A digital version of Deepak Chopra is coming to your phone and will offer you advice whenever you need it

Digital Deepak Chopra is an AI bot that will give you advice. A digital version of Dr. Deepak Chopra will soon be able to give you advice whenever you need it through an app on your phone. “My hope is to reach a critical mass —at least 1 billion people,” Dr. Chopra said. “The AI will live longer than me and be able to speak to my grandkids’, grandkids’, grandkids.” [Digital Deepak] is a digital representation of an actual human being in your pocket.”


Digital Deepak Chopra is an AI bot that will give you advice.
A digital version of Dr. Deepak Chopra will soon be able to give you advice whenever you need it through an app on your phone.
“My hope is to reach a critical mass —at least 1 billion people,” Dr. Chopra said.
“The AI will live longer than me and be able to speak to my grandkids’, grandkids’, grandkids.”
[Digital Deepak] is a digital representation of an actual human being in your pocket.”
A digital version of Deepak Chopra is coming to your phone and will offer you advice whenever you need it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: brandon gomez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, version, chopra, phone, app, foundation, digital, deepak, advice, able, coming, writer, offer, need, grandkids


A digital version of Deepak Chopra is coming to your phone and will offer you advice whenever you need it

Digital Deepak Chopra is an AI bot that will give you advice.

A digital version of Dr. Deepak Chopra will soon be able to give you advice whenever you need it through an app on your phone.

Chopra, the famous writer and teacher, has partnered with San Francisco-based software company The AI Foundation to create an advanced, personalized artificial intelligence adviser called “Digital Deepak” that will launch on phones in early 2020.

“My hope is to reach a critical mass —at least 1 billion people,” Dr. Chopra said. “The AI will live longer than me and be able to speak to my grandkids’, grandkids’, grandkids.”

A preview of the Digital Deepak app was presented last month in a first-ever public demonstration on stage at Dr. Chopra’s annual Sages & Scientists Symposium, and CNBC had a chance to try it out.

“At the AI Foundation, we are driven by the idea that AI has incredible potential to benefit humanity,” said Dr. Lars Buttler, CEO of The AI Foundation. “Digital Deepak exemplifies our mission to promote positive global uses of AI. [Digital Deepak] is a digital representation of an actual human being in your pocket.”

Here’s what it’s like.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: brandon gomez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, version, chopra, phone, app, foundation, digital, deepak, advice, able, coming, writer, offer, need, grandkids


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Advice that will save you headaches this year and prevent financial strain

Consumers are expected to spend around 5% more this year, with the average gift-giver shelling out $740, according to some surveys. But being able to afford those gifts for all of your loved ones can be difficult. Samantha Barry, editor in chief of Glamour, has some advice that will save you holiday shopping headaches this year and prevent financial strain down the road. The first step is to figure out how much you can actually spend, Barry says. While carrying cash is a great way to prevent ove


Consumers are expected to spend around 5% more this year, with the average gift-giver shelling out $740, according to some surveys.
But being able to afford those gifts for all of your loved ones can be difficult.
Samantha Barry, editor in chief of Glamour, has some advice that will save you holiday shopping headaches this year and prevent financial strain down the road.
The first step is to figure out how much you can actually spend, Barry says.
While carrying cash is a great way to prevent ove
Advice that will save you headaches this year and prevent financial strain Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-30  Authors: sharon epperson aj horch, sharon epperson, aj horch, dr brad klontz, financial psychologist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, barry, strain, headaches, spend, shopping, online, advice, financial, way, loved, budget, need, save, prevent, gifts


Advice that will save you headaches this year and prevent financial strain

Holiday shopping is in full swing.

Consumers are expected to spend around 5% more this year, with the average gift-giver shelling out $740, according to some surveys.

But being able to afford those gifts for all of your loved ones can be difficult. Especially if you have a tendency to spend on yourself while also shopping for others.

Samantha Barry, editor in chief of Glamour, has some advice that will save you holiday shopping headaches this year and prevent financial strain down the road.

The first step is to figure out how much you can actually spend, Barry says. The holidays can be pricey — between travel, parties and gift-giving, expenses can add up fast. It’s important you determine your gift budget early.

