Everybody complains Apple isn’t innovating, but R&D spending and patents tell a different story

Apple Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook greets customers at the grand opening of the new Apple Carnegie Library store in Washington, May 11, 2019. The analysts say that investors are focusing on the “apparent lack of ongoing innovation at Apple,” but that they believe that Apple is appropriately investing in new product categories. “When the iPhone (once in a generation product) becomes the basis of comparison, everything else, however successful, looks incremental,” the analysts write. Apple had


Apple Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook greets customers at the grand opening of the new Apple Carnegie Library store in Washington, May 11, 2019. The analysts say that investors are focusing on the “apparent lack of ongoing innovation at Apple,” but that they believe that Apple is appropriately investing in new product categories. “When the iPhone (once in a generation product) becomes the basis of comparison, everything else, however successful, looks incremental,” the analysts write. Apple had
Everybody complains Apple isn’t innovating, but R&D spending and patents tell a different story Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billion, granted, technologies, wearables, apple, patents, complains, spending, everybody, tell, different, according, product, 2018, iphone, innovating, isnt, rd


Everybody complains Apple isn't innovating, but R&D spending and patents tell a different story

Apple Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook greets customers at the grand opening of the new Apple Carnegie Library store in Washington, May 11, 2019.

Apple’s research and development spending has increased from $1 billion in 2009 to a projected $13 billion this year, not including stock-based compensation, according to a Thursday note from Bank of America analyst Wamsi Mohan.

The amount of money going into R&D in Cupertino shows that Apple is spending heavily both to fend off new technologies which could threaten its dominance in smartphones and tablets, as well as investing in technologies that could help the iPhone maker enter into new product categories, such as wearables, fitness and health.

“The patents around wearables suggest that Apple could be targeting AirPods with biometric sensors, Apple Watch with UV monitoring, gesture recognition for AR/VR applications, machine learning projects to enable autonomous driving and integration of various existing devices with a car,” according to the note.

The analysts say that investors are focusing on the “apparent lack of ongoing innovation at Apple,” but that they believe that Apple is appropriately investing in new product categories.

“When the iPhone (once in a generation product) becomes the basis of comparison, everything else, however successful, looks incremental,” the analysts write.

Apple’s massive scale can also mask how large some of its smaller product lines are.

“The wearables business in just 4 years is the size of a fortune 200 company with [estimated] $15 billion in sales (similar to Netflix, Paypal etc.) but the sheer size of the iPhone of $155 billion in 2018 (similar to General Motors) dwarfs the rapid growth of the relatively smaller businesses, ” Mohan writes.

Apple had 2,160 patents granted in 2018, down 3% from 2017, according to research from IFI Claims. Eight companies had more patents granted during that year, including Samsung, Qualcomm, Microsoft, and IBM, which led the table with 9,100 patents granted in 2018.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billion, granted, technologies, wearables, apple, patents, complains, spending, everybody, tell, different, according, product, 2018, iphone, innovating, isnt, rd


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Facebook has struggled to hire talent since the Cambridge Analytica scandal, according to recruiters who worked there

The company faces cutthroat competition for talent from other top tech companies like Google, Apple, Amazon, Microsoft and countless start-ups. Facebook disputed the accuracy of the recruiters’ accounts, but declined to point out any specific points that were wrong. In general, Facebook candidates are asking much tougher questions about the company’s approach to privacy, according to multiple former recruiters. This decline has put pressure on Facebook recruiters to fill a backlog of open positi


The company faces cutthroat competition for talent from other top tech companies like Google, Apple, Amazon, Microsoft and countless start-ups. Facebook disputed the accuracy of the recruiters’ accounts, but declined to point out any specific points that were wrong. In general, Facebook candidates are asking much tougher questions about the company’s approach to privacy, according to multiple former recruiters. This decline has put pressure on Facebook recruiters to fill a backlog of open positi
Facebook has struggled to hire talent since the Cambridge Analytica scandal, according to recruiters who worked there Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, tech, company, recruiters, facebook, analytica, hire, facebooks, cambridge, talent, worked, according, candidates, scandal, work, acceptance, struggled, companys


Facebook has struggled to hire talent since the Cambridge Analytica scandal, according to recruiters who worked there

Facebook is still reeling from the fallout from its Cambridge Analytica scandal more than a year ago, as multiple former recruiters say candidates are turning down job offers from what was once considered the best place to work in the United States.

More than half a dozen recruiters who left Facebook in recent months told CNBC that the tech company experienced a significant decrease in job offer acceptance rates after the March 2018 Cambridge Analytica scandal, in which a data firm improperly accessed the data of 87 million Facebook users and used it to target ads for Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election.

