The 5 best US states to live in, according to US News & World Report

Where you live doesn’t just affect what sports team you root for or whether you say “soda” vs. Geography can have a major impact on your career, earnings and quality of life. Each year, U.S. News & World Report surveys over 50,000 Americans in order to rank all U.S. states across 71 metrics in eight categories: crime and corrections, economy, education, environment, fiscal stability, healthcare, infrastructure and opportunity. The resulting Best States of 2019 list reflects the states that offer


Where you live doesn’t just affect what sports team you root for or whether you say “soda” vs. Geography can have a major impact on your career, earnings and quality of life. Each year, U.S. News & World Report surveys over 50,000 Americans in order to rank all U.S. states across 71 metrics in eight categories: crime and corrections, economy, education, environment, fiscal stability, healthcare, infrastructure and opportunity. The resulting Best States of 2019 list reflects the states that offer
The 5 best US states to live in, according to US News & World Report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ranking, highquality, report, stability, live, states, according, healthcare, infrastructure, world, public, education, best


The 5 best US states to live in, according to US News & World Report

Where you live doesn’t just affect what sports team you root for or whether you say “soda” vs. “pop.” Geography can have a major impact on your career, earnings and quality of life.

Each year, U.S. News & World Report surveys over 50,000 Americans in order to rank all U.S. states across 71 metrics in eight categories: crime and corrections, economy, education, environment, fiscal stability, healthcare, infrastructure and opportunity.

U.S. News ranks each state from one to 50 — with one being the best and 50 being the worst — across each of these eight categories and then uses a weighed average to create a final ranking of the best places to live in the country.

The resulting Best States of 2019 list reflects the states that offer residents public safety and just corrections programs, strong employment and growth, high-quality public education, clean air and water, long and short-term financial stability, access to high-quality healthcare as well as robust energy, internet and transportation infrastructure. U.S. News also calculated opportunity based on variables like cost of living and economic equality.

Here is are the top five states on U.S. News’ Best States of 2019 ranking:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ranking, highquality, report, stability, live, states, according, healthcare, infrastructure, world, public, education, best


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

AOC introduces her latest ‘unusual’ policy—3 months of paid parental leave for her staff

“I’d like to share another ‘unusual’ (but shouldn’t be) part of my office policy w/ you all: Parental Leave!” In my office, *every* new parent receives 3 mos paid leave – including dads.” “Paid parental leave applies to ALL new parents, period. If you’ve got a new child, you get 12 weeks to spend adjusting your family to this huge transition,” she wrote. “Our 12 weeks parental leave is up to the parent on how they want to use that time.


“I’d like to share another ‘unusual’ (but shouldn’t be) part of my office policy w/ you all: Parental Leave!” In my office, *every* new parent receives 3 mos paid leave – including dads.” “Paid parental leave applies to ALL new parents, period. If you’ve got a new child, you get 12 weeks to spend adjusting your family to this huge transition,” she wrote. “Our 12 weeks parental leave is up to the parent on how they want to use that time.
AOC introduces her latest ‘unusual’ policy—3 months of paid parental leave for her staff Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-10  Authors: abigail hess, reuters jeenah moon file photo, spencer platt getty images, brendan smialowski afp getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, policy3, parents, shouldnt, paid, policy, parental, months, transition, 12, unusual, latest, staff, office, aoc, leave, weeks, introduces


AOC introduces her latest 'unusual' policy—3 months of paid parental leave for her staff

On Friday Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez announced what she calls another “‘unusual’ (but shouldn’t be)” dimension of her office policy: In addition to paying all of her staffers at least $52,000 a year and paying interns $15 an hour plus benefits, her office will provide three months of paid parental leave.

“I’d like to share another ‘unusual’ (but shouldn’t be) part of my office policy w/ you all: Parental Leave!” the congresswoman tweeted on Friday. “Three members of our small team are expectant or new parents in the first 6 mos of my term. In my office, *every* new parent receives 3 mos paid leave – including dads.”

In an eight-part Twitter thread, she detailed how the policy works for her staff.

