Nationals pitcher Daniel Hudson missed a playoff game for the birth of his daughter—and is getting praise for it

For instance, in response to the news, David Samson, former president of the Marlins, tweeted, “Unreal that Daniel Hudson is on paternity list and missing game 1 of #NLCS. Only excuse would be a problem with the birth or health of baby or mother. The Nationals ended up winning the game, and fans, franchise leaders and teammates came to Hudson’s defense. “Boss moves by Daniel Hudson missing Game 1 of the #NLCS for #paternityleave to be there for the birth of his daughter,” wrote Reddit co-founder


For instance, in response to the news, David Samson, former president of the Marlins, tweeted, “Unreal that Daniel Hudson is on paternity list and missing game 1 of #NLCS. Only excuse would be a problem with the birth or health of baby or mother. The Nationals ended up winning the game, and fans, franchise leaders and teammates came to Hudson’s defense. “Boss moves by Daniel Hudson missing Game 1 of the #NLCS for #paternityleave to be there for the birth of his daughter,” wrote Reddit co-founder
Nationals pitcher Daniel Hudson missed a playoff game for the birth of his daughter—and is getting praise for it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pitcher, daniel, game, playoff, birth, praise, told, missed, family, hudson, miss, kids, getting, daughterand, everybodys, missing, nationals


Nationals pitcher Daniel Hudson missed a playoff game for the birth of his daughter—and is getting praise for it

On Oct. 11, the Washington Nationals announced that pitcher Daniel Hudson would be placed on postseason paternity leave, which allowed him to be away from the team for one to three days to support his wife as she gave birth to their third child.

For Hudson, being present for the birth of his daughter, Millie Lou, was an obvious choice, but taking one day off meant missing Game One of the National League Championship Series against the St. Louis Cardinals — and facing a few critics.

For instance, in response to the news, David Samson, former president of the Marlins, tweeted, “Unreal that Daniel Hudson is on paternity list and missing game 1 of #NLCS. Only excuse would be a problem with the birth or health of baby or mother. If all is well, he needs to get to St. Louis. Inexcusable. Will it matter?”

It didn’t matter. The Nationals ended up winning the game, and fans, franchise leaders and teammates came to Hudson’s defense.

“Boss moves by Daniel Hudson missing Game 1 of the #NLCS for #paternityleave to be there for the birth of his daughter,” wrote Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian on Instagram. “I’m buying his jersey right now.”

“It’s all about family, man,” Nationals general manager Mike Rizzo told USA Today after the Nationals’ win. “We said, ‘You have to take care of your family,’ that’s a No. 1 priority and you do what you have to do. No second thoughts about that, by any means.”

“If your reaction to someone having a baby is anything other than, ‘Congratulations, I hope everybody’s healthy,’ you’re an a——,” Sean Doolittle, a fellow Nationals pitcher, told reporters. “As important as our careers are to us as players, nothing is more important to us than our families. Our careers will end someday, but family is forever.”

He continued, “We sacrifice so much and we miss so much during our careers. We miss graduations and weddings. Lots of players might miss their kids’ first steps or first words. They’re gone six to eight months out of the year and can’t take their kids to school or help their wives with taking care of the kids. So when he said, ‘Hey, I need a day to be with my family because my wife is about to give birth,’ it was a no-brainer for me, and we focused all our energy on picking him up.”

Hudson said he is grateful for the support he and his family have received. “We were made aware of a lot of negative comments, but everybody’s got their opinions and everybody’s got their own priorities,” he told NBC Sports. “And this organization was 100% on board with what my priorities are, and I’m really appreciative of that.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pitcher, daniel, game, playoff, birth, praise, told, missed, family, hudson, miss, kids, getting, daughterand, everybodys, missing, nationals


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People who work from home earn more than those who commute—here’s why

Technology has radically transformed how — and where — Americans work. One Gallup survey found that 43% of Americans work from home occasionally. There’s evidence that even more Americans would work from home if they could. The median earnings for a person who works from home were $42,442 in 2018, far above the median earnings for all workers which were closer to $38,184. Last year, median earnings were $21,752 for those who walked to work; $40,184 for those who drove; $30,338 for those who carp


Technology has radically transformed how — and where — Americans work. One Gallup survey found that 43% of Americans work from home occasionally. There’s evidence that even more Americans would work from home if they could. The median earnings for a person who works from home were $42,442 in 2018, far above the median earnings for all workers which were closer to $38,184. Last year, median earnings were $21,752 for those who walked to work; $40,184 for those who drove; $30,338 for those who carp
People who work from home earn more than those who commute—here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-13  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, census, median, work, earnings, workers, transportation, walked, earn, americans, commuteheres, working, worked


People who work from home earn more than those who commute—here's why

Technology has radically transformed how — and where — Americans work.

