Amazon lessons from the last 25 years, according to one of its most bullish analysts

Amazon dominates e-commerce, has the biggest cloud-computing infrastructure offering and leads the market for home assistants with its Alexa technology. Embrace change: This is a core value from Zappos, the online shoe seller that Amazon acquired in 2009. “Before there was Uber, Pinterest, and, seemingly, every other newly minted IPO and also Roku, Shopify, Wayfair, there was Amazon, ” Forte wrote. In the report, Forte highlighted two significant areas where Amazon has fallen short: smartphones


Amazon dominates e-commerce, has the biggest cloud-computing infrastructure offering and leads the market for home assistants with its Alexa technology. Embrace change: This is a core value from Zappos, the online shoe seller that Amazon acquired in 2009. “Before there was Uber, Pinterest, and, seemingly, every other newly minted IPO and also Roku, Shopify, Wayfair, there was Amazon, ” Forte wrote. In the report, Forte highlighted two significant areas where Amazon has fallen short: smartphones
Amazon lessons from the last 25 years, according to one of its most bullish analysts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: ari levy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, price, bullish, 25, analysts, company, recent, according, amazon, customers, online, report, lessons, retail, forte, market


Amazon lessons from the last 25 years, according to one of its most bullish analysts

Amazon turned 25 years old this week. In its quarter century of existence, it has created roughly a trillion dollars in shareholder value.

Amazon dominates e-commerce, has the biggest cloud-computing infrastructure offering and leads the market for home assistants with its Alexa technology. Additionally, it has a burgeoning online ad business and is becoming a force in Hollywood through its video streaming division. Total sales jumped 31% last year to $232.9 billion.

Tom Forte of D.A. Davidson, one of the most bullish Wall Street analysts on Amazon, said in a report on Friday that the company has developed a number of strategies for others to learn from and even copy. Here’s what he laid out, along with some concrete examples.

Focus on customers, not competitors: CEO Jeff Bezos has been customer-obsessed since starting the company in 1994 as an online bookseller. According to Forte, that has been Amazon’s most important enduring quality — focusing on customers, not competition.

One recent example is its private label business, where Amazon sees what customers want most and tries to provide it at the lowest price by creating its own branded version.

Iterate: Amazon values iteration, “making continual refinements to improve its efforts.”

Examples: The Kindle e-reader has continued to evolve to keep pace with general-purpose tablets, and the Echo has gone from a basic voice assistant to a platform for developers to provide all sorts of help for customers.

Create a flywheel: Focus on having the lowest prices, biggest selection and fastest delivery and customers will keep coming back. This customer volume attracts suppliers and other partners, which in turn increases competition in these areas — price, selection and delivery speed — which in turn draws more customers, and so on.

One recent example of this is when Amazon introduced one-day shipping for its Prime customers. Although this increases Amazon’ costs in the short run, a recent RBC survey shows that customers spend more and are more loyal when they get this perk.

Embrace change: This is a core value from Zappos, the online shoe seller that Amazon acquired in 2009.

Examples: Amazon Web Services has proven adept at providing software that developers demand as technology changes, and the company has made key acquisitions in the smart home market, such as smart-doorbell maker Ring, as consumer behavior has evolved.

Losing money as a strategy: Forte calls it LmaS and says Amazon has perfected it. Investors subsidized the company for two decades, allowing it to subsist on the slimmest of margins while Amazon continued to invest in making shopping simpler, cheaper and faster and developed other, more profitable businesses. Thanks to AWS and its ad business, Amazon is finally showing real earnings, but still far slimmer margins than other tech giants like Alphabet, Facebook, Apple and Microsoft.

“Before there was Uber, Pinterest, and, seemingly, every other newly minted IPO and also Roku, Shopify, Wayfair, there was Amazon, ” Forte wrote. “The company either was the first or, at least, the best at losing money in its first-party retail efforts to take market share. Its ability to develop other, more profitable ventures (such as third-party retail, cloud computing, and, more recently advertising) have further enhanced its ability to run its first-party retail efforts at break even (if not worse) and this is one main reason it has been so disruptive in the retail sector.”

In the report, Forte highlighted two significant areas where Amazon has fallen short: smartphones and Chinese e-commerce. The latter, he says, is Amazon’s “greatest failure and it must continue to find a strategy succeed in China no matter how many times it fails.”

