Hillary Clinton attacks proposed Trump budget cuts as ‘cruelty’

Hillary Clinton assailed the man who beat her to the White House, slamming as “unimaginable cruelty” President Donald Trump’s proposal to cut $3.6 trillion in government spending over the next decade in a speech on Friday. But she took several veiled swipes at the businessman-turned-politician, whose budget proposal earlier this week proposed sharp cuts in programs for healthcare and food assistance. It is an attack of unimaginable cruelty on the most vulnerable among us,” Clinton told a crowd a


Hillary Clinton assailed the man who beat her to the White House, slamming as “unimaginable cruelty” President Donald Trump’s proposal to cut $3.6 trillion in government spending over the next decade in a speech on Friday. But she took several veiled swipes at the businessman-turned-politician, whose budget proposal earlier this week proposed sharp cuts in programs for healthcare and food assistance. It is an attack of unimaginable cruelty on the most vulnerable among us,” Clinton told a crowd a
Hillary Clinton attacks proposed Trump budget cuts as ‘cruelty’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: brian snyder
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, proposed, attacks, public, wellesley, graduating, cruelty, hillary, white, house, budget, trump, cuts, clinton, proposal, president


Hillary Clinton attacks proposed Trump budget cuts as 'cruelty'

Hillary Clinton assailed the man who beat her to the White House, slamming as “unimaginable cruelty” President Donald Trump’s proposal to cut $3.6 trillion in government spending over the next decade in a speech on Friday.

The defeated Democratic candidate did not name the Republican president in her remarks to the graduating class at her alma mater, Wellesley College. But she took several veiled swipes at the businessman-turned-politician, whose budget proposal earlier this week proposed sharp cuts in programs for healthcare and food assistance.

“Look at the budget that was just proposed in Washington. It is an attack of unimaginable cruelty on the most vulnerable among us,” Clinton told a crowd at the all-women’s college, located in Boston’s suburbs.

“It grossly underfunds public education, mental health and even efforts to combat the opioid epidemic.”

White House officials have described the proposed budget as providing tax cuts that they say would stimulate economic growth and create more private-sector jobs. As with all presidential budget proposals, the proposal was more of a wishlist that is unlikely to be approved in its current form by Congress.

Clinton, a former secretary of state, warned against an erosion of accepted standards of truth in U.S. public discourse, and also appeared to be attacking Trump on this issue.

“You are graduating a time when there is a full-fledged assault on truth and reason. Just log on to social media for 10 seconds, it will hit you right in the face,” she said, citing hoax online reports that her campaign was tied to a Washington pizzeria that operated a child sex ring.

“When people in power invent their own facts and attack those who question them, it can mark the beginning of the end of a free society,” Clinton said. “This is not hyperbole, it is what authoritarian regimes throughout history have done.”

She also urged graduates of the liberal-leaning school, which is located in one of the most Democratic states in the country, not to retreat into their own partisan echo chambers,

saying, “your learning, listening and serving should include people who don’t agree with you politically.”

Clinton has had a long public career since graduating in 1969 from Wellesley. She was first lady during her husband Bill Clinton’s two terms in the White House and was later elected to the U.S. Senate representing New York state. She made an unsuccessful presidential run in 2008 before serving as the country’s top diplomat during President Barack Obama’s first term.

Clinton, 69, has gradually returned to the public eye since her upset November defeat, saying that she will not run for office again but will serve as an activist citizen.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: brian snyder
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, proposed, attacks, public, wellesley, graduating, cruelty, hillary, white, house, budget, trump, cuts, clinton, proposal, president


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PRO Talks: James Altucher on the next big financial innovation

James Altucher shares his market views and discusses his latest book “Reinvent Yourself” in an exclusive interview for CNBC PRO with Mike Santoli. On the next big financial innovation: “There’s a lot more interest in investing in crowdfunded vehicles; you can even have crowdfunded IPOs now,” Altucher said. Altucher is a successful entrepreneur, angel investor and best-selling author of “Choose Yourself.” He is an investor and advisor to more than 30 companies and hosts the popular business podca