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Sticking to a budget will also prevent you from making impulse purchases. Sure, it may seem like a nice gesture to splurge on a gift for a loved one, yet you need to ask yourself how much it will set you back. Will you be able to afford gifts for others and, perhaps more important, will it drive you into debt?

One way to stick to your budget is to use only cash when you are out at retail stores. Research show that credit cards encourage people to spend more. Temper your need to spend by carrying just enough cash.

While carrying cash is a great way to prevent overspending at brick-and-mortar locations, it’s simply not possible if you plan on buying gifts online. This year, for the first time ever, more shoppers will shop online that at actual stores.

Since you cannot make a purchase online with bills and coins, Barry suggests creating so-called “digital barriers.” Digital barriers are designed to create friction between the shopper and the online cart.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-30  Authors: sharon epperson aj horch, sharon epperson, aj horch, dr brad klontz, financial psychologist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, barry, strain, headaches, spend, shopping, online, advice, financial, way, loved, budget, need, save, prevent, gifts


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5 self-made millionaires reveal their top—and most unconventional—money advice

Then, you can build a real business that’s tangible and profitable, with no debt and all the ownership. “No matter how much money you have, always remember that you’re much more fortunate than many others. ‘Plan how you’re going to spend your fortune.’ “Someone once told me, ‘If you don’t know how you’re going to spend your money, then you’re never going to make that money.’ —Josh Harris, founder of Agency Growth Secrets; teaches entrepreneurs how to start, grow, and scale marketing agencies tha


Then, you can build a real business that’s tangible and profitable, with no debt and all the ownership.
“No matter how much money you have, always remember that you’re much more fortunate than many others.
‘Plan how you’re going to spend your fortune.’
“Someone once told me, ‘If you don’t know how you’re going to spend your money, then you’re never going to make that money.’
—Josh Harris, founder of Agency Growth Secrets; teaches entrepreneurs how to start, grow, and scale marketing agencies tha
5 self-made millionaires reveal their top—and most unconventional—money advice Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-29  Authors: the oracles
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reveal, money, millionaires, advice, going, dont, businesses, thats, equity, entrepreneurs, selfmade, youre, business, unconventionalmoney, youll, topand


5 self-made millionaires reveal their top—and most unconventional—money advice

1. ‘Bootstrap your business so you own it all.’

“Today’s venture capital culture of celebrating failure is fundamentally unsustainable. Every day I meet entrepreneurs who are simultaneously really good at raising capital — and losing capital. The startup community used to be a place where entrepreneurs built products to change the world. Now, it’s where they raise millions to fund unprofitable ideas. There are so many other ways to make money. You can buy items at garage sales and sell them, sell your old junk, move into a smaller apartment, get an extra job, or just skip Coachella and stop spending money on stuff you don’t need. If you’re patient and practical, you’ll find the money. Then, you can build a real business that’s tangible and profitable, with no debt and all the ownership. That’s how I did it, so I know you can, too.” —Gary Vaynerchuk, founder and CEO of VaynerX; five-time New York Times best-selling author of “Crushing It!”

2. ‘Treat your money like you could lose it all tomorrow.’

“No matter how much money you have, always remember that you’re much more fortunate than many others. Treat your money like it could go away tomorrow and don’t overspend. This applies to both your personal and business finances. There was a time in 2008 when the world seemed to be falling apart. Businesses were shutting down and people were in serious financial despair. Because we hadn’t overextended our personal or company budgets, we were able to slow the growth and progress we had been making in life and business without much sacrifice. We weathered the storm until it was time to grow again.” —Kara Goldin, founder and CEO of Hint Inc.; creator of The Kara Network, a digital resource for entrepreneurs; and host of the “Unstoppable” podcast; follow Kara on Twitter and Instagram

3. ‘Work for free (a.k.a. earn sweat equity in companies).’

