Boeing to take $4.9 billion hit in second quarter on 737 Max grounding

Workers stand near Boeing 737 MAX airplanes as they sit parked at a Boeing facility adjacent to King County International Airport, known as Boeing Field, on May 31, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. Boeing on Thursday said it will take a $4.9 billion charge in the second quarter due to the worldwide grounding of its 737 Max planes after two fatal crashes that killed 346 people. Analysts expected the company to book a per-share profit of $1.80 for the second quarter, according to average estimates com


Workers stand near Boeing 737 MAX airplanes as they sit parked at a Boeing facility adjacent to King County International Airport, known as Boeing Field, on May 31, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. Boeing on Thursday said it will take a $4.9 billion charge in the second quarter due to the worldwide grounding of its 737 Max planes after two fatal crashes that killed 346 people. Analysts expected the company to book a per-share profit of $1.80 for the second quarter, according to average estimates com
Boeing to take $4.9 billion hit in second quarter on 737 Max grounding Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: leslie josephs phil lebeau, leslie josephs, phil lebeau
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 737, billion, second, quarter, grounding, max, charge, planes, hit, boeing, workers, 49, worldwide


Boeing to take $4.9 billion hit in second quarter on 737 Max grounding

Workers stand near Boeing 737 MAX airplanes as they sit parked at a Boeing facility adjacent to King County International Airport, known as Boeing Field, on May 31, 2019 in Seattle, Washington.

Boeing on Thursday said it will take a $4.9 billion charge in the second quarter due to the worldwide grounding of its 737 Max planes after two fatal crashes that killed 346 people.

The charge, which comes to $8.74 a share, is set to wipe out profits. Analysts expected the company to book a per-share profit of $1.80 for the second quarter, according to average estimates compiled by Refinitiv. The charge would reduce revenue and pre-tax earnings by $5.6 billion in the quarter, Boeing said.

The 737 Max jets have been grounded since mid-March and regulators have not said when they expect to allow the planes to fly again.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: leslie josephs phil lebeau, leslie josephs, phil lebeau
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 737, billion, second, quarter, grounding, max, charge, planes, hit, boeing, workers, 49, worldwide


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‘My life has no meaning.’ Man whose family was killed in 737 Max crash slams Boeing

A man whose family was killed in the crash of a Boeing 737 Max in Ethiopia in March slammed the manufacturer and told lawmakers at a congressional hearing Wednesday to scrutinize the Federal Aviation Administration, which approved the now-grounded planes two years ago. Paul Njoroge lost his wife, three small children and his mother-in-law on Nairobi-bound Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, a Boeing 737 Max 8 that crashed minutes after takeoff from Addis Ababa, killing all 157 people on board. It fol


A man whose family was killed in the crash of a Boeing 737 Max in Ethiopia in March slammed the manufacturer and told lawmakers at a congressional hearing Wednesday to scrutinize the Federal Aviation Administration, which approved the now-grounded planes two years ago. Paul Njoroge lost his wife, three small children and his mother-in-law on Nairobi-bound Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, a Boeing 737 Max 8 that crashed minutes after takeoff from Addis Ababa, killing all 157 people on board. It fol
‘My life has no meaning.’ Man whose family was killed in 737 Max crash slams Boeing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hearing, officials, house, crashes, aviation, man, flight, meaning, killed, slams, family, boeing, max, 737, crash, njoroge, life


'My life has no meaning.' Man whose family was killed in 737 Max crash slams Boeing

Paul Njoroge, representing the families of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, testifies before a House Transportation and Infrastructure Aviation Subcommittee hearing on “State of Aviation Safety” in the aftermath of two deadly Boeing 737 MAX crashes since October, in Washington D.C., July 17, 2019.

A man whose family was killed in the crash of a Boeing 737 Max in Ethiopia in March slammed the manufacturer and told lawmakers at a congressional hearing Wednesday to scrutinize the Federal Aviation Administration, which approved the now-grounded planes two years ago.