Working remotely is more popular than ever before. One Gallup survey found that 43% of Americans work from home occasionally. That’s up from 39% of those who did in 2012.

And according to Quartz, U.S. Census data indicates that 5.2% of U.S. workers completely worked at home in 2017 — that’s about 8 million people.

There’s evidence that even more Americans would work from home if they could.

A recent survey of 2,000 working professionals and 1,000 hiring managers by LinkedIn found that 82% of workers want to work from home at least one day per week, and 57% want to work from home at least three days per week.

While it is not surprising that people are interested in forgoing their commutes and working from the comfort of their couch, data from the U.S. Census Bureau shows that telecommuting can also pay more.

The Census Bureau estimates that in 2018, employees who worked at home out-earned those who walked, drove, carpooled, or took public transportation to get to work.

The median earnings for a person who works from home were $42,442 in 2018, far above the median earnings for all workers which were closer to $38,184.

Last year, median earnings were $21,752 for those who walked to work; $40,184 for those who drove; $30,338 for those who carpooled and $40,519 for those who took public transportation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-13  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, census, median, work, earnings, workers, transportation, walked, earn, americans, commuteheres, working, worked


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Students who don’t fill out FAFSA are missing out on their share of billions in financial aid

As of Oct. 1, college-bound students can apply for their share of $150 billion in federal student aid including grants, loans and work-study. To apply, they need to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or the FAFSA. NerdWallet estimates that students who are Pell Grant-eligible missed out on $2.6 billion in free FAFSA college aid in 2018 simply because they did not submit the FAFSA. Most students complete the FAFSA online, but students who choose to complete the application on


As of Oct. 1, college-bound students can apply for their share of $150 billion in federal student aid including grants, loans and work-study. To apply, they need to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or the FAFSA. NerdWallet estimates that students who are Pell Grant-eligible missed out on $2.6 billion in free FAFSA college aid in 2018 simply because they did not submit the FAFSA. Most students complete the FAFSA online, but students who choose to complete the application on
Students who don’t fill out FAFSA are missing out on their share of billions in financial aid Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billions, aid, students, dont, didnt, tax, federal, sallie, need, share, complete, fafsa, missing, financial


Students who don't fill out FAFSA are missing out on their share of billions in financial aid

As of Oct. 1, college-bound students can apply for their share of $150 billion in federal student aid including grants, loans and work-study. To apply, they need to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or the FAFSA. FAFSA funds are distributed on a first-come, first-served basis. Sallie Mae recently polled 2,000 undergraduate students and parents and asked if they submitted the FAFSA. According to Sallie Mae’s analysis, during the 2018 – 2019 school year, only 25% of undergraduate students completed the FAFSA the first month it was open, and just 77% of undergraduate students completed it at all. By not filling out FAFSA, American college students are missing out. Federal grants do not need to be repaid, federal student loans have low interest rates and work-study programs can be a convenient way to simultaneously fund an education and build a resume. Because FAFSA funds are distributed as applications come in, families who plan ahead can gain an upper hand. Sallie Mae reported that 80% of students from families that make between $35,000 and $100,000 filled out the FAFSA, but 75% of students from families making less did so. NerdWallet estimates that students who are Pell Grant-eligible missed out on $2.6 billion in free FAFSA college aid in 2018 simply because they did not submit the FAFSA. In Sallie Mae’s poll, the company asked the students and parents about their reasons for not submitting the FAFSA. Here’s what they said:

They thought they were too rich

Among the almost quarter of college students who did not apply, nearly 40% said their reason was because they didn’t think they would qualify. But there is no income cut-off to apply for federal student aid. Charlie Javice, founder & CEO of Frank, an online FAFSA platform, told CNBC Make It. “It’s really important as FAFSA season comes up that people don’t forget that there is no such thing as being too rich to file FAFSA.” Javice said families that make more than $250,000 do not typically qualify for grants or subsidized loans but pointed out that a vast majority of Americans make less than $250,000. Being too rich “only applies to less than 5% of the U.S. population. Everyone should be doing it.”