“Paid parental leave applies to ALL new parents, period. Moms, dads, parents; biological or adopted. If you’ve got a new child, you get 12 weeks to spend adjusting your family to this huge transition,” she wrote. “Our 12 weeks parental leave is up to the parent on how they want to use that time. They don’t have to take all 12 weeks at once – for example, they can take 5 weeks off and work 2 days a week to transition in; bank 3 weeks for later in the year, etc.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-10  Authors: abigail hess, reuters jeenah moon file photo, spencer platt getty images, brendan smialowski afp getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, policy3, parents, shouldnt, paid, policy, parental, months, transition, 12, unusual, latest, staff, office, aoc, leave, weeks, introduces


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

This map shows which states have the biggest gender pay gaps

The gender pay gap — the gap between the median salaries of all working men and women in the U.S. — is often estimated at around 80 cents earned by women for every dollar earned by a man. Black women earn 61 cents for every dollar earned by their white male counterparts. Native American women earn 58 cents to every dollar, and Latina women earn 53 cents. “One, how static the gender pay gap has been over the past 14-plus years, and two, that there is such extreme geographic disparities — the top


The gender pay gap — the gap between the median salaries of all working men and women in the U.S. — is often estimated at around 80 cents earned by women for every dollar earned by a man. Black women earn 61 cents for every dollar earned by their white male counterparts. Native American women earn 58 cents to every dollar, and Latina women earn 53 cents. “One, how static the gender pay gap has been over the past 14-plus years, and two, that there is such extreme geographic disparities — the top
This map shows which states have the biggest gender pay gaps Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shows, gaps, dollar, earned, states, gap, zippia, men, pay, cents, gender, women, biggest, earn, map


This map shows which states have the biggest gender pay gaps

The gender pay gap — the gap between the median salaries of all working men and women in the U.S. — is often estimated at around 80 cents earned by women for every dollar earned by a man.

When controlled for factors such as race, the gap widens further. Black women earn 61 cents for every dollar earned by their white male counterparts. Native American women earn 58 cents to every dollar, and Latina women earn 53 cents.

Another variable that dramatically impacts how much men and women make is geography.

Job search site Zippia analyzed data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the American Community Survey and compared the median annual earnings of year-round, full-time workers (those who worked 35 or more hours per week for at least 50 weeks of the year) including wages, salaries and self-employment incomes of men and women in all 50 states and Washington, D.C.

What they found was that where you live significantly impacts how much you make — especially if you’re a woman.

“We were surprised by two trends,” Chris Kolmar, co-founder of Zippia, tells CNBC Make It. “One, how static the gender pay gap has been over the past 14-plus years, and two, that there is such extreme geographic disparities — the top quintile is some 15 percentage points better than the bottom quintile.”

This map from Zippia illustrates the states with the largest and the smallest gender pay gaps:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shows, gaps, dollar, earned, states, gap, zippia, men, pay, cents, gender, women, biggest, earn, map


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Its costs $73,160 a year to go to MIT—but here’s how much students actually pay

Over the past several decades, the cost of attending college — any type of college — has increased significantly. According to the College Board’s 2018 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report, from 1988 to 2018, sticker prices tripled at public four-year schools and doubled at public two-year and private non-profit four-year schools. Despite these costs, earning a four-year degree — especially at a top-ranking university — continues to be a high-yield investment. In 2018, college graduates earned


Over the past several decades, the cost of attending college — any type of college — has increased significantly. According to the College Board’s 2018 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report, from 1988 to 2018, sticker prices tripled at public four-year schools and doubled at public two-year and private non-profit four-year schools. Despite these costs, earning a four-year degree — especially at a top-ranking university — continues to be a high-yield investment. In 2018, college graduates earned
Its costs $73,160 a year to go to MIT—but here’s how much students actually pay Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, public, college, schools, costs, mitbut, pay, 73160, 2018, heres, students, mit, graduates, fouryear, investment, salaries, earning, actually


Its costs $73,160 a year to go to MIT—but here's how much students actually pay

Over the past several decades, the cost of attending college — any type of college — has increased significantly.

According to the College Board’s 2018 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report, from 1988 to 2018, sticker prices tripled at public four-year schools and doubled at public two-year and private non-profit four-year schools.

Despite these costs, earning a four-year degree — especially at a top-ranking university — continues to be a high-yield investment. In 2018, college graduates earned weekly wages that were 80 percent higher than those of high school graduates.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is widely regarded as one of the most prestigious schools in the world and its graduates earn some of the highest salaries. According to an analysis from salary comparison site PayScale, MIT graduates are the second highest-earning workers in the country, with early-career salaries of about $83,600 on average and mid-career salaries of about $150,400 on average.