James Altucher shares his market views and discusses his latest book “Reinvent Yourself” in an exclusive interview for CNBC PRO with Mike Santoli. On the next big financial innovation: “There’s a lot more interest in investing in crowdfunded vehicles; you can even have crowdfunded IPOs now,” Altucher said. Altucher is a successful entrepreneur, angel investor and best-selling author of “Choose Yourself.” He is an investor and advisor to more than 30 companies and hosts the popular business podca
PRO Talks: James Altucher on the next big financial innovation Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: crystal mercedes, source, giovanny moreano, david a grogan, patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images, jerome favre, adam jeffery, gio moreano
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, big, talks, investor, views, james, crowdfunded, innovation, altucher, start, pro, writing, financial, interview


PRO Talks: James Altucher on the next big financial innovation

James Altucher shares his market views and discusses his latest book “Reinvent Yourself” in an exclusive interview for CNBC PRO with Mike Santoli.

On the next big financial innovation: “There’s a lot more interest in investing in crowdfunded vehicles; you can even have crowdfunded IPOs now,” Altucher said. “I think people should start looking into that.”

On reinventing yourself: “Start asking yourself, what opportunities exist out there, and that involves a combination of reading and writing down ideas every day, just to exercise that creativity muscle,” he said.

Altucher is a successful entrepreneur, angel investor and best-selling author of “Choose Yourself.” He is an investor and advisor to more than 30 companies and hosts the popular business podcast “The James Altucher Show.”

He also covers:

Investment strategy.

Entrepreneurial opportunity examples.

Self-driving car trend.

Why technology doesn’t displace jobs.

Hedge-fund business.

ETFs.

The interview is exclusively for CNBC PRO subscribers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: crystal mercedes, source, giovanny moreano, david a grogan, patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images, jerome favre, adam jeffery, gio moreano
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, big, talks, investor, views, james, crowdfunded, innovation, altucher, start, pro, writing, financial, interview


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Mark Cuban: ‘Don’t use credit cards’

Billionaire entrepreneur Mark Cuban is famously blunt. “Don’t use credit cards.” The one thing he wishes he had known about money in his 20s, he told Business Insider in 2014, is “that credit cards are the worst investment that you can make. That the money I save on interest by not having debt is better than any return I could possibly get by investing that money in the stock market. I should have paid off my cards every 30 days.”


Billionaire entrepreneur Mark Cuban is famously blunt. “Don’t use credit cards.” The one thing he wishes he had known about money in his 20s, he told Business Insider in 2014, is “that credit cards are the worst investment that you can make. That the money I save on interest by not having debt is better than any return I could possibly get by investing that money in the stock market. I should have paid off my cards every 30 days.”
Mark Cuban: ‘Don’t use credit cards’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: kathleen elkins, john lamparski, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, wishes, stock, words, told, dont, credit, thought, money, cuban, worst, wasnt, mark, cards


Mark Cuban: 'Don't use credit cards'

Billionaire entrepreneur Mark Cuban is famously blunt. So, when Inc. asked him in a 2017 interview to share his best money advice, the star of ABC’s “Shark Tank” and the owner of the Dallas Mavericks didn’t mince words. “From my dad,” he said. “Don’t use credit cards.”

The one thing he wishes he had known about money in his 20s, he told Business Insider in 2014, is “that credit cards are the worst investment that you can make. That the money I save on interest by not having debt is better than any return I could possibly get by investing that money in the stock market.

“I thought I would be a stock market genius. Until I wasn’t. I should have paid off my cards every 30 days.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: kathleen elkins, john lamparski, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, wishes, stock, words, told, dont, credit, thought, money, cuban, worst, wasnt, mark, cards


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Resume vs LinkedIn profile: You might be doing it all wrong—commentary

So, build a killer profile, update it regularly, and also have a base resume that you can customize for each job. Examples are proficiency in a specific software (hard skill) vs being computer literate (soft skill), having built and managed teams while creating new performance appraisal and compensation structure (multiple hard skills) vs. people person (soft skill). Not what you did on a day to day basis, but projects you helped complete, or products that you launched. For each job on your prof


So, build a killer profile, update it regularly, and also have a base resume that you can customize for each job. Examples are proficiency in a specific software (hard skill) vs being computer literate (soft skill), having built and managed teams while creating new performance appraisal and compensation structure (multiple hard skills) vs. people person (soft skill). Not what you did on a day to day basis, but projects you helped complete, or products that you launched. For each job on your prof
Resume vs LinkedIn profile: You might be doing it all wrong—commentary Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: dan yu, talent agent for the hired guns, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, skill, doing, keywords, hard, soft, job, linkedin, resume, add, profile, day, wrongcommentary, youll, vs, recruiters


Resume vs LinkedIn profile: You might be doing it all wrong—commentary

Think like a salesperson, and you’re selling YOU. How do you sell a highly specialized product? Attack the target markets, which are twofold: recruiters and hiring managers.