Paul Njoroge lost his wife, three small children and his mother-in-law on Nairobi-bound Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, a Boeing 737 Max 8 that crashed minutes after takeoff from Addis Ababa, killing all 157 people on board. It followed the crash of another Boeing 737 Max, Lion Air Flight 610 in Indonesia, in October. All 189 people on that flight were killed.

The twin crashes prompted aviation officials around the world to ground the jets in mid-March. Investigators have implicated an anti-stall system in both crashes. Boeing has developed a fix for the software to make it less aggressive and give pilots greater control of the aircraft, a newer version of Boeing’s workhorse 737 that’s been flying since the 1960s. Regulators have not said when they will allow the planes to fly again.

The House aviation panel is hearing from Njoroge as well as well as union officials representing pilots, mechanics and flight attendants at its third hearing on the 737 Max crashes.

“I miss their laughter, their playfulness, their touch,” Njoroge said of his family in written testimony. “I am empty. I feel that I should have been on that plane with them. My life has no meaning. It is difficult for me to think of anything else but the horror they must have felt.”

Lawmakers have not yet questioned Boeing officials, engineers or whistleblowers, and Njoroge urged the House panel to do so.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hearing, officials, house, crashes, aviation, man, flight, meaning, killed, slams, family, boeing, max, 737, crash, njoroge, life


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United Airlines posts higher profits and buys used Boeing 737s as Max grounding drags on

Strong travel demand pushed United Airlines Holdings second-quarter profit up more than 50% from a year ago, despite continued challenges from the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max. The Boeing 737 Max planes have been grounded worldwide since mid-March following two fatal crashes — one in Indonesia in October and another in Ethiopia in March — that killed a total of 346 people. United, which has 14 737 Max 9 jets, had expected the planes to return by Labor Day. American has 24 Boeing 737 Max jets


Strong travel demand pushed United Airlines Holdings second-quarter profit up more than 50% from a year ago, despite continued challenges from the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max. The Boeing 737 Max planes have been grounded worldwide since mid-March following two fatal crashes — one in Indonesia in October and another in Ethiopia in March — that killed a total of 346 people. United, which has 14 737 Max 9 jets, had expected the planes to return by Labor Day. American has 24 Boeing 737 Max jets
United Airlines posts higher profits and buys used Boeing 737s as Max grounding drags on Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, united, 737, demand, drags, planes, boeing, grounding, share, max, jets, posts, travel, profits, used, buys, higher


United Airlines posts higher profits and buys used Boeing 737s as Max grounding drags on

Strong travel demand pushed United Airlines Holdings second-quarter profit up more than 50% from a year ago, despite continued challenges from the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max.

United did not break out how the grounding, now in its fifth month, affected its bottom line but said it signed an agreement to buy 19 used Boeing 737-700 planes, older jets that it can use to meet growing demand. It expects those planes to be delivered in December.

The Boeing 737 Max planes have been grounded worldwide since mid-March following two fatal crashes — one in Indonesia in October and another in Ethiopia in March — that killed a total of 346 people. Regulators have not said when they expect to allow the planes to fly again, forcing airlines to cancel thousands of flights during the peak summer travel season and through the fall.

Airlines have scrambled to meet demand by combining flights and making other schedule tweaks.

On Friday, United removed the planes from its schedule through the start of November, with no end in sight to the grounding. United, which has 14 737 Max 9 jets, had expected the planes to return by Labor Day. American Airlines on Sunday also took the planes out of its schedules until early November, a move that would mean the cancellation of about 115 flights a day. American has 24 Boeing 737 Max jets in its fleet.

Delta Air Lines, which does not have the troubled plane in its fleet, said it has marginally benefited as rivals’ operations are hamstrung from the grounding.

In the three months ended June 30, net income rose 54% to $1.1 billion, or $4.02 a share, from $683 million, or $2.48 per share a year ago. On an adjusted basis, it earned $4.21 a share, beating analysts’ expectations of $4.09 a share.

