General Motors is retreating from Australia, New Zealand and Thailand

General Motors is continuing a years-long global restructuring to concentrate on high-profit markets such as North America and China. The Detroit automaker said Sunday that it will “wind down” its sales, design and engineering operations in Australia and New Zealand and discontinue its Holden brand in the region by 2021. GM also announced plans to exit Thailand, including withdrawing Chevrolet by the end of this year and selling a plant to Chinese automaker Great Wall Motors. GM said it expects


General Motors is continuing a years-long global restructuring to concentrate on high-profit markets such as North America and China.
The Detroit automaker said Sunday that it will “wind down” its sales, design and engineering operations in Australia and New Zealand and discontinue its Holden brand in the region by 2021.
GM also announced plans to exit Thailand, including withdrawing Chevrolet by the end of this year and selling a plant to Chinese automaker Great Wall Motors.
GM said it expects
General Motors is retreating from Australia, New Zealand and Thailand Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-17  Authors: michael wayland
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, general, restructuring, concentrate, zealand, global, actions, barra, including, announced, retreating, markets, australia, motors, automaker, thailand


General Motors is retreating from Australia, New Zealand and Thailand

General Motors is continuing a years-long global restructuring to concentrate on high-profit markets such as North America and China.

The Detroit automaker said Sunday that it will “wind down” its sales, design and engineering operations in Australia and New Zealand and discontinue its Holden brand in the region by 2021.

GM also announced plans to exit Thailand, including withdrawing Chevrolet by the end of this year and selling a plant to Chinese automaker Great Wall Motors.

GM said it expects to take $1.1 billion in charges mostly in the first quarter as a result of the actions, including $300 million in cash.

Chairman and CEO Mary Barra said the actions are part of the automaker’s global restructuring, which was initially announced in 2015, to concentrate on profitable markets and prioritize investment on driving “growth in the future of mobility,” especially in all-electric and autonomous vehicles.

“I’ve often said that we will do the right thing, even when it’s hard, and this is one of those times,” Barra said in a release.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-17  Authors: michael wayland
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, general, restructuring, concentrate, zealand, global, actions, barra, including, announced, retreating, markets, australia, motors, automaker, thailand


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Davos elite back corporate social responsibility, but ‘their words are bigger than their actions’

They will talk about how their companies have tackled societal issues — from diversity to climate change. Issues like climate change are more tangible, due to disasters like the wildfires in Australia. Shareholder advocacy groups like As You Sow are pushing for shareholder votes on issues including climate change and human rights. Muilenburg was a board member of the Business Roundtable until he was ousted as Boeing CEO in December. But the minimum wage debate — like climate change, board divers


They will talk about how their companies have tackled societal issues — from diversity to climate change.
Issues like climate change are more tangible, due to disasters like the wildfires in Australia.
Shareholder advocacy groups like As You Sow are pushing for shareholder votes on issues including climate change and human rights.
Muilenburg was a board member of the Business Roundtable until he was ousted as Boeing CEO in December.
But the minimum wage debate — like climate change, board divers
Davos elite back corporate social responsibility, but ‘their words are bigger than their actions’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: lauren hirsch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, business, roundtable, funds, elite, actions, ceo, issues, investors, social, words, corporate, bigger, change, companies, davos, climate, shareholder, responsibility


Davos elite back corporate social responsibility, but 'their words are bigger than their actions'

Klaus Schwab, founder and Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum (WEF), addresses a news conference ahead of the Davos annual meeting in Cologny near Geneva, Switzerland, January 14, 2020. Denis Balibouse

