5G rollout will ‘make things better’ for cybersecurity, according to Verizon

An illuminated 5G sign hangs behind a weave of electronic cables on the opening day of the MWC Barcelona in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Feb. 25, 2019. The impending rollout of the next generation 5G wireless standard could be a boon for cybersecurity, according to an expert from Verizon. “I actually think that the 5G rollout … will actually make things better,” Chris Novak, global director of the Threat Research Advisory Center at Verizon, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday. Novak’s comments


An illuminated 5G sign hangs behind a weave of electronic cables on the opening day of the MWC Barcelona in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Feb. 25, 2019. The impending rollout of the next generation 5G wireless standard could be a boon for cybersecurity, according to an expert from Verizon. “I actually think that the 5G rollout … will actually make things better,” Chris Novak, global director of the Threat Research Advisory Center at Verizon, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday. Novak’s comments
5G rollout will ‘make things better’ for cybersecurity, according to Verizon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, verizon, cybersecurity, according, 5g, things, think, novak, weve, rollout, companies, better, told, lot, actually, research, huawei


5G rollout will 'make things better' for cybersecurity, according to Verizon

An illuminated 5G sign hangs behind a weave of electronic cables on the opening day of the MWC Barcelona in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Feb. 25, 2019.

The impending rollout of the next generation 5G wireless standard could be a boon for cybersecurity, according to an expert from Verizon.

“I actually think that the 5G rollout … will actually make things better,” Chris Novak, global director of the Threat Research Advisory Center at Verizon, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday.

“I think there is a lot of research and development that we’ve done and I know others have done as well to make sure that 5G doesn’t just bring speed and reliability, but also that it’s done in a secure manner and addresses any of those kinds of concerns,” Novak said.

Novak’s comments come amid increasing scrutiny on companies seeking to win contracts to develop 5G capabilities for national networks. Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei is chief among the firms under the spotlight as the U.S. seeks to dissuade America’s allies from purchasing its equipment, with claims that the firm is “too close to the government. ”

Recent moves by the U.S. have reportedly resulted in major tech companies limiting their employees’ access to Huawei. On May 16, the U.S. Department of Commerce put Huawei on a blacklist, barring it from doing business with American companies without government approval, then a few days later it authorized firms to interact with Huawei in standards bodies through August “as necessary for the development of 5G standards.”

For its part, U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration appears to have a conflicting stance on Huawei.

Trump told CNBC on Monday that Huawei could be part of the U.S. trade negotiation with China, contradicting remarks by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who told CNBC on Sunday that Washington’s concerns surrounding the telecommunications behemoth are “national security” issues separate from trade.

On the subject of whether banning perceived bad actors from developing 5G networks would reduce the likelihood of data breaches, Novak said: “To be honest, it’s not even just the espionage element. In reality, the bigger percentage of that pie is actually financially motivated breaches.”

“If you actually roll back and look at the last decade, we’ve got almost about a half million security incidents that we’ve looked at over the course of that research,” he said. “While espionage plays a role in things and I think that’s kind of fired up a lot of the conversation here, I think ultimately there’s a lot of other facets to what we see happening in the cybersecurity and data breach landscape.”

— Reuters and CNBC’s Kate Fazzini contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, verizon, cybersecurity, according, 5g, things, think, novak, weve, rollout, companies, better, told, lot, actually, research, huawei


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James Holzhauer made an uncharacteristically low bet on his last Final Jeopardy, but it was actually a brilliant strategy

In the minute-long video, Holzhauer and competitor Emma Boettcher both correctly answer the Final Jeopardy question, but Boettcher pulls out the win, having wagered more money. Holzhauer bet an uncharacteristically low amount — only $1,399 — bringing his game total to $24,799. So, why did Holzhauer bet so little on the Final Jeopardy question? “I knew I could only win if Emma missed Final Jeopardy, as there was no way she wouldn’t bet to cover my all-in bet,” Holzhauer told The Action Network on


In the minute-long video, Holzhauer and competitor Emma Boettcher both correctly answer the Final Jeopardy question, but Boettcher pulls out the win, having wagered more money. Holzhauer bet an uncharacteristically low amount — only $1,399 — bringing his game total to $24,799. So, why did Holzhauer bet so little on the Final Jeopardy question? “I knew I could only win if Emma missed Final Jeopardy, as there was no way she wouldn’t bet to cover my all-in bet,” Holzhauer told The Action Network on
James Holzhauer made an uncharacteristically low bet on his last Final Jeopardy, but it was actually a brilliant strategy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boettcher, low, question, james, holzhauer, actually, uncharacteristically, strategy, final, jeopardy, place, game, bet, emma, doubled, brilliant


James Holzhauer made an uncharacteristically low bet on his last Final Jeopardy, but it was actually a brilliant strategy

This image made from video aired on “Jeopardy!” on Wednesday, April 17, 2019, and provided by Jeopardy Productions, Inc. shows James Holzhauer.