Revenue rose close to 6% from a year ago to $11.4 billion, slightly above the $11.36 billion analysts had forecast, as demand for seats in every region where it operates climbed in the busy travel period.

The Chicago-based carrier also raised the low-end of its profit forecast for the year to $10.50 to $12 per share from an estimate of as low as $10 a share.

Executives from the second-largest U.S. carrier will hold a call with analysts on Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. ET, when they will likely face questions on how the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max could affect its operations through the end of the year.

Shares were up 0.6% in postmarket trading.

American and Southwest report second-quarter results on July 25.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, united, 737, demand, drags, planes, boeing, grounding, share, max, jets, posts, travel, profits, used, buys, higher


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United Airlines extends Boeing 737 Max cancellations to early November

United Airlines on Friday said it will extend its Boeing 737 Max groundings through Nov. 3, amounting to 2,100 cancellations in September and 2,900 in October. United, which has 14 Max jets in its fleet, had previously removed the jets from its schedule through Aug. 3. “We are continuing to work through the schedule to try and swap and upgauge aircraft to mitigate the disruption caused by the grounding of the MAX,” United said in a statement. The 737 Max has been grounded worldwide since mid-Mar


United Airlines on Friday said it will extend its Boeing 737 Max groundings through Nov. 3, amounting to 2,100 cancellations in September and 2,900 in October. United, which has 14 Max jets in its fleet, had previously removed the jets from its schedule through Aug. 3. “We are continuing to work through the schedule to try and swap and upgauge aircraft to mitigate the disruption caused by the grounding of the MAX,” United said in a statement. The 737 Max has been grounded worldwide since mid-Mar
United Airlines extends Boeing 737 Max cancellations to early November Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cancellations, schedule, boeing, united, early, 737, likely, removed, max, software, try, extends, jets, airlines


United Airlines extends Boeing 737 Max cancellations to early November

United Airlines on Friday said it will extend its Boeing 737 Max groundings through Nov. 3, amounting to 2,100 cancellations in September and 2,900 in October.

United, which has 14 Max jets in its fleet, had previously removed the jets from its schedule through Aug. 3.

“We are continuing to work through the schedule to try and swap and upgauge aircraft to mitigate the disruption caused by the grounding of the MAX,” United said in a statement.

“We continue to automatically book affected customers on alternate flights. If we are unable to place them on a different flight, we will proactively reach out to try and offer other options.”

The 737 Max has been grounded worldwide since mid-March, after its anti-stall software was implicated in two deadly crashes in October and March.

Other major airlines including American and Southwest have canceled thousands of flights during the busy summer travel season, and have further removed the Max from schedules through Sept. 3 and Oct. 1, respectively. Those airlines will likely further extend cancellations.

United reports second-quarter results after the market closes on Tuesday. Delta Air Lines, which does not fly the 737 Max, said on Thursday that it’s seeing a small benefit as rivals grapple with the grounding.

Boeing deliveries are stopped until aviation regulators approve the jet’s return to service. The airplane maker said in June that it would likely take until September or later to introduce a new software fix after the Federal Aviation Administration identified a new software issue a month ago.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cancellations, schedule, boeing, united, early, 737, likely, removed, max, software, try, extends, jets, airlines


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Boeing 737 program manager to retire amid crisis over jet’s grounding

Mark Jenks, who has worked on Boeing’s potential new mid-market airplane (NMA) project, will assume the role as lead of the 737 program, McAllister said. Since his first job as a liaison engineer, to his current job leading the 737 program and Renton site, Eric has worked across Commercial Airplanes. Mark Jenks will step into the position to lead the 737 program and Renton site. With Mark’s move, we also have the opportunity to continue to invest in the NMA development. His strong track record o