“In three years, I earned eight figures in company shares without investing any money — and you can, too. Learn a valuable skill (like branding and business scaling) that small companies will trade equity for. To get references, offer free help to a few reputable organizations that have potential. Then, provide your services to other small businesses in exchange for equity and/or a share of the profits. Concentrate on growing businesses with solid experience, potential and references — ideally in industries like e-commerce, online marketing or public relations. Don’t go ‘all in’ on big projects; aim for 15% to 25% equity so you can scale the approach with other businesses. Pay attention to the contract you sign and always overdeliver.” —Matt Schuldt, co-founder of personal branding agency TPA Media Group; owner of five seven-figure companies. Connect with Matt on Instagram and LinkedIn

4. ‘Plan how you’re going to spend your fortune.’

“Someone once told me, ‘If you don’t know how you’re going to spend your money, then you’re never going to make that money.’ I’ve tested this theory myself and with others, and it has held true. If someone says they want to make $20,000 per month, I ask what they’re going to do with it. If they say they’re going to save it, I tell them they’re never going to see that money — and so far, I’ve been right. Without a reason for making $20,000, it’s just a number to you. You won’t make money just to save it. That’s not how our brains are wired. You need something more to make that money real. Write a list of the things you want: the house, car, vacations — you name it. Include the costs and calculate the total. That’s your goal, not an arbitrary number. Clearly define how you’ll allocate that money, including how much goes to taxes and savings, and you’ll dramatically improve your odds of achieving that number.” —Josh Harris, founder of Agency Growth Secrets; teaches entrepreneurs how to start, grow, and scale marketing agencies that help businesses grow

5. ‘Don’t buy a home.’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-29  Authors: the oracles
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reveal, money, millionaires, advice, going, dont, businesses, thats, equity, entrepreneurs, selfmade, youre, business, unconventionalmoney, youll, topand


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Busy Philipps: How I learned about money

The actress Busy Philipps is known for hit shows like NBC’s “Freaks and Geeks,” the WB’s “Dawson’s Creek,” and ABC’s “Cougar Town.” She is also a writer and a social media personality with 2 million followers on Instagram. Busy Philipps Actress and social media personalityWhat I did with my first big paycheck: Save and splurgeWhen I was 17 years old, I got a job for the Mattel toy corporation. I’m worth more. Busy Philipps Actress and social media personalityI ended up not taking it.


The actress Busy Philipps is known for hit shows like NBC’s “Freaks and Geeks,” the WB’s “Dawson’s Creek,” and ABC’s “Cougar Town.”
She is also a writer and a social media personality with 2 million followers on Instagram.
Busy Philipps Actress and social media personalityWhat I did with my first big paycheck: Save and splurgeWhen I was 17 years old, I got a job for the Mattel toy corporation.
I’m worth more.
Busy Philipps Actress and social media personalityI ended up not taking it.
Busy Philipps: How I learned about money Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-26  Authors: farnoosh torabi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, away, worth, social, advice, philipps, busy, money, learned, work, financial, job, media


Busy Philipps: How I learned about money

The actress Busy Philipps is known for hit shows like NBC’s “Freaks and Geeks,” the WB’s “Dawson’s Creek,” and ABC’s “Cougar Town.” She is also a writer and a social media personality with 2 million followers on Instagram. I caught up with Philipps on her media tour with brand partner HotelTonight. During our conversation, she revealed yet another role. It’s one that isn’t as public-facing, but it is just as notable: fierce negotiator. Below, she opens up about her financial upbringing, the financial freedoms that come with having a popular social media platform, and the time she walked away from what would become a successful TV series … with no regrets.

My earliest money memory: Always working

I truly have been a person that has always worked. I always had jobs. That was something that my parents tried to instill in me from a fairly young age. They were always insistent that I take responsibility for the things that I had. I got my first job at a mall when I was 14 at The Body Shop over the holidays making gift sets. And then I worked at California Pizza Kitchen and at a theater company teaching preschoolers. I was also a nanny one summer, all while working at the restaurant. When I turned 16, my parents bought me a used car, but it was my responsibility to pay for the gas and insurance every month, which came to about $100 a month. And for clothing, my mom had a very small budget for back-to-school clothes. I didn’t get an allowance. I had a job, so all the extracurricular stuff I wanted to do — movies, dinners, buy clothes and presents around the holidays — I was on the hook for that myself. That built a really strong work ethic from a very young age.