The world’s most influential executives will soon swarm the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, where they will embrace the idea that corporations no longer exist simply to funnel profits into the pockets of shareholders. They will talk about how their companies have tackled societal issues — from diversity to climate change. Powerful politicians, potentially including President Donald Trump, will also be at the five-day event, which begins Tuesday, laying out the way they have held companies accountable, all while populist rhetoric remains a heated topic during this year’s campaign for the White House. In the often-snowy Swiss village, stakeholder capitalism — a movement that redefines a company’s purpose from serving only its shareholders to all stakeholders, including customers and communities — will be the dominant theme. It will be the first Davos meeting since the Business Roundtable, a group representing the CEOs of nearly 200 companies, embraced stakeholder capitalism as its new purpose in August. But conversations with corporate advisors, investors and experts paint a more nuanced picture of how corporate America is taking on the issues. It is one in which Congress’ ability to force corporate change is dwarfed by state governments. And the biggest driver of change originates from where it always has — investors. As some investors have shifted their focus to the public good, so have companies. Yet there will be limits to change as long as the largest investors care most about making money. “So far, at most companies, their words are bigger than their actions,” said Erik Gordon, a professor at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business. “The other wordy people, politicians in an election year, aren’t as big a force as socially activist stockholders are. Stockholders like endowments and pension funds, who are more interested in stakeholder effects than are stockholders who look solely for returns, are the ones the corporations cannot ignore.” Setting the stage for Davos and corporate America over the past few years is a generation for which social and economic issues have become nearly unavoidable. Issues like climate change are more tangible, due to disasters like the wildfires in Australia. Homelessness is more apparent to young urbanites as the problem swells in cities like Seattle and San Francisco. Income inequality is rising as technology and globalization alter the employment landscape. With that, public pension funds are asking more questions — like whether private equity contributed to the demise of Toys R Us. Shareholder advocacy groups like As You Sow are pushing for shareholder votes on issues including climate change and human rights. The country’s biggest investors have joined in as well. Powerful names like ValueAct, Jana Partners and BlackRock have launched new funds that promote environmental, social and governance causes, known as ESG. The funds espouse the idea that investments that line up with public values are rewarded by the market place. Investing in alternative energy, for example, could be rewarded as countries move toward shifting their power standards.

Larry Fink David Orrell | CNBC

It was with that view that BlackRock CEO Larry Fink announced that the world’s largest money manager will exit investments with a high sustainability-related risk like coal. He attributed the move to “a fundamental reshaping of finance” and warned that climate change is a “defining factor in companies’ long-term prospects.” He also said the group will join the Climate Action 100+ investor coalition, which focuses on tackling greenhouse gas.

Limits and profits

But for funds like BlackRock, profit will always be the driving goal. To that end, there are reasons beyond the public good for ESG funds. As passive investing overtakes active, they offer a way to stand out to the Street. ESG funds may also endear the big investors who back them to proxy advisory agencies like the Institutional Shareholder Services when they agitate for seats on company boards. It is with that caveat that some question how far funds like BlackRock and Vanguard are willing to go. As an example, the Sierra Club’s Michael Brune applauded BlackRock’s announcement, while also noting that the firm voted against every single resolution backed by the Climate Action 100+ investor coalition. And behind the scenes, large funds like BlackRock are less focused on some of the demands that could create the most drastic change — like tying pay to ESG performance — than they are on shareholder return. “When companies have to talk to their shareholders about ESG issues, risk management and culture are among the top topics,” said Bill Anderson, global head of Evercore’s Activism Defense business and Strategic Shareholder Advisory practice. “Despite the heightened focus on stakeholders, most companies provide near-term guidance and compensation continues to focus on short-term total shareholder returns.” Some executives argue that improved shareholder returns can help CEOs benefit society in other ways, like through charitable endeavors. But so long as CEOs’ pay is tied to Wall Street performance, there is room for examples of discord between what benefits wallets and the world. Boeing’s former CEO Dennis Muilenburg, who was fired last month for his handling of the 737 Max crisis, walked away with more than $60 million, despite being denied severance. In 2018, the majority of his compensation was tied to performance-based bonuses linked to short-term incentives, like sales, cash-flow and earnings-per-share and longer-term metrics like its 3-year profit goal. “Yeah, you killed 346 people,” Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore. recently told reporters, arguing that a disproportionate focus on share price “somehow has got to change.” Muilenburg was a board member of the Business Roundtable until he was ousted as Boeing CEO in December. At a press conference earlier that month, then-Business Roundtable Chairman Jamie Dimon, the CEO of J.P. Morgan, scoffed at the notion that there was a disconnect between the Business Roundtable’s stakeholder capitalism and Muilenburg’s board-seat. The Business Roundtable is “not an enforcement group,” Dimon said. “[…] And yes, companies are going to make mistakes and have problems and that’ll never end — truthfully like any institution you’ll ever see on the planet — including the press.”