He also sees four significant risks to Amazon over the next 25 years, including figuring out who will succeed Bezos, “a once-in-a-generation type founder and CEO,” and dealing with intervention from regulators and lawmakers. Forte previously highlighted those issues in a report in May.

At least in the near term, Forte clearly expects Amazon to navigate those challenges. He has a price target of $2,550, implying a 32% gain from here and $1.26 trillion market cap. Only two of the 40 analysts with price targets tracked by FactSet have higher predictions, and the average price target is $2,249.73.

WATCH: Inside the world’s richest man’s apartment


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: ari levy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, price, bullish, 25, analysts, company, recent, according, amazon, customers, online, report, lessons, retail, forte, market


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Britain’s popular digital bank Monzo doubles valuation to $2.5 billion

U.K. online bank Monzo has raised £113 million ($144 million) in a fresh round of funding led by the U.S. start-up accelerator Y Combinator. Y Combinator, which has helped create companies such as Airbnb and Stripe, invested in Monzo through its Continuity Fund, which focuses on late-stage start-ups. Monzo is now valued at over £2 billion ($2.5 billion), double the £1 billion it was worth in its last funding round in October last year. The fintech firm has gained something of a following in Brit


U.K. online bank Monzo has raised £113 million ($144 million) in a fresh round of funding led by the U.S. start-up accelerator Y Combinator. Y Combinator, which has helped create companies such as Airbnb and Stripe, invested in Monzo through its Continuity Fund, which focuses on late-stage start-ups. Monzo is now valued at over £2 billion ($2.5 billion), double the £1 billion it was worth in its last funding round in October last year. The fintech firm has gained something of a following in Brit
Britain’s popular digital bank Monzo doubles valuation to $2.5 billion Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: ryan browne
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Britain's popular digital bank Monzo doubles valuation to $2.5 billion

U.K. online bank Monzo has raised £113 million ($144 million) in a fresh round of funding led by the U.S. start-up accelerator Y Combinator.

Y Combinator, which has helped create companies such as Airbnb and Stripe, invested in Monzo through its Continuity Fund, which focuses on late-stage start-ups.

Monzo is now valued at over £2 billion ($2.5 billion), double the £1 billion it was worth in its last funding round in October last year. The fintech firm has gained something of a following in Britain with its bright coral-colored bank cards and app-only checking accounts.

“It is a really great signifier of how far we’ve come since the last round,” Tristan Thomas, Monzo’s head of marketing, told CNBC, adding that the bank has also doubled its customer count to more than 2 million since the last round.

Monzo said it is already well-capitalized, but will use the extra capital to underpin its growth strategy as well as gain a foothold in the U.S. The start-up announced plans to expand to Los Angeles and other major U.S. cities last week.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bank, startup, billion, popular, 25, round, valuation, million, monzo, worth, britains, weve, funding, doubles, digital


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The last time the S&P did this, it rallied 25% to an all-time high

The Dow, S&P 500 and Nasdaq all notched their best week of the year as the markets digested a higher probability of a Fed rate cut. The S&P 500 shot past a key 2,800 level, testing a technical hurdle Wall Street is watching very closely. Furthermore, Suttmeier notes the S&P 500 is testing what’s been a historically key level of support at its 40-week moving average. Yet as trade uncertainties still loom, investors are now the most bearish they’ve been since those December lows. The S&P 500 ralli


The Dow, S&P 500 and Nasdaq all notched their best week of the year as the markets digested a higher probability of a Fed rate cut. The S&P 500 shot past a key 2,800 level, testing a technical hurdle Wall Street is watching very closely. Furthermore, Suttmeier notes the S&P 500 is testing what’s been a historically key level of support at its 40-week moving average. Yet as trade uncertainties still loom, investors are now the most bearish they’ve been since those December lows. The S&P 500 ralli
The last time the S&P did this, it rallied 25% to an all-time high Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-07  Authors: nia warfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bearish, market, 25, mean, able, trade, alltime, suttmeier, sp, high, 500, level, investors, rallied


The last time the S&P did this, it rallied 25% to an all-time high

It’s been a wild ride for stocks as trade tantrums and global growth fears have ignited a surge of bearish sentiment around the markets. But a top technician says the charts are signalling new highs could come sooner than investors think.

The Dow, S&P 500 and Nasdaq all notched their best week of the year as the markets digested a higher probability of a Fed rate cut. The S&P 500 shot past a key 2,800 level, testing a technical hurdle Wall Street is watching very closely.