They missed the deadline

The second most common reason students gave for not completing the FAFSA was because they missed the deadline, with 15% of those who did not complete the form giving this excuse. Each year, there is a nine-month period during which students can submit applications for both the current year and the future year. To avoid confusion, students should be sure to apply for aid for their upcoming school year as soon as possible. Most students complete the FAFSA online, but students who choose to complete the application on paper should submit their documents so that a federal processor reviews them by June 30. According to Edvisors, if a FAFSA is received after the June 30 deadline, it will not be processed. For those looking to avoid this challenge, here are the deadlines: Students attending college from July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020 can file the 2019 – 2020 FAFSA between Oct. 1, 2018, and June 30, 2020, using their 2017 tax information.

Students attending college from July 1, 2020 to June 30, 2021 can file the 2020 – 2021 FAFSA between Oct. 1, 2019, and June 30, 2021, using their 2018 tax information. Students should also make sure they are aware of the deadlines for applying for financial aid from their schools, states and local governments. The Department of Education and Edvisors provide resources for students to check their local deadlines.

jacoblund | Getty Images

It’s complicated

Of those who didn’t complete the FAFSA, 8% said it was because the application was too complicated, 9% said they didn’t have time and another 10% said they didn’t have the necessary information they needed to complete the form. In order to complete the FAFSA, students will need their tax returns, information about their family’s bank accounts and assets, and the names of the schools they are interested in attending. Over the past decade, the Department of Education has taken steps to make the form simpler and more intuitive, including redesigning the application website adding automatic error notifications if a field has been filled incorrectly. As of 2019, the FAFSA can even be completed on your phone. To test these improvements, I filled out the revamped FAFSA form myself. It took about five and a half minutes. The IRS data retrieval tool makes it easy for students to automatically transfer their tax return information, so I didn’t need to go searching for my returns. The banking information required was limited, so I didn’t need to go searching through bank statements. “I think [the Department of Education] has definitely made some strides,” Sallie Mae spokesperson Rick Castellano told CNBC Make It. “The IRS data retrieval tool is a game-changer, and the ability to use your prior year tax return is huge.” Castellano said that though it can take closer to 30 minutes for some students to complete the FAFSA, “it’s well worth it, given what you’re getting in line for.”

They didn’t know


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billions, aid, students, dont, didnt, tax, federal, sallie, need, share, complete, fafsa, missing, financial


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Elizabeth Warren says she was fired for being pregnant in 1971—that still happens today

As her campaign has gained traction, a story that Warren often tells on the campaign trail — about getting fired from her first teaching job for being pregnant — has been put in the spotlight. She said she was not offered the position the following year because she was visibly pregnant with her daughter, Amelia. (Warren gave birth to her daughter in September of 1971, so it is likely that she was not visibly pregnant when her contract was extended in April, but was visibly pregnant when she left


As her campaign has gained traction, a story that Warren often tells on the campaign trail — about getting fired from her first teaching job for being pregnant — has been put in the spotlight. She said she was not offered the position the following year because she was visibly pregnant with her daughter, Amelia. (Warren gave birth to her daughter in September of 1971, so it is likely that she was not visibly pregnant when her contract was extended in April, but was visibly pregnant when she left
Elizabeth Warren says she was fired for being pregnant in 1971—that still happens today Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warren, happens, 1971, trail, job, fired, riverdale, pregnancy, pregnant, today, 1971that, visibly, teaching, elizabeth, campaign


Elizabeth Warren says she was fired for being pregnant in 1971—that still happens today

Sen. Elizabeth Warren is a front-runner in the 2020 Democratic primary race and, according to polling aggregation site RealClearPolitics, she and former vice president Joe Biden are virtually tied in national polls.

As her campaign has gained traction, a story that Warren often tells on the campaign trail — about getting fired from her first teaching job for being pregnant — has been put in the spotlight. The story has resonated, at least in part, because pregnancy discrimination is still common today.

In 1970, Warren, who studied at the University of Houston to become a public school teacher, got her first teaching job as a part-time speech pathologist for special-needs children in Riverdale, New Jersey. She said she was not offered the position the following year because she was visibly pregnant with her daughter, Amelia.

