmed by it and need a rollback.

Business owners with a few dozen or more workers often resent the cost and regulatory burden of complying with the law’s mandates, and many have backed the Republican efforts. For those who employ only themselves, however, some of the features of the Affordable Care Act — like coverage for existing conditions and curbs on prices — opened up coverage unavailable to them before the law.

In addition, there is a vocal group of self-employed workers who are, like many people, paying higher premiums and deductibles because of the law. But some of them want lawmakers to adjust the law to address those higher costs, instead of repealing and replacing it entirely.

The National Federation of Independent Business, a powerful industry lobbying group that was the plaintiff in the case that went to the Supreme Court, helped lead the small-business effort, years ago, to fight the law. It dislikes the costs that complying with the law impose on businesses, and the mandate that individuals buy insurance.

As the Senate took up its overhaul proposals, the trade group pressed hard for a full repeal — and then criticized lawmakers for not getting it done.

“Small-business owners are deeply disappointed,” Jack Mozloom, a spokesman for the group, said. “The high cost of health care has been the No. 1 concern for small-business owners for more than three decades. Obamacare made that problem worse, driving up costs and shrinking choices. The Senate had a chance to address the problem, and they blew it.”

But as overhaul legislation advanced through Congress, many small-business owners became more vocal about their opposition to the changes. Other industry groups, like the Main Street Alliance and the Small Business Majority, championed their cause.

Manta, an online small-business community that regularly studies the sentiment of business owners, found that a majority of those it surveyed in January said that they wanted the law repealed during President Trump’s time in office. Asked this month about the Republicans’ Senate bill, far more people said they opposed it than supported it. (A majority of those same respondents said they approved of the job Mr. Trump had done so far as president.)

Brent Messenger, the head of community for Fiverr, a marketplace for freelancers, said that members he had spoken with recently lined up about 2-to-1 against a repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Striking down the law, he said, “would be potentially catastrophic for the gig economy.”

Small-business owners generally face higher per-person insurance costs for themselves and their employees than large employers, because individuals and smaller groups are inherently more risky to insure — and, therefore, more expensive — than the larger pools that big employers can assemble. The Affordable Care Act tried to address some of those problems by requiring insurers to set level premiums for all individual policyholders by age and by prohibiting insurers from dropping policyholders if they got sick.

One in five people who buy coverage through the marketplaces created by the law is a small-business owner, totaling 1.4 million people, according to Treasury Department research. Another significant population relies on government programs like Medicaid, which the health law expanded.

Joel Schaubert, 51, a software consultant in Minneapolis, said that before the law, he worried about what would happen if he harmed his left arm, which he broke a decade ago in a biking accident. It became a pre-existing condition, and as he navigated the individual insurance market, the policies he bought explicitly excluded it from coverage, he said. That changed only after the health law took effect.

“I can finally get insurance that covers my entire body,” Mr. Schaubert said.

But to expand coverage and bring in enough healthy customers to keep various insurance pools afloat, the government also forced some trade-offs. To put more people into the individual insurance market, it stopped allowing sole proprietors to join small-group pools and required them to instead buy individual coverage.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-24  Authors: stacy cowley, andrew seng, the new york times, andrew mangum
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, coverage, affordable, small, care, split, businesses, law, act, plans, smallbusiness, republican, group, health, owners, insurance


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Single-payer health insurance: Democrats and Bernie Sanders seem serious

“Medicare-for-all is a concept with very different meanings to different people,” said Harold Pollack, a health care expert at the University of Chicago. “Within that term, you’re really talking about vastly different visions for the health care system.” This idea — what is typically meant by “single-payer” or “Medicare-for-all” — would make it illegal for private insurers to offer basic health insurance plans, except in highly specialized and expensive cases. Rep. John Conyers (D-MI) has a sing


“Medicare-for-all is a concept with very different meanings to different people,” said Harold Pollack, a health care expert at the University of Chicago. “Within that term, you’re really talking about vastly different visions for the health care system.” This idea — what is typically meant by “single-payer” or “Medicare-for-all” — would make it illegal for private insurers to offer basic health insurance plans, except in highly specialized and expensive cases. Rep. John Conyers (D-MI) has a sing
Single-payer health insurance: Democrats and Bernie Sanders seem serious Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-24  Authors: jeff stein, jay laprete, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, medicare, bernie, private, medicareforall, care, democrats, different, singlepayer, sanders, serious, plans, policy, health, insurance


Single-payer health insurance: Democrats and Bernie Sanders seem serious

It’s worth laying out all of the wildly different kinds of policy ideas could reasonably fall within the rubric of Medicare-for-all.