This impact to Facebook’s recruiting efforts is important as the company adds thousands of employees each year. These new workers are key to the company’s ability to innovate and improve its existing products. The company faces cutthroat competition for talent from other top tech companies like Google, Apple, Amazon, Microsoft and countless start-ups.

Most notably, Facebook saw a sharp increase in students at top universities who are declining the company’s job offers.

Among top schools, such as Stanford, Carnegie Mellon and Ivy League universities, Facebook’s acceptance rate for full-time positions offered to new graduates has fallen from an average of 85% for the 2017-2018 school year to between 35% and 55% as of December, according to former Facebook recruiters. The biggest decline came from Carnegie Mellon University, where the acceptance rate for new recruits dropped to 35%.

This drop has been echoed elsewhere in the company’s recruiting efforts.

The company has seen a decline in acceptance rates among software engineer candidates for its product teams. Those teams have seen their acceptance rates fell from nearly 90% in late 2016 to almost 50% in early 2019, according to one recruiter who left recently.

Facebook spokesperson Anthony Harrison said the company’s head count grew 36% year over year from the first quarter of 2018 to the first quarter of 2019. Facebook disputed the accuracy of the recruiters’ accounts, but declined to point out any specific points that were wrong.

After the publication of this story, Harrison contacted CNBC to say “these numbers are totally wrong.”

“Facebook regularly ranks high on industry lists of most attractive employers,” Harrison said in a statement. “For example, in the last year we were rated as #1 on Indeed’s Top Rated Workplaces, #2 on LinkedIn’s Top Companies, and #7 on Glassdoor’s Best Places to Work. Our annual intern survey showed exceptionally strong sentiment and intent to return and we continue to see strong acceptance rates across University Recruiting.”

In general, Facebook candidates are asking much tougher questions about the company’s approach to privacy, according to multiple former recruiters.

This decline has put pressure on Facebook recruiters to fill a backlog of open positions under more difficult pressures than they’ve faced previously, the recruiters said.

“Usually half of the close is done for recruiters with the brand Facebook has,” one recruiter who left in 2019 said. “This is the first time a lot of our folks have had to be on top of their game to make sure top candidates don’t slip through the cracks.”

This drop in candidate interest follows other signs that show more tech workers are reconsidering working for Facebook. In December, former Facebook employees told CNBC that they were hearing from more current Facebook employees who were reaching out to ask about job opportunities elsewhere. And in April, executives at health-tech start-ups told CNBC that poaching employees from Facebook has become easier after the company’s scandals.

The scandals have impacted candidate interest and have hurt morale among recruiters.

“The biggest thing that impacted people at Facebook is that we found out information at the same time as the general public did,” one recruiter who left recently said. “It was like, ‘Wait, shouldn’t one of our leaders have told us about this first versus our parents or friends reaching out?’ It was a shock.”

Facebook has lost candidates to other top companies like Google, Microsoft and Amazon, which can offer salaries and signing bonuses as good as Facebook’s with much less scandal, recruiters said.

Facebook has also lost candidates to start-ups that are gearing up to go public or have just gone public, such as Airbnb, Slack, Uber and Lyft, the former recruiters said. Several candidates have also opted for high-potential start-ups, including Robinhood and Stripe.

The company’s scandals are not the only reason for Facebook’s new recruiting struggles, the recruiters said. There are a number of other reasons, including the skyrocketing cost of living in the Bay Area and the cutthroat competition for talent among top tech companies.

Some candidates have said they’re not interested due to concerns about the general culture of the company as well as its leadership. Others still say they don’t want to be involved with the company that was responsible for electing President Donald Trump or that they don’t want to work for a company that has Peter Thiel, a notable investor and staunch Trump supporter, on its board.

Other candidates, especially students, are also passing on Facebook’s offers because they simply don’t use the company’s apps as much as previous generations and are therefore less inspired to work for the company.

“The privacy scandals, the Cambridge Analytica stuff — students aren’t as interested in going to Facebook anymore,” a former Facebook university recruiter said.

