This is the ‘dry tinder’ that could set off explosive growth, top investor says

Investors are laser-focused on trade talks in the hopes that progress on Friday could bring relief to markets and the economy. There could be a different kind of “dry tinder” that could provide the U.S. with a major injection of stimulus, according to Scott Ladner, chief investment officer at Horizon Investments. “The most surprising thing that not many people are talking about right now would be a [refinancing] boom, a refi wave here in the U.S. which we actually think conditions are fairly wel


Investors are laser-focused on trade talks in the hopes that progress on Friday could bring relief to markets and the economy. There could be a different kind of “dry tinder” that could provide the U.S. with a major injection of stimulus, according to Scott Ladner, chief investment officer at Horizon Investments. “The most surprising thing that not many people are talking about right now would be a [refinancing] boom, a refi wave here in the U.S. which we actually think conditions are fairly wel
This is the ‘dry tinder’ that could set off explosive growth, top investor says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, set, right, really, ladner, talks, explosive, growth, dry, investor, kind, trade, think, tinder, actually, sides


This is the 'dry tinder' that could set off explosive growth, top investor says

Investors are laser-focused on trade talks in the hopes that progress on Friday could bring relief to markets and the economy.

There could be a different kind of “dry tinder” that could provide the U.S. with a major injection of stimulus, according to Scott Ladner, chief investment officer at Horizon Investments.

“The most surprising thing that not many people are talking about right now would be a [refinancing] boom, a refi wave here in the U.S. which we actually think conditions are fairly well set up for. That would be a big surprise and that’d be a form of fiscal expansion in the United States,” Ladner said on CNBC’s “Trading Nation” on Thursday.

Consumers refinancing existing mortgages or other loans could lead to increased activity in the homebuilding and homebuying market as well as encourage more spending across the board. Strength in the consumer has been credited with staving off a recession in this late-cycle phase of the economy.

Housing data is already picking up as mortgage rates decline. Housing starts and building permits increased to a more than 12-year high in August and home resales are their highest in nearly a year and a half.

“The consumer is in absolutely fantastic shape, and the conditions are really set up for them to kind of take advantage of this refi boom, where rates are right now. And that’s something people just aren’t looking for,” said Ladner.

As for the trade overhang, Ladner says actions speak louder than words, and the two sides look more likely to work toward a deal than not.

“Listening to the banter back and forth has been really very confusing, and frankly, kind of tiring, because both sides have been in a posturing situation for some time now. What we prefer to do is actually look at some of the actions from both parties that tell us whether they actually want to get a deal done,” said Ladner.

For one, he says, President Donald Trump has not antagonized China in the same way he has his other perceived political foes — this to Ladner suggests he is more sensitive to this issue and open to working toward progress.

“China, on the other hand, could really be using their currency in a much more forceful fashion to blunt the effects of the tariffs. That they haven’t done so, we think actually shows their hand that they actually want to get something done here as well,” said Ladner.

Trump said Thursday that talks between the two countries were going “really well.” He plans to meet Chinese Vice Premier Liu He on Friday afternoon.

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, set, right, really, ladner, talks, explosive, growth, dry, investor, kind, trade, think, tinder, actually, sides


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‘Million Dollar Listing’ star Ryan Serhant: The best piece of investing advice I ever got

Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both p


Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both p
‘Million Dollar Listing’ star Ryan Serhant: The best piece of investing advice I ever got Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, star, investing, advice, listing, serhant, piece, dollar, invest, youre, million, best, real, things, ryan, really, estate, actually, going


'Million Dollar Listing' star Ryan Serhant: The best piece of investing advice I ever got

Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. But when it comes to his own money, he’s fairly conservative. He saves a lot, and he knows the value of a dollar. When it comes to investing, he sticks to a pretty simple strategy: Invest in what you know. Serhant recently sat down with the Grow team to discuss the most valuable investing advice he’s received, how he learned about money at a young age, and more. Here is his story, as told to senior reporter Sam Becker.

Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’

The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. Things you use. Things you could see yourself using; things you actually like. Don’t invest in stuff that doesn’t interest you, because then you’re not going to follow up on it. You’re not going to be as active an investor. So, I invest in things or products that I enjoy, use, or think are really interesting. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both physical products as well as software — [and] investing in real estate.

When it comes to real estate, I used to really think that to be a wise investor, you have to invest what you actually have to spend, so don’t spend more than you can afford. But I’ve found that to be incorrect. The best investments I’ve made are the ones that actually push me outside of my comfort level. Because you need to work more. You need to do more to actually get a return on this investment. And that’s worked really, really well for me.