Your best weapon is your LinkedIn profile. It’s your sales brochure. So, build a killer profile, update it regularly, and also have a base resume that you can customize for each job.

Let’s first look at recruiters. Recruiters and headhunters are usually not subject matter experts in your field, so they pick out the most important parts from a job description, and distill it down to a few keywords. Then, they do a keyword search to generate a long list of potentials.

To properly attack this target market, you’ll need to have the right keywords in your profile just to get them to find you. What makes some keywords better than others? Hard skills are typically better than soft skills.

Examples are proficiency in a specific software (hard skill) vs being computer literate (soft skill), having built and managed teams while creating new performance appraisal and compensation structure (multiple hard skills) vs. people person (soft skill). Certifications (ex. PMP or Scrum Master) are excellent to add. Make a list of all your hard skills.

Hiring managers look at candidates differently. If they’re working with a recruiter, they probably expect candidates have been screened for the right skillset, and will want to read about what impact you had in your past roles.

Make a list of your coolest accomplishments. Not what you did on a day to day basis, but projects you helped complete, or products that you launched. Include key performance indicators (revenues generated, costs saved, for example) where you can.

For each job on your profile, include a short description of what your responsibilities in your day to day job were, add your accomplishments, and sprinkle those hard skill keywords where appropriate.

I’ve even seen profiles with headings under each job “Key Responsibilities” and “Key Accomplishments.” Optically, it helps the hiring manager get to the heart of what you could bring to the table. And bring your personality, add your interests or volunteer work. Being well rounded never hurts!

Recommendations from colleagues and bosses are another way to demonstrate the value you’ve delivered. The best way to get one is to give one. Be generous with your praise, and you’ll get it back in spades.

Now, your brochure is ready to go. Recruiters will find you via your keywords, and pass your profile on to the hiring managers who will see how you can add value. Update it regularly, and you’ll show up on your contacts’ feeds. Almost like a free drip marketing campaign!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: dan yu, talent agent for the hired guns, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, skill, doing, keywords, hard, soft, job, linkedin, resume, add, profile, day, wrongcommentary, youll, vs, recruiters


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Summer bummer? Why some see the market rally rolling over

With the market at all-time highs, how far can the rally go? That takes it to roughly 2,480, and that happens to bring it right back to an uptrend that’s been in place since 2016,” he said Thursday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation.” “I think that’s a concerning sign as we move into the summer,” he said. The broader market may be heading higher still, said Dennis Davitt of Harvest Volatility Management, but the options market appears to be flashing several negative signs about investor sentiment. Indeed


With the market at all-time highs, how far can the rally go? That takes it to roughly 2,480, and that happens to bring it right back to an uptrend that’s been in place since 2016,” he said Thursday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation.” “I think that’s a concerning sign as we move into the summer,” he said. The broader market may be heading higher still, said Dennis Davitt of Harvest Volatility Management, but the options market appears to be flashing several negative signs about investor sentiment. Indeed
Summer bummer? Why some see the market rally rolling over Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: rebecca ungarino, getty images, justin sullivan, brendan mcdermid, source, lawrence mcdonald
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, think, sp, options, technical, bummer, sluymer, thats, upside, summer, rally, market, uptrend, rolling


Summer bummer? Why some see the market rally rolling over

With the market at all-time highs, how far can the rally go? 21 Hours Ago | 04:42

The three major U.S. stock markets have all made solid advances so far this year, but some strategists are cautioning the coming months’ gains may not be as robust.

The S&P 500, which has traded in a relatively narrow 80-point range since early March, is due for a bullish breakout that could run directly into technical resistance and perhaps spell trouble, according to Robert Sluymer, Fundstrat Global Advisors managing director of technical analysis.