WATCH: Here’s how to see which apps have access to your Facebook data — and cut them off


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, tech, company, recruiters, facebook, analytica, hire, facebooks, cambridge, talent, worked, according, candidates, scandal, work, acceptance, struggled, companys


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The 5 best US states to live in, according to US News & World Report

Where you live doesn’t just affect what sports team you root for or whether you say “soda” vs. Geography can have a major impact on your career, earnings and quality of life. Each year, U.S. News & World Report surveys over 50,000 Americans in order to rank all U.S. states across 71 metrics in eight categories: crime and corrections, economy, education, environment, fiscal stability, healthcare, infrastructure and opportunity. The resulting Best States of 2019 list reflects the states that offer


Where you live doesn’t just affect what sports team you root for or whether you say “soda” vs. Geography can have a major impact on your career, earnings and quality of life. Each year, U.S. News & World Report surveys over 50,000 Americans in order to rank all U.S. states across 71 metrics in eight categories: crime and corrections, economy, education, environment, fiscal stability, healthcare, infrastructure and opportunity. The resulting Best States of 2019 list reflects the states that offer
The 5 best US states to live in, according to US News & World Report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ranking, highquality, report, stability, live, states, according, healthcare, infrastructure, world, public, education, best


The 5 best US states to live in, according to US News & World Report

Where you live doesn’t just affect what sports team you root for or whether you say “soda” vs. “pop.” Geography can have a major impact on your career, earnings and quality of life.

Each year, U.S. News & World Report surveys over 50,000 Americans in order to rank all U.S. states across 71 metrics in eight categories: crime and corrections, economy, education, environment, fiscal stability, healthcare, infrastructure and opportunity.

U.S. News ranks each state from one to 50 — with one being the best and 50 being the worst — across each of these eight categories and then uses a weighed average to create a final ranking of the best places to live in the country.

The resulting Best States of 2019 list reflects the states that offer residents public safety and just corrections programs, strong employment and growth, high-quality public education, clean air and water, long and short-term financial stability, access to high-quality healthcare as well as robust energy, internet and transportation infrastructure. U.S. News also calculated opportunity based on variables like cost of living and economic equality.

Here is are the top five states on U.S. News’ Best States of 2019 ranking:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ranking, highquality, report, stability, live, states, according, healthcare, infrastructure, world, public, education, best


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Save money and help the environment with these green home technologies

Making smart upgrades in a home — electricity, water usage, heating and air-conditioning — could save a homeowner from 5% to 30% on annual utility bills, according to energy.gov. There are a variety of in-home technology products that will save a homeowner money on their utility bills and help the environment at the same time. These technologies aim to help conserve resources — and potentially save you hundreds to thousands of dollars in unanticipated costs. The technology can also identify whic


Making smart upgrades in a home — electricity, water usage, heating and air-conditioning — could save a homeowner from 5% to 30% on annual utility bills, according to energy.gov. There are a variety of in-home technology products that will save a homeowner money on their utility bills and help the environment at the same time. These technologies aim to help conserve resources — and potentially save you hundreds to thousands of dollars in unanticipated costs. The technology can also identify whic
Save money and help the environment with these green home technologies Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: lorie konish, r paul herman, ceo, noah strouse, investment analyst, at hip investor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, environment, bills, according, money, water, phillips, green, save, utility, help, energy, using, technologies, technology


Save money and help the environment with these green home technologies

Sprinklers water the lawns of a housing development in Hesperia, California. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images) David McNew | Getty Images News | Getty Images

You probably have a rough idea of how much energy and water your home uses, based on your utility bills. But new technologies aim to turn the tables, letting you see just how much in resources you are using in advance of those bills so that your bottom line is lower. And that goes for everything from everyday appliances to your sprinkler system. If you want to get smart about your home’s energy efficiency, perhaps it’s time to upgrade. Making smart upgrades in a home — electricity, water usage, heating and air-conditioning — could save a homeowner from 5% to 30% on annual utility bills, according to energy.gov. There are a variety of in-home technology products that will save a homeowner money on their utility bills and help the environment at the same time. These technologies aim to help conserve resources — and potentially save you hundreds to thousands of dollars in unanticipated costs.

Flo Technologies

Flo Technologies

The idea for Flo Technologies’ products was inspired by a disaster. Company CEO Gabriel Halimi’s family had catastrophic water damage to their home, which resulted in a $300,000 insurance claim. Some of the losses, such as family heirlooms, were irreplaceable. Halimi’s father, Henry, a mechanical engineer by training, was inspired to come up with a solution. The result is the company’s water monitoring and control technology for the home. The technology is installed on the home’s main water supply. It works by tracking the flow, temperature and pressure of your home’s water system. Some insurance plans will give you a rebate for using the technology, Halimi said. It also shows you in real time via an app how much water you’re using. If your water usage requires attention, it can also send push notifications, text messages or emails. If you don’t respond, it can call you by phone. The technology can turn off your water in severe situations. You can also turn it off yourself by pushing a button. The key to the technology is that it can help a homeowner save by alerting them to a problem that needs to be addressed that they might not know about, like a broken sprinkler or water pipe. “Unless you have something like this, you have no way of knowing between the times that you get your water bill that you have something wrong with your home,” Halimi said.