But earning an MIT diploma requires meeting rigorous academic standards and a significant financial investment. Today, the cost of attending MIT is about $73,160 per year. Exactly how much student spends earning an MIT diploma however, can vary dramatically and many students end up paying far less.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, public, college, schools, costs, mitbut, pay, 73160, 2018, heres, students, mit, graduates, fouryear, investment, salaries, earning, actually


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg says his monthly mortgage payment is $450

In just a few short months, 37-year-old presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg has gone from being the little-known mayor of Indiana ‘s fourth largest city, South Bend, to a household name — regardless of whether you can pronounce it. In his time on the campaign trail Buttigieg (pronounced “boot-edge-edge”) — or as his constituents call him, “Mayor Pete” — has emphasized his Midwestern roots. “I actually live in a middle-class lifestyle, in a middle-class neighborhood, in the American Midwest. “


In just a few short months, 37-year-old presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg has gone from being the little-known mayor of Indiana ‘s fourth largest city, South Bend, to a household name — regardless of whether you can pronounce it. In his time on the campaign trail Buttigieg (pronounced “boot-edge-edge”) — or as his constituents call him, “Mayor Pete” — has emphasized his Midwestern roots. “I actually live in a middle-class lifestyle, in a middle-class neighborhood, in the American Midwest. “
Presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg says his monthly mortgage payment is $450 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, candidate, 450, middleclass, mayor, south, monthly, mortgage, payment, actually, writes, midwestern, city, pete, lifestyle, presidential, buttigieg


Presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg says his monthly mortgage payment is $450

In just a few short months, 37-year-old presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg has gone from being the little-known mayor of Indiana ‘s fourth largest city, South Bend, to a household name — regardless of whether you can pronounce it.

In his time on the campaign trail Buttigieg (pronounced “boot-edge-edge”) — or as his constituents call him, “Mayor Pete” — has emphasized his Midwestern roots.

“Everybody’s talking about the middle of the country like it’s some mysterious place and I think it might make sense to have somebody in the mix who actually lives here,” Buttigieg told CNBC Make It in a previous interview. “I actually live in a middle-class lifestyle, in a middle-class neighborhood, in the American Midwest.”

One aspect of that Midwestern lifestyle? Affordable housing. “[His] home is one of the nicest in the city and serves as a reminder of South Bend’s distance from the coasts: The mortgage payment, according to Buttigieg, is about $450 a month,” writes Nathan Heller in Vogue.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, candidate, 450, middleclass, mayor, south, monthly, mortgage, payment, actually, writes, midwestern, city, pete, lifestyle, presidential, buttigieg


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Meet the 10-year-old coder grabbing the attention of Google, Microsoft and Michelle Obama

But she also stands out from other 10-year-olds — Mehta is the CEO, founder and inventor of CoderBunnyz, a board game that teaches players as young as 4 basic coding concepts. Players draw and move their bunny piece along the board with the goal of eating carrots and hopping to their final destination. “CoderBunnyz will basically teach you all the concepts you ever need in computer programming,” Mehta tells CNBC Make It. Since inventing CoderBunnyz, Mehta also invented a second game called Coder


But she also stands out from other 10-year-olds — Mehta is the CEO, founder and inventor of CoderBunnyz, a board game that teaches players as young as 4 basic coding concepts. Players draw and move their bunny piece along the board with the goal of eating carrots and hopping to their final destination. “CoderBunnyz will basically teach you all the concepts you ever need in computer programming,” Mehta tells CNBC Make It. Since inventing CoderBunnyz, Mehta also invented a second game called Coder
Meet the 10-year-old coder grabbing the attention of Google, Microsoft and Michelle Obama Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-26  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, attention, coder, started, meet, microsoft, board, michelle, grabbing, 10yearold, young, kids, obama, mehta, coding, coderbunnyz, game, games, google, concepts


Meet the 10-year-old coder grabbing the attention of Google, Microsoft and Michelle Obama