I didn’t get an allowance. I had a job, so all the extracurricular stuff I wanted to do — movies, dinners, buy clothes and presents around the holidays — I was on the hook for that myself. That built a really strong work ethic from a very young age. Busy Philipps Actress and social media personality

What I did with my first big paycheck: Save and splurge

When I was 17 years old, I got a job for the Mattel toy corporation. Up until then, I’d been burning through minimum wage at restaurants and in retail. In that Mattel job, I got paid a ton of money for two weeks of work being a live Barbie doll at the Toy Fair. It was an incredible job. I remember asking my parents what to do with the money. I did put a lot of it away and then I bought a car stereo system for my Honda Civic. It had a detachable face and it was very exciting to be able to get a cool CD player to put in my car.

My negotiating tip: Be willing to walk away

My industry is unique in so many ways and I’m also a privileged white woman. So it’s all different for me. It’s hard for me to know if my advice is something that can work [for others] or would track. But I had one instance many years ago where the job offer was well below my quote, what I normally would get paid for an episodic television show. My agents at the time said I should take it because they thought the show was going to get picked up and blah blah blah. And I was like, “I’m worth more. I know that I’m worth more. I’ve done all of this work up until this point, and I’m not going to take it. Why would I do that?”

I’m worth more. I know that I’m worth more. I’ve done all of this work up until this point, and I’m not going to take it. Why would I do that? Busy Philipps Actress and social media personality

I ended up not taking it. And [my agents] were not wrong. The show got picked up and was on the air for many years, but I have never regretted it — not for a second. They didn’t value me enough. And [had I taken the job] I think that would have stuck with me. [The producers] said, “This is the most money we have for you.” And it’s like, “Well, then you don’t want me that bad … that’s the bottom line. I’m not worth enough to you.” So, there is something to knowing your worth and being able to take the advice of people around you. But at the end of the day, it’s your call. And only you know what you’re going to be OK with and what you’re not. You have to be willing to walk away. And it’s very easy for me to say you have to be willing to walk away, because I have that privilege. I’ve also been in the position where I can’t walk away and you’re in a tough spot, and that can be a thing that ends up sort of feeling like it holds you back. But yeah, I would say that that’s definitely been really like a game-changer for me.

My advice on reaching pay equality: Insist on transparency

I do think that that having transparency and being open with other people, even women who you may consider yourself in competition with, is actually kind of vital, as we’re striving for pay equality. We have to start to look out for one another. Think about these boys clubs. You think they don’t communicate to give each other advice on how to handle these situations or what to ask for or what to say when you’re told “No”? Of course they do. And that’s part of what we need to continue to work toward.

A big personal financial win: Monetizing social media

The last several years for me has been really transformative in terms of how I have been able to take control of making money and making the decisions on the kinds of things I want to do and partner with brands directly. Monetizing my Instagram was a huge ‘so money’ moment because … I can’t even tell you, I’ve gotten cornered at parties by actors at many different levels asking my advice on how they get to do the thing that I have been able to do. It’s offered, as a performer and an artist, so much financial freedom to not have to take a bad job.

My financial goal for 2020: Build more relationships with brands


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-26  Authors: farnoosh torabi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, away, worth, social, advice, philipps, busy, money, learned, work, financial, job, media


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Stacey Abrams’ advice for dealing with career setbacks and using failure to inspire new goals

That pain, Abrams says, is something she wants everyone to recognize whenever they experience a career setback or failure. “I still feel pain,” the 45-year-old politician told a crowd at The Riveter Summit earlier this month regarding her loss. When Abrams was 18, the pain from a failed relationship helped her learn to process the meaning behind her emotions. Now, years after starting that spreadsheet, Abrams is channeling the pain from her 2018 election loss into another goal: combating voter s