Unless you have something like this, you have no way of knowing between the times that you get your water bill that you have something wrong with your home. Gabriel Halimi CEO of Flo Technologies

The product sells for $499, plus the cost of having a plumber install it.

Sense

Another company, called Sense, also lets you monitor your home remotely via an app, but this one is for electricity usage. The technology works through a home monitor that helps to identify the biggest energy drains. The technology is installed inside the electrical panel in your home. It then lets you measure how much energy is used in real time. That can be especially convenient if you’re away from home. If you have a vacation house, for example, you can see if the hot tub has been shut off. The technology can also identify which routine appliances are driving up your energy bills. Old refrigerators or TVs are typically some of the big culprits, according to Mike Phillips, co-founder and CEO of Sense.

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Switching from incandescent lights to LED lights is another big energy saver, he said. In a large house that had not yet changed over to LEDs, the move could save about $500 per year, Phillips estimated. The average annual energy bill for a typical single-family home is about $2,060, according to Energy Star, a government-run program. Heating and electronics account for about half of those costs. If you do a home-energy audit, you can shave an average of $105 to $627 off your annual utility bills, according to estimates from the Department of Energy. Sense’s technology costs $299 for the hardware and access to its applications. You also have to pay to have an electrician install it. The technology can help you eliminate energy guzzlers and troubleshoot for possible new drains that could drive up your bills, Phillips said. “It’s all of these bits of visibility into what’s going on in your home that you just didn’t have visibility into before,” Phillips said.

Rachio

Rachio


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: lorie konish, r paul herman, ceo, noah strouse, investment analyst, at hip investor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, environment, bills, according, money, water, phillips, green, save, utility, help, energy, using, technologies, technology


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Uber employee No. 1 is a billionaire, and he got the job thanks to a tweet

On Jan 5, 2010, Ryan Graves sent a tweet to Uber co-founder Travis Kalanick suggesting himself as a potential hire for what was then a new start-up. On March 1, 2010, he became the first employee at Uber thanks to that tweet. “I was hitting Craigslist, Twitter, and other channels looking for the right candidate,” Kalanick wrote in a 2010 blog post about Uber’s early days. Because of his equity in the company, Graves, 35, is a very rich man, worth more than $1 billion, according to Forbes. Kalani


On Jan 5, 2010, Ryan Graves sent a tweet to Uber co-founder Travis Kalanick suggesting himself as a potential hire for what was then a new start-up. On March 1, 2010, he became the first employee at Uber thanks to that tweet. “I was hitting Craigslist, Twitter, and other channels looking for the right candidate,” Kalanick wrote in a 2010 blog post about Uber’s early days. Because of his equity in the company, Graves, 35, is a very rich man, worth more than $1 billion, according to Forbes. Kalani
Uber employee No. 1 is a billionaire, and he got the job thanks to a tweet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-10  Authors: catherine clifford, mark neuling
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ubers, silicon, job, billion, graves, billionaire, according, employee, wrote, uber, company, 2010, kalanick, thanks


Uber employee No. 1 is a billionaire, and he got the job thanks to a tweet

It would turn out to be a billion-dollar tweet.

On Jan 5, 2010, Ryan Graves sent a tweet to Uber co-founder Travis Kalanick suggesting himself as a potential hire for what was then a new start-up.

Graves, who was at the time working as a leader in a management training program in information technology at General Electric, got hired.

On March 1, 2010, he became the first employee at Uber thanks to that tweet.

“I was hitting Craigslist, Twitter, and other channels looking for the right candidate,” Kalanick wrote in a 2010 blog post about Uber’s early days. “What resulted was the Awesomest job post and response I’ve ever seen.”

Now of course, Uber is a multibillion-dollar company. It was valued at more than $75 billion based on it’s $45 a share IPO on Thursday, and shares were hovering between about $42 and $44 when it started trading on the New York Stock Exchange Friday.

Because of his equity in the company, Graves, 35, is a very rich man, worth more than $1 billion, according to Forbes.

Kalanick (worth over $5 billion, according to Forbes) has said that Graves, “hit the ground running,” at Uber after he was hired. “From the day he got going, we spent about 15-20 hours a week working together going over product, driver on-boarding, pricing model, the whole nine. He learned the startup game fast and worked his a– off to build the Uber team and make the San Francisco launch and subsequent growth a huge success,” Kalanick wrote in the 2010 blog post.

Graves’ tenure at Uber included an almost year-long stint as the CEO and an almost seven-year run as the senior vice president of global operations.

