5G rollout will ‘make things better’ for cybersecurity, according to Verizon

An illuminated 5G sign hangs behind a weave of electronic cables on the opening day of the MWC Barcelona in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Feb. 25, 2019. The impending rollout of the next generation 5G wireless standard could be a boon for cybersecurity, according to an expert from Verizon. “I actually think that the 5G rollout … will actually make things better,” Chris Novak, global director of the Threat Research Advisory Center at Verizon, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday. Novak’s comments


An illuminated 5G sign hangs behind a weave of electronic cables on the opening day of the MWC Barcelona in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Feb. 25, 2019. The impending rollout of the next generation 5G wireless standard could be a boon for cybersecurity, according to an expert from Verizon. “I actually think that the 5G rollout … will actually make things better,” Chris Novak, global director of the Threat Research Advisory Center at Verizon, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday. Novak’s comments
5G rollout will ‘make things better’ for cybersecurity, according to Verizon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, verizon, cybersecurity, according, 5g, things, think, novak, weve, rollout, companies, better, told, lot, actually, research, huawei


5G rollout will 'make things better' for cybersecurity, according to Verizon

An illuminated 5G sign hangs behind a weave of electronic cables on the opening day of the MWC Barcelona in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Feb. 25, 2019.

The impending rollout of the next generation 5G wireless standard could be a boon for cybersecurity, according to an expert from Verizon.

“I actually think that the 5G rollout … will actually make things better,” Chris Novak, global director of the Threat Research Advisory Center at Verizon, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday.

“I think there is a lot of research and development that we’ve done and I know others have done as well to make sure that 5G doesn’t just bring speed and reliability, but also that it’s done in a secure manner and addresses any of those kinds of concerns,” Novak said.

Novak’s comments come amid increasing scrutiny on companies seeking to win contracts to develop 5G capabilities for national networks. Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei is chief among the firms under the spotlight as the U.S. seeks to dissuade America’s allies from purchasing its equipment, with claims that the firm is “too close to the government. ”

Recent moves by the U.S. have reportedly resulted in major tech companies limiting their employees’ access to Huawei. On May 16, the U.S. Department of Commerce put Huawei on a blacklist, barring it from doing business with American companies without government approval, then a few days later it authorized firms to interact with Huawei in standards bodies through August “as necessary for the development of 5G standards.”

For its part, U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration appears to have a conflicting stance on Huawei.

Trump told CNBC on Monday that Huawei could be part of the U.S. trade negotiation with China, contradicting remarks by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who told CNBC on Sunday that Washington’s concerns surrounding the telecommunications behemoth are “national security” issues separate from trade.

On the subject of whether banning perceived bad actors from developing 5G networks would reduce the likelihood of data breaches, Novak said: “To be honest, it’s not even just the espionage element. In reality, the bigger percentage of that pie is actually financially motivated breaches.”

“If you actually roll back and look at the last decade, we’ve got almost about a half million security incidents that we’ve looked at over the course of that research,” he said. “While espionage plays a role in things and I think that’s kind of fired up a lot of the conversation here, I think ultimately there’s a lot of other facets to what we see happening in the cybersecurity and data breach landscape.”

— Reuters and CNBC’s Kate Fazzini contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, verizon, cybersecurity, according, 5g, things, think, novak, weve, rollout, companies, better, told, lot, actually, research, huawei


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Russian sovereign wealth fund says US allegations against Huawei are unproven and unfair

The head of Russia’s sovereign investment fund has urged the U.S. to back-up claims that China’s Huawei represents a national security threat. The U.S. has led allegations that Huawei’s equipment can be used by Beijing for espionage operations, with Washington calling on Western allies to bar the company from next-generation 5G networks. Huawei has repeatedly denied the allegations against it. Huawei has become a point of contention in a broader trade dispute between Washington and Beijing, with


The head of Russia’s sovereign investment fund has urged the U.S. to back-up claims that China’s Huawei represents a national security threat. The U.S. has led allegations that Huawei’s equipment can be used by Beijing for espionage operations, with Washington calling on Western allies to bar the company from next-generation 5G networks. Huawei has repeatedly denied the allegations against it. Huawei has become a point of contention in a broader trade dispute between Washington and Beijing, with
Russian sovereign wealth fund says US allegations against Huawei are unproven and unfair Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-07  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, equipment, wealth, used, unfair, washington, western, worlds, sovereign, fund, unproven, russias, huawei, beijing, 5g, allegations, russian


Russian sovereign wealth fund says US allegations against Huawei are unproven and unfair

The head of Russia’s sovereign investment fund has urged the U.S. to back-up claims that China’s Huawei represents a national security threat.