Disclosure as enforcement

Business Roundtable CEO Joshua Bolten said at the same press conference that “every single one of the CEOs who are members” of the group is already engaged in supporting their customers, employees and communities, as well as shareholders. Its new purpose is a challenge to its CEOs to “do better and more,” he said. From the Business Roundtable’s standpoint, that means engaging in policy debates like its push for a federal increase in the minimum wage. But the minimum wage debate — like climate change, board diversity and privacy — is already being tackled by the states, far ahead of federal regulation. While the federal minimum wage has held steady at $7.25 an hour since 2009, nearly half of states raised their minimums in 2019. In turn, companies are already responding, with everyone from Walmart to Amazon having already announced plans to raise their wages. “I think every CEO of a large company knows that it would be difficult to have big changes at the federal level, because most corporate law is done at the state level,” said Michigan’s Gordon. “It costs nothing for a CEO to throw out a bill proposal. You can’t accuse them of doing anything other than what politicians try to do — you hold hearings — its Kabuki theater.”

A general view shows the congress centre, the venue of the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland January 13, 2020. Arnd Wiegmann | Reuters


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: lauren hirsch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, business, roundtable, funds, elite, actions, ceo, issues, investors, social, words, corporate, bigger, change, companies, davos, climate, shareholder, responsibility


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Saudi energy minister on Trump’s actions in the Middle East: ‘He can do whatever he wishes’

Saudi Arabia’s Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman said Monday that President Donald Trump should be able to do as he chooses when it comes to international security. Speaking during a panel session at the International Petroleum Technology Conference (IPTC) in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, Abdulaziz said: “The president of the United States is the president of the United States, he can do whatever he wishes.” Abdulaziz’s comments come as energy market participants continue to closely monitor h


Saudi Arabia’s Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman said Monday that President Donald Trump should be able to do as he chooses when it comes to international security.
Speaking during a panel session at the International Petroleum Technology Conference (IPTC) in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, Abdulaziz said: “The president of the United States is the president of the United States, he can do whatever he wishes.”
Abdulaziz’s comments come as energy market participants continue to closely monitor h
Saudi energy minister on Trump’s actions in the Middle East: ‘He can do whatever he wishes’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, middle, saudi, trumps, united, states, actions, energy, east, international, wisheshes, military, abdulaziz, arabia, wishes, minister


Saudi energy minister on Trump's actions in the Middle East: 'He can do whatever he wishes'

Saudi Arabia’s Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman said Monday that President Donald Trump should be able to do as he chooses when it comes to international security.

Speaking during a panel session at the International Petroleum Technology Conference (IPTC) in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, Abdulaziz said: “The president of the United States is the president of the United States, he can do whatever he wishes.”

He’s “certainly” not accountable to me or “anybody in this room,” he added.

Abdulaziz’s comments come as energy market participants continue to closely monitor heightened tensions in the Middle East.

The U.S. killed Iranian military commander Qasem Soleimani earlier this month, triggering a dramatic escalation that many feared could result in a widening regional conflict.

Iran, an arch-rival of Saudi Arabia in the region, responded to the U.S. attack by launching missiles at two military bases housing U.S. troops in Iraq.

Iran’s supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has since said the missile attacks were a “slap on the face” of the U.S., but such military actions were “not enough.”

The situation remains tense, but both sides have sought to back off from intensifying the conflict over recent days.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, middle, saudi, trumps, united, states, actions, energy, east, international, wisheshes, military, abdulaziz, arabia, wishes, minister


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‘You don’t do these things prior to negotiations,’ ex-diplomat says of US actions against China

A Chinese and U.S. flag at a booth during the first China International Import Expo in Shanghai, taken on taken on November 6, 2018. The latest U.S. actions against Chinese officials and companies don’t “set a good tone” for an upcoming high-level trade talk, a former American ambassador to China said Wednesday. Both announcements came just days ahead of a high-level trade meeting set to take place in Washington on Thursday and Friday. Max Baucus, former U.S. ambassador to China from February 20


A Chinese and U.S. flag at a booth during the first China International Import Expo in Shanghai, taken on taken on November 6, 2018. The latest U.S. actions against Chinese officials and companies don’t “set a good tone” for an upcoming high-level trade talk, a former American ambassador to China said Wednesday. Both announcements came just days ahead of a high-level trade meeting set to take place in Washington on Thursday and Friday. Max Baucus, former U.S. ambassador to China from February 20
‘You don’t do these things prior to negotiations,’ ex-diplomat says of US actions against China Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: yen nee lee abigail ng, yen nee lee, abigail ng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, street, chinese, signs, taken, exdiplomat, prior, things, negotiations, china, tone, told, actions, dont, set, trade


'You don't do these things prior to negotiations,' ex-diplomat says of US actions against China

A Chinese and U.S. flag at a booth during the first China International Import Expo in Shanghai, taken on taken on November 6, 2018.

