Oil prices stay weak as US drilling undermines drive to tighten markets

Oil prices remained weak on Monday as a relentless rise in U.S. drilling undermined an OPEC-led push to tighten supply. Brent crude futures were trading at $52.10 per barrel at 0150 GMT, down 5 cents from their last close. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures remained below $50, down 8 cents at $49.72.


Oil prices remained weak on Monday as a relentless rise in U.S. drilling undermined an OPEC-led push to tighten supply. Brent crude futures were trading at $52.10 per barrel at 0150 GMT, down 5 cents from their last close. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures remained below $50, down 8 cents at $49.72.
Oil prices stay weak as US drilling undermines drive to tighten markets Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-28  Authors: getty images, j pat carter
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, weak, drive, remained, undermines, wti, crude, drilling, stay, cents, trading, oil, tighten, markets, prices, undermined, futures, west


Oil prices stay weak as US drilling undermines drive to tighten markets

Oil prices remained weak on Monday as a relentless rise in U.S. drilling undermined an OPEC-led push to tighten supply.

Brent crude futures were trading at $52.10 per barrel at 0150 GMT, down 5 cents from their last close.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures remained below $50, down 8 cents at $49.72.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-28  Authors: getty images, j pat carter
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, weak, drive, remained, undermines, wti, crude, drilling, stay, cents, trading, oil, tighten, markets, prices, undermined, futures, west


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Gold holds near 4-week highs, political tensions support

Political tensions surrounding U.S. President Donald Trump are providing some safe-haven support for gold, OCBC analyst Barnabas Gan said. Gold, which is used as an alternative investment during times of political and financial uncertainty, has gained more than 4 percent since hitting an eight-week low of $1,213.81 on May 9. Spot gold may climb to $1,276 per ounce, as it has broken above a resistance at $1,264, said Reuters technical analyst Wang Tao. “We remain friendly on gold and suspect that


Political tensions surrounding U.S. President Donald Trump are providing some safe-haven support for gold, OCBC analyst Barnabas Gan said. Gold, which is used as an alternative investment during times of political and financial uncertainty, has gained more than 4 percent since hitting an eight-week low of $1,213.81 on May 9. Spot gold may climb to $1,276 per ounce, as it has broken above a resistance at $1,264, said Reuters technical analyst Wang Tao. “We remain friendly on gold and suspect that
Gold holds near 4-week highs, political tensions support Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-28  Authors: getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, near, white, highs, political, support, 4week, market, analyst, gold, holds, push, week, tensions, federal, gan


Gold holds near 4-week highs, political tensions support

Political tensions surrounding U.S. President Donald Trump are providing some safe-haven support for gold, OCBC analyst Barnabas Gan said.

The market is also watching out for the Federal Open Market Committee meeting next month for any cues on U.S. Federal Reserve’s stance on interest rate hikes and balance sheet reduction intentions, Gan added.

Trump attacked the news media and dismissed leaks from the White House as “fake news” on Sunday, following reports his son-in-law tried to set up a secret channel of communications with Moscow before he took office. The ongoing furore has raised concerns about his ability to push through promised fiscal stimulus.

Gold, which is used as an alternative investment during times of political and financial uncertainty, has gained more than 4 percent since hitting an eight-week low of $1,213.81 on May 9.

Spot gold may climb to $1,276 per ounce, as it has broken above a resistance at $1,264, said Reuters technical analyst Wang Tao.

“We remain friendly on gold and suspect that we will likely push higher over the course of the coming week,” INTL FCStone analyst Edward Meir said in a note.