The U.S. has led allegations that Huawei’s equipment can be used by Beijing for espionage operations, with Washington calling on Western allies to bar the company from next-generation 5G networks.

Huawei has repeatedly denied the allegations against it.

Huawei has become a point of contention in a broader trade dispute between Washington and Beijing, with other countries under pressure to decide whether to allow the world’s largest maker of telecom equipment to help build their 5G networks.

On Wednesday, Huawei announced it had signed a deal with Russia’s top mobile operator MTS to develop 5G technology in Russia.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-07  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, equipment, wealth, used, unfair, washington, western, worlds, sovereign, fund, unproven, russias, huawei, beijing, 5g, allegations, russian


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We don’t believe US on Huawei, but we’re still working with other firms, says Russian mobile giant

Russia’s top mobile operator MTS defended its decision to allow China’s Huawei to build out its 5G networks but will continue to work with other firms, the company’s CEO said Friday. The statement directly contracts warnings from U.S. officials that Huawei’s 5G software and equipment poses a national security threat. Kornya added MTS is also working with Sweden’s Ericsson and Finland’s Nokia on 5G technology saying “all three major vendors are represented in our network.” Huawei is the world’s l


Russia’s top mobile operator MTS defended its decision to allow China’s Huawei to build out its 5G networks but will continue to work with other firms, the company’s CEO said Friday. The statement directly contracts warnings from U.S. officials that Huawei’s 5G software and equipment poses a national security threat. Kornya added MTS is also working with Sweden’s Ericsson and Finland’s Nokia on 5G technology saying “all three major vendors are represented in our network.” Huawei is the world’s l
We don’t believe US on Huawei, but we’re still working with other firms, says Russian mobile giant Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-07  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, equipment, qualified, firms, 5g, dont, believe, russias, mts, huawei, vendors, kornya, giant, networks, mobile, nokia, working, russian


We don't believe US on Huawei, but we're still working with other firms, says Russian mobile giant

Russia’s top mobile operator MTS defended its decision to allow China’s Huawei to build out its 5G networks but will continue to work with other firms, the company’s CEO said Friday.

In an interview with CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore at the St Petersburg International Economic Forum (SPIEF), MTS CEO Alexey Kornya said Huawei is “fully qualified” to provide infrastructure for Russia’s next-generation wireless networks. The statement directly contracts warnings from U.S. officials that Huawei’s 5G software and equipment poses a national security threat.

“Every country has its own right and capabilities to identify whether that or different types of the equipment represent certain concerns,” Kornya said. “In this sense Huawei is fully qualified to be in our networks.”

Kornya added MTS is also working with Sweden’s Ericsson and Finland’s Nokia on 5G technology saying “all three major vendors are represented in our network.” Huawei is the world’s largest provider of telecommunications equipment, followed by Nokia and Ericsson, according to research firm Dell’Oro Group.

“In business thinking you always balance between vendors and you don’t want to fall into dependency from one vendor,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-07  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, equipment, qualified, firms, 5g, dont, believe, russias, mts, huawei, vendors, kornya, giant, networks, mobile, nokia, working, russian


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Russia’s MTS and China’s Huawei sign agreement on 5G

Oil at $100? Experts predict where crude could go if an Iran… In an area responsible for the shipment of one-third of the world’s seaborne oil, just how high could military confrontation — or indeed, an outright war — send the price of…Oilread more


Oil at $100? Experts predict where crude could go if an Iran… In an area responsible for the shipment of one-third of the world’s seaborne oil, just how high could military confrontation — or indeed, an outright war — send the price of…Oilread more
Russia’s MTS and China’s Huawei sign agreement on 5G Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-06
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 5g, oil, chinas, predict, russias, agreement, outright, sign, price, worlds, seaborne, shipment, mts, war, send, responsible, huawei


Russia's MTS and China's Huawei sign agreement on 5G

Oil at $100? Experts predict where crude could go if an Iran…

In an area responsible for the shipment of one-third of the world’s seaborne oil, just how high could military confrontation — or indeed, an outright war — send the price of…