It’s official, James Holzhauer has finally lost “Jeopardy!.”

The 34-year-old professional sports gambler’s winning streak comes to an end Monday night, according to leaked footage of the episode and confirmation from the man himself. Holzhauer walked away with $2.46 million, just $59,000 shy of the all-time winnings record held by Ken Jennings from 2004.

In the minute-long video, Holzhauer and competitor Emma Boettcher both correctly answer the Final Jeopardy question, but Boettcher pulls out the win, having wagered more money.

Holzhauer bet an uncharacteristically low amount — only $1,399 — bringing his game total to $24,799. Boettcher, on the other hand, bet a whopping $20,201 on the question, bringing her total to $46,801.

So, why did Holzhauer bet so little on the Final Jeopardy question?

“I knew I could only win if Emma missed Final Jeopardy, as there was no way she wouldn’t bet to cover my all-in bet,” Holzhauer told The Action Network on Monday. “So my only concern was getting overtaken by third place, and I bet just enough to make sure of locking him out. Betting big would have looked good for the cameras, but now I turn my straight bet (Emma misses) into a parlay (Emma misses and I get it right).”

Holzhauer went on to explain that if he had doubled down, wagering all of his money, and gotten the question correct, he would have only been at $46,800. For comparison, if Boettcher had doubled down and correctly answered she would have earned $53,200. Instead, she bet a strategic $20,201, earning a final amount of $46,801, one dollar more than what Holzhauer would have won had he bet it all.

Knowing the odds were not in his favor for first place, Holzhauer decided to protect himself against coming in third place. If the other contestant, who had $11,000 at the start of Final Jeopardy had doubled down and was correct, he would have earned $22,000 as his final score.

Holzhauer bet $1,399, the exact amount he’d need to still come in second place should his answer have been incorrect.

The sports gambler had become known for employing an aggressive strategy when selecting boxes on the board at the start of each game. While many contestants would typically work their way through a single category, starting with the least valuable answer and moving to the most valuable tiles, Holzhauer did something different. He would go across the bottom of the board, picking out the highest valued boxes for each category. With correct answers, he was able to amass money quickly before stumbling on the Daily Double squares, which would allow him to bet a large portion of his winnings. It’s part of the reason he was able to tally more than $130,000 in a single game, a record.

“I lost to a really top-level competitor,” Holzhauer said, in an interview with the New York Times. “She played a perfect game. And that was what it took to beat me.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boettcher, low, question, james, holzhauer, actually, uncharacteristically, strategy, final, jeopardy, place, game, bet, emma, doubled, brilliant


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Brown University costs $73,892 a year—but here’s how much students actually pay

The rising cost of college can make earning an advanced degree seem out of reach for many students today. According to the College Board’s 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report, from 1988 to 2018, prices tripled at public four-year schools and doubled at public two-year and private non-profit four-year schools. In particular, private schools often get significant attention for having sky-high “sticker prices,” which include tuition, fees, room and board. But when the College Board broke down wha


The rising cost of college can make earning an advanced degree seem out of reach for many students today. According to the College Board’s 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report, from 1988 to 2018, prices tripled at public four-year schools and doubled at public two-year and private non-profit four-year schools. In particular, private schools often get significant attention for having sky-high “sticker prices,” which include tuition, fees, room and board. But when the College Board broke down wha
Brown University costs $73,892 a year—but here’s how much students actually pay Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 73892, public, private, yearbut, fees, brown, students, costs, schools, fouryear, college, tuition, university, cost, prices, heres, pay, actually


Brown University costs $73,892 a year—but here's how much students actually pay

The rising cost of college can make earning an advanced degree seem out of reach for many students today.

According to the College Board’s 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report, from 1988 to 2018, prices tripled at public four-year schools and doubled at public two-year and private non-profit four-year schools.