‘The best investment I ever made’

The best investment I ever made: I invest in my business all the time. I invested in our YouTube vlog, and I think it’s funny because before I started the vlog on YouTube, everyone thought it was stupid and crazy. Including me. Actually, mostly me. I thought it was dumb. Just another form of social media. I was just sick and tired of it and I had no idea what it was going to do to our business. But it is a massive way of driving business and driving brand awareness. So, by investing the money that I did into the vlog, more people buy my book, more people buy the course, more people reach out to me to buy and sell homes.

Don’t invest in stuff that doesn’t interest you, because then you’re not going to follow up on it. You’re not going to be as active an investor. Ryan Serhant Real estate broker, author, and TV star

How being ‘broke’ led to his real estate career


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, star, investing, advice, listing, serhant, piece, dollar, invest, youre, million, best, real, things, ryan, really, estate, actually, going


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More than 50% of married people say these 3 wedding costs are actually worth it

In hindsight, married people agree three costs were worth the money: The bride’s dress, the wedding cake and photography. Participants were asked to rate different costs and share whether they felt it was worth it to splurge on various wedding expenses, such as a professional photographer, videographer, flowers, wedding cake and more. Of those polled, 56.6% said buying the bride’s dress was a good use of their money, followed by 53.1% who said photography and 52.4% who said the wedding cake. Whe


In hindsight, married people agree three costs were worth the money: The bride’s dress, the wedding cake and photography. Participants were asked to rate different costs and share whether they felt it was worth it to splurge on various wedding expenses, such as a professional photographer, videographer, flowers, wedding cake and more. Of those polled, 56.6% said buying the bride’s dress was a good use of their money, followed by 53.1% who said photography and 52.4% who said the wedding cake. Whe
More than 50% of married people say these 3 wedding costs are actually worth it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, purchases, say, responses, spent, wedding, cake, wish, worth, wisely, costs, married, actually


More than 50% of married people say these 3 wedding costs are actually worth it

Leading up to your wedding, you can expect to be in full-on decision making mode. Will you have a live band or a DJ at the reception? Chocolate cake or vanilla? Small wedding or large? The list goes on. Since most significant wedding purchases aren’t cheap, it’s important to choose wisely. In hindsight, married people agree three costs were worth the money: The bride’s dress, the wedding cake and photography. That’s according to a recent survey from Novi Financial Inc., which collected 1,000 responses from people ages 18 to 54 who married in the past decade. Participants were asked to rate different costs and share whether they felt it was worth it to splurge on various wedding expenses, such as a professional photographer, videographer, flowers, wedding cake and more. Of those polled, 56.6% said buying the bride’s dress was a good use of their money, followed by 53.1% who said photography and 52.4% who said the wedding cake.

When it comes to wedding purchases married people regret, 48.5% of those polled said wedding planners weren’t worth the cost, followed by 36.7% who said videography and 36.1% who said wedding favors. Other popular responses include the champagne toast (35.2%) and flowers (29.2%).

While wedding decisions are personal, it can be beneficial to have an idea of which purchases married people regret to see where it might be possible to cut costs. Over 40% of those who spent more than $30,000 on their big day wish they hadn’t spent so much and over two-thirds wish they had done “at least one thing” to reduce the cost of the wedding, the study found.

How to spend wisely on the wedding costs that count


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, purchases, say, responses, spent, wedding, cake, wish, worth, wisely, costs, married, actually


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Don’t be surprised if that credit score you see is not what a lender actually uses

Earlier this year, pharmacy technician Curtis Webb thought his credit score was high enough to help him snag good terms on a mortgage. The underwriter had checked Webb’s “classic” FICO score, which was more than 40 points lower than the score he’d been monitoring online. Consumers can retrieve a credit score online that may not be the one that’s used when they actually apply for a loan. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the largest purchasers of home mortgages on the secondary market, rely on a consum


Earlier this year, pharmacy technician Curtis Webb thought his credit score was high enough to help him snag good terms on a mortgage. The underwriter had checked Webb’s “classic” FICO score, which was more than 40 points lower than the score he’d been monitoring online. Consumers can retrieve a credit score online that may not be the one that’s used when they actually apply for a loan. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the largest purchasers of home mortgages on the secondary market, rely on a consum
Don’t be surprised if that credit score you see is not what a lender actually uses Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-12  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lender, fico, consumers, score, vantagescore, credit, dont, surprised, used, influential, webb, actually, number, scores, uses


Don't be surprised if that credit score you see is not what a lender actually uses

Earlier this year, pharmacy technician Curtis Webb thought his credit score was high enough to help him snag good terms on a mortgage. “It was close to 730. I thought it would help me get a good interest rate,” said Webb, 28, a Utah resident. “Then the lender came back with my actual score,” he said. “I was shocked.” The underwriter had checked Webb’s “classic” FICO score, which was more than 40 points lower than the score he’d been monitoring online. The lower score meant a higher interest rate, making the loan a more expensive prospect.