The latest U.S. actions against Chinese officials and companies don’t “set a good tone” for an upcoming high-level trade talk, a former American ambassador to China said Wednesday.

The Trump administration on Tuesday placed visa restrictions on Chinese officials it “believed to be responsible for, or complicit in, the detention and abuse of” Muslim minorities in China’s northwestern Xinjiang region. That followed a Monday move to blacklist 28 Chinese companies alleged to be involved in surveillance and detention of minority groups in China.

Both announcements came just days ahead of a high-level trade meeting set to take place in Washington on Thursday and Friday.

“You don’t do these things prior to negotiations. It does not set a good tone, that’s tactically. Strategically, all these actions — I think — are causing the Chinese to wonder: ‘What is the US’ real motive here?'” Max Baucus, former U.S. ambassador to China from February 2014 to January 2017, told CNBC’s “Street Signs Asia.”

Baucus, also a former Democratic senator from Montana, said the U.S. actions could simply be posturing ahead of the planned trade talks to get a better deal from China. But, “China will not be bluffed,” he added.

Taimur Baig, chief economist at DBS Group Research, echoed that sentiment. “There are ways of putting pressure — back channel diplomacy, implicit threats and so on, but this is very explicit (and) very noisy,” he told CNBC’s “Street Signs Asia.”

“The … potential loss of face for the Chinese is massive. I can’t imagine anybody rationally expecting a constructive outcome out of this,” he added. Baig also said the timing of the U.S. move “could not be worse” and it would “definitely backfire.”

Beijing, in response to the U.S. blacklist of Chinese firms, said it urges the U.S. to “stop interfering” in its internal affairs and suggested that it would retaliate against the American move.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: yen nee lee abigail ng, yen nee lee, abigail ng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, street, chinese, signs, taken, exdiplomat, prior, things, negotiations, china, tone, told, actions, dont, set, trade


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China wants to track and grade each citizen’s actions — it’s in the testing phase

Since the push to build a social credit system kicked off in earnest five years ago, a few dozen pilot programs have emerged with varying tracking metrics, and consequences for violations. Worries about misuseThe overarching concern, whether or not a social credit system reaches national scale, is the potential for abuse. Especially as technology develops, a social credit system has the potential to be far more invasive, with few checks on its power in authoritarian China. He is a co-author of t


Since the push to build a social credit system kicked off in earnest five years ago, a few dozen pilot programs have emerged with varying tracking metrics, and consequences for violations. Worries about misuseThe overarching concern, whether or not a social credit system reaches national scale, is the potential for abuse. Especially as technology develops, a social credit system has the potential to be far more invasive, with few checks on its power in authoritarian China. He is a co-author of t
China wants to track and grade each citizen’s actions — it’s in the testing phase Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: evelyn cheng shirley tay, evelyn cheng, shirley tay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wants, month, credit, system, chinese, individuals, country, grade, testing, citizens, social, china, track, scores, peoples, actions, phase


China wants to track and grade each citizen's actions — it's in the testing phase

People walk past the Public Credit Information Service Hall in Suzhou, China, on May 6, 2019. Suzhou was one of several places chosen in 2018 by the Chinese government to run a social credit trial, which can reward or punish citizens for their behavior. Qilai Shen | Bloomberg | Getty Images

The Chinese government is forging ahead with official efforts to create a national social credit system, even as several academic analysts doubt whether authorities can ever reach that goal. Beijing affirmed its commitment last month to building out social credit, a plan which has sparked fears that the government will gain overt control over ordinary people’s lives. At its core, the proposed system tries to create a standard for trust by tracking individual actions across Chinese society, and rewarding or punishing accordingly. It’s unclear how fairly such a system could impose penalties on individuals, or how easy it would be to get off blacklists. Still, authorities already claim to have the records of 990 million individuals and 25.91 million enterprises, as the central government runs up against a self-imposed 2020 deadline to formulate a nationwide social credit plan that includes the capital city. Since the push to build a social credit system kicked off in earnest five years ago, a few dozen pilot programs have emerged with varying tracking metrics, and consequences for violations. In many respects, the measures are China’s attempt to manufacture a more law-abiding society in a country where respect for contracts has a far shorter history than that of the U.S. or England. Nevertheless, the trials have sparked concerns.