“A weaker dollar, coupled with rising geopolitical tensions should keep the precious metal relatively buoyant.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-28  Authors: getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, near, white, highs, political, support, 4week, market, analyst, gold, holds, push, week, tensions, federal, gan


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Dollar edges up, markets take N.Korea missile test in stride

San Francisco Federal Reserve President John Williams said in Singapore on Monday that medium-term trends in U.S. inflation remained “pretty favorable, “despite some recent soft consumer price data. Data on Friday indicated the U.S. economy was modestly expanding, which might allow the Fed to raise interest rates further and to begin paring its $4.5 trillion balance sheet. Rates futures implied traders saw a nearly 90 percent chance the Fed would increase rates by a quarter point to 1.00-1.25 pe


San Francisco Federal Reserve President John Williams said in Singapore on Monday that medium-term trends in U.S. inflation remained “pretty favorable, “despite some recent soft consumer price data. Data on Friday indicated the U.S. economy was modestly expanding, which might allow the Fed to raise interest rates further and to begin paring its $4.5 trillion balance sheet. Rates futures implied traders saw a nearly 90 percent chance the Fed would increase rates by a quarter point to 1.00-1.25 pe
Dollar edges up, markets take N.Korea missile test in stride Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-28  Authors: dan kitwood, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, missile, edges, williams, nkorea, rates, likely, policy, dollar, quarter, employment, market, economy, markets, fed, test, federal, stride


Dollar edges up, markets take N.Korea missile test in stride

San Francisco Federal Reserve President John Williams said in Singapore on Monday that medium-term trends in U.S. inflation remained “pretty favorable, “despite some recent soft consumer price data.

The U.S. economy was at or near the Federal Reserve’s goals of full employment and stable prices, Williams said, adding that the U.S. central bank wanted to ensure markets stayed calm as the Fed slowly returned interest-rate policy to normal.

Data on Friday indicated the U.S. economy was modestly expanding, which might allow the Fed to raise interest rates further and to begin paring its $4.5 trillion balance sheet.

Gross domestic product grew at an annual 1.2 percent in the first quarter, faster than the 0.7 percent reported last month, though softening business investment and moderate consumer spending might impede an acceleration in the second quarter.

Rates futures implied traders saw a nearly 90 percent chance the Fed would increase rates by a quarter point to 1.00-1.25 percent at its June 13-14 policy meeting, according to CME Group’s FedWatch program.

“The market is waiting for the U.S. employment data on Friday,” said Masashi Murata, currency strategist for Brown Brothers Harriman in Tokyo.

The nonfarm payrolls report was likely to show that labor market conditions remain solid, which he said “will support the expectation that the Fed is likely to hike rates.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-28  Authors: dan kitwood, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, missile, edges, williams, nkorea, rates, likely, policy, dollar, quarter, employment, market, economy, markets, fed, test, federal, stride


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Op-Ed: US should focus on the economy and skip irrelevant talking forums

Seeking to cut $610 billion from health care for the poor, and $192 billion from food assistance to 43 million Americans struggling to make ends meet, while spending millions of dollars on European jamborees will probably strike most people as an example of bad and insensitive public policy. All these issues have been explained in bilateral and multilateral forums and constantly amplified by the European media. The White House should have taken a cue from Italy’s former (and most probably future


Seeking to cut $610 billion from health care for the poor, and $192 billion from food assistance to 43 million Americans struggling to make ends meet, while spending millions of dollars on European jamborees will probably strike most people as an example of bad and insensitive public policy. All these issues have been explained in bilateral and multilateral forums and constantly amplified by the European media. The White House should have taken a cue from Italy’s former (and most probably future
Op-Ed: US should focus on the economy and skip irrelevant talking forums Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-28  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, european, skip, irrelevant, focus, money, forums, dollars, talking, oped, economy, taken, trade, probably, net, public, countries, billion


Op-Ed: US should focus on the economy and skip irrelevant talking forums

Seeking to cut $610 billion from health care for the poor, and $192 billion from food assistance to 43 million Americans struggling to make ends meet, while spending millions of dollars on European jamborees will probably strike most people as an example of bad and insensitive public policy.

Given the vacuity of last week’s European meetings, one may question why was it necessary for the U.S. president to spend four days and all that money to repeat for the nth time to people who took $165 billion net out of their U.S. trade in 2016 what he has been telling them over the last two years.