That pain, Abrams says, is something she wants everyone to recognize whenever they experience a career setback or failure.
“I still feel pain,” the 45-year-old politician told a crowd at The Riveter Summit earlier this month regarding her loss.
When Abrams was 18, the pain from a failed relationship helped her learn to process the meaning behind her emotions.
Now, years after starting that spreadsheet, Abrams is channeling the pain from her 2018 election loss into another goal: combating voter s
Stacey Abrams’ advice for dealing with career setbacks and using failure to inspire new goals Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-26  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spreadsheet, goals, think, failure, dealing, pain, abrams, try, setbacks, career, shes, using, stacey, told, need, real, inspire, teacher, advice


Stacey Abrams' advice for dealing with career setbacks and using failure to inspire new goals

“It’s not about pushing past [the pain],” she tells CNBC Make It. “It’s actually about embracing it, acknowledging it …. When you let yourself feel all of the emotions, you can then contextualize them, and you can use them to galvanize you.”

That pain, Abrams says, is something she wants everyone to recognize whenever they experience a career setback or failure.

“I still feel pain,” the 45-year-old politician told a crowd at The Riveter Summit earlier this month regarding her loss. “The pain is real, and I hold it close.”

After running a highly publicized campaign that included the support of celebrities such as Oprah Winfrey and Will Ferrell , Abrams lost her race by a narrow margin to Republican Brian Kemp.

In her book, “Lead from the Outside: How to Build Your Future and Make Real Change,” Abrams touches on some of the setbacks she experienced as a young person and says she’s always made herself think about the meaning behind her emotions.

“I’ve made myself really think through: Why did it hurt? But, more importantly, what can I do with that hurt?” she writes. “Does it galvanize me, or does it serve as a warning that this isn’t for you? And sometimes that’s the answer. Sometimes pain is a teacher that says, ‘Don’t do that again.’ And sometimes it’s a teacher that says, ‘This is for you. You just need to try it a different way and try harder.'”

When Abrams was 18, the pain from a failed relationship helped her learn to process the meaning behind her emotions. It also led her to map out her life goals in an Excel spreadsheet so she would never lose sight of her ambitions.

“I wrote the spreadsheet because I was like, ‘I’ll show him,'” she recalls of the experience. “But, No. 1, I didn’t need to show him anything. I needed to show me. And while he may have been the catalyst, what I know for myself is that when I was 18, when I was 28 and when I was 38, I was fully capable of being who I am and laying my own course.”

Now, years after starting that spreadsheet, Abrams is channeling the pain from her 2018 election loss into another goal: combating voter suppression through her organization, Fair Fight. She’s using her platform to encourage more 2020 presidential candidates to discuss this issue as a major point of concern during upcoming debates.

“I hope to hear, one, an acknowledgment from the moderators that this is a national scourge and deserves the same degree of attention as any other topic,” she told Politico earlier this month. “Because all of the progress we speak of as Democrats rests on the ability of voters to be heard and to participate in our process.”

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Don’t miss: Stacey Abrams has used an Excel spreadsheet to track life her goals since she was 18—why it’s been crucial to her success


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-26  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spreadsheet, goals, think, failure, dealing, pain, abrams, try, setbacks, career, shes, using, stacey, told, need, real, inspire, teacher, advice


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Dolly Parton’s advice to young people: ‘You’ve got your own journey’

To many fans, Dolly Parton is more than just an iconic musician and a living legend, she’s a role model for success. “I’m like that mother figure,” Parton told ABC News’ Robin Roberts in a recent interview. Specifically, Parton was told that she wouldn’t be taken seriously due to the way she dressed and presented herself, she told People. I will know it because I’m that in tune with myself and that in tune with God,'” Parton recalled to People. “It may not always turn out right from me, but I’m


To many fans, Dolly Parton is more than just an iconic musician and a living legend, she’s a role model for success.
“I’m like that mother figure,” Parton told ABC News’ Robin Roberts in a recent interview.
Specifically, Parton was told that she wouldn’t be taken seriously due to the way she dressed and presented herself, she told People.
I will know it because I’m that in tune with myself and that in tune with God,'” Parton recalled to People.
“It may not always turn out right from me, but I’m
Dolly Parton’s advice to young people: ‘You’ve got your own journey’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-25  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, partons, told, parton, young, youve, tune, dolly, know, musician, journey, right, making, wrong, doing, advice


Dolly Parton's advice to young people: 'You've got your own journey'

To many fans, Dolly Parton is more than just an iconic musician and a living legend, she’s a role model for success.