Mark Jenks, who has worked on Boeing’s potential new mid-market airplane (NMA) project, will assume the role as lead of the 737 program, McAllister said. Since his first job as a liaison engineer, to his current job leading the 737 program and Renton site, Eric has worked across Commercial Airplanes. Mark Jenks will step into the position to lead the 737 program and Renton site. With Mark’s move, we also have the opportunity to continue to invest in the NMA development. His strong track record o
Boeing 737 program manager to retire amid crisis over jet’s grounding Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: emma newburger, michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, role, program, boeing, crisis, amid, 737, eric, grounding, retire, nma, mark, jets, development, vice, manager, service


Boeing 737 program manager to retire amid crisis over jet's grounding

Mark Jenks, who has worked on Boeing’s potential new mid-market airplane (NMA) project, will assume the role as lead of the 737 program, McAllister said.

Mike Sinnett, Boeing Commercial Airplanes vice president of product development and future airplane development, will also take over as vice president for NMA in addition to his current role, according to the memo.

Here’s the full memo:

“These are unprecedented times for us, as our primary focus remains the safe return of service for the 737 MAX and driving quality and safety in all that we do.

To that end, I am grateful to Eric Lindblad for his strong leadership and tireless drive over the past 12 months leading the 737 program, as he has navigated some of the most difficult challenges our company has ever faced. He shared with me his desire to retire last year, and we will now begin to embark on a thoughtful and seamless transition plan.

For the past 34 years, Eric has dedicated his career to Boeing. Since his first job as a liaison engineer, to his current job leading the 737 program and Renton site, Eric has worked across Commercial Airplanes. Over the past three decades, Eric has made an impact on countless employees and has led some of the biggest bets of our business. And, he has done it through a lens of doing what’s right and continuing to ensure our relentless focus on safety and quality.

I have admired Eric’s resolve and drive, and we are grateful for his service and dedication.

Mark Jenks will step into the position to lead the 737 program and Renton site. He will work closely with Eric over the next several weeks to ensure a seamless transition as we approach the safe return to service of the 737 MAX.

As the vice president of the New Mid-Market (NMA) program, Mark has led all aspects of the development program ranging from the business case to the definition of the production system, services offerings and airplane configuration. Mark also led the 787 program during some of its most challenging of years, and has held several leadership roles within Boeing’s defense and space businesses. A true One Boeing leader, Mark will leverage his learnings and expertise for our 737 program as we carefully and fully return to the 737 MAX to service and meet our customer commitments.

With Mark’s move, we also have the opportunity to continue to invest in the NMA development. I’m pleased to announce that Mike Sinnett will assume the role of vice president for the NMA in addition to his current role leading the Product Strategy and Future Airplane Development Team. Let me be clear – the NMA team will continue to operate as a program, and I am looking forward to Mike’s leadership in this important effort. Before leading the Product Strategy and Future Airplane Development organization, Mike served as vice president and chief project engineer for the 787 program. His strong track record of new development programs will be instrumental to the long-term success of the NMA program. Mike will also continue to play a pivotal role in our stakeholder and customer outreach efforts on the MAX certification and return to service efforts.

All three of these leaders have consistently demonstrated a One Boeing approach to their work, and have been living the Boeing Behaviors. Please join me in congratulating Eric on his planned retirement, and welcoming Mark and Mike to their new leadership roles. “


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: emma newburger, michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, role, program, boeing, crisis, amid, 737, eric, grounding, retire, nma, mark, jets, development, vice, manager, service


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Boeing again reports no new orders for 737 Max as planes stay grounded after crashes

Boeing 737 MAX airplanes are stored in an area adjacent to Boeing Field, on June 27, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. After a pair of crashes, the 737 MAX has been grounded by the FAA and other aviation agencies since March, 13, 2019. The FAA has reportedly found a new potential flaw in the Boeing 737 Max software update that was designed to improve safety. The dearth of Max orders in June marked the third straight month without any new orders for the planes. The Boeing 737 Max planes have been grou