Of course, Graves’ time at Uber was not without controversy, and he announced his resignation from Uber in August 2017, two months after Kalanick was forced to resign when investigations into Uber’s culture revealed sexual harassment and discrimination.

“We should have taken more time to reflect on our mistakes and make changes together,” Graves said in an email sent to Uber staff at the time. “There always seemed to be another goal, another target, another business or city to launch. Confucius said that reflection is the noblest method to learn wisdom, and fortunately, our new found reflection and introspection has become an asset to us and we have evolved and grown considerably.”

Graves still sits on Uber’s board of directors. He now lives with his family in Hawaii, according to Forbes, and is running the investment firm he founded, Saltwater. Saltwater’s portfolio includes independent San Francisco beer company Fort Point beer, cannabis company Caliva and women’s health and fertility services company Kindbody.

Though Graves’ money tweet may sound like a Silicon Valley fairy tale, it’s not entirely unique. Adam Lyons was the 25-year-old founder of car-insurance start-up The Zebra when he guessed Mark Cuban’s email address, shot him a note and ended up getting an investment from the billionaire star of ABC’s “Shark Tank.” And Elon Musk recently suggested a Reddit user “should interview at Tesla” for the analysis he posted of his Tesla’s self-driving car technology.

And it’s not just Silicon Valley: Hafthor Bjornsson who stars as “The Mountain” on HBO’s “Game of Thrones,” got an audition for the role via an unsolicited Facebook Messenger message.

See also:

Hedge fund billionaire Ray Dalio to younger self: ‘Why are you so stupidly arrogant!?!’

Pinterest’s employee No. 2 left before his equity vested—here’s what he says of the decision that cost him millions

Google execs reveal secrets to success they got from Silicon Valley’s ‘trillion dollar’ business coach


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-10  Authors: catherine clifford, mark neuling
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ubers, silicon, job, billion, graves, billionaire, according, employee, wrote, uber, company, 2010, kalanick, thanks


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Wealthy Goldman Sachs clients stand to rake in $1 billion on Uber IPO

Goldman Sachs’ millionaire clients are teed up to be among the biggest winners in Uber’s initial public offering this week. The stake results in a $1 billion profit on paper for the Goldman clients in just a matter of years, the person said. The convertible bond deal let Goldman Sachs clients get a deeper discount on the stock the longer Uber stayed private, the person said. Luckily for certain Goldman clients, Uber remained private for a decade. The Goldman Sachs shareholders are subject to the


Goldman Sachs’ millionaire clients are teed up to be among the biggest winners in Uber’s initial public offering this week. The stake results in a $1 billion profit on paper for the Goldman clients in just a matter of years, the person said. The convertible bond deal let Goldman Sachs clients get a deeper discount on the stock the longer Uber stayed private, the person said. Luckily for certain Goldman clients, Uber remained private for a decade. The Goldman Sachs shareholders are subject to the
Wealthy Goldman Sachs clients stand to rake in $1 billion on Uber IPO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09  Authors: kate rooney, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images, cnbcs john schoen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, person, uber, rake, ubers, clients, goldman, shares, billion, stock, ipo, sachs, according, stand, wealthy


Wealthy Goldman Sachs clients stand to rake in $1 billion on Uber IPO

Goldman Sachs’ millionaire clients are teed up to be among the biggest winners in Uber’s initial public offering this week.

About four years ago, the bank’s private-wealth customers were offered what are known as convertible bonds. In this case, the Uber corporate bonds turn into discounted stock when the ride-hailing company goes public, according to a person familiar with the fundraising.

Uber raked in $1.6 billion in those debt sales to Goldman’s clients, who will now get a 40% discount on Uber stock as it debuts on the New York Stock Exchange, the person told CNBC. The Wall Street Journal first reported the news and financial figures.

Collectively, those clients’ investments will amount to a 3.4% stake in Uber, the person said. That percentage is worth $2.7 billion if Uber prices its shares in the middle of its expected price range, which a source told CNBC this week is likely to happen. The stake results in a $1 billion profit on paper for the Goldman clients in just a matter of years, the person said.

The San Francisco-based start-up is expected to price shares on Thursday and start trading Friday under the symbol “UBER.” On a fully diluted basis, the company’s valuation could come in at $91.51 billion on the high end. At the midpoint of that range, Uber’s valuation would be about $86 billion.

The convertible bond deal let Goldman Sachs clients get a deeper discount on the stock the longer Uber stayed private, the person said. Luckily for certain Goldman clients, Uber remained private for a decade. During that time, the interest on Uber debt also increased. The bonds started out by kicking back 2.5% for investors in the early years and rose to as high as 12.5% this year, the person said.