“I’m like that mother figure,” Parton told ABC News’ Robin Roberts in a recent interview. “I’m the one that’s older now to kind of look down on the kids and say, ‘OK, come on, you can do it and you’re doing great. I’m proud of you.'”

The 73-year-old singer has been making music since 1962, and has sold more than 100 million records worldwide and written thousands of songs. In 2017, Forbes reported Parton’s net worth as $37 million.

But when Parton was starting out as a musician, she faced a lot of criticism from people who claimed she was making the “wrong” choices. Specifically, Parton was told that she wouldn’t be taken seriously due to the way she dressed and presented herself, she told People.

“I thought, ‘How can I do things wrong when it’s about me? I will know it if it’s wrong. I will know it because I’m that in tune with myself and that in tune with God,'” Parton recalled to People. “It may not always turn out right from me, but I’m still safer in doing what feels right in my gut and in my heart.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-25  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, partons, told, parton, young, youve, tune, dolly, know, musician, journey, right, making, wrong, doing, advice


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The money advice Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte would tell his younger self

If Ryan Lochte could go back and offer his younger self a piece of advice, he’d start with “a big slap across the head,” the 35-year-old tells CNBC Make It. It started with a scandal during the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro that resulted in a 10-month suspension and the loss of his major sponsors. Two years later, Lochte was suspended again by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency for receiving an intravenous vitamin B-12 infusion. You’re going to have a family and that costs money.” If you’re ra


If Ryan Lochte could go back and offer his younger self a piece of advice, he’d start with “a big slap across the head,” the 35-year-old tells CNBC Make It.
It started with a scandal during the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro that resulted in a 10-month suspension and the loss of his major sponsors.
Two years later, Lochte was suspended again by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency for receiving an intravenous vitamin B-12 infusion.
You’re going to have a family and that costs money.”
If you’re ra
The money advice Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte would tell his younger self Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-19  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tells, younger, raising, advice, olympic, swimmer, tell, ryan, costs, self, life, lochte, youre, going, money, start


The money advice Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte would tell his younger self

If Ryan Lochte could go back and offer his younger self a piece of advice, he’d start with “a big slap across the head,” the 35-year-old tells CNBC Make It.

The American swimmer, who was making “well over $1 million” in the prime of his career, lost nearly all of his earnings, he tells Alex Rodrgiuez on a 2019 episode of CNBC’s “Back in the Game,” in which Rodriguez helps athletes bounce back after damaging their reputations and finances.

It started with a scandal during the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro that resulted in a 10-month suspension and the loss of his major sponsors. Two years later, Lochte was suspended again by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency for receiving an intravenous vitamin B-12 infusion.

Looking back, he says he would do a lot of things differently, but in terms of managing his money, he would advise a younger version of himself to anticipate future costs, like raising kids: “You’re not going to be alone your whole life. You’re going to have a family and that costs money.”

As the father of two now knows by experience, parenthood comes with an array of expenses: Households earning $200,000 can spend $52,000 just in the first 12 months of a newborn’s life, and raising a child to 18 costs around $234,000, not including college.

If you’re raising a family in an expensive city like San Francisco or New York, even a $350,000 salary may not be enough.