“2,800-2,810 [is] the most important level here from a tactical perspective,” said Stephen Suttmeier, chief equity technical strategist at Bank of America on CNBC’s “Futures Now” on Thursday. “If the trade war doesn’t kill this market it would only make it stronger and what that would mean is that you’d be able to have a base and project the market higher.”

Furthermore, Suttmeier notes the S&P 500 is testing what’s been a historically key level of support at its 40-week moving average.

“[The] same thing happened in 2016, you had Brexit and had a lot of macro risks but the market rallied and was able to hold a 38% retracement and was able to rally off of that [sharply],” he said.

Yet as trade uncertainties still loom, investors are now the most bearish they’ve been since those December lows. However, according to Suttmeier, that could actually mean good news for stocks.

“People are pretty negative on equities here if you look at the AAII bulls-bear ratio — basically, back as bearish as they were in December of last year,” he said. “[But] if investors are this bearish, this gloomy — I mean my guess is we should be able to continue to work our way up here.”

The S&P 500 rallied more than 25% from its low on December 24 to its high on May 1.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-07  Authors: nia warfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bearish, market, 25, mean, able, trade, alltime, suttmeier, sp, high, 500, level, investors, rallied


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Drinking 25 cups of coffee a day is still safe for the heart, study says

People who drink up to 25 cups of coffee a day don’t run a greater risk of a heart attack. That’s the remarkable finding from a study of over 8,000 people in the U.K., carried out by the British Heart Foundation (BHF). Previous studies have linked drinking coffee with a hardening of the arteries that pump blood from your heart to other parts of the body. If arteries become stiff, it can increase stress on the heart and raise a person’s chance of having a heart attack or stroke. For the study, co


People who drink up to 25 cups of coffee a day don’t run a greater risk of a heart attack. That’s the remarkable finding from a study of over 8,000 people in the U.K., carried out by the British Heart Foundation (BHF). Previous studies have linked drinking coffee with a hardening of the arteries that pump blood from your heart to other parts of the body. If arteries become stiff, it can increase stress on the heart and raise a person’s chance of having a heart attack or stroke. For the study, co
Drinking 25 cups of coffee a day is still safe for the heart, study says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, drink, coffee, 25, claimed, arteries, studies, drinking, study, heart, cups, day, british, safe


Drinking 25 cups of coffee a day is still safe for the heart, study says

People who drink up to 25 cups of coffee a day don’t run a greater risk of a heart attack.

That’s the remarkable finding from a study of over 8,000 people in the U.K., carried out by the British Heart Foundation (BHF).

Previous studies have linked drinking coffee with a hardening of the arteries that pump blood from your heart to other parts of the body. If arteries become stiff, it can increase stress on the heart and raise a person’s chance of having a heart attack or stroke.

But the fresh research, presented Monday at the British Cardiovascular Society (BCS) Conference, claimed that after looking at the heart scans of 8,412 people, it had “debunked” previous studies linking coffee to poor heart health.

For the study, coffee drinking was categorized into three groups: those who drink less than one cup a day, those who drink between one and three cups a day and those who drink more than three.

People who consumed more than 25 cups of coffee a day were excluded, but the BHP claimed that “no increased stiffening of arteries was associated with those who drank up to this high limit.”

“This research will hopefully put some of the media reports in perspective, as it rules out one of the potential detrimental effects of coffee on our arteries,” said Professor Metin Avkiran, Associate Medical Director at the British Heart Foundation in a statement.

In 2018, the findings of a study of around half-a-million British adults claimed that coffee drinkers were found to have a slightly lower risk of death over a 10-year follow-up period than non-coffee drinkers.

Other studies have claimed substances in coffee might reduce inflammation and improve how the body uses insulin, which could decrease the likelihood of developing diabetes.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: david reid
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25% of US adults have no retirement savings

A new report from the Federal Reserve paints a bleak picture of America’s retirement savings. Almost a quarter of adults in the U.S. have no retirement savings or pension at all, according to the Fed’s 2018 Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households, and just 36% percent of non-retired adults think that their retirement saving is on track. The report also found that a third of middle-class adults can’t afford to cover a $400 emergency. Of non-retired adults with savings, 54% say they h


A new report from the Federal Reserve paints a bleak picture of America’s retirement savings. Almost a quarter of adults in the U.S. have no retirement savings or pension at all, according to the Fed’s 2018 Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households, and just 36% percent of non-retired adults think that their retirement saving is on track. The report also found that a third of middle-class adults can’t afford to cover a $400 emergency. Of non-retired adults with savings, 54% say they h
25% of US adults have no retirement savings Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, retirement, report, bill, adults, workers, savings, nonretired, save, say, pension, 25