The Goldman Sachs shareholders are subject to the same lockup rules as the investment bank, which has a separate $500 million investment in Uber, according to The Wall Street Journal report. The bank is barred from selling shares for 6 months, and both Goldman and its clients are not allowed to enter into hedges or any other transactions such as shorting before that lockup period is over, according to the Journal.

Shares of rival Lyft have fallen 30% since its March stock market debut. Some have blamed a hedge related to a trade between billionaire investors Carl Icahn and George Soros for the stock’s underperformance. According to the Journal, Uber’s lawyers combed through Lyft’s lockup agreement for any loopholes that permitted the hedge, looking to close them for Uber ahead of its own IPO.

There are plenty of other winners in Uber’s highly anticipated debut. Softbank Vision Fund is Uber’s largest shareholder. The world’s largest technology investor announced an additional $1 billion investment in Uber’s self-driving vehicle unit just weeks before its initial public offering. Venture capital firm Benchmark is its second-largest shareholder with 8.5% of total shares on the private market, followed by founder and former CEO Travis Kalanick, who was replaced by Dara Khosrowshahi in 2017.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09  Authors: kate rooney, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images, cnbcs john schoen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, person, uber, rake, ubers, clients, goldman, shares, billion, stock, ipo, sachs, according, stand, wealthy


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Iran appears to be restarting oil shipments to Syria as Trump turns up pressure

Tanker-tracking firms believe Iran is once again shipping crude oil to Syria, resuming the illicit trade as tensions with Washington rise and the Islamic Republic faces increasing international isolation. An Iranian delivery of approximately one million barrels of crude was made into the Syrian port of Baniyas during the first week of May, according to TankerTrackers.com and ClipperData, two groups that follows oil vessels. This would be the first Iranian oil delivery to Syria since the end of 2


Tanker-tracking firms believe Iran is once again shipping crude oil to Syria, resuming the illicit trade as tensions with Washington rise and the Islamic Republic faces increasing international isolation. An Iranian delivery of approximately one million barrels of crude was made into the Syrian port of Baniyas during the first week of May, according to TankerTrackers.com and ClipperData, two groups that follows oil vessels. This would be the first Iranian oil delivery to Syria since the end of 2
Iran appears to be restarting oil shipments to Syria as Trump turns up pressure Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09  Authors: leila gharagozlou, tom dichristopher, ali mohammadi, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, week, pressure, appears, crude, restarting, trump, international, oil, iranian, follows, iran, shipments, syria, turns, according, delivery


Iran appears to be restarting oil shipments to Syria as Trump turns up pressure

Tanker-tracking firms believe Iran is once again shipping crude oil to Syria, resuming the illicit trade as tensions with Washington rise and the Islamic Republic faces increasing international isolation.

An Iranian delivery of approximately one million barrels of crude was made into the Syrian port of Baniyas during the first week of May, according to TankerTrackers.com and ClipperData, two groups that follows oil vessels.

This would be the first Iranian oil delivery to Syria since the end of 2018, according to Samir Madani, founder of TankerTrackers.

The suspected delivery comes one year after the U.S. unilaterally pulled out of an international nuclear agreement with Iran and just one week after the Trump administration tightened energy sanctions in an effort to push Iranian crude exports to zero. It also follows the deployment of a U.S. carrier strike group and bomber task force to the Middle East earlier this week.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09  Authors: leila gharagozlou, tom dichristopher, ali mohammadi, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, week, pressure, appears, crude, restarting, trump, international, oil, iranian, follows, iran, shipments, syria, turns, according, delivery


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China’s $670 billion ‘sheconomy’ is growing like crazy

A “sheconomy” is booming in China, driven by a seismic shift in younger women’s spending habits. “Those who win over women’s hearts win it all” is now an oft-repeated business slogan across the Asian giant. Overall spending by Chinese women is estimated to have increased 81% in the past five years to $670 billion, according to Guotai Junan, one of the country’s largest investment banks and securities companies. In 2013, China’s online retail sales totaled $280 billion, but that figure ballooned


A “sheconomy” is booming in China, driven by a seismic shift in younger women’s spending habits. “Those who win over women’s hearts win it all” is now an oft-repeated business slogan across the Asian giant. Overall spending by Chinese women is estimated to have increased 81% in the past five years to $670 billion, according to Guotai Junan, one of the country’s largest investment banks and securities companies. In 2013, China’s online retail sales totaled $280 billion, but that figure ballooned
China’s $670 billion ‘sheconomy’ is growing like crazy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: dawn liu, ryan browne, cnbccom with reuters
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 670, online, women, win, chinese, chinas, crazy, growing, spending, shopping, womens, sheconomy, billion, sales, according


China's $670 billion 'sheconomy' is growing like crazy

A “sheconomy” is booming in China, driven by a seismic shift in younger women’s spending habits.