In particular, private schools often get significant attention for having sky-high “sticker prices,” which include tuition, fees, room and board. But when the College Board broke down what the average net price of college is today – taking scholarships and grants into account – they found that students typically pay less than the published price.

Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, reports that the cost to attend for the 2018-2019 academic year included $54,320 for tuition, $9,120 for rooming, $5,550 for boarding, $,2,017 for personal expenses, $1,595 for books and $1,236 for fees — totaling roughly $73,892.

But for some students, the cost of attending Brown is significantly less.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 73892, public, private, yearbut, fees, brown, students, costs, schools, fouryear, college, tuition, university, cost, prices, heres, pay, actually


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Wall Street firms expect more deals in 2019—how to profit from the merger madness

And — you guessed it — there’s a way for investors to try to capitalize on upcoming deals — using an exchange-traded fund from IndexIQ called the IQ Merger Arbitrage ETF, ticker MNA. Typically, this ETF’s overseers wait until deals are announced, then buy the target company, providing it meets their criteria. Under the Trump administration, deal completion rates have only gone up, making that piece of MNA’s strategy stronger, Bruno said Wednesday. The fund also has a unique short-selling strateg


And — you guessed it — there’s a way for investors to try to capitalize on upcoming deals — using an exchange-traded fund from IndexIQ called the IQ Merger Arbitrage ETF, ticker MNA. Typically, this ETF’s overseers wait until deals are announced, then buy the target company, providing it meets their criteria. Under the Trump administration, deal completion rates have only gone up, making that piece of MNA’s strategy stronger, Bruno said Wednesday. The fund also has a unique short-selling strateg
Wall Street firms expect more deals in 2019—how to profit from the merger madness Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-30  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expect, deal, deals, actually, sector, firms, bruno, broad, market, merger, wall, profit, 2019how, strategy, madness, etf, street


Wall Street firms expect more deals in 2019—how to profit from the merger madness

Merger mania is alive and well on Wall Street.

A slew of top firms including J.P. Morgan, Deloitte, Morgan Stanley and PwC have predicted that 2019 will continue to see strong deal activity after a banner 2018, when global merger and acquisition activity posted over $4 trillion in volumes.

Several megadeals have already hit the market in the first half of 2019, including Bristol-Myers Squibb’s purchase of Celgene, the largest health-care deal on record when you factor in the debt load, according to data gathered by Refinitiv.

And — you guessed it — there’s a way for investors to try to capitalize on upcoming deals — using an exchange-traded fund from IndexIQ called the IQ Merger Arbitrage ETF, ticker MNA.

MNA’s strategy is rules-based, says Salvatore Bruno, the man behind the ETF and IndexIQ’s chief investment officer. Speaking on CNBC’s “ETF Edge,” he said the general idea behind the ETF is investing in large deals expected to generate high premiums ahead of their completion, giving investors “the opportunity to pick up some of those premiums.”

Typically, this ETF’s overseers wait until deals are announced, then buy the target company, providing it meets their criteria. Under the Trump administration, deal completion rates have only gone up, making that piece of MNA’s strategy stronger, Bruno said Wednesday.

“By owning approximately 40 to 50 names at any point in time, we’re trying to diversify some of that specific risk of one particular deal breaking, but, really, trying to capture the overall premium associated with merger arbitrage investing,” he said.

The fund also has a unique short-selling strategy, Bruno said. Rather than shorting the stock of the acquirer, like in a typical merger arbitrage strategy, MNA shorts the acquirer’s sector as a whole.

“We’re trying to provide broad protection against downside moves related to a specific event in an industry, a sector or the broad market,” Bruno said, adding that Wednesday’s choppy, negative trading in the broader market didn’t end up putting much pressure on his fund, which is roughly 35% hedged against broad market weakness.

“MNA has all of the benefits of a traditional ETF, including transparency, liquidity and tax efficiency, so that’s why we think it’s actually the preferred vehicle for a strategy like this,” said Bruno, who is also managing director at New York Life Investments. “It’s actually been fairly effective at protecting against the broad downside moves.”

In addition to Celgene, MNA’s top holdings include oil and gas company Anadarko Petroleum, which is in the process of being acquired by Occidental Petroleum, and software play Red Hat, which was bought by IBM last October.