Conservative websites have accused Warren of lying, highlighting minutes from a Riverdale Board of Education meeting in April 1971 that states the board unanimously approved Warren to work two days per week, as well as minutes from a June 1971 meeting that state Warren’s resignation was “accepted with regret.”

(Warren gave birth to her daughter in September of 1971, so it is likely that she was not visibly pregnant when her contract was extended in April, but was visibly pregnant when she left the role in June.)

The senator has since stood by her story.

“When I was 22 and finishing my first year of teaching, I had an experience millions of women will recognize. By June I was visibly pregnant — and the principal told me the job I’d already been promised for the next year would go to someone else,” wrote Warren on Twitter.

“This was 1971, years before Congress outlawed pregnancy discrimination — but we know it still happens in subtle and not-so-subtle ways. We can fight back by telling our stories. I tell mine on the campaign trail, and I hope to hear yours.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warren, happens, 1971, trail, job, fired, riverdale, pregnancy, pregnant, today, 1971that, visibly, teaching, elizabeth, campaign


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The 20 best MBA programs of 2019, according to WalletHub

U.S. business schools are seeing a drop in applications. According to a survey of 1,087 graduate business programs at 363 business schools by the Graduate Management Admission Council, 70% of two-year full-time MBA programs in the United States saw a decline in application volume in 2018. Harvard Business School, Stanford’s Graduate School of Business and The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania all saw decreases in applications that year. The result is WalletHub’s Best MBA Programs


U.S. business schools are seeing a drop in applications. According to a survey of 1,087 graduate business programs at 363 business schools by the Graduate Management Admission Council, 70% of two-year full-time MBA programs in the United States saw a decline in application volume in 2018. Harvard Business School, Stanford’s Graduate School of Business and The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania all saw decreases in applications that year. The result is WalletHub’s Best MBA Programs
The 20 best MBA programs of 2019, according to WalletHub Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, business, graduate, 2019, schools, graduates, average, school, mba, according, best, wallethub, programs


The 20 best MBA programs of 2019, according to WalletHub

U.S. business schools are seeing a drop in applications. According to a survey of 1,087 graduate business programs at 363 business schools by the Graduate Management Admission Council, 70% of two-year full-time MBA programs in the United States saw a decline in application volume in 2018.

Harvard Business School, Stanford’s Graduate School of Business and The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania all saw decreases in applications that year.

But earning an MBA can still pay off big for graduates. According to the nonprofit National Association of Colleges and Employers, the average starting salary for MBA graduates from the class of 2019 is $84,580, some $25,000 more than the average for graduates with bachelor’s degrees in business.

To determine which business schools pay off the most for students, WalletHub compared nearly 100 schools across 10 key metrics including tuition, the average base salary for graduates and gender diversity. They then scored the schools, with the highest possible score being 100. The result is WalletHub’s Best MBA Programs of 2019.

Here are the best business schools of 2019, according to WalletHub:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, business, graduate, 2019, schools, graduates, average, school, mba, according, best, wallethub, programs


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Women are slowly pursuing more high-paying degrees, but the pay gap remains, says new research

Economists estimate that the gender pay gap — the gap between the median salaries of all working men and women in the U.S. — is about 80 cents earned by women for every dollar earned by a man. When CNBC Make It spoke with economists about the causes behind the pay gap, several pointed to education. Today, women outnumber men at all levels of education, but many pursue degrees in traditionally lower-paying fields. By analyzing data from the U.S. census, the researchers found that women born in th


Economists estimate that the gender pay gap — the gap between the median salaries of all working men and women in the U.S. — is about 80 cents earned by women for every dollar earned by a man. When CNBC Make It spoke with economists about the causes behind the pay gap, several pointed to education. Today, women outnumber men at all levels of education, but many pursue degrees in traditionally lower-paying fields. By analyzing data from the U.S. census, the researchers found that women born in th
Women are slowly pursuing more high-paying degrees, but the pay gap remains, says new research Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, men, pursuing, wages, degrees, gender, women, gap, majors, slowly, university, research, potential, lower, remains, highpaying, pay


Women are slowly pursuing more high-paying degrees, but the pay gap remains, says new research

Economists estimate that the gender pay gap — the gap between the median salaries of all working men and women in the U.S. — is about 80 cents earned by women for every dollar earned by a man. When CNBC Make It spoke with economists about the causes behind the pay gap, several pointed to education. Today, women outnumber men at all levels of education, but many pursue degrees in traditionally lower-paying fields. But according to new research from Carolyn Sloane, an assistant professor at the University of California, Riverside, and Erik Hurst and Dan Black, professors at the University of Chicago, women are slowly shifting to higher-paying majors. “College major choice has strong predictive power in explaining gender wage gaps, independent of occupation choice,” they wrote. By analyzing data from the U.S. census, the researchers found that women born in the 1950s chose majors with potential wages that were 12.5% lower than their male peers. But women born in the 1990s, who are the most recent generation to graduate, chose majors with potential wages that were 9.5% lower, indicating a slow but significant shift.