Worries about misuse

The overarching concern, whether or not a social credit system reaches national scale, is the potential for abuse. China has a far from stellar human rights record. Earlier this month, 22 countries issued a joint statement calling on the world’s most populous nation to “refrain from the arbitrary detention and restrictions on freedom of movement” of ethnic minorities in Xinjiang. The region in the westernmost part of the country is known for intense surveillance and is where the United Nations last year said more than a million people were being held in “counter-extremism centres” and another two million were forced into “re-education camps.” Especially as technology develops, a social credit system has the potential to be far more invasive, with few checks on its power in authoritarian China. Still, the country hasn’t crossed that threshold yet. “At the moment, the negative consequences (e.g., the sticks, not the carrots) are only carefully used, and if, only to those businesses and individuals, who clearly broke a law,” Genia Kostka, professor of Chinese politics at Freie Universitat Berlin (the Free University of Berlin), said in an email. “So the consequences are not huge at the moment,” she said, “but the system is developing fast and more sticks can quickly be added to the system once it is running.” That sentiment was echoed by the Economist Intelligence Unit, which said in a Monday report that “the social credit system is set to become a steadily more important aspect of daily life in China, including while doing business.”

It’s not yet a sure thing

For now, however, it remains to be seen how far-reaching the social credit system will be in practice, or when it will be implemented nationally. In fact, there are some who doubt it will ever realize its stated goals. “The social credit system is such a sprawling endeavor that it may never actually be ‘done’ in any meaningful sense,” said Martin Chorzempa, research fellow, at the Washington-based Peterson Institute For International Economics. He is a co-author of the June 2018 report “China’s Social Credit System: A Mark of Progress or a Threat to Privacy?” “They are years away from having some system that integrates all government data and data from the private sector into a unified nationwide system with a single score, and they may never actually achieve that because of bureaucratic infighting over data and growing privacy concerns, ” Chorzempa said in an email to CNBC last month. Launching social credit in the capital city would be significant for the country, but little has yet been divulged about Beijing’s plans to establish individual scores for permanent residents by the end of 2020, as was announced in November 2018. The major government entities involved in creating the China-wide system, the National Development and Reform Commission and the People’s Bank of China, did not respond to CNBC requests for comment. The Municipality of Beijing also did not respond. Currently, social credit is tied to a handful of disparate initiatives. One is the stringent garbage sorting regime that took effect in Shanghai this month, according to city regulations that were adopted in January. It’s not clear to what extent individual scores will be affected by adherence to the rules, although the Communist Party newspaper People’s Daily noted that in Xiamen, multiple violations of similar waste management statutes land individuals on a so-called blacklist. It was not clear from publicly available resources what that list does. Of various government efforts to track individuals in China, the Supreme People’s Court system of issuing travel restrictions for anyone who defies a court order is the most widely used, the EIU report said. These cases typically involve unpaid debt, and prevent offenders from taking flights or traveling by high-speed rail. Critics say such punishments are not enough to prevent fraudulent behavior, while the consequences would be rather extreme if tied to, say, a few improperly sorted pieces of garbage.