Oil

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-06
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 5g, oil, chinas, predict, russias, agreement, outright, sign, price, worlds, seaborne, shipment, mts, war, send, responsible, huawei


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China gives green light for local 5G rollout amid tech tensions with US

The country’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology on Thursday issued 5G commercial licenses to China Telecom, China Mobile, China Unicom and China Radio and Television. China will, according to the association, account for the largest number of 5G connections in 2025, greater than North America and Europe combined. The GSMA expects China to reach 460 million 5G connections by the end of that year. If China begins rolling out 5G this year, it will be one of the first to do so. ‘Race t


The country’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology on Thursday issued 5G commercial licenses to China Telecom, China Mobile, China Unicom and China Radio and Television. China will, according to the association, account for the largest number of 5G connections in 2025, greater than North America and Europe combined. The GSMA expects China to reach 460 million 5G connections by the end of that year. If China begins rolling out 5G this year, it will be one of the first to do so. ‘Race t
China gives green light for local 5G rollout amid tech tensions with US Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-06  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tensions, 5g, rollout, amid, end, rolling, local, tech, gives, china, technology, mobile, light, green, trade, war, huawei, chinese


China gives green light for local 5G rollout amid tech tensions with US

An illuminated 5G sign hangs behind a weave of electronic cables on the opening day of the MWC Barcelona in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Feb. 25, 2019. Angel Garcia | Bloomberg | Getty Images

China has given the go ahead for its major state-owned mobile carries to start rolling out next generation networks known as 5G, a move experts said was partly a response to the ongoing trade war with the U.S. The country’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology on Thursday issued 5G commercial licenses to China Telecom, China Mobile, China Unicom and China Radio and Television. It means those carriers can start rolling out commercial 5G applications. They were given a license for testing at the end of last year. The 5G networking standard is seen as a critical because it can support the next generation of mobile devices in addition to new applications like driverless cars.

Even though the licenses have been issued, there’s no guarantee that the networks will begin rolling out 5G services immediately — though some companies have indicated that they will begin this year. The GSMA, a trade body that represents mobile networks globally, said in a recent report that it expects a wide scale rollout of 5G in 2020. China will, according to the association, account for the largest number of 5G connections in 2025, greater than North America and Europe combined. The GSMA expects China to reach 460 million 5G connections by the end of that year. If China begins rolling out 5G this year, it will be one of the first to do so. Some U.S. carries such as Verizon have rolled out 5G in a limited number of cities. Carriers in the U.K. and South Korea have also launched 5G services. China Unicom said in a statement released by the Hong Kong stock exchange that it would make “dynamic and precise investment in 5G construction” but did not give a timeline. The other carriers did not immediately respond to a request for comment when contacted by CNBC.

‘Race to 5G’

The move by China to grant the licenses comes amid growing tensions in the trade war with the U.S., which appears to be increasingly focusing on technology and 5G. Even U.S. President Donald Trump has suggested that the networking standard is a battleground: “The race to 5G is on and America must win,” he said earlier this year.

Trump’s administration has targeted Huawei, the world’s largest maker of telecom equipment, by putting the company on a blacklist that restricts its access to U.S. technology — on which it heavily relies. While China was initially eyeing a 5G rollout in 2020, Neil Shah, research director at Counterpoint Research, said the timeline looks “more aggressive now” with services likely to be launched later this year. “First and foremost, the tech cold war is going on, and China does not want to remain behind the U.S. and Korea,” Shah said, explaining why China may have sped up its 5G launch. “Second, in light of the Huawei trade ban, (Chinese officials) want to provide Huawei with an early base to use their equipment and roll out before they don’t have access to U.S. components and gear,” he added. “Huawei may have stocked for a few months to roll this out, accordingly, China will look to start rollout at the end of this year before Chinese New Year so they can use Chinese New Year to leverage 5G smartphone and 5G plans.” Chinese New Year is a major public holiday that will take place at the end of January 2020. —Additional reporting by CNBC’s Hilary Pan.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-06  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tensions, 5g, rollout, amid, end, rolling, local, tech, gives, china, technology, mobile, light, green, trade, war, huawei, chinese