Commencement at Wellesley College REUTERS/Brian Snyder


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: abigail hess
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The FAFSA opens today—here’s how to complete it, in 6 simple steps

Making a list of target schools is a good way for students to inspire and motivate themselves to complete the FAFSA. To log into the site, students and parents need to create a Federal Student Aid (FSA) ID, which will require making a username and password. Parent demographics: Parents’ marital status; parents’ names, social security numbers and birthdays; parents’ email address and household information, such as who lives with them. (Note: If the student is an independent, they will not need to


Making a list of target schools is a good way for students to inspire and motivate themselves to complete the FAFSA. To log into the site, students and parents need to create a Federal Student Aid (FSA) ID, which will require making a username and password. Parent demographics: Parents’ marital status; parents’ names, social security numbers and birthdays; parents’ email address and household information, such as who lives with them. (Note: If the student is an independent, they will not need to
The FAFSA opens today—here’s how to complete it, in 6 simple steps Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, number, fafsa, information, status, student, steps, opens, students, school, need, simple, parents, complete, todayheres


The FAFSA opens today—here's how to complete it, in 6 simple steps

Every year, the Department of Education distributes $150 billion in federal student aid through grants, loans and work-study. Most students qualify, but in order to get their share of these funds for college they need to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, otherwise known as the FAFSA. Students can begin completing the FAFSA for the 2020-2021 school year on October 1st, and because FAFSA funds are distributed on a first-come, first-serve basis, they will want to complete the form as soon as possible. While the process of applying for federal student aid may feel overwhelming, recent updates to the FAFSA have made it simpler and more stream-lined. CNBC Make It filled out the FAFSA ourselves to see what it takes. Here is a step-by-step guide:

Step 1: Make a list of schools

Students will need to share their FAFSA with schools they are interested in applying to. For this reason, students should make a list of schools they are potentially interested in before they even begin filling out the form. As part of completing their application, students will be able to look up the federal school codes of colleges and universities they are interested in sending their information to. Making a list of target schools is a good way for students to inspire and motivate themselves to complete the FAFSA.

Step 2: Gather financial documents

The FAFSA determines how much financial assistance students qualify for, which is why applicants must submit documentation about their family’s financial status. Before starting the FAFSA, applicants should be sure to gather all of the forms and documents they’ll need. To complete the FAFSA, students will need: A Social Security number

An Alien Registration number (For non-U.S. citizens)

Federal income tax returns, W-2s, and other records of money earned (Thanks to the newly-updated IRS data retrieval tool, applicants may be able to automatically transfer their tax return information instead.)

Bank statements and records of any investments

Records of any untaxed income

@eddie_rios via Twenty20

Step 3: Create a Federal Student Aid ID

Having prepared a list of schools and documentation, the next step is for applications to visit the FAFSA website (https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/fafsa) or the myStudentAid app.

To log into the site, students and parents need to create a Federal Student Aid (FSA) ID, which will require making a username and password. Once applicants have created an FSA ID, they can start the FAFSA, save their progress and log in and out as they wish.

Step 4: Start the FAFSA for the desired year

Each year there is a nine-month period during which students can submit financial aid applications for both the current year and future years. Students should carefully select which year’s FAFSA application they would like to complete: Students attending college from July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020 can file the 2019 – 2020 FAFSA between October 1st, 2018 and June 30th, 2020 using their 2017 tax information.

Students attending college from July 1, 2020 to June 30, 2021 can file the 2020 – 2021 FAFSA between October 1st, 2019 and June 30th, 2021 using their 2018 tax information.

Step 5: Follow the instructions carefully

The FAFSA itself is broken into seven sections: student demographics, school selection, dependency status, parent demographics, financial information, sign and submit, and confirmation. Complete each of these sections carefully, making sure that the information is accurate: Student demographics: The student’s name, social security number, date of birth, address, email, gender, telephone number, driver’s license number (if the student has a driver’s license), marital status, citizenship status, education history and interest in work-study.