Low awareness in China

Despite the many pilot programs and government-run websites such as “Credit China,” the Chinese public so far generally does not know much about the country’s plans for social credit. Dev Lewis, research associate at Digital Asia Hub, said last month that most people he spoke with in Xiamen and Fuzhou did not know such scores existed, and that less than 4% of people in Xiamen had signed up. Lewis’ findings match other recent news reports about how few people in China actually know about a social credit test that is happening in their own city. However, while he noted that more rewards for high scores could improve awareness, other academic research and anecdotes indicate many in the country favor a system that steps up punishments on wrongdoers. “An algorithm with public criteria is more transparent than systems depending on human, possibly corrupt decision making, and it is supposed to supervise officials too,” Peterson Institute’s Chorzempa said. “There is a real problem with lack of rule of law in China that affects everyone, and lets people off (without punishment) when they’ve done terrible things.” The Chinese government’s push to move forward with social credit, and launch a system in Beijing, is part of the powerful State Council’s announcement in 2014 of a “Planning Outline for the Construction of a Social Credit System.” The document called for nationwide, uniform credit information collection, and for the regulations to be established by the year 2020. The council noted e-commerce, logistics and statistics as areas in which to use a credit system to build “social sincerity.” The idea for such a program has a longer history. The first well-known test for a local social credit system in China launched back in 2010 in the rural county of Suining in the province of Jiangsu. As much as modern China has moved toward an increasingly rigid system, the local environment was vastly different just half a century ago. During the decade-long Cultural Revolution that began in the late 1960s, “Mao’s word was the law, like that of the emperors who preceded him,” Weijian Shan, CEO of investment firm PAG, wrote in his 2019 book “Out of the Gobi: My Story of China and America.” “Even now (in the 1980s) that the chaos of the Mao era had ended, laws, policies, and rules were subject to change, sometimes arbitrarily or quite suddenly,” Shan said. “There was a common expression in China at that time: ‘ji hua (a plan) cannot catch up with bian hua (change).’ The resulting uncertainty and risk necessarily led to greater social costs. ”

Testing phase


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: evelyn cheng shirley tay, evelyn cheng, shirley tay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wants, month, credit, system, chinese, individuals, country, grade, testing, citizens, social, china, track, scores, peoples, actions, phase


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Huawei protests FCC actions to block it in the U.S. on national security grounds

Guests hold umbrellas with Huawei logos at the Songshan Lake New Campus in Dongguan, China, May 31, 2019. China’s Huawei has responded again to actions from the Federal Communications Commission, releasing an ex parte memo further laying out its response to the commission’s efforts to block its equipment on national security grounds. “While Huawei does not agree with the view that Chinese companies pose a threat simply because they are Chinese, Huawei agrees that threats to network security do e


Guests hold umbrellas with Huawei logos at the Songshan Lake New Campus in Dongguan, China, May 31, 2019. China’s Huawei has responded again to actions from the Federal Communications Commission, releasing an ex parte memo further laying out its response to the commission’s efforts to block its equipment on national security grounds. “While Huawei does not agree with the view that Chinese companies pose a threat simply because they are Chinese, Huawei agrees that threats to network security do e
Huawei protests FCC actions to block it in the U.S. on national security grounds Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, national, block, actions, umbrellas, grounds, protests, security, view, fcc, approach, vendortovendor, trough, huawei, equipment, cites


Huawei protests FCC actions to block it in the U.S. on national security grounds

Guests hold umbrellas with Huawei logos at the Songshan Lake New Campus in Dongguan, China, May 31, 2019.

China’s Huawei has responded again to actions from the Federal Communications Commission, releasing an ex parte memo further laying out its response to the commission’s efforts to block its equipment on national security grounds.

“While Huawei does not agree with the view that Chinese companies pose a threat simply because they are Chinese, Huawei agrees that threats to network security do exist, and should be addressed comprehensively trough a holistic approach to supply chain security, not through a vendor-to-vendor approach,” according to the brief.

The company cites comments by government officials that it says appear to indicate the U.S. may have economic motives for the ban, and cites the use of its equipment in other European and North American markets.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, national, block, actions, umbrellas, grounds, protests, security, view, fcc, approach, vendortovendor, trough, huawei, equipment, cites


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China says trade talks can’t continue unless US addresses its ‘wrong actions’

Chinese President Xi Jinping and members of Chinese delegation attend a working dinner with U.S. President Donald Trump after the G20 leaders summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina December 1, 2018. The latest U.S. actions on trade are preventing negotiations with Beijing from proceeding, China’s Commerce Ministry said Thursday. “If the U.S. would like to keep on negotiating it should, with sincerity, adjust its wrong actions. Only then can talks continue,” Ministry of Commerce spokesperson Gao Feng


Chinese President Xi Jinping and members of Chinese delegation attend a working dinner with U.S. President Donald Trump after the G20 leaders summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina December 1, 2018. The latest U.S. actions on trade are preventing negotiations with Beijing from proceeding, China’s Commerce Ministry said Thursday. “If the U.S. would like to keep on negotiating it should, with sincerity, adjust its wrong actions. Only then can talks continue,” Ministry of Commerce spokesperson Gao Feng
China says trade talks can’t continue unless US addresses its ‘wrong actions’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-23  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, huawei, talks, continue, president, chinese, telecom, wrong, trade, actions, order, cant, addresses, china, unless, ministry, weeks, trump


China says trade talks can't continue unless US addresses its 'wrong actions'

Chinese President Xi Jinping and members of Chinese delegation attend a working dinner with U.S. President Donald Trump after the G20 leaders summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina December 1, 2018.