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The hot trend in smartphones? Not buying a new one

Samsung , the world’s largest smartphone maker by shipment volume, earlier this year introduced the Galaxy Fold — a nearly $2,000 foldable smartphone that ran into early issues, which delayed its commercial release . Chinese phone maker Huawei, for its part, also announced a foldable phone that will cost around $2,600 . “Phones are supposed to be for calling, for texting and for being connected with the world,” a user in London said about her expectations for smartphones. When mobile phones firs


Samsung , the world’s largest smartphone maker by shipment volume, earlier this year introduced the Galaxy Fold — a nearly $2,000 foldable smartphone that ran into early issues, which delayed its commercial release . Chinese phone maker Huawei, for its part, also announced a foldable phone that will cost around $2,600 . “Phones are supposed to be for calling, for texting and for being connected with the world,” a user in London said about her expectations for smartphones. When mobile phones firs
The hot trend in smartphones? Not buying a new one Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-27  Authors: saheli roy choudhury arjun kharpal elizabeth schul, saheli roy choudhury, arjun kharpal, elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, phone, phones, 5g, smartphone, london, internet, mobile, buying, hot, smartphones, trend, user, world, foldable


The hot trend in smartphones? Not buying a new one

Samsung , the world’s largest smartphone maker by shipment volume, earlier this year introduced the Galaxy Fold — a nearly $2,000 foldable smartphone that ran into early issues, which delayed its commercial release . Chinese phone maker Huawei, for its part, also announced a foldable phone that will cost around $2,600 .

But those flashy new features may not be enough to sway people to trade in their old phones immediately, as long as they’re in good condition.

The smartphone industry has a two-part plan to tackle a global slowdown in sales: sell a pricey new type of mobile device that is able to transform into a tablet, and promote phones that can support super high-speed mobile internet standard 5G.

CNBC’s “Beyond The Valley ” caught up with people on the streets of London, Singapore and Guangzhou, China to ask what they thought of foldable smartphones and the responses were not positive:

“It looks very strange,” according to a smartphone user in Guangzhou.

“It’s super bulky,” said a user in Singapore.

“Phones are supposed to be for calling, for texting and for being connected with the world,” a user in London said about her expectations for smartphones. “I don’t think that I really need to pay that much to have this because I can pay a lot less and still be satisfied.”

Market research firm International Data Corporation said that smartphone shipment volumes for the first quarter of 2019 fell 6.6% on-year after a 4.9% year-over-year decline in the fourth quarter of 2018.

Ben Wood, chief of research at CCS Insight, explained that all smartphone makers face “one over-arching problem” at the moment — their devices look pretty much the same and they have similar functionality. When mobile phones first came out, there was tremendous innovation both in hardware and software, but that’s not now the case, according to Wood.

“The marginal gains over the different generation of products started to slow down,” he added.

Smartphone makers are also betting on super-fast internet as an incentive to get more people to switch their existing devices for new ones that can support the so-called 5G mobile internet.

South Korea’s three mobile carriers as well as Verizon in the U.S. commercially launched their 5G services last month while other countries like China and Japan are racing to launch their own versions of the nascent technology. Still, widespread adoption of 5G will take time since most of the infrastructure around the world is still being built.

But there’s some enthusiasm among potential customers of 5G phones.

A user in Guangzhou said he would buy a 5G phone because it is “trendy” but it also has a “better internet system” that would let him do more, including video streaming.

“It just makes everything easier for us, like social media, streaming Netflix and stuff,” another user in London said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-27  Authors: saheli roy choudhury arjun kharpal elizabeth schul, saheli roy choudhury, arjun kharpal, elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, phone, phones, 5g, smartphone, london, internet, mobile, buying, hot, smartphones, trend, user, world, foldable


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5G is at the center of America’s beef with Huawei — here’s why it’s such a big deal

5G is also a big topic for Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile and AT&T. Put simply, 5G is a next-generation wireless network that will give you much faster internet connections. The greater bandwidth of 5G means that more devices can use the network at the same time. Those cables also need to connect to a modem and/or router to provide wireless internet to your house. This is how devices like the Apple TV 4K, your smartphone, computer and other internet gadgets will connect to Verizon’s 5G wireless netwo