25% of US adults have no retirement savings

A new report from the Federal Reserve paints a bleak picture of America’s retirement savings. Almost a quarter of adults in the U.S. have no retirement savings or pension at all, according to the Fed’s 2018 Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households, and just 36% percent of non-retired adults think that their retirement saving is on track. The report also found that a third of middle-class adults can’t afford to cover a $400 emergency. Of non-retired adults with savings, 54% say they have money in a 401(k) or 403(b) plan, 33% have an individual retirement account and 22% have a pension. Retirement preparedness, of course, varies by age. Young workers aged 18 to 29 are less likely to have savings, with 42% saying they have nothing stashed away, while 17% of those aged 45 to 59 say the same thing.

A bipartisan bill passed by the U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday, May 23, could help Americans save more. The Secure Act would make it easier for small businesses to offer 401(k) plans and eliminates the maximum age to contribute to IRAs, which is currently 70½. The bill would also require businesses to make retirement accounts available to long-term, part-time workers. The bill is now heading to the Senate.

How to save for retirement


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, retirement, report, bill, adults, workers, savings, nonretired, save, say, pension, 25


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Fed speakers could steal focus from trade war in week ahead

A flurry of Fed speakers and any new trade developments could shake up what normally might be a slow week of trading ahead of the three-day Memorial Day holiday weekend. Stocks ended the past week with losses, as trade-related headlines caused big swings in the market. The Dow ended the week with a 0.7% loss to 25,764 in its fourth negative week. The Nasdaq lost even more, 1.2% for the week, after U.S. action against China’s Huawei depressed U.S. tech names that do business in China. The U.S. ra


A flurry of Fed speakers and any new trade developments could shake up what normally might be a slow week of trading ahead of the three-day Memorial Day holiday weekend. Stocks ended the past week with losses, as trade-related headlines caused big swings in the market. The Dow ended the week with a 0.7% loss to 25,764 in its fourth negative week. The Nasdaq lost even more, 1.2% for the week, after U.S. action against China’s Huawei depressed U.S. tech names that do business in China. The U.S. ra
Fed speakers could steal focus from trade war in week ahead Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billion, raised, ended, speakers, huawei, losses, china, fed, trade, focus, 25, steal, tariffs, week, ahead, war


Fed speakers could steal focus from trade war in week ahead

A flurry of Fed speakers and any new trade developments could shake up what normally might be a slow week of trading ahead of the three-day Memorial Day holiday weekend.

Stocks ended the past week with losses, as trade-related headlines caused big swings in the market. The Dow ended the week with a 0.7% loss to 25,764 in its fourth negative week. The S&P 500 fell for a second week, losing 0.8% to 2,859. The Nasdaq lost even more, 1.2% for the week, after U.S. action against China’s Huawei depressed U.S. tech names that do business in China.

Friday ended with losses in the final hour, after CNBC’s Kayla Tausche reported that talks between the U.S. and China appear to have stalled, and there have been no discussions on scheduling a new round.

“With the trade stuff, this is brass knuckles time. When you institute tariffs…when you go to 25% like we just did, all of a sudden there’s no room for error,” said Peter Boockvar, chief investment officer at Bleakley Advisory Group. “The stakes are so much greater at 25%, and if we did the other $300 billion dollars, then we start damaging the consumer and you can guarantee a global recession.”

The U.S. raised tariffs last week from 10% to 25% on $200 billion in goods, and China responded by raising tariffs on $60 billion in goods.

Boockvar, like others, had been looking for a trade deal earlier in the month, but there has been no sign of positive movements, and the crackdown on Huawei raised concerns about China retaliating against U.S. companies.