The latest U.S. actions on trade are preventing negotiations with Beijing from proceeding, China’s Commerce Ministry said Thursday.

“If the U.S. would like to keep on negotiating it should, with sincerity, adjust its wrong actions. Only then can talks continue,” Ministry of Commerce spokesperson Gao Feng said Thursday in Mandarin, according to a CNBC translation.

He did not mention any U.S. actions specifically, but it’s been a tense couple of weeks between the world’s two-largest economies. President Donald Trump unexpectedly announced earlier this month that tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods would increase to 25% from 10% on May 10. In the last two weeks, his administration also put Chinese telecom giant Huawei on a blacklist that prevents it from buying from American companies without U.S. government permission.

Google said Sunday it would cut ties with Huawei in order to comply with the order. But after the U.S. temporarily eased some restrictions on trade for the telecom and smartphone company, Google said Tuesday it plans to work with Huawei over the next 90 days.

“The U.S. … crackdown on Chinese companies not only seriously damages the normal commercial cooperation between both countries, but it also forms a great threat to the security of the global industrial and supply chain,” Gao said. “China is firmly opposed to this. We will closely monitor developments and make adequate preparations.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-23  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, huawei, talks, continue, president, chinese, telecom, wrong, trade, actions, order, cant, addresses, china, unless, ministry, weeks, trump


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Deepak Chopra: How to stay calm and avoid impulsive actions in a volatile market

The twists and the turns of the stock market may have you itching to make a move, but health and wellness expert Deepak Chopra has some advice: stay calm, don’t panic. “Any investor will tell you that if you get caught up in the melodrama of the fluctuations of the stock market, you’re going to be a loser,” the best-selling author and co-founder of The Chopra Center for Wellbeing, recently told CNBC. “If you want to be a winner, stay in for the long haul, and don’t take unnecessary, impulsive ri


The twists and the turns of the stock market may have you itching to make a move, but health and wellness expert Deepak Chopra has some advice: stay calm, don’t panic. “Any investor will tell you that if you get caught up in the melodrama of the fluctuations of the stock market, you’re going to be a loser,” the best-selling author and co-founder of The Chopra Center for Wellbeing, recently told CNBC. “If you want to be a winner, stay in for the long haul, and don’t take unnecessary, impulsive ri
Deepak Chopra: How to stay calm and avoid impulsive actions in a volatile market Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: michelle fox louise connelly, michelle fox, louise connelly
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youthese, stock, actions, avoid, impulsive, volatile, calm, worst, youre, winner, zen, chopra, stay, deepak, dont, market


Deepak Chopra: How to stay calm and avoid impulsive actions in a volatile market

The twists and the turns of the stock market may have you itching to make a move, but health and wellness expert Deepak Chopra has some advice: stay calm, don’t panic.

“Any investor will tell you that if you get caught up in the melodrama of the fluctuations of the stock market, you’re going to be a loser,” the best-selling author and co-founder of The Chopra Center for Wellbeing, recently told CNBC.

“If you want to be a winner, stay in for the long haul, and don’t take unnecessary, impulsive risks and actions.”

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Market volatility has been rearing its head of late, with jittery traders selling on concerns about an escalating trade war with China. On Monday, the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down more than 600 points, its worst day since January.

Finding your zen amid the turbulence may be easier said than done.

Chopra, whose books include “Creating Affluence” and “The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success,” is the master of mindfulness and meditation. He has a number of tips for not losing your cool.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: michelle fox louise connelly, michelle fox, louise connelly
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youthese, stock, actions, avoid, impulsive, volatile, calm, worst, youre, winner, zen, chopra, stay, deepak, dont, market


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Not being financially literate could cost you a bundle

You don’t know what you don’t know. Scrambling to pay bills or struggling with credit card debt is just the tip of the iceberg. Can you manage your own finances successfully if you don’t understand the relationship between bond prices and interest rates? Ric Edelman, founder of Edelman Financial Engines, says the answer isn’t that clear-cut. “Yes, your actions matter more than your attitude,” Edelman said.