Curtis Webb, a pharmacy technician and student at the University of Utah, holds his son, Callahan. Source: Curtis Webb.

That scenario is common, experts say. Consumers can retrieve a credit score online that may not be the one that’s used when they actually apply for a loan. And while the discrepancy might not always be significant — or could be in your favor — some industry watchers say the differences are confusing at best and misleading at worst. “Consumers don’t even know what score they’re looking at, or if it’s the one used by lenders,” said Al Bingham, a credit expert and author of “The Road to 850.” “In most cases, it’s not,” he said. The credit-scoring world is a complex one, despite many consumers thinking their score is a number that is the same — or at least very similar — no matter where it’s presented. “It’s unrealistic to expect that a number, whether from a website or credit bureau or anywhere else, will be the same number that some future lender is going to use,” said John Ulzheimer, a credit expert and president of The Ulzheimer Group in Atlanta. “If it is identical, chalk it up to luck.” FICO scores are considered the most widely used numbers in lending decisions across consumer loans and lines of credit. The company says its scores are used in 90% of lending decisions, based on data audited by a third party.

VantageScore, meanwhile, says that 2,800 organizations (including 2,500 financial institutions) used close to 10.5 billion of its scores from July 2017 through June 2018, based on a study by global consulting firm Oliver Wyman. Most of that usage, though, came from credit card companies managing existing accounts and prescreening applicants. Webb, the Utah resident, had been monitoring his score on personal finance website Credit Karma, which provides scores from the VantageScore model. That’s a joint venture among the nation’s three biggest credit-reporting firms: Experian, Equifax and TransUnion. The VantageScore was created in 2006 as a competitor to FICO, which has been around since 1989. Both brands use similar data to compute your number — including things like outstanding debt, payment history and other financial tidbits that help predict whether you’ll repay what you borrow. The most familiar versions of both VantageScore and FICO result in a score that falls on a scale of 300 to 850.

It’s unrealistic to expect that a number, whether from a website or credit bureau or anywhere else, will be the same number that some future lender is going to use. John Ulzheimer President of The Ulzheimer Group

However, the specific algorithms used to arrive at your numbers are different. And both brands have multiple versions — upgraded editions, often — which also contribute to variations in the scores that you see. Even the credit-reporting companies can provide same-named scores that differ from one to the next, due to differences in the information reported or the timing of it. Of course, regardless of the score used, lenders also typically weigh additional items including income, length of employment, stable housing or other aspects of your financial life that don’t show up in your credit report or get reflected in your score. Yet as many consumers know, the higher your score, the better terms you can get on loans and credit cards, including the interest rate — which can save a lot of money in interest over the life of a loan. For illustration: On a $160,000 mortgage, paying 4% over 30 years incurs $115,280 in interest. Just a half-percentage point higher, 4.5%, would yield $132,128 in interest over the same period — $16,848 more. FICO Score Factors:

Most influential: Payment history on loans and credit cards

Highly influential: Total debt and amounts owed

Moderately influential: Length of credit history

Less influential: New credit and credit mix (the types of accounts you have) VantageScore Factors:

Most influential: Payment history

Highly influential: Age and type of credit, percent of credit limit used

Moderately influential: Total balances and debt

Less influential: Recent credit behavior and inquiries, available credit Source: Experian Consumers often see the biggest discrepancy in scores when they apply for a mortgage, experts say. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the largest purchasers of home mortgages on the secondary market, rely on a consumer’s classic FICO score. As such, lenders generally follow their guidelines to ensure their loans can be resold to investors. Last month, however, the Federal Housing Finance Agency issued a final rule that allows Fannie and Freddie to employ alternative models— which means VantageScore could be considered by those government-sponsored enterprises. It’s an about-face from the originally proposed version of the rule, released in December, which would have banned Fannie or Freddie from using a model owned in part by the company providing the credit score. That would have eliminated VantageScore due to its ownership by the three largest credit-reporting companies, which provide the scores that end up at Fannie and Freddie. Whether the policy change would allow VantageScore to gain traction any time soon is uncertain, partly because FICO scores are so embedded in how lenders assess consumers’ ability to handle their debt, Bingham said. “The lending industry relies on the FICO scores and that’s a big industry to change course,” he said. “Lenders, insurers and investors are ultimately the consumer for credit scores. It’s their money at risk.” More from Personal Finance:

Half of student loan borrowers worry they’ll be in debt forever

Equifax adds extra step to claim $125 damage award

Fewer women now pay their credit card balances in full Meanwhile, a VantageScore spokesman said the important thing for consumers to pay attention to is their number and whether it’s improving or getting worse. “If you’re monitoring your score, that’s a good thing,” said Jeff Richardson, a VantageScore spokesman. “And, VantageScore is directionally accurate and similar to other scores that will be used future lending decisions.” Bingham, however, said that’s not always the case. Yet whether it’s similar or not, VantageScore does come with an advantage: Consumers can often access it for free. Checking a FICO score that a lender plans to use can mean paying for it — although lenders also are required to tell you the score they used in their decision if you are either denied a loan or credit, or are offered less favorable terms than other consumers get.

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MyFico.com, where you can see all of your FICO scores, charges from about $20 to $40 monthly, depending on the level of credit monitoring you sign up for. And while FICO has partnered with some banks and lenders to share specific FICO scores with customers, another loan company might use an entirely different version in their decision-making. For Webb, the Utah resident, the difference in scores meant that he and his wife needed to revise their plans. Instead of buying an existing home, they plan to purchase a new home — it’s now under construction — that won’t be ready for at least several more months. Webb has been working to improve his score so he can lock in the best interest rate possible before they go to settlement. Soon after Webb’s disappointing experience, the disparity in his scores was explained to him in a personal finance class at the University of Utah, where he’s working on both a bachelor’s degree in human family and community development, and a certified financial planner designation. Bingham, the credit expert, was there as a classroom guest to explain to students the differences among credit scores. “It was eye-opening for me,” Webb said.

If you can get your score for free but it’s not accurate, what’s the purpose? Al Bingham Author of “Road to 850”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-12  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lender, fico, consumers, score, vantagescore, credit, dont, surprised, used, influential, webb, actually, number, scores, uses


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Salesforce launches new ads that explain what the $130 billion company actually does

Salesforce has become a $130 billion behemoth by pioneering the move to cloud software. But when you get into the ‘what we do,’ we have further work to do there,” Buscemi said in an interview. Last month, Salesforce closed the $15.3 billion acquisition of Tableau, its biggest deal ever, to push into data visualization tools. The $6.5 billion purchase of MuleSoft last year put Salesforce into the business of data integration, more of a back-end technology. Through radio, print, TV, digital, metro


Salesforce has become a $130 billion behemoth by pioneering the move to cloud software. But when you get into the ‘what we do,’ we have further work to do there,” Buscemi said in an interview. Last month, Salesforce closed the $15.3 billion acquisition of Tableau, its biggest deal ever, to push into data visualization tools. The $6.5 billion purchase of MuleSoft last year put Salesforce into the business of data integration, more of a back-end technology. Through radio, print, TV, digital, metro
Salesforce launches new ads that explain what the $130 billion company actually does Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buscemi, salesforce, company, thats, technology, campaign, launches, work, explain, customers, tools, does, actually, ads, 130, billion


Salesforce launches new ads that explain what the $130 billion company actually does

Marc Benioff, chairman and chief executive officer of Salesforce.com Inc., speaks during the grand opening ceremonies for the Salesforce Tower in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Tuesday, May 22, 2018.

Salesforce has become a $130 billion behemoth by pioneering the move to cloud software. Marc Benioff, the co-founder and co-CEO, is a towering and outspoken figure in the technology industry.

But two decades after the company was launched out of a small apartment in San Francisco and almost two years after opening the city’s tallest building, you would be forgiven for not knowing what Salesforce does. That’s true even after reading the “About Us” section on its website, which starts “Salesforce is a customer relationship management solution that brings companies and customers together.”

Salesforce — whose stock ticker, CRM, stands for customer relationship management — is now making an aggressive effort to promote its brand in a way that more people can understand. Stephanie Buscemi, Salesforce’s chief marketing officer and executive VP, said the company is rolling out a new global advertising campaign this week designed to help executives from businesses of all sizes and across a wide swath of industries get a clear sense of how Salesforce might work for them.

“There’s high recognition of Salesforce. But when you get into the ‘what we do,’ we have further work to do there,” Buscemi said in an interview. “The goal of the campaign is to really focus on talking about what our products do for our customers.”

In recent years, Salesforce has evolved from a technology vendor focused on providing cloud-based tools that help salespeople and marketing teams connect with customers to a sprawling software giant that’s one of the top acquirers in the industry. Last month, Salesforce closed the $15.3 billion acquisition of Tableau, its biggest deal ever, to push into data visualization tools. The $6.5 billion purchase of MuleSoft last year put Salesforce into the business of data integration, more of a back-end technology.