5G is also a big topic for Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile and AT&T. Put simply, 5G is a next-generation wireless network that will give you much faster internet connections. The greater bandwidth of 5G means that more devices can use the network at the same time. Those cables also need to connect to a modem and/or router to provide wireless internet to your house. This is how devices like the Apple TV 4K, your smartphone, computer and other internet gadgets will connect to Verizon’s 5G wireless netwo
5G is at the center of America’s beef with Huawei — here’s why it’s such a big deal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-22  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, center, deal, beef, tmobile, tv, means, huawei, americas, sprint, network, verizon, internet, heres, big, 5g, cable, wireless


5G is at the center of America's beef with Huawei -- here's why it's such a big deal

5G logo is seen on an android mobile phone with Huawei logo on the background. Omar Marques | LightRocket | Getty Images

You’ve probably heard “5G” a lot recently. It’s been in a lot of stories. It’s at the center of America’s fight with China’s Huawei, which provides cellular equipment for wireless carriers around the globe. 5G is also a big topic for Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile and AT&T. Those carriers are working to build out the faster networks now, and Sprint and T-Mobile have even used 5G to discuss the competitive landscape in an effort to get merger approval from the Justice Department.

Apple recently ended a bitter, yearslong legal battle with Qualcomm mainly because the chipmaker manufactures some core 5G technology that Apple needs to make future iPhones competitive. But what the heck is 5G? Put simply, 5G is a next-generation wireless network that will give you much faster internet connections. But, because of the way it works, it’s about to change the way lots of other things connect to the internet, too, like cars and TVs, and even things like connected lights on city streets. Here’s what you need to know:

Faster connections, and more of them

Busakorn Pongparnit | Moment | Getty Images

5G promises much faster network speeds, which means heavy-duty content like video should travel much more quickly to connected devices. Verizon’s 5G network, which is live in Minneapolis and Chicago, is already providing speeds in excess of 1Gbps, or about 10 times the speeds you might get on a good day with 4G LTE, the current standard offered by wireless carriers in most places. That means you should be able to download an hourlong high-definition video in seconds instead of minutes. The lower latency of 5G also means that it takes less time for one gadget to talk to another. This is important in places like smart cities that are connecting to smart cars, since information needs to be delivered instantly. One day, 5G might be able to tell your car that someone is about to run a red light and that your car needs to slam on the brakes. In that sort of situation, you can’t have much delay in the network. The greater bandwidth of 5G means that more devices can use the network at the same time. This means it should alleviate problems at places like sports stadiums or concerts where thousands of people may be trying to place a phone call or upload a picture at the same time. In these instances, a network can get jammed up and stops working for everyone. 5G should prevent that from happening.

5G will change the way you get TV and internet at home

Verizon Communications Inc. 5G wireless signage is displayed at the company’s booth during the Mobile World Congress Americas in Los Angeles, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018. Patrick T. Fallon | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Right now, you probably have a cable wire running from the telephone poles on your street to your house. It might come in the attic and then, thanks to some drilling done by the cable guy, snakes its way from room to room connecting to cable boxes. Those cables also need to connect to a modem and/or router to provide wireless internet to your house. That means even if you “cut the cord” and ditch cable, you still need the same coaxial cable line for internet at home. 4G LTE is fast but not quite fast enough for an entire house of people to play games and stream 4K movies at the same time. It makes a poor replacement for wired broadband. According to proponents, 5G will be fast enough for that, and you can forget the cords. It’s supposed to be just as reliable as the wired broadband internet you’re used to, and it could save you a lot of headaches. Verizon has already talked a bit about how this will work. Instead of giving you a bunch of cable boxes and other gadgets, it’s going to simply give you an Apple TV 4K and a wireless modem. Since Verizon isn’t going to run a standard cable line to your house, it’s also going to include a subscription to YouTube TV, YouTube’s streaming service that will provide access to TV channels. YouTube TV normally costs $40 per month, but Verizon’s deal is likely only a limited-time offer. You’ll still have a modem at home, but it’ll connect to Verizon’s wireless 5G signal and then serve as a home Wi-Fi router, complete with standard Ethernet ports. This is how devices like the Apple TV 4K, your smartphone, computer and other internet gadgets will connect to Verizon’s 5G wireless network.

What phones support it?