You don’t know what you don’t know. Scrambling to pay bills or struggling with credit card debt is just the tip of the iceberg. Can you manage your own finances successfully if you don’t understand the relationship between bond prices and interest rates? Ric Edelman, founder of Edelman Financial Engines, says the answer isn’t that clear-cut. “Yes, your actions matter more than your attitude,” Edelman said.
Not being financially literate could cost you a bundle Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: jill cornfield, martin-dm, getty images, -ric edelman, founder of edelman financial engines
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dont, edelman, bundle, actions, tip, attitude, financial, cost, financially, successfully, struggling, literate, thats, understand


Not being financially literate could cost you a bundle

You don’t know what you don’t know.

And that’s the whole problem with financial literacy. Scrambling to pay bills or struggling with credit card debt is just the tip of the iceberg.

Can you manage your own finances successfully if you don’t understand the relationship between bond prices and interest rates?

Ric Edelman, founder of Edelman Financial Engines, says the answer isn’t that clear-cut.

“Yes, your actions matter more than your attitude,” Edelman said. “But your attitude often colors your actions.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: jill cornfield, martin-dm, getty images, -ric edelman, founder of edelman financial engines
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dont, edelman, bundle, actions, tip, attitude, financial, cost, financially, successfully, struggling, literate, thats, understand


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US politics: Romney says Trump causes dismay around the world

Mitt Romney, the former Republican presidential candidate and incoming U.S. senator from Utah, sharply criticized President Donald Trump and suggested the U.S. leader had caused dismay around the world. In a Washington Post essay published on Tuesday evening, Romney criticized a number of Trump’s actions in December. During the 2016 presidential campaign, Romney excoriated Trump as a “fraud” who was “playing the American public for suckers.” Trump responded that Romney had “choked like a dog” in


Mitt Romney, the former Republican presidential candidate and incoming U.S. senator from Utah, sharply criticized President Donald Trump and suggested the U.S. leader had caused dismay around the world. In a Washington Post essay published on Tuesday evening, Romney criticized a number of Trump’s actions in December. During the 2016 presidential campaign, Romney excoriated Trump as a “fraud” who was “playing the American public for suckers.” Trump responded that Romney had “choked like a dog” in
US politics: Romney says Trump causes dismay around the world Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-02
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dismay, romneys, trump, actions, president, politics, presidential, freedom, causes, essay, suggested, world, trumps, romney


US politics: Romney says Trump causes dismay around the world

Mitt Romney, the former Republican presidential candidate and incoming U.S. senator from Utah, sharply criticized President Donald Trump and suggested the U.S. leader had caused dismay around the world.

In a Washington Post essay published on Tuesday evening, Romney criticized a number of Trump’s actions in December.

“The appointment of senior persons of lesser experience, the abandonment of allies who fight beside us, and the president’s thoughtless claim that America has long been a ‘sucker’ in world affairs all defined his presidency down,” he wrote.

He added that “Trump’s words and actions have caused dismay around the world.”

The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Romney suggested that “on balance, (Trump’s) conduct over the past two years … is evidence that the president has not risen to the mantle of the office.”

Romney is staking out an independent position two days before he takes office on Thursday. It is unclear whether Trump will face a serious challenge in 2020 to securing the Republican Party’s presidential nomination.

Trump last February endorsed Romney’s run for a Senate seat in Utah.

During the 2016 presidential campaign, Romney excoriated Trump as a “fraud” who was “playing the American public for suckers.” Trump responded that Romney had “choked like a dog” in his unsuccessful 2012 campaign against Democratic President Barack Obama.

Despite Romney’s prior criticism, after Trump won the presidency in November 2016, he briefly considered tapping Romney as secretary of state.

In his essay on Tuesday, Romney said he “will speak out against significant statements or actions that are divisive, racist, sexist, anti-immigrant, dishonest or destructive to democratic institutions.”

Romney has strongly defended press freedom and challenged Trump’s repeated attacks on some news outlets as an “enemy of the people.”

“The media is essential to our Republic, to our freedom, to the cause of freedom abroad, and to our national security. It is very much our friend,” Romney wrote in an essay in November.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-02
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dismay, romneys, trump, actions, president, politics, presidential, freedom, causes, essay, suggested, world, trumps, romney


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