Boeing 737 MAX airplanes are stored in an area adjacent to Boeing Field, on June 27, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. After a pair of crashes, the 737 MAX has been grounded by the FAA and other aviation agencies since March, 13, 2019. The FAA has reportedly found a new potential flaw in the Boeing 737 Max software update that was designed to improve safety. The dearth of Max orders in June marked the third straight month without any new orders for the planes. The Boeing 737 Max planes have been grou
Boeing again reports no new orders for 737 Max as planes stay grounded after crashes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, max, deliveries, month, planes, reported, grounded, orders, manufacturer, reports, stay, crashes, 737, boeing


Boeing again reports no new orders for 737 Max as planes stay grounded after crashes

Boeing 737 MAX airplanes are stored in an area adjacent to Boeing Field, on June 27, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. After a pair of crashes, the 737 MAX has been grounded by the FAA and other aviation agencies since March, 13, 2019. The FAA has reportedly found a new potential flaw in the Boeing 737 Max software update that was designed to improve safety.

Boeing on Tuesday again reported no new orders for its 737 Max, as the worldwide grounding of its best-selling plane is about to enter its fifth month, dragging down aircraft deliveries.

Boeing delivered 239 commercial airplanes in the first half of the year, down 37% from the first six months of 2018. Deliveries are key for the company since that is generally when the manufacturer is paid for the aircraft.

The dearth of Max orders in June marked the third straight month without any new orders for the planes. The issues could give European manufacturer Airbus, which reported 389 commercial plane deliveries in the first six months of the year, the crown as the world’s biggest airplane maker. Airbus’ popular A320 planes compete with Boeing’s 737s in the single-aisle segment, which comprise most aircraft orders.

The Boeing 737 Max planes have been grounded since mid-March after two fatal crashes that claimed a total of 346 lives. Investigators found similarities between the two crashes and implicated an anti-stall system in both deadly incidents. Boeing has prepared software fixes for the planes but regulators have not said when they will permit the planes to fly again, prompting carriers to cancel thousands of flights. Both airlines and Boeing have been force to park the grounded jets.

Boeing cut production of the 737 Max by about a fifth to 42 jetliners a month in April. It had originally expected to ramp up production to 57 a month. The Chicago-based company has a backlog of about 4,600 737 jets.

Last month, Boeing won a vote of confidence in the troubled 737 Max when British Airways’ parent International Consolidated Airlines Group, said it plans to buy 200 of the jets. Boeing didn’t include the orders in its monthly tally because the order isn’t finalized. Over the weekend, flyadeal, a budget airline based in Saudi Arabia, canceled a provisional order for 30 Boeing 737 Max planes, and said it would take delivery of A320 jets from Airbus instead.

Boeing’s shares initially fell after the manufacturer reported its quarterly orders and deliveries, but closed up 0.6% at $353.09.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, max, deliveries, month, planes, reported, grounded, orders, manufacturer, reports, stay, crashes, 737, boeing


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Boeing sets aside $100 million for families of 737 Max crash victims

Boeing, still reeling from the two deadly 737 Max crashes, is setting aside $100 million to assist the families of victims and communities impacted by the accidents in October and March that killed 346 people. The victims’ families won’t have to waive their right to sue Boeing if they take money from the fund, the company said. The move comes as Boeing continues to feel backlash for how it designed the 737 Max earlier this decade. Critics say the company rushed to build the plane and did not ful


Boeing, still reeling from the two deadly 737 Max crashes, is setting aside $100 million to assist the families of victims and communities impacted by the accidents in October and March that killed 346 people. The victims’ families won’t have to waive their right to sue Boeing if they take money from the fund, the company said. The move comes as Boeing continues to feel backlash for how it designed the 737 Max earlier this decade. Critics say the company rushed to build the plane and did not ful
Boeing sets aside $100 million for families of 737 Max crash victims Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-03  Authors: phil lebeau
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeing, sets, accidents, million, aside, company, sue, 100, plane, 737, families, software, victims, max, crash


Boeing sets aside $100 million for families of 737 Max crash victims

Boeing, still reeling from the two deadly 737 Max crashes, is setting aside $100 million to assist the families of victims and communities impacted by the accidents in October and March that killed 346 people.