Samsung Galaxy S10 5G Benjamin Hall | CNBC

It’s still super early in 5G days for phones, but things are about to take off quickly. Verizon and AT&T already have some 5G markets active, and Sprint and T-Mobile will begin rolling them out this year. Verizon is now selling the first 5G phone in the U.S. — the Samsung Galaxy S10 5G — in just two markets. Meanwhile, Sprint’s LG V50 ThinQ 5G launches on May 31 for its first markets. AT&T isn’t selling a true 5G phone just yet, but it’s signed up to sell the Samsung Galaxy S10 5G later this year, as are T-Mobile and Sprint. These are all Android phones, but Apple is expected to have its first 5G iPhone ready in 2020.

How does 5G impact Sprint and T-Mobile’s merger?

John Legere, chief executive officer and president of T-Mobile US Inc., left, gives two thumbs-up as Marcelo Claure, chief executive officer of Sprint Corp., listens during an interview on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., on Monday, April 30, 2018. Michael Nagle | Bloomberg | Getty Images

5G also plays a role in the proposed merger of T-Mobile and Sprint. Earlier this week, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai recommended that the FCC approve the $26.5 billion merger because he argues that it’ll speed up how quickly the two carriers are able to activate 5G in the U.S. “Two of the FCC’s top priorities are closing the digital divide in rural America and advancing United States leadership in 5G, the next generation of wireless connectivity. The commitments made today by T-Mobile and Sprint would substantially advance each of these critical objectives,” Pai said. But the decision is up to the DOJ, which has antitrust concerns if the two companies join.

Trump says 5G is a race America must win

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks next to Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Commissioner Ajit Pai during an event on United States 5G deployment in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., April 12, 2019. Carlos Barria | Reuters

Even President Donald Trump is all in on 5G. In April, Trump said that 5G is a race that America “will win.” He said 92 5G markets will be up and running by the end of the year, which will be ahead of South Korea, which is said to have 48 live at the same time. “According to some estimates, the wireless industry plans to invest $275 billion in 5G networks, creating 3 million American jobs quickly, and adding $500 billion to our economy,” Trump said in April. At the same time, the FCC announced new rules that will make it easier to deploy next-generation networks, including hub and relay antennas, to spur the advancement of 5G. The FCC also announced a $20.4 billion Rural Digital Opportunity Fund to bring faster 5G networks to rural areas, and a new spectrum auction that opens up 3,400 MHz of wireless spectrum for carriers to bid on. The spectrum can be thought of as a highway: the more lanes you have, the more customers you can support and the faster you can go.

5G, Huawei and the U.S. trade war

Richard Yu, CEO of Huawei’s consumer business, speaks as he presents the P30 series smartphone during a launch event in Paris. Marlene Awaad | Bloomberg | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-22  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, center, deal, beef, tmobile, tv, means, huawei, americas, sprint, network, verizon, internet, heres, big, 5g, cable, wireless


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Verizon CEO: ‘Tens of thousands’ of customers buying new 5G phones

Verizon is betting that customers will pay up for Samsung’s new 5G smartphone, even though the price point is high and the technology’s infrastructure is still being built up. “It’s a great experience,” Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg said in an interview with CNBC’s “Closing Bell ” on Thursday. We are seeing tens of thousands of customers taking it already,” he said. The Samsung Galaxy S10 5G is the first device that supports Verizon’s new 5G network out of the box. It follows the Motorola Z3, which


Verizon is betting that customers will pay up for Samsung’s new 5G smartphone, even though the price point is high and the technology’s infrastructure is still being built up. “It’s a great experience,” Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg said in an interview with CNBC’s “Closing Bell ” on Thursday. We are seeing tens of thousands of customers taking it already,” he said. The Samsung Galaxy S10 5G is the first device that supports Verizon’s new 5G network out of the box. It follows the Motorola Z3, which
Verizon CEO: ‘Tens of thousands’ of customers buying new 5G phones Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: michelle fox
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Verizon CEO: 'Tens of thousands' of customers buying new 5G phones

Verizon is betting that customers will pay up for Samsung’s new 5G smartphone, even though the price point is high and the technology’s infrastructure is still being built up.

“It’s a great experience,” Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg said in an interview with CNBC’s “Closing Bell ” on Thursday.

“I believe that there’s going to be people taking it. We are seeing tens of thousands of customers taking it already,” he said. “And today is the first day you can actually buy it.”