The student’s name, social security number, date of birth, address, email, gender, telephone number, driver’s license number (if the student has a driver’s license), marital status, citizenship status, education history and interest in work-study. School selection: The name and location of the high school the student attended and the colleges they’re interested in applying to.

The name and location of the high school the student attended and the colleges they’re interested in applying to. Dependency status: Whether the student has children or dependents and the size of their household.

Whether the student has children or dependents and the size of their household. Parent demographics: Parents’ marital status; parents’ names, social security numbers and birthdays; parents’ email address and household information, such as who lives with them. (Note: If the student is an independent, they will not need to complete this section.)

Parents’ marital status; parents’ names, social security numbers and birthdays; parents’ email address and household information, such as who lives with them. (Note: If the student is an independent, they will not need to complete this section.) Financial information: Applicants can either use the IRS Data Retrieval Tool or input information from their W-2s manually.

Applicants can either use the IRS Data Retrieval Tool or input information from their W-2s manually. Sign and submit: Applicant’s signature.

Applicant’s signature. Confirmation: Applications will receive a confirmation when their FAFSA has been completed.

Step 6: Submit


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: abigail hess
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The 10 US universities that receive the most applications

Some of the biggest schools receive tens of thousands of applications and enroll over 50,000 undergraduate students. Every year, accredited American colleges and universities are required to submit admissions data to the Department of Education. CNBC Make It recently analyzed 2018 admissions data in order to identify which schools receive the most applications each year. We found was that the one school system, and 10 universities in total, stand out for receiving the most applications — by far.


Some of the biggest schools receive tens of thousands of applications and enroll over 50,000 undergraduate students. Every year, accredited American colleges and universities are required to submit admissions data to the Department of Education. CNBC Make It recently analyzed 2018 admissions data in order to identify which schools receive the most applications each year. We found was that the one school system, and 10 universities in total, stand out for receiving the most applications — by far.
The 10 US universities that receive the most applications Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-28  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, college, students, yearcnbc, receive, data, admissions, applications, schools, colleges, universities


The 10 US universities that receive the most applications

Students are applying to more colleges than ever before. According to the National Association for College Admission Counseling, in 1990, 9% of college freshmen applied to seven or more schools. By 2016, this percentage had increased to 35%.

Some of the biggest schools receive tens of thousands of applications and enroll over 50,000 undergraduate students. Every year, accredited American colleges and universities are required to submit admissions data to the Department of Education. More than 7,500 institutions complete these surveys each year.

CNBC Make It recently analyzed 2018 admissions data in order to identify which schools receive the most applications each year. We found was that the one school system, and 10 universities in total, stand out for receiving the most applications — by far.

Here are the 10 universities with the most applications and how many students get in:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-28  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, college, students, yearcnbc, receive, data, admissions, applications, schools, colleges, universities


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The Wonderful Company co-owners donate $750 million to Caltech for environmental research

On Thursday, Lynda and Stewart Resnick, co-owners of The Wonderful Company, announced a $750 million pledge to Caltech — comprised of a $400 million gift and a $350 million sponsored research agreement — in support of the school’s environmental sustainability initiatives. The National Center for Education Statistics estimates that Caltech has the 35th biggest college endowment in the country, worth roughly $2.2 billion. The Wonderful Company is privately held. Forbes estimates that the company i


On Thursday, Lynda and Stewart Resnick, co-owners of The Wonderful Company, announced a $750 million pledge to Caltech — comprised of a $400 million gift and a $350 million sponsored research agreement — in support of the school’s environmental sustainability initiatives. The National Center for Education Statistics estimates that Caltech has the 35th biggest college endowment in the country, worth roughly $2.2 billion. The Wonderful Company is privately held. Forbes estimates that the company i
The Wonderful Company co-owners donate $750 million to Caltech for environmental research Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wonderful, company, environmental, million, stewart, 750, gift, money, donate, college, research, worth, caltech, sustainability, climate, coowners


The Wonderful Company co-owners donate $750 million to Caltech for environmental research

On Thursday, Lynda and Stewart Resnick, co-owners of The Wonderful Company, announced a $750 million pledge to Caltech — comprised of a $400 million gift and a $350 million sponsored research agreement — in support of the school’s environmental sustainability initiatives.