The funds will be available over the next several years and are not part of any compensation Boeing may have to pay to those who sue the company for damages related to accidents.

Days after the second 737 Max jet crashed in Ethiopian, the FAA and other aviation regulators around the world grounded the airplane until the company could fix defects in the aircraft and prove it is safe for commercial flights. The plane has now been grounded for more than three months and Boeing has said it is unlikely questions about the plane’s safety will be resolved until sometime in the September time frame.

“We at Boeing are sorry for the tragic loss of lives in both of these accidents and these lives lost will continue to weigh heavily on our hearts and on our minds for years to come,” Boeing Chairman and CEO Dennis Muilenburg said in a release announcing the funds. “The families and loved ones of those on board have our deepest sympathies, and we hope this initial outreach can help bring them comfort.”

The victims’ families won’t have to waive their right to sue Boeing if they take money from the fund, the company said.

The move comes as Boeing continues to feel backlash for how it designed the 737 Max earlier this decade. Critics say the company rushed to build the plane and did not fully disclose issues regarding the the 737 Max MCAS flight control software. That software is suspected of causing the crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia. In both accidents, investigators have not determined an official cause of the crash.

“We are focused on re-earning that trust and confidence from our customers and the flying public in the months ahead.” Muilenburg said in a statement announcing the fund.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-03  Authors: phil lebeau
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Boeing 737 Max likely grounded until the end of the year after new problem emerges

Boeing’s 737 Max could stay on the ground until late this year after a new problem emerged with the plane’s in-flight control chip. Boeing hopes to submit all of its fixes to the Federal Aviation Administration this fall, the Boeing official said. “We believe additional items will be remedied by a software fix.” Boeing will need to reach agreement with airlines and pilots unions on how much extra training pilots will need. The global Max fleet was grounded in mid-March following two fatal crashe


Boeing’s 737 Max could stay on the ground until late this year after a new problem emerged with the plane’s in-flight control chip. Boeing hopes to submit all of its fixes to the Federal Aviation Administration this fall, the Boeing official said. “We believe additional items will be remedied by a software fix.” Boeing will need to reach agreement with airlines and pilots unions on how much extra training pilots will need. The global Max fleet was grounded in mid-March following two fatal crashe
Boeing 737 Max likely grounded until the end of the year after new problem emerges Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: elijah shama
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, issue, end, fix, software, boeing, likely, pilots, problem, official, emerges, planes, mcas, grounded, need, max, 737


Boeing 737 Max likely grounded until the end of the year after new problem emerges

Boeing’s 737 Max could stay on the ground until late this year after a new problem emerged with the plane’s in-flight control chip.

This latest holdup in the plane’s troubled recertification process has to do with a chip failure that can cause uncommanded movement of a panel on the aircraft’s tail, pointing the plane’s nose downward, a Boeing official said. Subsequent emergency tests to fix the issue showed it took pilots longer than expected to solve the problem, according to The Wall Street Journal.

This marks a new problem with the plane unrelated to the issues Boeing is already facing with the plane’s MCAS automated flight control system, an issue the company maintains can be remedied by a software fix. Boeing hopes to submit all of its fixes to the Federal Aviation Administration this fall, the Boeing official said.

“We’re expecting a September time frame for a full software package to fix both MCAS and this new issue,” the official said. “We believe additional items will be remedied by a software fix.”

Once that software package is submitted, it will likely take at least another two months before the planes are flying again. The FAA will need time to recertify the planes. Boeing will need to reach agreement with airlines and pilots unions on how much extra training pilots will need. And the airlines will need some time to complete necessary maintenance checks.

FAA spokesman Lynn Lunsford declined to comment on a specific timeline for the plane’s recertification, saying, “We have steadfastly stayed away from offering any timelines.”