With the company becoming more complex, it’s looking to simplify the message. The new ad campaign is called “We Bring Companies and Customers Together.” Through radio, print, TV, digital, metro ads and more as well as some local events, Buscemi said Salesforce is showing specifically how its technology is used in different businesses.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buscemi, salesforce, company, thats, technology, campaign, launches, work, explain, customers, tools, does, actually, ads, 130, billion


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This is when people start saving for retirement—and when they actually should

Just 39% of adults who are saving for retirement started in their 20s, according to a recent report from Morning Consult, despite half of respondents saying that people should start saving during those years. Just over a quarter of Americans began saving in their 30s, 15% in their 40s and 6% in their 50s. When to start investing for retirementFinancial experts advise everyone to start saving and investing for retirement as soon as they can, ideally putting away at least 10% of your income each m


Just 39% of adults who are saving for retirement started in their 20s, according to a recent report from Morning Consult, despite half of respondents saying that people should start saving during those years. Just over a quarter of Americans began saving in their 30s, 15% in their 40s and 6% in their 50s. When to start investing for retirementFinancial experts advise everyone to start saving and investing for retirement as soon as they can, ideally putting away at least 10% of your income each m
This is when people start saving for retirement—and when they actually should Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-04  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, retirementand, start, returns, retirement, started, rate, adults, starting, month, career, actually, saving


This is when people start saving for retirement—and when they actually should

A significant portion of U.S. adults are delaying starting to save for retirement until a decade or more into their working career — far later than what financial experts advise. Just 39% of adults who are saving for retirement started in their 20s, according to a recent report from Morning Consult, despite half of respondents saying that people should start saving during those years. Just over a quarter of Americans began saving in their 30s, 15% in their 40s and 6% in their 50s. Plus, half of adults between 18 and 34 are not saving for retirement at all, compared to 42% of adults aged 35 to 44, and 40% aged 45 to 64. Not starting early can impede or complicate your ability to build up an adequate retirement account, which Americans think should be at least $1.7 million at age 65, according to a recent survey from Charles Schwab, which looked at 1,000 401(k) plan participants across the nation. Here’s why.

When to start investing for retirement

Financial experts advise everyone to start saving and investing for retirement as soon as they can, ideally putting away at least 10% of your income each month. That way, your retirement funds have time to recover from any dips in the market and benefit from compound interest, which is when you earn returns on investments, as well as returns on those returns. This helps money grow at a faster rate than with simple interest. To hit $1.7 million by 65, you would need to save $486.97 per month starting at age 25, assuming an 8% rate of return, CNBC Make It previously reported. But if you waited a few years and started saving at 30, you’d need to contribute $741.10 per month to reach the same goal with an 8% rate of return. Starting early eases the savings burden significantly.

If you can’t afford to invest hundreds of dollars a month at the beginning of your career, start with as much as you are able to, even if it’s just $10 or $20 per month, experts say. If you increase your contributions gradually, you’ll still be able to build a healthy retirement account. “If you spend the first half of your career not saving, you’ve got to do a lot of catching up later in your career, and you don’t have the time in the market to ride out any fluctuations,” Katie Taylor, vice president of thought leadership at Fidelity Investments, told CNBC Make It. “It’s always a good idea to get started as early as possible.”

How to start saving for retirement


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-04  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, retirementand, start, returns, retirement, started, rate, adults, starting, month, career, actually, saving


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Starbucks is serving a brand new pumpkin drink—and it’s actually cheaper than the PSL

The Seattle-based coffee chain will start to serve its pumpkin spice latte nationwide on Tuesday, Aug. 27. Starbucks is releasing a new pumpkin-flavored drink: the pumpkin cream cold brew. A 16-ounce grande size, Starbucks’ term for a medium, of the pumpkin cream cold brew will set you back $4.45. The price for a pumpkin spice latte, however, starts at $4.95 and ranges to $5.45, depending on the size. And if you’re looking for snacks, Starbucks is leaning hard into the pumpkin-flavored pastries


The Seattle-based coffee chain will start to serve its pumpkin spice latte nationwide on Tuesday, Aug. 27. Starbucks is releasing a new pumpkin-flavored drink: the pumpkin cream cold brew. A 16-ounce grande size, Starbucks’ term for a medium, of the pumpkin cream cold brew will set you back $4.45. The price for a pumpkin spice latte, however, starts at $4.95 and ranges to $5.45, depending on the size. And if you’re looking for snacks, Starbucks is leaning hard into the pumpkin-flavored pastries
Starbucks is serving a brand new pumpkin drink—and it’s actually cheaper than the PSL Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-26  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cheaper, brew, topped, cream, actually, brand, spice, drinkand, psl, drink, serving, drinks, starbucks, pumpkin, cold


Starbucks is serving a brand new pumpkin drink—and it's actually cheaper than the PSL

Temperatures may still be warm, but fall officially starts this week — at least at Starbucks.