The couple’s gift is the second-largest gift to an academic institution in U.S. history (behind Michael Bloomberg’s 2018 $1.8 billion gift to Johns Hopkins University) and the largest gift geared towards combating climate change ever.

“We’ve always as a company and as individuals given back, particularly in the areas that we do business,” Stewart tells CNBC Make It, mentioning the charitable work the couple has done in California’s Central Valley and Los Angeles. “My thought was that we see climate change. We’re in the ultimate sustainability business, which is farming, and we see the changes already. And if we’re going to be helpful, if we can’t solve the sustainability problem, then the other problems don’t mean anything.”

In 2009, the Resnicks, whose company grows and sells produce like pistachios and mandarins and produces consumer brands like POM Wonderful and FIJI Water, gave $20 million to the school to create the Resnick Sustainability Institute, which is dedicated to energy sustainability research.

The $750 million total of their most recent gift, which will be used to support solar science, climate science, energy, biofuels, decomposable plastics, water and environmental resources, and ecology and biosphere engineering research at Caltech, is significantly larger than most college endowments. According to U.S. News, the median college endowment is around $65.1 million. The National Center for Education Statistics estimates that Caltech has the 35th biggest college endowment in the country, worth roughly $2.2 billion.

The Wonderful Company is privately held. Forbes estimates that the company is worth $4.2 billion and that the Resnicks are worth $9 billion.

“I have been fortunate enough to be able to make the money and I feel comfortable with how to do that. Giving away the money is a little harder because I started with nothing,” says Stewart who began his entrepreneurial career when he started a janitorial business while in college at UCLA. “We could use that money to maybe make more money, but this climate change thing ain’t waiting for anybody.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wonderful, company, environmental, million, stewart, 750, gift, money, donate, college, research, worth, caltech, sustainability, climate, coowners


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A new Google tool aims to bring ‘in-depth analysis’ to the college search

In 2018, the search giant launched a college search feature that gives students information about four-year universities, including acceptance rates, costs and graduation rates. This year, Google expanded the feature to include two-year colleges, associate programs and certificate programs, reflecting the changing ways Americans are pursuing degrees. Today, roughly 35% of all college students, about 6 million people, are enrolled in two-year institutions like community colleges, rather than trad


In 2018, the search giant launched a college search feature that gives students information about four-year universities, including acceptance rates, costs and graduation rates. This year, Google expanded the feature to include two-year colleges, associate programs and certificate programs, reflecting the changing ways Americans are pursuing degrees. Today, roughly 35% of all college students, about 6 million people, are enrolled in two-year institutions like community colleges, rather than trad
A new Google tool aims to bring ‘in-depth analysis’ to the college search Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, google, rates, search, indepth, colleges, programs, students, institutions, tool, bring, aims, fouryear, analysis, twoyear, workers, college, education


A new Google tool aims to bring 'in-depth analysis' to the college search

Students today use Google to do their homework, connect with peers and teachers and apply to college. Now, more college-bound students may turn to the search engine for decision-making help. In 2018, the search giant launched a college search feature that gives students information about four-year universities, including acceptance rates, costs and graduation rates. This year, Google expanded the feature to include two-year colleges, associate programs and certificate programs, reflecting the changing ways Americans are pursuing degrees. Today, roughly 35% of all college students, about 6 million people, are enrolled in two-year institutions like community colleges, rather than traditional four-year colleges. While workers with associate’s degrees are typically out-earned by workers with higher educational attainment, earning a two-year degree in a high-demand field can be a low-cost way for workers to continue their education and increase their potential earnings. As a result, the number of students earning an associate’s degree each year has risen from 579,000 in 2001 to nearly 1 million in 2018, an increase of about 74%.

Attendance at these kinds of programs has increased also because they are typically “open-access,” meaning they accept most, or all, qualified students. Proponents of these kinds of open-access programs emphasize that they provide a low-cost education to students who might not have the opportunity to attend more exclusive four-year schools and that they enroll high percentages of students of color and low-income students. But graduation rates are significantly lower at two-year programs than they are at four-year programs. According to the Department of Education, 31.6% of students at two-year institutions graduate within four years, compared to over 40% at four-year institutions.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, google, rates, search, indepth, colleges, programs, students, institutions, tool, bring, aims, fouryear, analysis, twoyear, workers, college, education


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