Scroll through Samaira Mehta’s Instagram and you’ll see that she is a lot like other kids her age. She posts about having a lemonade stand, going swimming and doing the “In My Feelings” dance challenge. But she also stands out from other 10-year-olds — Mehta is the CEO, founder and inventor of CoderBunnyz, a board game that teaches players as young as 4 basic coding concepts. Players draw and move their bunny piece along the board with the goal of eating carrots and hopping to their final destination. “CoderBunnyz will basically teach you all the concepts you ever need in computer programming,” Mehta tells CNBC Make It. “There’s the very basic concepts like sequencing and conditionals to more advanced concepts like loops, functions, stack, queue, lists, parallelism, inheritance and many others.” Mehta says she first conceptualized the board game when she was “about 6-and-a-half, maybe 7,” after her father, an engineer who serves as an official adviser for the company, started teaching her how to code. As she researched learning materials for first-time coders, Mehta noticed there was an opening in the market for a product that helped young people pick up programming.

Samaira Mehta

She started by sketching how she wanted the game to be designed. Then, with the help of her family, she connected with graphic designers and game manufacturers in China and New Zealand. After exchanging dozens of emails, Mehta settled on a product that she says she’s very proud of. “My family is very much involved in my business,” she says. Her mother oversees marketing and social media for CoderBunnyz and her little brother tests the games. Since inventing CoderBunnyz, Mehta also invented a second game called CoderMindz, a coding-based artificial intelligence (AI) board game that teachers basic AI concepts using the Java programming language. “I’m really passionate about coding,” says the budding entrepreneur. “I want the kids to be the same way, because coding is the future and coding is what the world will depend on in the next 10 to 15 years. So if kids learn to code now, [when] they grow up they can think of coding maybe as a career option.” So far, Mehta says her company has generated about $200,000 in revenue since April 2018 and sold about 6,000 games. She says she is reinvesting that money in the company, saving for college and donating to charities that address homelessness in her community.

CoderBunnyz

At first, Mehta sold the board games through her website and stored the games in her garage. “We used to pack every order we got,” she says. “And when it started building up, and we started getting more orders, we were not able to fulfill that many, so we were seeing if we could get it on Amazon, and luckily within almost just the first year, we got it on Amazon.” Today, Mehta has a team that helps package the games and Amazon helps fulfill shipping. The business venture has taken Mehta to schools, libraries and companies like Facebook, Microsoft and Intel, where she has held workshops for employers and their kids about how to get young people involved with coding.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-26  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, attention, coder, started, meet, microsoft, board, michelle, grabbing, 10yearold, young, kids, obama, mehta, coding, coderbunnyz, game, games, google, concepts


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak plans to donate his salary to public education—here’s why

Sisolak is Nevada’s first Democratic governor in decades and ran on a platform that included reforming education spending, drawing on his experience serving for 10 years as a Nevada System of Higher Education regent. The gift is relatively small compared to the size of Nevada’s education budget — The Guinn Center reports that Nevada’s budget allocates nearly $6.6 billion to education — but draws attention to the need for increased education funding. In the years following the great recession, ed


Sisolak is Nevada’s first Democratic governor in decades and ran on a platform that included reforming education spending, drawing on his experience serving for 10 years as a Nevada System of Higher Education regent. The gift is relatively small compared to the size of Nevada’s education budget — The Guinn Center reports that Nevada’s budget allocates nearly $6.6 billion to education — but draws attention to the need for increased education funding. In the years following the great recession, ed
Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak plans to donate his salary to public education—here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: abigail hess, ethan miller getty image, ethan miller getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salary, plans, steve, schools, state, spending, budget, education, states, public, donate, funding, nevadas, governor, nevada, educationheres, sisolak


Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak plans to donate his salary to public education—here's why

Sisolak is Nevada’s first Democratic governor in decades and ran on a platform that included reforming education spending, drawing on his experience serving for 10 years as a Nevada System of Higher Education regent. Before entering politics, Sisolak founded and ran a telemarketing business.

According to Sisolak’s statement, the Governor will donate the net of his $163,474 salary, and has instructed Department of Education officials to evenly divide his gift among the state’s 416 Title I schools — schools with high percentages of low-income students — so that each school receives at least $1,000 over his four years in office.

The gift is relatively small compared to the size of Nevada’s education budget — The Guinn Center reports that Nevada’s budget allocates nearly $6.6 billion to education — but draws attention to the need for increased education funding. “This unprecedented gesture serves to highlight the need for more funding in our schools now,” Keenan Korth, communications specialist for a Nevada teachers union, tells CNN.