“China is not bending and with Trump taunting them, they’re pissed. It still remains the case that everyone wants a deal , It’s in everyone’s best interest. It’s tough to negotiate when you get hit in the head with a baseball bat,” said Boockvar.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: patti domm
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The cost of your shoes could jump thanks to the US-China trade war

The cost of your sneakers or high heels could soon jump, thanks to another round of tariffs under consideration by the Trump administration as part of an ongoing trade war with China. The list includes footwear — everything from sneakers to sandals, golf shoes, rain boots and ski shoes. Should the tariff increase ultimately take effect, analysts say consumers would feel the brunt of the impact. FDRA said a popular type of canvas “skate” sneaker, currently retailing at $49.99, with a 25% tariff,


The cost of your sneakers or high heels could soon jump, thanks to another round of tariffs under consideration by the Trump administration as part of an ongoing trade war with China. The list includes footwear — everything from sneakers to sandals, golf shoes, rain boots and ski shoes. Should the tariff increase ultimately take effect, analysts say consumers would feel the brunt of the impact. FDRA said a popular type of canvas “skate” sneaker, currently retailing at $49.99, with a 25% tariff,
The cost of your shoes could jump thanks to the US-China trade war Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, war, footwear, billion, jump, shoes, increase, trade, thanks, tariff, cost, tariffs, 25, china, working, uschina


The cost of your shoes could jump thanks to the US-China trade war

The cost of your sneakers or high heels could soon jump, thanks to another round of tariffs under consideration by the Trump administration as part of an ongoing trade war with China.

The White House on Monday released a fresh list of about $300 billion in Chinese goods that could get hit with 25% tariffs, if President Donald Trump decides to move forward with his threat. The list includes footwear — everything from sneakers to sandals, golf shoes, rain boots and ski shoes.

Should the tariff increase ultimately take effect, analysts say consumers would feel the brunt of the impact. And the American footwear industry is particularly dependent on China.

In 2017, China accounted for about 72% of all footwear imported into the U.S., according to the American Apparel and Footwear Association. The U.S. imported $11.4 billion worth of footwear from China last year, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

“While brands have moved their production into other countries in Asia because labor costs are lower there, everybody is still making shoes in China,” said Matt Powell, a sports analyst for NPD Group. “The Chinese have years of expertise. They tend to be the best at making high-value product.”

Both Nike and Adidas — the top two sneaker makers in the U.S. by sales — have steadily been easing their reliance on China, shifting production to Vietnam instead. Both companies declined to comment when reached by CNBC.

Puma has said it’s working to do more of the same. But China still dominates when it comes to footwear manufacturing.

“For a lot of working families who buy shoes at Walmart, Target and these other retailers … a ton of volume runs through [China], ” said Matt Priest, the president and CEO of the Footwear Distributors and Retailers of America, a trade organization. The proposed tariffs on footwear “are concerning to say the least,” he said. “It’s every single type of shoe.”

FDRA said a popular type of canvas “skate” sneaker, currently retailing at $49.99, with a 25% tariff, could increase to $65.57. The price of a typical hunting boot would increase from $190 to $248.56. And a popular performance running shoe could jump from $150 to $206.25, FDRA said.

Ultimately, a 25% tariff on footwear could cost shoppers more than $7 billion each year, Priest said — what he called a “conservative” estimate.

— CNBC’s Jessica Golden contributed to this reporting.

WATCH: Cramer explains which businesses have the most exposure to the trade war


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, war, footwear, billion, jump, shoes, increase, trade, thanks, tariff, cost, tariffs, 25, china, working, uschina


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Retailers to take a hit: Trade war could cause ‘widespread store closures’

Another potential round of tariffs in a tit-for-tat trade war between the U.S. and China could have an unintended consequences: massive store closures. “The market is not realizing how much brick & mortar retail is incrementally struggling and how new 25% tariffs could force widespread store closures,” UBS analyst Jay Sole said in a research note. “We think potential 25% tariffs on Chinese imports could accelerate pressure on these company’s profit margins to the point where major store closures


Another potential round of tariffs in a tit-for-tat trade war between the U.S. and China could have an unintended consequences: massive store closures. “The market is not realizing how much brick & mortar retail is incrementally struggling and how new 25% tariffs could force widespread store closures,” UBS analyst Jay Sole said in a research note. “We think potential 25% tariffs on Chinese imports could accelerate pressure on these company’s profit margins to the point where major store closures
Retailers to take a hit: Trade war could cause ‘widespread store closures’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, war, trump, struggling, 25, trade, list, cause, goods, hit, tariffs, retailers, closures, store, chinese, widespread


Retailers to take a hit: Trade war could cause 'widespread store closures'

Another potential round of tariffs in a tit-for-tat trade war between the U.S. and China could have an unintended consequences: massive store closures.

The White House on Monday evening released a fresh list for about $300 billion in Chinese goods that President Donald Trump has said he’s contemplating hitting with tariffs as high as 25%. The list includes everything from clothing and sneakers to sporting goods and other accessories, often found at the mall.