“By traditional technical analysis, you could double that range; that’s another 3.5 percent on the upside, another 80 points from 2,400. That takes it to roughly 2,480, and that happens to bring it right back to an uptrend that’s been in place since 2016,” he said Thursday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation.”

While another 3.5 percent of gains is not a wildly momentous move, Sluymer acknowledged, such a move higher would bring the index into an uptrend that’s been in place since 2016, and “I think it starts to run into trouble there.”

“We do have some longer-term cycle concerns about the market and we think that as we move into the summer we’re probably going to see more evidence of a cycle peak developing, so we’re getting more cautious as we move into the summer,” he said.

Specifically, Sluymer pointed to stocks’ average monthly momentum in the index giving him pause even as the index reaches new highs. That same data that turned him particularly bullish in the beginning of 2016 is now showing levels of peaking.

Additionally, the Russell 2000’s performance relative to that of the S&P 500 is breaking below a long-term uptrend, which makes Sluymer think some of the market’s leadership is beginning to shift and narrow to large caps.

“I think that’s a concerning sign as we move into the summer,” he said.

The broader market may be heading higher still, said Dennis Davitt of Harvest Volatility Management, but the options market appears to be flashing several negative signs about investor sentiment. While buying options is one way to obtain “insurance” to protect investors’ portfolios, he isn’t observing much upside call buying.

“There are far more negative people out there than there are positive people in the market, and I still think people are under-levered and underweight,” he said Thursday.

Of course, so-called portfolio “insurance” to protect against a market downturn has never been cheaper, Davitt pointed out, given the CBOE volatility index’s historically low levels.

Indeed, according to the options market investors appear to have less optimism around the S&P 500 seeing significant upside over the next few months than practically any other time in history.

As Stacey Gilbert, Susquehanna’s head of derivative strategy, noted recently on CNBC’s “Trading Nation,” put prices are more expensive relative to calls than they’ve ever been before, based on data dating back to 1990.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: rebecca ungarino, getty images, justin sullivan, brendan mcdermid, source, lawrence mcdonald
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, think, sp, options, technical, bummer, sluymer, thats, upside, summer, rally, market, uptrend, rolling


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Instagram’s ritualistic body waxing clips on are going viral

Some of Lizbeth’s most popular clips, which are seconds long and repeat on an endless loop, have been viewed almost 900,000 times apiece. There’s no screaming and no blood — just hair, some wax and a smooth skin surface. “Couldn’t sleep last night and literally watched all these videos,” wrote another. “I want to go to California and have this woman wax my entire body lol,” someone commented. Waxing clips may also provide a safe-for-work version of another popular type of ritualistic skin care


Some of Lizbeth’s most popular clips, which are seconds long and repeat on an endless loop, have been viewed almost 900,000 times apiece. There’s no screaming and no blood — just hair, some wax and a smooth skin surface. “Couldn’t sleep last night and literally watched all these videos,” wrote another. “I want to go to California and have this woman wax my entire body lol,” someone commented. Waxing clips may also provide a safe-for-work version of another popular type of ritualistic skin care
Instagram’s ritualistic body waxing clips on are going viral Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: michelle castillo, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, viral, youtube, popular, videos, wax, wrote, waxing, sleep, watched, instagrams, clips, instagram, dr, body, skin, going, ritualistic


Instagram's ritualistic body waxing clips on are going viral

Some of Lizbeth’s most popular clips, which are seconds long and repeat on an endless loop, have been viewed almost 900,000 times apiece. She currently has more than 311,00 Instagram followers. There’s no screaming and no blood — just hair, some wax and a smooth skin surface.

“These videos are way too satisfying to watch!!” one Instagram user wrote under a video.

“Couldn’t sleep last night and literally watched all these videos,” wrote another.

“I want to go to California and have this woman wax my entire body lol,” someone commented.

The repetitive motions give some viewers a feeling called Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR), which is described as a gentle pins and needles sensation. A scientific study in March 2015 found 98 percent of people watched for relaxation, with the majority using the videos to help them sleep or relieve stress. Many people have made full-time careers on YouTube creating bizarre whispering or repeated actions.