No European leader has been in any doubt for quite some time that (a) trillions of dollars in U.S. trade deficits and a soaring net foreign debt of $8.1 trillion could not continue, (b) trade policies would be reviewed with particular attention to countries running systematic and large trade surpluses with the U.S., (c) the treaty on global warming would be closely scrutinized and (d) U.S. would insist on all member countries honoring their financial obligations to the NATO alliance.

All these issues have been explained in bilateral and multilateral forums and constantly amplified by the European media.

The White House should have taken a cue from Italy’s former (and most probably future) Prime Minister Matteo Renzi. Outraged by do-nothing summits in Brussels, he scolded the spendthrift Eurocrats for squandering public money and precious time on matters where a simple SMS could have taken care of their trivial agenda.

Yes, tweeting would have saved a lot of money and an embarrassing French and German media portrayal of a “confused and isolated America.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-28  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, european, skip, irrelevant, focus, money, forums, dollars, talking, oped, economy, taken, trade, probably, net, public, countries, billion


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5 signs you’re working for a toxic boss (and 5 tips to help)

Unfortunately, it’s all too common to work for a manager who’s hard to please, demanding for all the wrong reasons and tough to talk to about day-to-day tasks. Researchers say good bosses are a rare breed. As many as 60 to 75 percent of managers are unfit for leadership, according to Psychology Today. Meanwhile, about half of employees cite a bad manager as their top reason for quitting a job, according to a Gallup poll from 2015. If your boss exhibits any of the characteristics below, chances a


Unfortunately, it’s all too common to work for a manager who’s hard to please, demanding for all the wrong reasons and tough to talk to about day-to-day tasks. Researchers say good bosses are a rare breed. As many as 60 to 75 percent of managers are unfit for leadership, according to Psychology Today. Meanwhile, about half of employees cite a bad manager as their top reason for quitting a job, according to a Gallup poll from 2015. If your boss exhibits any of the characteristics below, chances a
5 signs you’re working for a toxic boss (and 5 tips to help) Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-28  Authors: benjamin snyder
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, working, unfortunately, according, whos, toxic, signs, manager, boss, work, help, wrong, unfit, youre, tough, topresume, tips


5 signs you're working for a toxic boss (and 5 tips to help)

Unfortunately, it’s all too common to work for a manager who’s hard to please, demanding for all the wrong reasons and tough to talk to about day-to-day tasks.

Researchers say good bosses are a rare breed. As many as 60 to 75 percent of managers are unfit for leadership, according to Psychology Today. Meanwhile, about half of employees cite a bad manager as their top reason for quitting a job, according to a Gallup poll from 2015.

If your boss exhibits any of the characteristics below, chances are they’re toxic, according to career expert Amanda Augustine of TopResume.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-28  Authors: benjamin snyder
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, working, unfortunately, according, whos, toxic, signs, manager, boss, work, help, wrong, unfit, youre, tough, topresume, tips


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Skip the Sun Belt: 10 perfect states for retirees

If you’re gearing up for retirement, forget the Sun Belt states. “It’s not a place where you’re going on vacation,” he said. California, meanwhile, offered the best weather, but ranked 42nd due to its high taxes. Be sure to weigh your options if you can’t drive and whether you can easily access your care providers. “A support network of family and friends will be important as you get older,” said Bell.


If you’re gearing up for retirement, forget the Sun Belt states. “It’s not a place where you’re going on vacation,” he said. California, meanwhile, offered the best weather, but ranked 42nd due to its high taxes. Be sure to weigh your options if you can’t drive and whether you can easily access your care providers. “A support network of family and friends will be important as you get older,” said Bell.
Skip the Sun Belt: 10 perfect states for retirees Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-28  Authors: darla mercado, davidbyronkeener, getty images, steve smith, jonathan kirn, erik isakson, robbreece, blend images – ariel skelley, wildnerdpix, troy aossey
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, bell, weigh, wellbeingthe, place, vacation, weather, cant, skip, states, perfect, retirees, ranked, belt, youre, network


Skip the Sun Belt: 10 perfect states for retirees

If you’re gearing up for retirement, forget the Sun Belt states.