“The market is not realizing how much brick & mortar retail is incrementally struggling and how new 25% tariffs could force widespread store closures,” UBS analyst Jay Sole said in a research note. “We think potential 25% tariffs on Chinese imports could accelerate pressure on these company’s profit margins to the point where major store closures become a real possibility.”

Just last week, the Trump administration raised tariffs to 25% from 10% on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods. But retailers, for the most part, were unscathed, with many of the items impacted by that hike hurting agricultural workers. Furniture, handbags and some consumer electronics were on that list, but not apparel and shoes.

Then, China retaliated on Monday by raising tariffs on about $60 billion of U.S. goods.

And now the Trump administration has proposed a new list that targets items like performance wear, windbreakers, headbands, gloves, bathing suits and ski suits.

UBS said it was already calling for nearly 21,000 stores to close by 2026 in the U.S. But now, it said a new round of tariffs could cause more than 50% of those closures to happen within the course of one year, rather than four, as it was estimating. And this is only looking a publicly traded retailers, Sole said. “We continue to think the apparel and footwear consumer’s willingness to spend remains tepid at best.”

Many retailers — and specifically those that sell clothing — have already been struggling, without the threat of tariffs hanging over them. Companies like Victoria’s Secret, Gap, Gymboree, Chico’s, Payless Shoesource and Charlotte Russe have been shutting stores, struggling to find ways to differentiate themselves from popular fast-fashion brands like Zara, and up-start brands like Everlane, Rockets of Awesome and ThirdLove.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: lauren thomas
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Trump’s tariffs on China are a ‘harbinger’ for Europe, here’s why

The latest U.S. tariffs on China could be a sign of what’s to come for Europe, analysts have told CNBC. President Donald Trump announced Sunday that the current tariffs of 10% on $200 billion of Chinese goods will increase to 25% on Friday. His decision sparked a sell-off in global equity markets and created further jitters in Europe whose exports could also face similar U.S. tariffs. President Trump threatened in early 2018 to impose duties of 20% on European cars. “On the one hand, this (tarif


The latest U.S. tariffs on China could be a sign of what’s to come for Europe, analysts have told CNBC. President Donald Trump announced Sunday that the current tariffs of 10% on $200 billion of Chinese goods will increase to 25% on Friday. His decision sparked a sell-off in global equity markets and created further jitters in Europe whose exports could also face similar U.S. tariffs. President Trump threatened in early 2018 to impose duties of 20% on European cars. “On the one hand, this (tarif
Trump’s tariffs on China are a ‘harbinger’ for Europe, here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-06  Authors: silvia amaro
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Trump's tariffs on China are a 'harbinger' for Europe, here's why

WASHINGTON, DC – JULY 25: (AFP OUT) U.S. President Donald Trump (R) meets with President of the European Commission Jean-Claude Juncker, in the Oval Office at the White House July 25, 2018 in Washington, DC.

The latest U.S. tariffs on China could be a sign of what’s to come for Europe, analysts have told CNBC.

President Donald Trump announced Sunday that the current tariffs of 10% on $200 billion of Chinese goods will increase to 25% on Friday. In a Twitter post, he also threatened to impose an extra 25% levies on an additional $325 billion of Chinese goods “shortly”.

His decision sparked a sell-off in global equity markets and created further jitters in Europe whose exports could also face similar U.S. tariffs.

“It is a harbinger of what is likely to come for Europe,” Fredrik Erixon, head of the European Centre for International Political Economy (ECIPE), told CNBC via email.

“Trump may be an economic illiterate, but he means what he says, and the message that has been coming for quite a while is that European auto producers will be hit with higher tariffs as well,” Erixon added.

President Trump threatened in early 2018 to impose duties of 20% on European cars. Since then, he has met the president of the European Commission, the EU’s executive body, and both decided to seek an agreement over trade and avoid tariffs. Nearly a year since their meeting, both sides of the Atlantic have yet to start those official trade talks.

On Monday, European auto stocks fell more than 3%.

“On the one hand, this (tariff announcement on China) just confirms what we already know, which is that President Trump is willing to publically escalate conflicts to achieve policy objectives. So, we may also see volatility in the settling of European trade negotiations,” Mark Haefele, chief investment officer at UBS Global Wealth Management, told CNBC via email.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-06  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, told, china, threatened, harbinger, european, trump, europe, 25, heres, washington, tariffs, trade, president


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