As Lochte has learned, “You want to put your kids into a great school, you want to have a great house for them growing up — and all of that is going to add up, so you need to start saving your money now.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-19  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tells, younger, raising, advice, olympic, swimmer, tell, ryan, costs, self, life, lochte, youre, going, money, start


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Akon’s advice to young musicians: ‘Stop looking for a record deal’

Senegalese-American singer Akon says young music artists should avoid looking for lucrative record deals and instead focus on building their careers independently. “In the next 3 to 5 years, the major labels won’t exist anymore,” the multi-platinum selling R&B artist told CNBC in an interview. “So just stop looking for a record deal.” “You’re wasting your time, you’re losing money doing it obviously, and you’re gonna lose control,” he added. He started two successful record labels, and more rece


Senegalese-American singer Akon says young music artists should avoid looking for lucrative record deals and instead focus on building their careers independently.
“In the next 3 to 5 years, the major labels won’t exist anymore,” the multi-platinum selling R&B artist told CNBC in an interview.
“So just stop looking for a record deal.”
“You’re wasting your time, you’re losing money doing it obviously, and you’re gonna lose control,” he added.
He started two successful record labels, and more rece
Akon’s advice to young musicians: ‘Stop looking for a record deal’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-18  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, labels, wont, careers, stop, youtube, looking, advice, musicians, record, youre, young, music, artist, deal, akons


Akon's advice to young musicians: 'Stop looking for a record deal'

Senegalese-American singer Akon says young music artists should avoid looking for lucrative record deals and instead focus on building their careers independently.

“In the next 3 to 5 years, the major labels won’t exist anymore,” the multi-platinum selling R&B artist told CNBC in an interview. “So just stop looking for a record deal.”

“You’re wasting your time, you’re losing money doing it obviously, and you’re gonna lose control,” he added.

Akon, whose real name is Aliaune Thiam, enjoyed much popularity in the mid-2000s with hits like “Smack That” and “I Wanna Love You.” He started two successful record labels, and more recently launched a third in partnership with Motown veteran Kedar Massenburg.

Artists have increasingly gone down the route of launching their careers through unorthodox methods like releasing a mixtape online to gain traction for their music. Chance the Rapper is one artist in America that managed to do exactly that, while Stormzy in the U.K. went viral with a track posted onto YouTube.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-18  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, labels, wont, careers, stop, youtube, looking, advice, musicians, record, youre, young, music, artist, deal, akons


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Private equity investors are zeroing in on financial advice business

The registered investment advisor industry may be the perfect playground for private equity investors. “The industry has a lot of the traditional ingredients that private equity investors like,” said Brad Armstrong, a partner at Lovell Minnick Partners in Philadelphia. Lovell Minnick Partners is one of the more active private equity investors in the wealth management industry. A lot more private equity investors are showing conviction in the value of independent RIAs. For the most part, private


The registered investment advisor industry may be the perfect playground for private equity investors.
“The industry has a lot of the traditional ingredients that private equity investors like,” said Brad Armstrong, a partner at Lovell Minnick Partners in Philadelphia.
Lovell Minnick Partners is one of the more active private equity investors in the wealth management industry.
A lot more private equity investors are showing conviction in the value of independent RIAs.
For the most part, private
Private equity investors are zeroing in on financial advice business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: andrew osterland
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, private, lot, firms, advice, investors, equity, partners, zeroing, business, capital, financial, good, industry


Private equity investors are zeroing in on financial advice business

The registered investment advisor industry may be the perfect playground for private equity investors. It has good growth, high profit margins, consistent cash flow and low capital needs. With roughly 13,000 firms in the industry, it is also highly fragmented, ripe for roll-up, and begging for consolidation.

“The industry has a lot of the traditional ingredients that private equity investors like,” said Brad Armstrong, a partner at Lovell Minnick Partners in Philadelphia. Lovell Minnick Partners is one of the more active private equity investors in the wealth management industry.

The firm sold its stake in Mercer Advisors in September and last week announced its latest investment in Pathstone, an RIA focused on ultra-high-net-worth clients, managing $16 billion in assets. “We felt under-invested in an industry we have a lot of conviction in,” said Armstrong.

A lot more private equity investors are showing conviction in the value of independent RIAs. The pace of consolidation in the industry has picked up dramatically in the last several years. Mergers-and-acquisitions activity is poised to set its sixth consecutive record this year and valuations on acquired firms continue to climb.

“This space has blossomed,” said Liz Nesvold, head of asset and wealth management investment banking at Raymond James Silver Lane in New York. “Cash flows are up, the markets are good, debt is cheap and the trend to [advisor] independence remains strong.