Beaches, sunny days and low taxes are just a handful of criteria you ought to consider when finding a place to live for the remainder of your life, said Claes Bell, an analyst at Bankrate.

“It’s not a place where you’re going on vacation,” he said. Florida, for instance, ranked 17th, because crime was a bigger issue there than in other locales.

California, meanwhile, offered the best weather, but ranked 42nd due to its high taxes.

Be sure to weigh your options if you can’t drive and whether you can easily access your care providers.

Your accessibility to a social network also is important.

“A support network of family and friends will be important as you get older,” said Bell. “You can’t get isolated — it can lead to issues with well-being.”

The following is the top 10. Find out how your state ranks here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-28  Authors: darla mercado, davidbyronkeener, getty images, steve smith, jonathan kirn, erik isakson, robbreece, blend images – ariel skelley, wildnerdpix, troy aossey
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, bell, weigh, wellbeingthe, place, vacation, weather, cant, skip, states, perfect, retirees, ranked, belt, youre, network


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Silicon Valley is trumpeting AI as the cure for the medical industry, but doctors are skeptical

Several doctors agreed that AI will help them with their grunt work, and hopefully free them up to spend more time with patients. “Health and health care is too human a notion for AI alone to cure it,” says Rasu Shrestha, chief innovation officer at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and chief of the division of radiology informatics. Radiology is the specialty that many in the tech industry believe will be disrupted first by AI. The reality with health care, he said, is that it’s a complic


Several doctors agreed that AI will help them with their grunt work, and hopefully free them up to spend more time with patients. “Health and health care is too human a notion for AI alone to cure it,” says Rasu Shrestha, chief innovation officer at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and chief of the division of radiology informatics. Radiology is the specialty that many in the tech industry believe will be disrupted first by AI. The reality with health care, he said, is that it’s a complic
Silicon Valley is trumpeting AI as the cure for the medical industry, but doctors are skeptical Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-27  Authors: christina farr, ariel skelley, getty images, -ethan weiss, ucsf cardiologist
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, cure, agreed, university, doctors, silicon, care, patients, skeptical, valley, human, think, health, medical, ai, industry, trumpeting


Silicon Valley is trumpeting AI as the cure for the medical industry, but doctors are skeptical

Several doctors agreed that AI will help them with their grunt work, and hopefully free them up to spend more time with patients.

“Health and health care is too human a notion for AI alone to cure it,” says Rasu Shrestha, chief innovation officer at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and chief of the division of radiology informatics.

Radiology is the specialty that many in the tech industry believe will be disrupted first by AI. A nuanced read in the New Yorker on the topic cites a computer scientist who thinks that medical schools should stop training radiologists altogether.

But Shrestha doesn’t think that AI will do his job. Instead, he hopes that it will free him up to spend more time with patients, rather than being a “mere diagnostician” or a “human robot.”

Oates agreed that it could take over some of the more mundane aspects of his job. He said UPMC has some AI algorithms in place to help them with their decision-making, but it’s still limited today.

Most of the doctors were not aware of uses of AI being used in the clinic to benefit patients outside of a research study. Before it becomes mainstream, health systems will need to find ways to protect the privacy of patients, and protect themselves from liability. What if the AI gets it wrong?

Ultimately, they agreed that what matters is whether this technology is helping patients — not how cool it seems, or whether it makes money for Silicon Valley venture capitalists.

Joel Zivot, an anesthesiologist and fellowship director in critical care medicine at Emory University, noted that doctors and patients are too rarely represented in health technology. Too often, he said that companies “imagine what they think is our deep problem and they try to solve it.”

The reality with health care, he said, is that it’s a complicated, collaborative and fundamentally human. It’s not about super-doctors — or supercomputers for that matter — parachuting in to save the day.