“Those who win over women’s hearts win it all” is now an oft-repeated business slogan across the Asian giant.

Overall spending by Chinese women is estimated to have increased 81% in the past five years to $670 billion, according to Guotai Junan, one of the country’s largest investment banks and securities companies.

And despite China’s gender imbalance — there were 31.6 million more males than females at the end of last year, according to official government figures — women account for 55% of online spending, significantly more than their proportion of the population.

A host of online shopping events — dubbed “queen festival,” “goddess festival,” or “butterfly festival” — offer dazzling coupons and discounts as retailers battle to win over women.

Such promotions appear to be working.

International Women’s Day, which is meant to celebrate women’s rights and push for gender equality, has also been turned into an excuse for a massive shopping spree in China. Over the course of three years ending in 2017, female users’ spending increased by 64% on International Women’s Day on Alibaba’s Taobao, China’s biggest online marketplace.

Around 35% of China’s retail sales happen online — by far, the highest rate in the world, according to eMarketer, a New York-based research company. By comparison, e-commerce represents only 10.9% of U.S. sales, the firm says.

In 2013, China’s online retail sales totaled $280 billion, but that figure ballooned to $1.34 trillion in 2018, according to Ministry of Commerce statistics.

Qiu Xiaodong, an economics professor at Beijing’s Jiaotong University, believes broader cultural trends have driven a “fundamental shift” in women’s spending patterns.

“The new generation, girls born in the ’80s and ’90s, live in a time when the country’s economy is growing, their income is growing, and then their parents’ consumption power and consumption concept are changing,” Qiu said.

Wei Sijia, 26, a Chinese fashion blogger and influencer, boasts 2 million followers on social media platforms.

Her posts aim to convince fans to buy the same products she uses, from makeup and skincare products to clothes.

Wei says 92% of her followers are women. And women are the holy grail for Chinese retailers.

“They are well-educated, have a good taste and powerful consuming ability,” Wei said, adding that women in their 20s and 30s “are now growing to be the new middle-class in Chinese society.”

Song Yining, 25, is a kindergarten teacher living in south China’s Fujian province who admits that she sometimes regrets impulse purchases.

When asked why she loves shopping, Song said it makes her “feel happy, fulfilled and confident.”

She added: “I can see the change in myself. When I wear nice clothes and a little makeup, I look prettier.”

To Lu Pin, a U.S.-based Chinese feminist, that’s the exactly the problem.

She thinks shopping festivals targeted at women are “commercial trap” that are “consuming women’s self-awareness.”

Lu believes the obsession with shopping leaves women “nothing but a bunch of daily commodities; not much value for themselves but a lot of money for Taobao.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: dawn liu, ryan browne, cnbccom with reuters
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 670, online, women, win, chinese, chinas, crazy, growing, spending, shopping, womens, sheconomy, billion, sales, according


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Young or old, it’s a good time to get a job

Young or old, it’s a good time to get a job. Those armed with a newly minted diploma will enter a job market with unemployment near the lowest level in 50 years and job prospects up significantly from just last year. This also marks the first time since 2011 that hiring projections are in the double digits, the group said. In addition, many offers pay better than they did last year in nearly every degree category, ranging from business to social sciences. Those job seekers are more likely to be


Young or old, it’s a good time to get a job. Those armed with a newly minted diploma will enter a job market with unemployment near the lowest level in 50 years and job prospects up significantly from just last year. This also marks the first time since 2011 that hiring projections are in the double digits, the group said. In addition, many offers pay better than they did last year in nearly every degree category, ranging from business to social sciences. Those job seekers are more likely to be
Young or old, it’s a good time to get a job Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: sharon epperson jessica dickler, sharon epperson, jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, job, age, nearly, good, workforce, old, career, working, occupations, overall, young, according, enter


Young or old, it's a good time to get a job

Young or old, it’s a good time to get a job.

Those armed with a newly minted diploma will enter a job market with unemployment near the lowest level in 50 years and job prospects up significantly from just last year.

Employers plan to hire nearly 11% more graduates from the Class of 2019 than they did from the Class of ’18, according to a recent survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers. This also marks the first time since 2011 that hiring projections are in the double digits, the group said.

In addition, many offers pay better than they did last year in nearly every degree category, ranging from business to social sciences.

Once again, STEM degree holders are projected to earn the most overall as the demand for workers in science, technology, engineering and math occupations continues to increase, the association said.