While MNA’s performance has essentially been flat for 2019, it’s hedged especially well against the U.S.-China trade debacle, Bruno said.

“Even though we have probably about a 25% weight in technology, we’re actually short about 12% on the technology sector,” he said. “As we’ve seen some of the semis come under pressure with the China trade issues, … that’s actually provided very good downside protection … against that broad, down move that’s affecting the entire sector. ”

All in all, Bruno’s thesis is simple: “For an individual investor, it would probably be pretty difficult to own 40 or 50 deals and then to identify the hedges and to put those on,” he said. “Clearly, doing it in a structure like an ETF gives you that diversification.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-30  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expect, deal, deals, actually, sector, firms, bruno, broad, market, merger, wall, profit, 2019how, strategy, madness, etf, street


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Actually, carrying a balance on your credit card doesn’t increase your credit score

He’s built a successful business in the Detroit suburbs and is on track to earn close to $300,000 this year. A 2018 survey from CreditCards.com found that of people who carry a credit card balance, 22% did so because they believed it would help their credit score. But carrying a balance on your credit card doesn’t increase your score, it just means you’ll pay more money over the long term as your interest payments build. “The best way to use a credit card is to make charges during the month and


He’s built a successful business in the Detroit suburbs and is on track to earn close to $300,000 this year. A 2018 survey from CreditCards.com found that of people who carry a credit card balance, 22% did so because they believed it would help their credit score. But carrying a balance on your credit card doesn’t increase your score, it just means you’ll pay more money over the long term as your interest payments build. “The best way to use a credit card is to make charges during the month and
Actually, carrying a balance on your credit card doesn’t increase your credit score Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-28  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, credit, money, interest, creditcardscom, survey, increase, pay, pardoe, carrying, score, balance, actually, card, doesnt


Actually, carrying a balance on your credit card doesn't increase your credit score

Alex Pardoe, a 25-year-old hairstylist in Detroit, is pretty good with his money. He’s built a successful business in the Detroit suburbs and is on track to earn close to $300,000 this year.

But he’s fallen victim to a pervasive money myth that could hurt his overall financial health: Pardoe keeps a balance on his credit card because he believes it will improve his credit score, even though he has more than enough in his checking account to pay the $2,000 debt off in full.

It’s a common misconception, Ted Rossman, industry analyst for CreditCards.com, tells CNBC Make It. A 2018 survey from CreditCards.com found that of people who carry a credit card balance, 22% did so because they believed it would help their credit score.

But carrying a balance on your credit card doesn’t increase your score, it just means you’ll pay more money over the long term as your interest payments build. With interest rates at record highs — currently 17.73% on average, according to CreditCards.com — it’s a costly myth.

“The best way to use a credit card is to make charges during the month and then pay it off in full before the statement is due,” says Rossman.

About four in 10 Americans don’t know how their credit score is determined, according to a recent survey from CompareCards by LendingTree. But it’s not that complicated.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-28  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, credit, money, interest, creditcardscom, survey, increase, pay, pardoe, carrying, score, balance, actually, card, doesnt


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Bitcoin is up 125% this year but could be due for a pullback, experts say

Bitcoin is now sitting just under its 52-week highs, but some experts warn a pullback could be coming. The cryptocurrency soared above $8,000 this week, pushing its total gains for the year to 125%. “[Bitcoin] has doubled in the last five months, so I would expect a bit of a pullback, and on the downside, there’s a very interesting gap there, from $6,870 to $6,425.” The technicals may signal a pullback, but Path Trading Partners chief market strategist Bob Iaccino says there’s a key catalyst beh


Bitcoin is now sitting just under its 52-week highs, but some experts warn a pullback could be coming. The cryptocurrency soared above $8,000 this week, pushing its total gains for the year to 125%. “[Bitcoin] has doubled in the last five months, so I would expect a bit of a pullback, and on the downside, there’s a very interesting gap there, from $6,870 to $6,425.” The technicals may signal a pullback, but Path Trading Partners chief market strategist Bob Iaccino says there’s a key catalyst beh
Bitcoin is up 125% this year but could be due for a pullback, experts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: tyler bailey
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, experts, bitcoin, network, software, market, trading, making, pullback, theres, actually, say, 125, transactions


Bitcoin is up 125% this year but could be due for a pullback, experts say

Bitcoin is now sitting just under its 52-week highs, but some experts warn a pullback could be coming.