Waxing clips may also provide a safe-for-work version of another popular type of ritualistic skin care video in which people have blackheads, ear wax and cysts removed. Dr. Sandra Lee, a dermatologist known online as Dr. Pimple Popper, has 2.6 million YouTube subscribers to her videos of “pimples popped, blackheads extracted, cysts and lipomas excised.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: michelle castillo, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, viral, youtube, popular, videos, wax, wrote, waxing, sleep, watched, instagrams, clips, instagram, dr, body, skin, going, ritualistic


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Trump NATO visit gets bad reviews from former ambassadors

President Trump presents World Trade Center fragment to NATO Thursday, 25 May 2017 | 10:45 AM ET | 01:58President Donald Trump’s first trip to a NATO summit Thursday did not sit well with former ambassadors to the alliance. “I do think Trump’s visit to NATO was the least effective of any American president since 1949,” Nicholas Burns, who served as ambassador to the 28-member defense alliance under President George W. Bush, tweeted Friday. In Brussels, Trump admonished members of the alliance fo


President Trump presents World Trade Center fragment to NATO Thursday, 25 May 2017 | 10:45 AM ET | 01:58President Donald Trump’s first trip to a NATO summit Thursday did not sit well with former ambassadors to the alliance. “I do think Trump’s visit to NATO was the least effective of any American president since 1949,” Nicholas Burns, who served as ambassador to the 28-member defense alliance under President George W. Bush, tweeted Friday. In Brussels, Trump admonished members of the alliance fo
Trump NATO visit gets bad reviews from former ambassadors Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: jacob pramuk, jonathan ernst
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, visit, trade, reviews, publicly, article, world, ambassadors, bad, defense, center, trump, nato, trumps, gets, president


Trump NATO visit gets bad reviews from former ambassadors

President Trump presents World Trade Center fragment to NATO Thursday, 25 May 2017 | 10:45 AM ET | 01:58

President Donald Trump’s first trip to a NATO summit Thursday did not sit well with former ambassadors to the alliance.

“I do think Trump’s visit to NATO was the least effective of any American president since 1949,” Nicholas Burns, who served as ambassador to the 28-member defense alliance under President George W. Bush, tweeted Friday. NATO came into existence in 1949.

In Brussels, Trump admonished members of the alliance for not paying their “fair share” for defense. The president failed to publicly endorse “Article 5,” the NATO mutual assistance clause that he was widely expected to back publicly for the first time.

Trump was silent on Article 5 while standing next to a twisted metal piece of the World Trade Center, a new memorial to the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: jacob pramuk, jonathan ernst
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, visit, trade, reviews, publicly, article, world, ambassadors, bad, defense, center, trump, nato, trumps, gets, president


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The nation’s top tech companies are asking Congress to reform a key NSA surveillance program

Facebook, Google, Microsoft and a host of tech companies asked Congress on Friday to reform a government surveillance program that allows the National Security Agency to collect emails and other digital communications of foreigners outside the United States. In their note, the tech companies asked lawmakers for a number of changes to the law particularly to ensure that Americans’ data isn’t swept up in the fray. Many top tech companies even banded together in a lobbying group that pushed for sur


Facebook, Google, Microsoft and a host of tech companies asked Congress on Friday to reform a government surveillance program that allows the National Security Agency to collect emails and other digital communications of foreigners outside the United States. In their note, the tech companies asked lawmakers for a number of changes to the law particularly to ensure that Americans’ data isn’t swept up in the fray. Many top tech companies even banded together in a lobbying group that pushed for sur
The nation’s top tech companies are asking Congress to reform a key NSA surveillance program Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: tony romm, tom williams, cq roll call, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, nations, companies, asking, americans, tech, key, 702, number, program, nsa, lawmakers, congress, reform, surveillance, asked


The nation’s top tech companies are asking Congress to reform a key NSA surveillance program

Facebook, Google, Microsoft and a host of tech companies asked Congress on Friday to reform a government surveillance program that allows the National Security Agency to collect emails and other digital communications of foreigners outside the United States.

The requests came in the form of a letter to Republican Rep. Bob Goodlatte, a Virginia lawmaker who’s overseeing the debate in the House of Representatives to reauthorize a program, known as Section 702, which will expire at the end of the year without action by Capitol Hill.

In their note, the tech companies asked lawmakers for a number of changes to the law particularly to ensure that Americans’ data isn’t swept up in the fray. Meanwhile, they endorsed the need for new transparency measures, including the ability to share with their customers more information about the government surveillance requests they receive.