In the years following the great recession, education funding was slashed in states across the country and Nevada experienced some of the greatest cuts. According to most-recent data from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CPBB), American elementary and high schools cut capital spending by $23 billion, or 31%, between 2008 and 2015. Nevada’s budget made the deepest cuts to capital spending, which was reduced by 82%.

The CPBB reports that during those years, Nevada reduced per-pupil state funding for pre-K students by 39.5% (about $1,448 after adjusting for inflation) and the student-to-teacher ratio in Nevada rose from 18.3 to 21.2.

Sisolak has called for restoring education funding to at least pre-recession levels and proposes shifting money from the state’s hotel and marijuana taxes towards schools.

During his first State of the State Address in January, the Governor emphasized his focus on education. “So far we’ve talked about a number of important issues,” he said. “But there is no issue more important to me than making sure every child in every classroom gets a great education.”

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Don’t miss:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: abigail hess, ethan miller getty image, ethan miller getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salary, plans, steve, schools, state, spending, budget, education, states, public, donate, funding, nevadas, governor, nevada, educationheres, sisolak


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Tuition at public universities is $10,230 a year on average—here’s how much students actually pay

Today, public universities increasingly rely on revenue from tuition and fees paid by students to keep their doors open, and prices continue to rise. According to the College Board’s report, published in‐state tuition and fees at public four‐year schools increased from $9,980 during the 2017-2018 school year to $10,230 during the 2018-2019 school year. For out-of-state students, these costs can be even higher. The College Board estimates that out-of-state tuition and fees at public four-year ins


Today, public universities increasingly rely on revenue from tuition and fees paid by students to keep their doors open, and prices continue to rise. According to the College Board’s report, published in‐state tuition and fees at public four‐year schools increased from $9,980 during the 2017-2018 school year to $10,230 during the 2018-2019 school year. For out-of-state students, these costs can be even higher. The College Board estimates that out-of-state tuition and fees at public four-year ins
Tuition at public universities is $10,230 a year on average—here’s how much students actually pay Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: abigail hess, aaron ontiveroz the denver post via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, averageheres, 10230, funding, students, actually, fees, universities, costs, public, tuition, school, college, fouryear, outofstate


Tuition at public universities is $10,230 a year on average—here's how much students actually pay

Earning a college diploma is more expensive than ever, even at public universities.

“Overall state funding for public two- and four-year colleges in the school year ending in 2018 was more than $7 billion below its 2008 level, after adjusting for inflation,” write researchers for the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. “Colleges responded to significant funding cuts by increasing tuition, reducing faculty, limiting course offerings and in some cases closing campuses. Funding has rebounded slightly since then, but costs remain high and services in some places have not returned.”

Today, public universities increasingly rely on revenue from tuition and fees paid by students to keep their doors open, and prices continue to rise. According to the College Board’s report, published in‐state tuition and fees at public four‐year schools increased from $9,980 during the 2017-2018 school year to $10,230 during the 2018-2019 school year.

For out-of-state students, these costs can be even higher. The College Board estimates that out-of-state tuition and fees at public four-year institutions rose by $620, from $25,670 during the 2017-2018 school year to $26,290 during the 2018-2019 school year.

Once costs like room and board are taken into consideration, the average total charges come out to about $21,370 a year for in-state students and about $37,430 for out-of-state students, on average.

But once variables like scholarships, grants and tax benefits are factored in, many student end up paying less.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: abigail hess, aaron ontiveroz the denver post via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, averageheres, 10230, funding, students, actually, fees, universities, costs, public, tuition, school, college, fouryear, outofstate


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Elizabeth Warren’s $1.25 trillion education plan aims to end the cycle of student debt—here’s how

I’m calling for universal free college and the cancellation of student loan debt for more than 95% of Americans. In 2015, President Barack Obama proposed a national policy that would make two years of community college free for all eligible students. Providing two years of community college at no cost for every responsible student is one of the best ways to do that.” Today, at least 17 states offer tuition-free community college for residents. Warren’s proposal also emphasizes the benefits — bey