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“All these things moving in the right direction have created a frenzy in the industry.”

When Nesvold launched Silver Lane in 1991, there were six transactions in the wealth management industry that year. This year she expects roughly 200 — one good reason she sold her firm to Raymond James earlier this year. “RIA firms need capital solutions,” she said. “Some require growth capital, others leadership capital and succession planning solutions.

“Private equity is fostering a lot of those solutions.”

For the most part, private equity investors are interested in the upper end of the market. They want to write big checks, taking majority stakes in large firms with the goal of spurring further growth with needed capital.

The recent Pathstone transaction was a good example. So was the blockbuster deal done by Hellman & Friedman last year. The private equity firm payed more than $3 billion in cash to buy 401(k) plan robo-advisor Financial Engines, then merged it with Edelman Financial to form the biggest RIA in the country.

Private equity, however, has also fueled deals in the mid-size and smaller end of the market through its investments in acquisitive RIAs and consolidator firms such as United Capital — formerly backed by Sageview Capital, Bessemer Venture Partners and Grail Partners, and acquired by Goldman Sachs for $750 million in May — and Focus Financial, in which KKR and Stone Point Capital took a stake in 2017 then brought to the public markets last year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: andrew osterland
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, private, lot, firms, advice, investors, equity, partners, zeroing, business, capital, financial, good, industry


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Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella says this piece of advice impacted him profoundly

Microsoft’s 52-year-old chief executive officer, Satya Nadella, has proven himself a formidable leader, pushing the company to an extra $500 billion in market capitalization since he taking the helm five years ago. “(Burgum) said, look, you’re going to work … at Microsoft more time than you are going to even spend with your kids,” Nadella recalled at a Stanford University Graduate School of Business speech in October. “I take great pride in these people whom I’ve mentored or go on to do great th


Microsoft’s 52-year-old chief executive officer, Satya Nadella, has proven himself a formidable leader, pushing the company to an extra $500 billion in market capitalization since he taking the helm five years ago.
“(Burgum) said, look, you’re going to work … at Microsoft more time than you are going to even spend with your kids,” Nadella recalled at a Stanford University Graduate School of Business speech in October.
“I take great pride in these people whom I’ve mentored or go on to do great th
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella says this piece of advice impacted him profoundly Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meaning, microsoft, advice, going, nadella, ceo, work, great, think, thats, satya, profoundly, impact, impacted, piece


Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella says this piece of advice impacted him profoundly

Microsoft’s 52-year-old chief executive officer, Satya Nadella, has proven himself a formidable leader, pushing the company to an extra $500 billion in market capitalization since he taking the helm five years ago.

But it was during his 30s that he received some advice from Doug Burgum, the current governor of North Dakota, which he says helped shape him into the businessman he is today.

“(Burgum) said, look, you’re going to work … at Microsoft more time than you are going to even spend with your kids,” Nadella recalled at a Stanford University Graduate School of Business speech in October.

“I said wow, that sounds pretty harsh,” Nadella added.

Still, there’s some truth to Burgum’s statement. Since work takes up so much of our lives, Nadella said he realized it’s important to think about a deeper meaning to work — one that’s more than transactional.

For the engineer, that comes down to relating to the people he works with, he said.

“I take great pride in these people whom I’ve mentored or go on to do great things,” Nadella said.

“The technologies will all be passed in time, but the people, what you did, how you behave … that’s the relationship that I think you seek out while being true to yourself, and what makes you happy.”

Governor Burgum’s advice to find meaning at work also made Nadella think about his purpose at Microsoft, he said in a May 2018 interview with CNBC.

It forced him to question: “Why am I at Microsoft? What is it that gives me the energy at Microsoft, day in and day after?” Nadella told CNBC’s Jon Fortt.

That motivation came, he said, from being able to connect his passions to work, and see its impact on the world.

“What defines me, I think, is curiosity, love of ideas, and the ability to translate that into impact,” he said.

Don’t miss: Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on the 3 qualities that make a great leader

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meaning, microsoft, advice, going, nadella, ceo, work, great, think, thats, satya, profoundly, impact, impacted, piece


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