The cryptocurrency soared above $8,000 this week, pushing its total gains for the year to 125%.

“We had rallied above [key resistance] but then failed on two different occasions,” Anthony Grisanti of GRZ Energy said Wednesday in a “Futures Now ” segment. “[Bitcoin] has doubled in the last five months, so I would expect a bit of a pullback, and on the downside, there’s a very interesting gap there, from $6,870 to $6,425.”

“If we start getting some profit-taking in this market, it will fill in that gap, but that’s actually very healthy for markets going forward,” Grisanti said.

The technicals may signal a pullback, but Path Trading Partners chief market strategist Bob Iaccino says there’s a key catalyst behind the bitcoin boom that could change the ecosystem, making the cryptocurrency much more friendly to consumers and businesses.

“I do believe I know part of the reason why [Bitcoin is booming], and that has to do with the inception and the application of software called the Lightning Network, which actually makes small transactions a lot easier for those who hold bitcoin,” said Iaccino.

“Where you look at Visa, who can transact 65,000 transactions per second, Bitcoin’s [prior level] was about seven, and now with the implementation of the Lightning Network, which is a software add-on, you can actually get these smaller transactions off the blockchain network, making adoptability of bitcoin as a currency a lot easier.”

Bitcoin futures were trading about 5% higher on Wednesday, hovering above the $8,100 level.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: tyler bailey
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, experts, bitcoin, network, software, market, trading, making, pullback, theres, actually, say, 125, transactions


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Chevron, the loser in the Anadarko buyout battle, is actually a winner on Wall Street

Michael Wirth, CEO of Chevron, speaking at the 2019 WEF in Davos, Switzerland on Jan. 23rd, 2019. Occidental Petroleum may have spoiled Chevron’s plans to acquire oil and gas driller Anadarko Petroleum, but Wall Street is not pronouncing the oil company the loser in the buyout battle. Several analysts are commending Chevron for declining to counter Occidental’s $38 billion bid for Anadarko. Chevron not only walks away with a $1 billion breakup fee, but showed investors it won’t sacrifice its bud


Michael Wirth, CEO of Chevron, speaking at the 2019 WEF in Davos, Switzerland on Jan. 23rd, 2019. Occidental Petroleum may have spoiled Chevron’s plans to acquire oil and gas driller Anadarko Petroleum, but Wall Street is not pronouncing the oil company the loser in the buyout battle. Several analysts are commending Chevron for declining to counter Occidental’s $38 billion bid for Anadarko. Chevron not only walks away with a $1 billion breakup fee, but showed investors it won’t sacrifice its bud
Chevron, the loser in the Anadarko buyout battle, is actually a winner on Wall Street Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09  Authors: tom dichristopher
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chevron, occidental, street, actually, offer, battle, petroleum, loser, bid, winner, billion, analysts, wall, oil, share, buyout, anadarko


Chevron, the loser in the Anadarko buyout battle, is actually a winner on Wall Street

Michael Wirth, CEO of Chevron, speaking at the 2019 WEF in Davos, Switzerland on Jan. 23rd, 2019.

Occidental Petroleum may have spoiled Chevron’s plans to acquire oil and gas driller Anadarko Petroleum, but Wall Street is not pronouncing the oil company the loser in the buyout battle.

Several analysts are commending Chevron for declining to counter Occidental’s $38 billion bid for Anadarko. Chevron not only walks away with a $1 billion breakup fee, but showed investors it won’t sacrifice its budget sheet in a bidding war, the analysts say.

The San Ramon, California-based energy giant was under pressure to hike its original $65 per share offer into the $70s after the underdog Occidental sweetened its offer this week. For Occidental, funding a $76 per share bid relied in part on agreeing to a steep 8% annual payout to Warren Buffett in order to secure a $10 billion investment from the Oracle of Omaha.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09  Authors: tom dichristopher
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chevron, occidental, street, actually, offer, battle, petroleum, loser, bid, winner, billion, analysts, wall, oil, share, buyout, anadarko


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Cramer’s lightning round: Cirrus is an Apple supplier, but I wouldn’t buy here

Next thing I know, boom. Holly Energy Partners LP: “You know what, something’s wrong with this thing at 10% yield. Cirrus Logic Inc.: “I think the world of Apple. Petmed Express Inc: “What the heck is that stock doing at 10-times earnings with that yield? Chart Industries Inc.: “I cannot believe the gas to liquids, which is what that stands for, GTLS, is actually all the way back up.