The Seattle-based coffee chain will start to serve its pumpkin spice latte nationwide on Tuesday, Aug. 27. But for the first time in 16 years, the PSL, as it’s known, will have some competition that slightly edges out the fan-favorite on price.

Starbucks is releasing a new pumpkin-flavored drink: the pumpkin cream cold brew. Made with cold brew coffee mixed with a few pumps of vanilla, the iced drink is topped with a pumpkin cream cold foam and dusted with Starbucks’ signature pumpkin spice topping.

A 16-ounce grande size, Starbucks’ term for a medium, of the pumpkin cream cold brew will set you back $4.45. The price for a pumpkin spice latte, however, starts at $4.95 and ranges to $5.45, depending on the size. Prices may vary by location.

Of course, the new pumpkin cream cold brew has a long way to go before it dethrones the PSL: Starbucks reports it has sold 424 million cups in the U.S. since 2003.

In addition to the pumpkin-spice drinks, Starbucks is also bringing back its salted caramel mocha on Tuesday. The drink combines the flavors of mocha and toffee nut, topped off with whipped cream, caramel drizzle and a crunchy sea salt sugar.

And if you’re looking for snacks, Starbucks is leaning hard into the pumpkin-flavored pastries with pumpkin cream cheese muffins, pumpkin scones and pumpkin spice madeleines.

All of the seasonal drinks and snacks are available while supplies last, but typically sales of the PSL drinks go into the holiday season.

Don’t miss: Meet the woman whose name is on 2 million pints of ice cream

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-26  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cheaper, brew, topped, cream, actually, brand, spice, drinkand, psl, drink, serving, drinks, starbucks, pumpkin, cold


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I got over $100 worth of free stuff on my birthday—but these are the 5 places actually worth visiting

I was largely successful, too: I ended up with $111.18 worth of free food, products and beauty treatments from 17 places. If you’re planning on scoring your own free birthday deals, keep in mind that it’s important to plan ahead. Here are the five best places to score free stuff on your birthday, based on my own experience, from lowest to highest dollar value. To get the deal, I signed up for Moe’s Rockin Rewards program and downloaded the app. Godiva ChocolatierItems: Four chocolate barsValue:


I was largely successful, too: I ended up with $111.18 worth of free food, products and beauty treatments from 17 places. If you’re planning on scoring your own free birthday deals, keep in mind that it’s important to plan ahead. Here are the five best places to score free stuff on your birthday, based on my own experience, from lowest to highest dollar value. To get the deal, I signed up for Moe’s Rockin Rewards program and downloaded the app. Godiva ChocolatierItems: Four chocolate barsValue:
I got over $100 worth of free stuff on my birthday—but these are the 5 places actually worth visiting Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-24  Authors: emmie martin
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, free, visiting, stars, app, stuff, program, birthdaybut, worth, rewards, 100, birthday, beauty, rating, places, actually


I got over $100 worth of free stuff on my birthday—but these are the 5 places actually worth visiting

For my birthday last August, I spent the day traipsing around New York City, attempting to acquire as many freebies as I could. I was largely successful, too: I ended up with $111.18 worth of free food, products and beauty treatments from 17 places. However, not every stop proved worth my time, as some rewards were far more valuable than others. When my birthday came around again this year, I took a different approach and zeroed in on the restaurants and retailers that offered the best deals. If you’re planning on scoring your own free birthday deals, keep in mind that it’s important to plan ahead. Many places require a coupon or code that’s only available via email or through an app. Sign up for loyalty and rewards programs well before your birthday month in order to make sure you end up with deals in your inbox. Here are the five best places to score free stuff on your birthday, based on my own experience, from lowest to highest dollar value.

Moe’s Southwest Grill

Items: ‘Homewrecker’ burrito and chips

Value: $9

My rating: 5/5 stars I’d heard that Moe’s gives out free burritos for birthdays, and I was not disappointed. To get the deal, I signed up for Moe’s Rockin Rewards program and downloaded the app. My birthday perk appeared in the app, and all I had to do at the store was show the app to the cashier in lieu of payment. I also made sure to call ahead, as not every franchise participates in the deal. Between the burrito and accompanying chips, I got a complete and filling meal for free.