The global Max fleet was grounded in mid-March following two fatal crashes, in which a malfunction of MCAS was implicated. The crashes killed 346 people combined.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: elijah shama
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, issue, end, fix, software, boeing, likely, pilots, problem, official, emerges, planes, mcas, grounded, need, max, 737


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‘Miracle on the Hudson’ pilot urges simulator training for the Boeing 737 Max

A Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane sits next to another 737 outside the company’s factory on March 11, 2019 in Renton, Washington. The US Airways captain famed for his January 2009 landing on the Hudson River told lawmakers on Wednesday that airline pilots should receive simulator training to fly the Boeing 737 Max before the planes return to service after two fatal crashes. Aviation officials haven’t signed off on software and training updates Boeing has developed to get the planes back in the air. Ca


A Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane sits next to another 737 outside the company’s factory on March 11, 2019 in Renton, Washington. The US Airways captain famed for his January 2009 landing on the Hudson River told lawmakers on Wednesday that airline pilots should receive simulator training to fly the Boeing 737 Max before the planes return to service after two fatal crashes. Aviation officials haven’t signed off on software and training updates Boeing has developed to get the planes back in the air. Ca
‘Miracle on the Hudson’ pilot urges simulator training for the Boeing 737 Max Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, miracle, planes, urges, pilots, experience, told, max, hudson, pilot, 737, boeing, simulator, training


'Miracle on the Hudson' pilot urges simulator training for the Boeing 737 Max

A Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane sits next to another 737 outside the company’s factory on March 11, 2019 in Renton, Washington.

The US Airways captain famed for his January 2009 landing on the Hudson River told lawmakers on Wednesday that airline pilots should receive simulator training to fly the Boeing 737 Max before the planes return to service after two fatal crashes.

Aviation officials haven’t signed off on software and training updates Boeing has developed to get the planes back in the air. The jets, Boeing’s all-time bestseller, have been grounded for more than three months after two of the planes crashed within five months of one another, killing a total of 346 people.

“We should all want pilots to experience these challenging situations for the first time in a simulator, and not with passengers and crew on board,” Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger, told the House aviation subcommittee.

The hearing was the second of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure’s aviation panel on the 737 Max, and included testimony by representatives from flight attendant and pilot labor unions, and major U.S. airlines.

Unlike the computer-based training pilots received before transitioning to the 737 Max from older models of the plane, or stationary simulators, a full-motion simulator would give pilots physical experience in maneuvers required in emergencies, Sullenberger said. Those include recovery procedures that could require a pilot to use both hands or the efforts of two pilots to move a wheel that would right a plane tipped downward, skills they can commit to “muscle memory,” he said.

Dan Carey, president the Allied Pilot Association that represents roughly 15,000 American Airlines pilots, said the union requested experience in a full-motion 737 Max simulator in Miami but said the airline said they could receive it after the planes were recertified by the FAA. Carey said the union is concerned about whether new training Boeing is proposing will be sufficient.

American Airlines has “been working closely with our pilots on the APA national safety committee on the suggested training and other issues concerning returning the 737 MAX back to revenue service,” said American spokesman Ross Feinstein. “We appreciate their input and collaboration.”

American has ordered a 737 Max simulator that is scheduled to arrive by the end of the year.

Sullenberger added to criticism over the Federal Aviation Administration’s certification of the planes and the jet’s design saying “these crashes are demonstrable evidence that our current system of aircraft design and certification has failed us.”

Lawmakers, the Justice Department and several other bodies are examining the plane’s certification.

Sullenberger’s landing after a bird strike on the Airbus jet he was flying in 2009 became known as the “Miracle on the Hudson.”