Engineering was the top paid major this year, with an average starting salary of $69,188, followed by computer science and math. In 2018, grads earned an overall average of $51,022.

Even though a new generation is starting to enter the working world, employees age 65 and older are still the fastest-growing segment of the workforce, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Among 65- to 74-year-olds, labor force participation is predicted to hit 32% by 2022, up from 20% in 2002. At age 75 and older, the rate will jump to 11% from 5% over the same time period.

Whether they have not saved enough money or because they prefer to work, nearly 3 in 4 Americans are actively seeking employment beyond traditional retirement age on at least a part-time basis, according to a Gallup poll.

A separate AARP study found that 37 percent of working Americans ages 50 to 64 said they intend to work after retiring from their current careers. Of those, 44 percent plan to enter new fields.

Those job seekers are more likely to be in management, legal and community or social service occupations than the overall workforce and less likely to be in computer and mathematical, food preparation and construction-related occupations, according to Pew Research Center.

Regardless of your age or position, when it comes to landing a sought-after gig in today’s market, networking is still your best bet, experts say.

“Relationships follow you everywhere, ” said Caroline Ceniza-Levine, a career expert and co-founder of career coaching firm SixFigureStart.

Nearly two-thirds of hiring managers cited employee referrals as the most successful source for top applicants, yet only 48% of employees invest time to nurture job referrals, according to a Randstad and Future Workplace survey of 1,200 managers and employees.

“It’s still about who you know even early in your career,” Ceniza-Levine said.

More from Invest in You:

There’s a retirement crisis in America

Got goals? These simple actions will help you

Here’s what it takes to become a 401(k) millionaire

Check out 4 Money Lessons Everyone Should Know by Age 25 via Grow with Acorns+CNBC.

Disclosure: NBCUniversal and Comcast Ventures are investors in Acorns.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: sharon epperson jessica dickler, sharon epperson, jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, job, age, nearly, good, workforce, old, career, working, occupations, overall, young, according, enter


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Ray Dalio had CEOs like Bill Gates and Elon Musk take a personality test—here’s what he found that makes them so successful

Bridgewater has long used personality tests for recruitment and management purposes, according to the book. So to figure out how to build up the team’s “shaping” skills, Dalio had the best shapers he knew complete an hour-long personality assessment. Shapers including Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, Tesla and SpaceX founder Elon Musk, Netflix co-founder Reed Hastings and Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey took the test, according to “Principles.” Shapers, Dalio learned from the tests, “have a lot i


Bridgewater has long used personality tests for recruitment and management purposes, according to the book. So to figure out how to build up the team’s “shaping” skills, Dalio had the best shapers he knew complete an hour-long personality assessment. Shapers including Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, Tesla and SpaceX founder Elon Musk, Netflix co-founder Reed Hastings and Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey took the test, according to “Principles.” Shapers, Dalio learned from the tests, “have a lot i
Ray Dalio had CEOs like Bill Gates and Elon Musk take a personality test—here’s what he found that makes them so successful Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cofounder, musk, elon, ray, makes, gates, dalio, shapers, team, shaper, ceos, successful, personality, principles, testheres, according, tests


Ray Dalio had CEOs like Bill Gates and Elon Musk take a personality test—here's what he found that makes them so successful

When billionaire Ray Dalio stepped down as CEO of Bridgewater Associates in 2011 after 35 years at the helm, the new management struggled with the transition.

So Dalio — who is known for working by a set of principles and systems for success — analytically dissected what was missing without him running the company.

The missing piece, Dalio and his team found, was that he was a “shaper.”

“A shaper is someone who comes up with unique and valuable visions and builds them out beautifully, typically over the doubts and opposition of others,” Dalio writes his book “Principles: Life and Work. ” Apple’s Steve Jobs was the most iconic shaper, he says.

Bridgewater has long used personality tests for recruitment and management purposes, according to the book. So to figure out how to build up the team’s “shaping” skills, Dalio had the best shapers he knew complete an hour-long personality assessment. Shapers including Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, Tesla and SpaceX founder Elon Musk, Netflix co-founder Reed Hastings and Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey took the test, according to “Principles.”

(Though “Principles” does not say what assessment was given, Dalio has tweeted that he finds the “Workplace Personality Inventory and Team Dimensions Profile in conjunction with the Golden Personality Profiler and Myers Briggs to be exceptionally accurate. “)

Shapers, Dalio learned from the tests, “have a lot in common.” Here are the characteristics of elite shapers, like Musk and Gates, according to “Principles.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cofounder, musk, elon, ray, makes, gates, dalio, shapers, team, shaper, ceos, successful, personality, principles, testheres, according, tests


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