Interpreted in the most literal possible way, Medicare-for-all would entail extending Medicare coverage to the rest of the country. Medicare is a broadly popular program that enjoys wide support and name recognition with the public. The idea of extending Medicare to everyone is one that voters can immediately and easily understand, particularly compared with the byzantine subsidy structure of Obamacare’s private exchanges.

But that simple description obscures massive differences between potential policy paths for the idea. “Medicare-for-all is a concept with very different meanings to different people,” said Harold Pollack, a health care expert at the University of Chicago. “Within that term, you’re really talking about vastly different visions for the health care system.”

For instance, Medicare could be made available to all Americans as a buy-in, without necessarily forcing everyone off their current private plans in order to put them on the government-run system. Vox’s Dylan Matthews has looked at Rep. Peter Stark’s AmeriCare Health Care Act, which wouldn’t immediately create a single-payer system but would automatically enroll all children and all Medicaid patients, in addition to offering a cheap public option available to employers and individuals alike that would be cheaper than private insurance and eventually drive private insurers out of the market.

A more sweeping solution would be to create a single, government-operated health insurer that would automatically enroll every American and pay for their insurance. This idea — what is typically meant by “single-payer” or “Medicare-for-all” — would make it illegal for private insurers to offer basic health insurance plans, except in highly specialized and expensive cases. In other words, these plans would force at least 150 million Americans — or everyone who gets their insurance through their employer, except for a small number who could choose to buy specialty insurance — off their current health care plans and onto the new government system.

Rep. John Conyers (D-MI) has a single-payer bill — now co-signed by about 60 percent of House Democrats — that would do roughly that. Sanders’s upcoming Senate bill is expected to adhere to a similar blueprint. These plans would face significant political obstacles, which I’ll address in the next section.

Another big bucket of policy questions is the benefit package itself. “Many people refer to single-payer as Medicare-for-all, but most of the proposals don’t actually use Medicare,” said Larry Levitt, a health policy expert at the Kaiser Foundation. “If you proposed Medicare-for-all, some people would be horrified at the level of cost sharing required.”

Medicare is a somewhat strangely designed benefit aimed at elderly beneficiaries — it would need standardization and customization to work for the rest of the country. The plans that use Medicare’s name often don’t actually use its benefits package. Unlike in real Medicare, for instance, Conyers’s bill calls for zero cost sharing, meaning the government would pay for all Americans’ premiums, copays, and deductibles, which would drive up the bill’s price tag; Sanders’s plan is likely to offer something similar.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-24  Authors: jeff stein, jay laprete, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, medicare, bernie, private, medicareforall, care, democrats, different, singlepayer, sanders, serious, plans, policy, health, insurance


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Parents of UK baby Charlie Gard end legal battle over treatment

The parents of Charlie Gard have ended their legal battle to give the terminally ill British baby further treatment, a lawyer representing the parents said on Monday. The lawyer told London’s High Court that time had “run out” for the child. Charlie has a rare genetic condition causing progressive muscle weakness and brain damage. His parents had sought to send him to the United States to undergo experimental therapy. U.S. President Donald Trump and Pope Francis have voiced support for Charlie.


The parents of Charlie Gard have ended their legal battle to give the terminally ill British baby further treatment, a lawyer representing the parents said on Monday. The lawyer told London’s High Court that time had “run out” for the child. Charlie has a rare genetic condition causing progressive muscle weakness and brain damage. His parents had sought to send him to the United States to undergo experimental therapy. U.S. President Donald Trump and Pope Francis have voiced support for Charlie.
Parents of UK baby Charlie Gard end legal battle over treatment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-24  Authors: neil hall
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, united, gard, end, uk, parents, charlie, court, baby, undergo, battle, weakness, trump, treatment, lawyer, damage, voiced, legal


Parents of UK baby Charlie Gard end legal battle over treatment

The parents of Charlie Gard have ended their legal battle to give the terminally ill British baby further treatment, a lawyer representing the parents said on Monday.