I’m calling for universal free college and the cancellation of student loan debt for more than 95% of Americans. In 2015, President Barack Obama proposed a national policy that would make two years of community college free for all eligible students. Providing two years of community college at no cost for every responsible student is one of the best ways to do that.” Today, at least 17 states offer tuition-free community college for residents. Warren’s proposal also emphasizes the benefits — bey
Elizabeth Warren’s $1.25 trillion education plan aims to end the cycle of student debt—here’s how Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: abigail hess, reuters karen pulfer focht, -elizabeth warren
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trillion, student, aims, warrens, elizabeth, cycle, community, debtheres, free, college, debt, plan, cost, end, policy, students, obama, public, education


Elizabeth Warren's $1.25 trillion education plan aims to end the cycle of student debt—here's how

I’m calling for universal free college and the cancellation of student loan debt for more than 95% of Americans. This is the kind of big, structural change we need to make sure our kids have opportunity in this country. pic.twitter.com/KERw3APDMo

Free community college has become an increasingly popular policy among progressive politicians. In 2015, President Barack Obama proposed a national policy that would make two years of community college free for all eligible students.

“No hardworking student should be stuck in the red,” said Obama during his final State of the Union address in 2017. “We’ve actually got to cut the cost of college. Providing two years of community college at no cost for every responsible student is one of the best ways to do that.”

Today, at least 17 states offer tuition-free community college for residents.

Warren’s proposal also emphasizes the benefits — beyond reducing future student debt — that free public university would have on future and current college students.

“We expect everyone but the wealthy to take on mountains of debt if they want to get a post-secondary education. This is closing off opportunities for generations of Americans and widening this country’s racial wealth gap,” Warren wrote. “The cost of college deters people from attending college.”

She also argues that eliminating tuition and fees at public institutions would help increase graduation rates, especially among low-income students. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, just 40 percent of first-time full-time students earn a bachelor’s degree in four years, and only 59 percent earn their bachelor’s in six years.

With more than half of students struggling to graduate in four years, most students are forced to take — and pay for — extra years of college.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: abigail hess, reuters karen pulfer focht, -elizabeth warren
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trillion, student, aims, warrens, elizabeth, cycle, community, debtheres, free, college, debt, plan, cost, end, policy, students, obama, public, education


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Tuition at community colleges is $3,660 a year on average—but here’s how much students actually pay

Published tuition costs do not account for scholarships, grants and tax benefits. In fact, according to the College Board, “56% of independent students and 50% of dependent students at public two-year colleges did not pay any part of their tuition and fees.” Overall, more than half of community college students received enough grant aid to cover their tuition and fees. The average grant aid and tax benefits provided to full-time students at public two-year institutions is about $4,050, which mea


Published tuition costs do not account for scholarships, grants and tax benefits. In fact, according to the College Board, “56% of independent students and 50% of dependent students at public two-year colleges did not pay any part of their tuition and fees.” Overall, more than half of community college students received enough grant aid to cover their tuition and fees. The average grant aid and tax benefits provided to full-time students at public two-year institutions is about $4,050, which mea
Tuition at community colleges is $3,660 a year on average—but here’s how much students actually pay Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: abigail hess, derek davis portland press herald via getty images, hill street studios, getty images, melanie stetson freeman, the christian science monitor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, community, averagebut, actually, college, twoyear, tuition, tax, public, average, colleges, published, students, fees, pay, heres, 3660, grant


Tuition at community colleges is $3,660 a year on average—but here's how much students actually pay

But in reality, many students end up paying far less in tuition. Published tuition costs do not account for scholarships, grants and tax benefits. The College Board broke down what the average net price of college is today — taking scholarships and grants into account — and found that students typically pay less than the published price.

Between 2009 and 2019, the average published tuition and fees at public two-year colleges increased by $930 (about 34% after adjusting for inflation) but the average combined grant aid and tax benefits also increased by over $1,300 (almost 50%) during that period.

In fact, according to the College Board, “56% of independent students and 50% of dependent students at public two-year colleges did not pay any part of their tuition and fees.” Overall, more than half of community college students received enough grant aid to cover their tuition and fees.

The average grant aid and tax benefits provided to full-time students at public two-year institutions is about $4,050, which means the net tuition and fees to attend these schools is -$390. This is one reason why many students choose to attend one or two years of community college before transferring to a traditional four-year college.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: abigail hess, derek davis portland press herald via getty images, hill street studios, getty images, melanie stetson freeman, the christian science monitor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, community, averagebut, actually, college, twoyear, tuition, tax, public, average, colleges, published, students, fees, pay, heres, 3660, grant


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post