Signing the note are companies like Airbnb, Amazon, Cisco, Dropbox, Facebook, Google, LinkedIn, Lyft, Microsoft and Uber.

Absent, however, is Apple, which previously has joined with its tech counterparts in pushing for limits in government surveillance programs. A spokesman did not immediately respond to a request for comment Friday.

More From Recode:

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Mark Zuckerberg called on Harvard’s graduates to help save the environment and cure all disease

Section 702 is one of a number of U.S. surveillance authorities that had been the subject of great scrutiny and debate in the aftermath of Edward Snowden’s surveillance leaks. The disclosures have also caused years of heartburn for Silicon Valley, which has faced an onslaught of criticism from international customers who feel the tech industry is too close to the U.S. government. Many top tech companies even banded together in a lobbying group that pushed for surveillance reforms in 2013.

As the fight over the NSA’s powers returns to Congress, however, the Trump administration has urged lawmakers to keep Section 702 in its exact, current form.

Earlier this month, the NSA on its own terminated a piece of its program that essentially allowed the agency to collect Americans’ emails and texts if those communications contained key words related to foreigners that already are targeted for government surveillance.

To that end, the tech companies writing Congress today said Congress should formally outlaw that practice, known as “about” collection, as part of its new legislation, to ensure it can’t come back.

Otherwise, the government’s Section 702 program isn’t supposed to target Americans. But their communications still are lapped up in the bunch, sometimes incidentally, including cases in which an American is communicating directly with a non-U.S. person who is the subject of NSA scrutiny. Despite calls from the likes of Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., the agency has never disclosed the total number of Americans affected by such a program.

In response, the tech industry asked Congress to put in place “judicial oversight for government queries” for U.S. citizens’ data. And they asked House lawmakers to rethink other portions of the law to “reduce the likelihood of collecting information about non-U.S. persons who are not suspected of wrongdoing.”

—By Tony Romm, Recode.net.

CNBC’s parent NBCUniversal is an investor in Recode’s parent Vox, and the companies have a content-sharing arrangement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: tony romm, tom williams, cq roll call, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, nations, companies, asking, americans, tech, key, 702, number, program, nsa, lawmakers, congress, reform, surveillance, asked


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US plans first test of system to intercept missiles, with North Korea on mind

With North Korea’s nuclear missile threat in mind, the Pentagon is planning a missile defense test next week that for the first time will target an intercontinental-range missile. The plan is to more closely simulate a North Korean ICBM aimed at the U.S. homeland. The U.S. interceptor has a spotty track record, having succeeded in nine of 17 attempts since 1999 and only one in the last four. North Korea is now the focus of U.S. missile defense efforts because it vows to soon field a nuclear-arme


With North Korea’s nuclear missile threat in mind, the Pentagon is planning a missile defense test next week that for the first time will target an intercontinental-range missile. The plan is to more closely simulate a North Korean ICBM aimed at the U.S. homeland. The U.S. interceptor has a spotty track record, having succeeded in nine of 17 attempts since 1999 and only one in the last four. North Korea is now the focus of U.S. missile defense efforts because it vows to soon field a nuclear-arme
US plans first test of system to intercept missiles, with North Korea on mind Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: kcna
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, territory, intercept, missiles, missile, test, system, week, defense, mind, plans, vows, korea, threat, track, north, tuesdaythe


US plans first test of system to intercept missiles, with North Korea on mind

With North Korea’s nuclear missile threat in mind, the Pentagon is planning a missile defense test next week that for the first time will target an intercontinental-range missile.

The plan is to more closely simulate a North Korean ICBM aimed at the U.S. homeland. The test is scheduled for next Tuesday.

The U.S. interceptor has a spotty track record, having succeeded in nine of 17 attempts since 1999 and only one in the last four. The most recent test, in June 2014, was successful.