The Samsung Galaxy S10 5G is the first device that supports Verizon’s new 5G network out of the box. It follows the Motorola Z3, which also runs on 5G but only if you buy an additional $200 accessory that enables it.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, z3, today, taking, verizon, thousands, 5g, buy, vestberg, phones, upits, tens, ceo, customers, buying, verizons


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UK says it will make its own decision on 5G and Huawei

The U.K. government said it will make its own decision as to whether to include Huawei technology as it builds out its 5G network. The United States has asked allies to reject Huawei’s infrastructure on fears it could open up avenues to Chinese spying, a claim the tech firm has repeatedly rejected. The U.S. has even blacklisted Huawei, among other firms, effectively blocking the company from sourcing components and tech from America. The U.S. Commerce Department said in a statement Wednesday tha


The U.K. government said it will make its own decision as to whether to include Huawei technology as it builds out its 5G network. The United States has asked allies to reject Huawei’s infrastructure on fears it could open up avenues to Chinese spying, a claim the tech firm has repeatedly rejected. The U.S. has even blacklisted Huawei, among other firms, effectively blocking the company from sourcing components and tech from America. The U.S. Commerce Department said in a statement Wednesday tha
UK says it will make its own decision on 5G and Huawei Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, decision, tech, states, undermine, willing, 5g, work, united, huawei, uk, technology, security


UK says it will make its own decision on 5G and Huawei

The U.K. government said it will make its own decision as to whether to include Huawei technology as it builds out its 5G network.

The United States has asked allies to reject Huawei’s infrastructure on fears it could open up avenues to Chinese spying, a claim the tech firm has repeatedly rejected. The U.S. has even blacklisted Huawei, among other firms, effectively blocking the company from sourcing components and tech from America.

The U.S. Commerce Department said in a statement Wednesday that the move aimed to protect U.S. technology from “foreign-owned entities” that could undermine national security. In response, Huawei said that it is willing to work with U.S. officials to ensure product security.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, decision, tech, states, undermine, willing, 5g, work, united, huawei, uk, technology, security


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Here’s how Trump’s latest executive order could affect Huawei

We are ready and willing to engage with the US government and come up with effective measures to ensure product security,” a spokesperson for the company told CNBC. Experts have told CNBC that the U.S. would be able to find alternatives, namely Nokia and Ericsson, but other countries, including in Europe, could get hit. That means U.S. firms will need to get a license from the bureau to sell or transfer technology to Huawei. The Chinese company relies on some components from U.S. companies like


We are ready and willing to engage with the US government and come up with effective measures to ensure product security,” a spokesperson for the company told CNBC. Experts have told CNBC that the U.S. would be able to find alternatives, namely Nokia and Ericsson, but other countries, including in Europe, could get hit. That means U.S. firms will need to get a license from the bureau to sell or transfer technology to Huawei. The Chinese company relies on some components from U.S. companies like
Here’s how Trump’s latest executive order could affect Huawei Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, huawei, business, huaweis, told, technology, chinese, order, company, 5g, trumps, latest, executive, affect, heres, spokesperson


Here's how Trump's latest executive order could affect Huawei

Huawei claimed Thursday that attempts to restrict the Chinese tech giant from doing business stateside will cause the U.S. to fall behind in the development of next-generation mobile networks — and could raise “other serious legal issues.” On Wednesday, President Donald Trump signed an executive order that gives the government authority to block transactions that involve information or communications technology that “poses an unacceptable risk to the national security of the United States.” According to the executive order, the technology that could be blocked will be that which is “designed, developed, manufactured, or supplied, by persons owned by, controlled by, or subject to the jurisdiction or direction of a foreign adversary.”

Battle for 5G

While Huawei isn’t named in the policy, the U.S. has long-accused the Chinese telecoms equipment maker of being closely-linked to China’s ruling Communist Party. Washington has also alleged that Huawei’s telecom equipment poses a national security risk because it could be used by Beijing for espionage. Huawei has denied these claims. In a statement to CNBC on Thursday, Huawei said that further moves to block it from the U.S. market could have a damaging impact on America’s 5G development. “Huawei is the unparalleled leader in 5G. We are ready and willing to engage with the US government and come up with effective measures to ensure product security,” a spokesperson for the company told CNBC. “Restricting Huawei from doing business in the US will not make the US more secure or stronger; instead, this will only serve to limit the US to inferior yet more expensive alternatives, leaving the US lagging behind in 5G deployment, and eventually harming the interests of US companies and consumers,” the statement said. “In addition, unreasonable restrictions will infringe upon Huawei’s rights and raise other serious legal issues.”