“I think Silicon Valley has taken this simplistic voice in thinking that we need data and fast computers,” he said. “Before companies say they’re going to make the future better, first come and talk to me and try to understand what I do in some deeper way.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-27  Authors: christina farr, ariel skelley, getty images, -ethan weiss, ucsf cardiologist
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, cure, agreed, university, doctors, silicon, care, patients, skeptical, valley, human, think, health, medical, ai, industry, trumpeting


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We went inside an Amazon Prime Now hub to learn how Amazon does 2-hour delivery

Amazon is quietly expanding Prime Now, its free 2-hour delivery service. Amazon may be keeping it under wraps as it ramps up its offerings and perfects its fastest delivery method yet. After all, you won’t find the service on the Amazon mobile app — you’ll have to give up some screen real estate for its “Prime Now” app. We headed inside one of Amazon’s Prime Now hubs in the company’s hometown, Seattle, to see for ourselves what free 2-hour delivery looks like. What we found was surprising effici


Amazon is quietly expanding Prime Now, its free 2-hour delivery service. Amazon may be keeping it under wraps as it ramps up its offerings and perfects its fastest delivery method yet. After all, you won’t find the service on the Amazon mobile app — you’ll have to give up some screen real estate for its “Prime Now” app. We headed inside one of Amazon’s Prime Now hubs in the company’s hometown, Seattle, to see for ourselves what free 2-hour delivery looks like. What we found was surprising effici
We went inside an Amazon Prime Now hub to learn how Amazon does 2-hour delivery Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-27  Authors: deirdre bosa, eric piermont, afp, getty images, justin sullivan, source
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, does, zip, amazon, learn, 2hour, delivery, amazons, seattle, free, went, service, youll, prime, inside, hub


We went inside an Amazon Prime Now hub to learn how Amazon does 2-hour delivery

Amazon is quietly expanding Prime Now, its free 2-hour delivery service. After originally launching in one zip code in New York City back in 2014, it’s now available in more than 45 cities in eight countries. This year alone, it’s added 14 more cities.

But don’t feel bad if you haven’t heard about it yet. Amazon may be keeping it under wraps as it ramps up its offerings and perfects its fastest delivery method yet.

After all, you won’t find the service on the Amazon mobile app — you’ll have to give up some screen real estate for its “Prime Now” app.

We headed inside one of Amazon’s Prime Now hubs in the company’s hometown, Seattle, to see for ourselves what free 2-hour delivery looks like.

What we found was surprising efficiency, a whole lot of randomness and some hints as to what Seattle consumers are shopping for. And, possibility, Amazon’s vision for the future of ecommerce and retail.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-27  Authors: deirdre bosa, eric piermont, afp, getty images, justin sullivan, source
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, does, zip, amazon, learn, 2hour, delivery, amazons, seattle, free, went, service, youll, prime, inside, hub


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US backs call for fight against protectionism in G-7 communique: Source

U.S. President Donald Trump has agreed to include a pledge to fight trade protectionism in a final communique due to be released later on Saturday at the end of a summit of Group of Seven leaders, a G-7 source said. However, the world’s largest economy declined to join the group’s consensus on the Paris climate accord, with Trump posting on Twitter that the U.S. would render a final decision next week. According to the communique released to reporters, the U.S. “is in the process of reviewing it


U.S. President Donald Trump has agreed to include a pledge to fight trade protectionism in a final communique due to be released later on Saturday at the end of a summit of Group of Seven leaders, a G-7 source said. However, the world’s largest economy declined to join the group’s consensus on the Paris climate accord, with Trump posting on Twitter that the U.S. would render a final decision next week. According to the communique released to reporters, the U.S. “is in the process of reviewing it
US backs call for fight against protectionism in G-7 communique: Source Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-27  Authors: alessandro bianchi
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, previously, backs, fight, communique, trade, released, source, protectionism, trump, process, g7, united, final, paris


US backs call for fight against protectionism in G-7 communique: Source

U.S. President Donald Trump has agreed to include a pledge to fight trade protectionism in a final communique due to be released later on Saturday at the end of a summit of Group of Seven leaders, a G-7 source said.