North Korea is now the focus of U.S. missile defense efforts because it vows to soon field a nuclear-armed missile capable of reaching American territory. It has yet to test an intercontinental ballistic missile.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: kcna
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, territory, intercept, missiles, missile, test, system, week, defense, mind, plans, vows, korea, threat, track, north, tuesdaythe


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Bounceback or not? Next week’s jobs, consumer data and inflation will carry big message for economy

There’s a virtual wall of economic data ready to hit the market after a three-day weekend. Consumer spending, a question mark after first quarter’s mixed signals, is scheduled to be reported Tuesday as is the PCE deflator inflation data. It was the weak jobs data, and it was ahead of Brexit.” The jobs number lands after the Fed sent markets a mixed message this past week, in the minutes of its early May meeting. “If it’s a weak number, and they hike in June, the market is going to question wheth


There’s a virtual wall of economic data ready to hit the market after a three-day weekend. Consumer spending, a question mark after first quarter’s mixed signals, is scheduled to be reported Tuesday as is the PCE deflator inflation data. It was the weak jobs data, and it was ahead of Brexit.” The jobs number lands after the Fed sent markets a mixed message this past week, in the minutes of its early May meeting. “If it’s a weak number, and they hike in June, the market is going to question wheth
Bounceback or not? Next week’s jobs, consumer data and inflation will carry big message for economy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: patti domm, sebastian willnow, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, big, bounceback, weeks, weak, week, expected, message, carry, data, number, inflation, consumer, economy, fed, economic, jobs, market


Bounceback or not? Next week's jobs, consumer data and inflation will carry big message for economy

Come back from the beach Tuesday and bam! There’s a virtual wall of economic data ready to hit the market after a three-day weekend.

The four-day post-Memorial Day week could be a big one for markets, which have been monitoring a series of economic reports that have been missing forecasts for weeks now.

Consumer spending, a question mark after first quarter’s mixed signals, is scheduled to be reported Tuesday as is the PCE deflator inflation data. There are car sales, running soft lately, and manufacturing Thursday. Then there’s Friday’s always important employment report.

While the stock market has surged ahead, questions of economic weakness have weighed on the dollar and bond yields. The debate centers around whether the economy will spring back in the second quarter and second half with enough vigor to justify further Federal Reserve interest rate hikes, after an expected move by the Fed in June.

The strong labor market is one area that should continue to be a catalyst for the Fed. Economists expect that 185,000 jobs were created in May, after 211,000 in April. The very low unemployment rate is expected to stay at 4.4 percent, and average hourly wages are projected to edge up 0.3 percent.

“Next week’s nonfarm payrolls is critical. It’s been taking a back seat to all other data. It’s been a low volatility event for the last four to five months,” said George Goncalves, head of fixed income strategy at Nomura. But that could change. “If you remember, last year the May number was weak. It was like 38,000, and that’s what took the Fed off [hiking rates] completely. It was the weak jobs data, and it was ahead of Brexit.”

The jobs number lands after the Fed sent markets a mixed message this past week, in the minutes of its early May meeting. Economists still mostly expect an interest rate hike for June, but some traders read into the release that the central bank will be cautious and assess economic progress before it moves further.

The Fed, in the release, said it saw weakness in both the consumer and inflation as transitory. That makes the personal consumption expenditures data Tuesday also very important, as the data includes a reading on consumer spending and the PCE deflator, the Fed’s preferred inflation measure. Core PCE inflation is expected to rise 0.1 percent, after a decline last month.

Some encouragement came in the surprise revision to first-quarter GDP growth, now at 1.2 percent, especially since it included improvement in consumer spending. But the second-quarter forecasts continue to be notched down, and in the past week, economists trimmed about a half percent from the consensus 3 percent, according to the CNBC/Moody’s Analytics Rapid Update.

“It wouldn’t stop them from hiking in June if we get a weak jobs print, but I think it’s what will set the tone of the [Fed post-meeting] statement and press conference. If it’s relatively strong, and you see wage increases, which hasn’t been happening, they’re going to sound even more optimistic at the June meeting and temper some of this dovishness,” Goncalves said. If the number is weak, however, the Fed could still raise rates anyway in June.

“If it’s a weak number, and they hike in June, the market is going to question whether they are done for the year. That’s the trillion-dollar question,” he said. The Fed is mostly expected to raise rates two more times this year and then address unwinding its $4.5 trillion balance sheet, by setting up a program to allow maturing securities to roll off its balance sheet. It now replaces them.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-26  Authors: patti domm, sebastian willnow, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, big, bounceback, weeks, weak, week, expected, message, carry, data, number, inflation, consumer, economy, fed, economic, jobs, market


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