He told lawmakers Wednesday that pilots face a “startle factor” that should be taken into account when assessing abnormalities during flight.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, miracle, planes, urges, pilots, experience, told, max, hudson, pilot, 737, boeing, simulator, training


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American Airlines’ pilots union ‘concerned’ about fixes for Boeing 737 Max after crashes

An American Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 arriving from Washington’s Ronald Reagan National Airport is seen taxiing to its gate at the Miami International Airport on March 12, 2019 in Miami, Florida. American Airlines’ pilots union is planning to tell lawmakers on Wednesday that it is concerned about whether training materials and updates for the grounded Boeing 737 Max will be sufficient. Dan Carey, president of Allied Pilots Association, which represents some 15,000 American Airlines pilots, plans


An American Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 arriving from Washington’s Ronald Reagan National Airport is seen taxiing to its gate at the Miami International Airport on March 12, 2019 in Miami, Florida. American Airlines’ pilots union is planning to tell lawmakers on Wednesday that it is concerned about whether training materials and updates for the grounded Boeing 737 Max will be sufficient. Dan Carey, president of Allied Pilots Association, which represents some 15,000 American Airlines pilots, plans
American Airlines’ pilots union ‘concerned’ about fixes for Boeing 737 Max after crashes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pilots, simulator, represents, airlines, fixes, crashes, max, boeing, concerned, training, union, american, 737, plane


American Airlines' pilots union 'concerned' about fixes for Boeing 737 Max after crashes

An American Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 arriving from Washington’s Ronald Reagan National Airport is seen taxiing to its gate at the Miami International Airport on March 12, 2019 in Miami, Florida.

American Airlines’ pilots union is planning to tell lawmakers on Wednesday that it is concerned about whether training materials and updates for the grounded Boeing 737 Max will be sufficient.

A House aviation panel is scheduled to hear from pilots, flight attendants and airline representatives at its second hearing about the plane, which has been grounded worldwide since mid-March after two fatal crashes within five months of one another killed a total of 346 people.

Boeing is scrambling to win regulators’ approval to get the 737 Max, its best-selling aircraft ever, flying again and to win back public trust after several surveys showed travelers might try to avoid the plane.

Dan Carey, president of Allied Pilots Association, which represents some 15,000 American Airlines pilots, plans to tell lawmakers Wednesday that Boeing has “made significant positive changes with the new software fixes,” according to written testimony reviewed by CNBC.

“However, at APA we remained concerned about whether the new training protocol, materials and method of instruction suggested by Boeing are adequate to ensure that pilots across the globe flying the MAX fleet can do so in absolute complete safety,” he said in his statement.

American Airlines has “been working closely with our pilots on the APA national safety committee on the suggested training and other issues concerning returning the 737 MAX back to revenue service,” said American spokesman Ross Feinstein. “We appreciate their input and collaboration.”

Airlines that have the 737 Max in their fleets, including American, Southwest and United, have canceled thousands of flights during the peak summer travel season as the plane remains out of service.

Boeing has developed a software upgrade for the jets but regulators have yet to sign off on those changes.

Carey also questioned whether the Federal Aviation Administration can ensure that pilots receive enough training “as aircraft are becoming more and more technologically sophisticated.”

Carey told CNBC the union has requested simulator time in the sole Boeing 737 Max full-motion simulator in the U.S., which is located in Miami, and said American told the union it can receive the simulator time after the plane is certified by the FAA. The pilots previously used a stationary simulator near Boeing’s production facility near Seattle.

American ordered a 737 Max simulator that should arrive by the end of the year, Feinstein said.

The Association of Professional Flight Attendants, which represents American’s cabin crew and is not testifying in person at Wednesday’s hearing, sent testimony to the House panel that says the issue of trust must be addressed before the plane flies again.

“If the public does not believe that the process of returning the 737 Max 8 to service is not the result of a thorough, rigorous, and transparent safety-driven process, then this aircraft will likely be forever tainted,” the statement said.

The House panel is also scheduled to hear from Airlines for America, an industry group that represents most of the largest U.S. airlines; the Association of Flight Attendants, which represents United Airlines cabin crew members; and Capt. Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger, famed for his 2009 “Miracle on the Hudson” landing of a US Airways Airbus jet.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pilots, simulator, represents, airlines, fixes, crashes, max, boeing, concerned, training, union, american, 737, plane


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