Next thing I know, boom. Holly Energy Partners LP: “You know what, something’s wrong with this thing at 10% yield. Cirrus Logic Inc.: “I think the world of Apple. Petmed Express Inc: “What the heck is that stock doing at 10-times earnings with that yield? Chart Industries Inc.: “I cannot believe the gas to liquids, which is what that stands for, GTLS, is actually all the way back up.
Cramer’s lightning round: Cirrus is an Apple supplier, but I wouldn’t buy here Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thing, company, apple, buy, yield, wouldnt, lightning, bless, cramers, supplier, way, stock, im, think, round, cirrus, know, actually


Cramer's lightning round: Cirrus is an Apple supplier, but I wouldn't buy here

Knight-Swift Transportation Holdings Inc.: “I’m not a trucker fan. I mean, I looked at XPO Logistics. I kind of liked the quarter. Next thing I know, boom. The stock got clobbered. Let’s stay away. ”

Wheaton Precious Metals Corp.: “You can own that. Just for the record: I prefer Barrick Gold. ”

Holly Energy Partners LP: “You know what, something’s wrong with this thing at 10% yield. The other day I saw one of these companies that’s very similar that actually got blitzed. They cut the dividend. I am concerned. Let me do some work.”

Cirrus Logic Inc.: “I think the world of Apple. Cirrus is a supplier. I cannot bless buying it at this level. I can’t, as good a company I think it is. ”

Petmed Express Inc: “What the heck is that stock doing at 10-times earnings with that yield? That makes no sense to me. That said, when it comes to animal health, I’m never gonna deviate from Idexx and Zoetis. Those are the two blue-chips of the industry. ”

Chart Industries Inc.: “I cannot believe the gas to liquids, which is what that stands for, GTLS, is actually all the way back up. That is a company that I’ve gotta tell you: I have missed the move back. I cannot bless it all the way up here. It’s run too much.”

WATCH: Cramer’s lightning round


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thing, company, apple, buy, yield, wouldnt, lightning, bless, cramers, supplier, way, stock, im, think, round, cirrus, know, actually


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Its costs $73,160 a year to go to MIT—but here’s how much students actually pay

Over the past several decades, the cost of attending college — any type of college — has increased significantly. According to the College Board’s 2018 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report, from 1988 to 2018, sticker prices tripled at public four-year schools and doubled at public two-year and private non-profit four-year schools. Despite these costs, earning a four-year degree — especially at a top-ranking university — continues to be a high-yield investment. In 2018, college graduates earned


Over the past several decades, the cost of attending college — any type of college — has increased significantly. According to the College Board’s 2018 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report, from 1988 to 2018, sticker prices tripled at public four-year schools and doubled at public two-year and private non-profit four-year schools. Despite these costs, earning a four-year degree — especially at a top-ranking university — continues to be a high-yield investment. In 2018, college graduates earned
Its costs $73,160 a year to go to MIT—but here’s how much students actually pay Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, public, college, schools, costs, mitbut, pay, 73160, 2018, heres, students, mit, graduates, fouryear, investment, salaries, earning, actually


Its costs $73,160 a year to go to MIT—but here's how much students actually pay

Over the past several decades, the cost of attending college — any type of college — has increased significantly.

According to the College Board’s 2018 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report, from 1988 to 2018, sticker prices tripled at public four-year schools and doubled at public two-year and private non-profit four-year schools.

Despite these costs, earning a four-year degree — especially at a top-ranking university — continues to be a high-yield investment. In 2018, college graduates earned weekly wages that were 80 percent higher than those of high school graduates.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is widely regarded as one of the most prestigious schools in the world and its graduates earn some of the highest salaries. According to an analysis from salary comparison site PayScale, MIT graduates are the second highest-earning workers in the country, with early-career salaries of about $83,600 on average and mid-career salaries of about $150,400 on average.

But earning an MIT diploma requires meeting rigorous academic standards and a significant financial investment. Today, the cost of attending MIT is about $73,160 per year. Exactly how much student spends earning an MIT diploma however, can vary dramatically and many students end up paying far less.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, public, college, schools, costs, mitbut, pay, 73160, 2018, heres, students, mit, graduates, fouryear, investment, salaries, earning, actually


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