However, the world’s largest economy declined to join the group’s consensus on the Paris climate accord, with Trump posting on Twitter that the U.S. would render a final decision next week. According to the communique released to reporters, the U.S. “is in the process of reviewing its policies on climate change and on the Paris Agreement and thus is not in a position to join the consensus on these topics.”

It added: “Understanding this process, the Heads of State and of Government of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United Kingdom and the Presidents of the European Council and of the European Commission reaffirm their strong commitment to swiftly implement the Paris Agreement, as previously stated at the Ise-Shima Summit.”

Trump has previously endorsed protectionist measures, saying the United States was suffering due to unfair trade practices from some of its main Western allies, including Germany, as well as from China and some developing nations.

“Trump agreed that the fight against protectionism should be in the final statement,” a G7 source said.

–CNBC contributed to this article.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-27  Authors: alessandro bianchi
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, previously, backs, fight, communique, trade, released, source, protectionism, trump, process, g7, united, final, paris


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This is a growth budget that will restore Clinton-Gingrich welfare reforms

So now, over 20 years later, Mick Mulvaney is talking workfare over welfare. Almost eight years after the recession trough, government benefits for welfare, food stamps (44 million people receive food-stamp benefits today, compared with 14 million in December 2007), Medicaid, and Social Security Disability Insurance are still exploding. That is, the best of government intentions have actually backfired by reducing incentives to work and earn. The expansion of food stamps, welfare, health-insuran


So now, over 20 years later, Mick Mulvaney is talking workfare over welfare. Almost eight years after the recession trough, government benefits for welfare, food stamps (44 million people receive food-stamp benefits today, compared with 14 million in December 2007), Medicaid, and Social Security Disability Insurance are still exploding. That is, the best of government intentions have actually backfired by reducing incentives to work and earn. The expansion of food stamps, welfare, health-insuran
This is a growth budget that will restore Clinton-Gingrich welfare reforms Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-27  Authors: larry kudlow, jim bourg
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, taking, stamps, assistance, unemployed, reforms, restore, subsidies, food, growth, work, budget, welfare, clintongingrich, recession, mulligan


This is a growth budget that will restore Clinton-Gingrich welfare reforms

So now, over 20 years later, Mick Mulvaney is talking workfare over welfare. And, of course, the left-wing screaming has begun.

But something must be done. Almost eight years after the recession trough, government benefits for welfare, food stamps (44 million people receive food-stamp benefits today, compared with 14 million in December 2007), Medicaid, and Social Security Disability Insurance are still exploding.

So by tightening eligibility and putting back time limits and various work requirements, millions will return to the labor force, just as they did in the mid-1990s.

University of Chicago economics professor Casey Mulligan calls this the redistribution recession. That is, the best of government intentions have actually backfired by reducing incentives to work and earn.

The expansion of food stamps, welfare, health-insurance subsidies, unemployment assistance, and disability assistance have led to unintended consequences and perverse after-tax incentives, such that it pays more to stay on assistance than to go to work. At the working-poor margin, taking a job may rob you of Obamacare subsidies. So better off not to work.

A couple of years ago, Mulligan estimated that the marginal tax rate — the extra taxes paid and subsidies foregone as the result of working — had increased from 40 percent to 48 percent. Progressives hate this viewpoint. But Mulligan summed it up this way: “Helping people is valuable but not free. The more you help low-income people, the more low-income people you have. The more you help unemployed people, the more unemployed people you’ll have.”

The Left is also up in arms because Trump is “slashing” the budget. He’s taking food out of the mouths of babes! Killing people for lack of health insurance! Throwing granny in the wheelchair off the side of the cliff!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-27  Authors: larry kudlow, jim bourg
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, taking, stamps, assistance, unemployed, reforms, restore, subsidies, food, growth, work, budget, welfare, clintongingrich, recession, mulligan


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