The lawyer told London’s High Court that time had “run out” for the child.

“For Charlie it is too late. The damage has been done,” Grant Armstrong said.

Charlie has a rare genetic condition causing progressive muscle weakness and brain damage. His parents had sought to send him to the United States to undergo experimental therapy.

Britain’s courts, backed by the European Court of Human Rights, have refused permission, saying it would prolong his suffering without any realistic prospect of helping the 11-month-old child.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Pope Francis have voiced support for Charlie.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-24  Authors: neil hall
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, united, gard, end, uk, parents, charlie, court, baby, undergo, battle, weakness, trump, treatment, lawyer, damage, voiced, legal


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Here’s why traders are expecting big moves out of biotech this week

The busiest week for earnings kicks off on Monday, and investors are eyeing one group in particular: biotech. The ETF could continue to rally when the top names in the group report earnings this week. Amgen and Biogen kick off the foray on Tuesday, Gilead and Vertex report on Wednesday and Alexion and Celgene on Thursday. The options market is implying some large moves for the biotech names that are reporting this week. If all of these biotech names move according to their implied earnings moves


The busiest week for earnings kicks off on Monday, and investors are eyeing one group in particular: biotech. The ETF could continue to rally when the top names in the group report earnings this week. Amgen and Biogen kick off the foray on Tuesday, Gilead and Vertex report on Wednesday and Alexion and Celgene on Thursday. The options market is implying some large moves for the biotech names that are reporting this week. If all of these biotech names move according to their implied earnings moves
Here’s why traders are expecting big moves out of biotech this week Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-24  Authors: heidi chung, alex raths, getty images, mariya gordeyeva, ashlee espinal, brittany sowacke, bloomberg, david a grogan
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, earnings, heres, vertex, stocks, trading, celgene, traders, expecting, moves, week, report, options, names, biotech, big


Here’s why traders are expecting big moves out of biotech this week

The busiest week for earnings kicks off on Monday, and investors are eyeing one group in particular: biotech.

The biotech ETF, IBB, is up more than 22 percent this year and just posted its best week in a month. The ETF could continue to rally when the top names in the group report earnings this week. Amgen and Biogen kick off the foray on Tuesday, Gilead and Vertex report on Wednesday and Alexion and Celgene on Thursday. Together, those stocks make up more than 30 percent of the ETF.

“Biotech has underperformed [the Nasdaq] for about a year and a half. They just picked up. I think it’s important to remember that these stocks move around [on earnings],” Dan Nathan of RiskReversal.com said Friday on CNBC’s “Options Action.”

Furthermore, heading into earnings, “one of the places where you see names that see a lot of options activity tends to be biotech,” added Mike Khouw of Optimize Advisors.

The options market is implying some large moves for the biotech names that are reporting this week. Traders are anticipating Alexion to see the biggest move on earnings, about a 6 percent move in either direction. Biogen is expected to move 4.2 percent, Gilead could see a move of 3.9 percent, Celgene is expecting a 3.3 percent move, and Vertex could move about 3.2 percent. Amgen is expected to see the smallest move of 2.7 percent in either direction.

If all of these biotech names move according to their implied earnings moves, that would be about a $16 billion total market cap shift.

Khouw is specifically targeting Celgene for a breakout. “[Celgene] finally seems like it’s starting to move after trading sideways all this time, and right now is a good time to take advantage of options prices being low,” he said. He recommended buying the September 140 calls for $3.80, looking for a move above $143.80, or roughly 4 percent above its current stock price, by September expiration. “This is a way to capture earnings,” he added.

The IBB was trading at the $326.07 range by midday Monday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-24  Authors: heidi chung, alex raths, getty images, mariya gordeyeva, ashlee espinal, brittany sowacke, bloomberg, david a grogan
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, earnings, heres, vertex, stocks, trading, celgene, traders, expecting, moves, week, report, options, names, biotech, big


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