Emmie Martin | CNBC

Mario Badescu

Item: Rosewater facial spray

Value: $10

My rating: 3/5 stars As a benefit of signing up for its mailing list, skincare company Mario Badescu emailed me a promo code worth $10 on my birthday. Although my birthday was in August, it didn’t expire until well into September. I used the code right away to order a bottle of the facial spray with aloe, herbs and rosewater, which retails for $7. With shipping and tax, the total came to just over $13, so I still had to pay a few bucks, but overall it was a good deal.

Godiva Chocolatier

Items: Four chocolate bars

Value: $10

My rating: 5/5 stars For chocolate lovers like myself, Godiva’s rewards program is a must. For my birthday, the company emailed me a $10 voucher that could be used both in stores or online. I headed to a nearby location and picked up four of the classic bars, which retail for around $3 each, but are discounted when you buy four for $10.

Emmie Martin | CNBC

Sephora

Item: Bite Beauty sampler kit

Value: $21

My rating: 4/5 stars Sephora’s Beauty Insider program is popular for its annual birthday giveaways, which I’ve collected for several years now. When I stopped by in 2018, I got a sampler from Bite Beauty, which included a miniature lip crayon, miniature lipstick, lip balm and lip scrub. You can’t buy the sample sizes at Sephora, but the kit is currently available from Bite for $21 on Amazon, up from around $15 when I originally scored the freebie.

Benefit


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-24  Authors: emmie martin
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, free, visiting, stars, app, stuff, program, birthdaybut, worth, rewards, 100, birthday, beauty, rating, places, actually


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The common money regimen that can actually backfire and leave you worse off

Source: Pauline YanThere’s plenty of disagreement about whether diets truly work, and whether money diets are effective. One approach that can work is trimming your budget, says Lauren Anastasio, a certified financial planner at New York personal finance company SoFi. The ‘diet’ problemAlicia McElhaney, founder of She Spends, a personal finance website aimed at women, says there’s nothing wrong with comparing saving with healthy eating. “So, of course, it seeps into everything, including persona


Source: Pauline YanThere’s plenty of disagreement about whether diets truly work, and whether money diets are effective. One approach that can work is trimming your budget, says Lauren Anastasio, a certified financial planner at New York personal finance company SoFi. The ‘diet’ problemAlicia McElhaney, founder of She Spends, a personal finance website aimed at women, says there’s nothing wrong with comparing saving with healthy eating. “So, of course, it seeps into everything, including persona
The common money regimen that can actually backfire and leave you worse off Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, anastasio, regimen, worse, financial, common, finance, dieting, personal, actually, work, money, leave, spending, yan, mcelhaney, backfire


The common money regimen that can actually backfire and leave you worse off

So-called money diets work about as well as the ordinary kind. That is, they may work for a short time, but you’ll have to stay on the diet to keep the weight off.

Pauline Yan, 41, says managing your money starts with scouting your feelings. Source: Pauline Yan

There’s plenty of disagreement about whether diets truly work, and whether money diets are effective. A money diet sounds terrible to Monica Sipes, a certified financial planner and senior wealth advisor at Exencial Wealth Advisors in Frisco, Texas. “It usually follows an overspend or a bad financial situation,” Sipes said. “It’s a restriction, often temporary, and I haven’t ever seen it work well.” Sipes never recommends this strategy. You’re better off with a budget and some financial goals, which you support with some type of savings and perhaps a sacrifice. “Ultimately, it comes down to why you are making the decisions around your money, not a temporary restriction to undo bad spending habits,” Sipes said. One approach that can work is trimming your budget, says Lauren Anastasio, a certified financial planner at New York personal finance company SoFi. Anastasio calls this the dieting equivalent of having a side of veggies instead of a starch. But avoid the equivalent of crash dieting when it comes to your finances, she adds. “I rarely encourage someone to go on a no-spend diet or budget,” Anastasio said.

The ‘diet’ problem

Alicia McElhaney, founder of She Spends, a personal finance website aimed at women, says there’s nothing wrong with comparing saving with healthy eating. “It’s described as an investment in your future, which is great,” McElhaney said. What McElhaney doesn’t like is when people equate not saving money with being overweight or lazy. “I’ve seen quite a bit more talk about dieting, body hate and discomfort with fatness on social media in personal finance circles than I expected when I first got into this,” McElhaney said. Weight is a fraught subject in our culture, McElhaney says. “So, of course, it seeps into everything, including personal finance,” she said.