5G refers to the next-generation of mobile networks that promise super-fast download speeds and the ability to underpin new technologies like driverless cars, which require huge amounts of data to be transmitted. The U.S. and China are battling to dominate in 5G as the technology is seen as crucial for the future of both countries’ infrastructure. Washington wants to ensure China has as little influence as possible globally, and trying to block Huawei and its rival ZTE is a key part of that strategy. Huawei has often made the argument that banning it from providing telecom equipment to any country would reduce competition there. Experts have told CNBC that the U.S. would be able to find alternatives, namely Nokia and Ericsson, but other countries, including in Europe, could get hit.

US ‘abusing’ power

Both Huawei and the Chinese government have issued strong statements against the U.S. over the past few months. “For some time, the US has been abusing its national power to tarnish the image of and suppress specific Chinese companies, which is disgraceful and unjust,” said a Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson on Wednesday, before Trump’s impending executive order was officially announced. “The world knows clearly what its intentions are,” said the spokesperson Geng Shuang during a regular media briefing. “We urge the US side to stop oppressing Chinese companies under the pretext of security concerns and provide a fair, just and non-discriminatory environment for their normal investment and operation.” Huawei’s founder and CEO Ren Zhengfei told CNBC earlier this year that the U.S. was “scared” of his company.

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It’s unclear as yet what the fallout will be for Huawei. The company has been relatively absent from the U.S. market for several years. In 2018, just 6.6% of its revenues came from the Americas, with most of that coming from Latin America, according to the company’s latest financial results. It also appears to have made a strong start to the year with revenue up 39% year-on-year for the first quarter of 2019, according to Huawei, which released quarterly earnings for the first time this year.

Reliance on other firms

A bigger concern, however, could be the move by the U.S. to add Huawei to the Bureau of Industry and Security’s so-called Entity List. That means U.S. firms will need to get a license from the bureau to sell or transfer technology to Huawei. The Chinese company relies on some components from U.S. companies like Intel and Qualcomm for smartphones and laptops. Some analysts said this could have a large impact on Huawei. “If fully implemented, the Entity List would immediately deny Huawei access to key hardware and software suppliers for its mobile infrastructure and handset businesses,” Eurasia Group said in a note on Wednesday. “This would also quickly put at risk both the company itself and the networks of Huawei customers around the world, as the firm would be unable to upgrade software and conduct routine maintenance and hardware replacement,” analysts at the political risk consultancy said.

Eurasia Group warned it would “hit virtually all of Huawei’s products, including high-end smart phones, mobile infrastructure, data centers and cloud services, and have immediate global implications for any company utilizing Huawei’s products or services. European carriers, in particular, are likely to be affected quickly.” In addition, Huawei’s consumer business is now its biggest division by revenues and is seen as a key growth driver for the company. Any disruption to the consumer group could impact its overall business. But over the past few years, Huawei has been designing its own chips for its smartphones to reduce reliance on other firms. It has a series of processors, known as Kirin, and a modem, called Balong 5000, that will allow devices to connect to 5G networks. In 2018, 73% of Huawei’s smartphones contained the company’s own chips, according to IDC data. Another 10% were from Taiwanese firm MediaTek, and the remaining 17% were from Qualcomm — but these were mainly for lower-end sub-$200 phones. “Even if — for whatever reason — Qualcomm can’t supply to Huawei, I’m sure MediaTek would be more than happy to pick up their business just given their expertise in low-end devices,” Bryan Ma, vice president of devices research at IDC, told CNBC. However, Huawei relies on American components for its networking equipment and that could be the bigger concern, Ma added. Last year, a list showing what Huawei deemed as “core suppliers,” reportedly released by the company, circulated around Chinese media. Of the 92 suppliers listed, 33 were American. A Huawei spokesperson told CNBC it does not have an official list to provide and declined to offer comments.

Europe to follow?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, huawei, business, huaweis, told, technology, chinese, order, company, 5g, trumps, latest, executive, affect, heres, spokesperson


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