The best tips are sensible

The pros recommend dieting sensibly, and that goes for your finances, too. A budget doesn’t have to be restrictive. It just means you create a plan for your money. Your goal is to become more aware of how you spend, Anastasio says. The best time to restrict your spending in a determined/short-term way is when you have a specific financial goal. Whether you’d like to pay off credit card debt or save for a vacation, reducing your discretionary spending frees some income to allocate toward those goals, Anastasio says. Her firm encourages members to divide their income into three parts commonly known as the 50/30/20 rule of budgeting: 50% should go to fixed, essential expenses such as rent, utilities and insurance; 20% goes into savings; and 30% is for discretionary spending. More from Invest in You:

Want an extra $100 a month? Try these simple spending tweaks

It’s not your imagination. Spending is easier than saving

You’ll probably regret that timeshare and car payments

Be realistic

As can happen with food dieting, being too restrictive financially can end in binging. Whether it’s money or calories, the goal should be something practical and sustainable. “Reevaluate your plan and make adjustments,” Anastasio said. You can taper off regular check-ins after you’ve established some good habits. Definitely tweak your plan as you go along. “Sometimes we like to think we can make it to the gym every morning before work but find that we’re more likely to go to the group exercise classes offered in the evening,” Anastasio said.

Think mindset

Spending diets, no-buys and no-spends aren’t on Pauline Yan’s radar. “The brain doesn’t process the negative part that well,” said Yan, 41, a portfolio manager in Toronto who has a personal finance blog. Instead, all your brain is likely to hear is “spending,” “buy” and “spend.” And your brain will then notice all the opportunities to buy and spend. That’s why people boomerang after a diet, Yan says. “They used up a lot of willpower to make it through,” Yan said. “But I find the yo-yoing back and forth to be worse for my overall budget.” It helps to dig into the “why” of a purchase. After all, most of us have pretty much everything we already need. New lipstick? Yan says she’s got plenty. “I don’t need a new one,” Yan said. “Same with clothes. No one needs another little black dress.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, anastasio, regimen, worse, financial, common, finance, dieting, personal, actually, work, money, leave, spending, yan, mcelhaney, backfire


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What a payroll tax cut would actually mean for your wallet

RyanJLane | Getty ImagesPresident Donald Trump has considered new payroll tax cuts to let American workers take home bigger pay checks. The president told reporters on Tuesday that he is “thinking about” cutting payroll taxes. How payroll taxes workPayroll taxes are withheld from workers’ wages and are used to fund government programs, notably Social Security and Medicare. Jeffrey Levine CEO, BluePrint Wealth AllianceFor Social Security, employee wages are currently subject to a 6.2% tax up to $


RyanJLane | Getty ImagesPresident Donald Trump has considered new payroll tax cuts to let American workers take home bigger pay checks. The president told reporters on Tuesday that he is “thinking about” cutting payroll taxes. How payroll taxes workPayroll taxes are withheld from workers’ wages and are used to fund government programs, notably Social Security and Medicare. Jeffrey Levine CEO, BluePrint Wealth AllianceFor Social Security, employee wages are currently subject to a 6.2% tax up to $
What a payroll tax cut would actually mean for your wallet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-21  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, payroll, taxes, security, social, pay, trump, wallet, mean, wages, workers, medicare, cut, actually


What a payroll tax cut would actually mean for your wallet

RyanJLane | Getty Images

President Donald Trump has considered new payroll tax cuts to let American workers take home bigger pay checks. But such a move could have negative consequences for both individuals and the economy, a number of experts warn. The president told reporters on Tuesday that he is “thinking about” cutting payroll taxes. The move, however, would have nothing to do with talk of a looming downturn, he said. “Payroll tax is something we think about, and a lot of people would like to see that, and that very much affects the workers of our country,” Trump said. On Wednesday, however, the president said the economy is still too strong to warrant such a move.

How payroll taxes work

Payroll taxes are withheld from workers’ wages and are used to fund government programs, notably Social Security and Medicare.

You don’t use your best play in the second quarter. You wait until you really need it at the end of the game. Jeffrey Levine CEO, BluePrint Wealth Alliance

For Social Security, employee wages are currently subject to a 6.2% tax up to $132,900. Workers also pay a Medicare tax of 1.45%. Employers match what workers contribute by also kicking in 6.2% toward Social Security and 1.45% for Medicare. Workers who earn more than $200,000 individually, or $250,000 if they are married and filing jointly, pay an additional 0.9% Medicare tax. Self-employed individuals pay 12.4% toward Social Security and 2.9% for Medicare. They also are subject to the Medicare surtax for wages over $200,000.

What a tax cut would mean


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-21  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, payroll, taxes, security, social, pay, trump, wallet, mean, wages, workers, medicare, cut, actually


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