Here’s the advice 15-year-old tennis phenom Coco Gauff got from her dad before winning her first WTA title

At just 15 years old, Cori “Coco” Gauff became the youngest woman to win a Women’s Tennis Association title since 2004 (and the youngest American to do so in 28 years) by winning Austria’s Linz Open on Sunday. Gauff, who in July became the youngest player to ever qualify for Wimbledon, beat former French Open champion Jelena Ostapenko in three sets to win her first WTA singles title and take home $43,000 in prize money. “Just relax, you’re not going to sprint to the finish line,” Gauff’s father


At just 15 years old, Cori “Coco” Gauff became the youngest woman to win a Women’s Tennis Association title since 2004 (and the youngest American to do so in 28 years) by winning Austria’s Linz Open on Sunday. Gauff, who in July became the youngest player to ever qualify for Wimbledon, beat former French Open champion Jelena Ostapenko in three sets to win her first WTA singles title and take home $43,000 in prize money. “Just relax, you’re not going to sprint to the finish line,” Gauff’s father
Here’s the advice 15-year-old tennis phenom Coco Gauff got from her dad before winning her first WTA title Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wta, youngest, daughter, title, coco, advice, winning, match, heres, tennis, gauff, win, think, youre, phenom, finish, trust, dad


Here's the advice 15-year-old tennis phenom Coco Gauff got from her dad before winning her first WTA title

At just 15 years old, Cori “Coco” Gauff became the youngest woman to win a Women’s Tennis Association title since 2004 (and the youngest American to do so in 28 years) by winning Austria’s Linz Open on Sunday.

Gauff, who in July became the youngest player to ever qualify for Wimbledon, beat former French Open champion Jelena Ostapenko in three sets to win her first WTA singles title and take home $43,000 in prize money.

The victory on Sunday was hard-fought for Gauff, who received some much-needed advice from her father and coach, Corey Gauff, who helped his daughter regroup after she had lost the second set of the match to the more experienced, 22-year-old Ostapenko.

With his daughter leading 5-2 in the third set of the match, and needing to win just one more game to finish off Ostapenko, Corey Gauff knelt beside Coco to offer her some calming advice as television network Eurosport’s cameras caught the conversation.

“Just relax, you’re not going to sprint to the finish line,” Gauff’s father and coach told her. “We’re going to walk to the finish line, OK?”

The elder Gauff went on to tell his daughter it was important to trust her abilities on the court in order to think positively and not let the pressure of the potentially historic moment throw her off her game.

“What I want you to do is take your mind to another place right now. Remember we talked about that?” Gauff asked the tennis star.

“Take your mind to another place, take yourself to a practice match, just play. Don’t think about negatives, just think about positives,” Gauff told his daughter.

He also added that Coco Gauff was in a strong position to win the match, assuming she could mentally remove herself from the pressure of the situation in order to remain calm and trust her skills to defeat her opponent. “You’re right where we want to be,” he says on the video released by Eurosport.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wta, youngest, daughter, title, coco, advice, winning, match, heres, tennis, gauff, win, think, youre, phenom, finish, trust, dad


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

10 years on: Despite dramatic change, ‘personal touch’ will dominate financial advice space

Matt Bird | Corbis | Getty ImagesWhere is the future of financial advice headed? “I’m very bullish on the long-term success of the financial advice business,” said certified financial planner Evelyn Zohlen, head of Inspired Financial in Huntington Beach, California, and current president of the Financial Planning Association. “We give investment advice and we manage portfolios but we spend much more time on financial planning,” Yeske said. Asked what the biggest challenge facing firms is, financ


Matt Bird | Corbis | Getty ImagesWhere is the future of financial advice headed? “I’m very bullish on the long-term success of the financial advice business,” said certified financial planner Evelyn Zohlen, head of Inspired Financial in Huntington Beach, California, and current president of the Financial Planning Association. “We give investment advice and we manage portfolios but we spend much more time on financial planning,” Yeske said. Asked what the biggest challenge facing firms is, financ
10 years on: Despite dramatic change, ‘personal touch’ will dominate financial advice space Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: andrew osterland
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financial, clients, advice, space, technology, rias, despite, fiduciary, touch, change, investment, personal, yeske, firms, dramatic, advisors, dominate


10 years on: Despite dramatic change, 'personal touch' will dominate financial advice space

Matt Bird | Corbis | Getty Images

Where is the future of financial advice headed? The answers always seem fraught with risk and uncertainty. While the bull market in stocks has gone a long way to helping the advice industry recover from the reputational fallout of the financial crisis, technology, demographics and regulatory confusion continue to challenge all corners of the industry. What happens when advisors’ baby boomer clients pass their wealth on to kids who want nothing to do with Mom and Dad’s financial advisor? Why pay an advisor a fee when you can build a customized investment portfolio online for a fraction of the cost? How will the industry cope when thousands of boomer advisors retire over the next decade?

I think the prospects for independent RIAs are excellent. We’re on the right side of the argument. David Yeske co-founder of Yeske Buie

For all the worries that seem to plague the advisory business, one thing suggests it will continue to thrive: The demand for financial advice is, and will remain, strong. “I’m very bullish on the long-term success of the financial advice business,” said certified financial planner Evelyn Zohlen, head of Inspired Financial in Huntington Beach, California, and current president of the Financial Planning Association. “The demand for advice will continue to grow and the industry offers a great career path for young people.” The outlook is particularly good for independent registered investment advisors offering comprehensive financial planning, adds CFP David Yeske, co-founder of advisory firm Yeske Buie. More from Financial Advisor 100:

CNBC FA 100 2019: Top-rated financial advisory firms

Top ranked firms help clients meet financial goals

What inspired these top advisors to help others manage money “I think the prospects for independent RIAs are excellent,” said Yeske, who founded his San Francisco-based company in 1990. “We’re on the right side of the argument.” Where will the industry be 10 years from now? It’s a safe bet that the answer is, “In a very different place from today.” We looked at three factors driving change in the financial advice industry and among the fee-based RIAs that still represent the fasting-growing segment of the wealth management industry.

Technology and maturing millennials

It’s tempting to see technology as a great disruptor, and it is. If you can build a perfectly good portfolio cheaply online based on your financial goals and tolerance for risk, why pay a 1%-plus fee to an advisor to do it? The robo-advisors are still growing rapidly, particularly as big firms such as Vanguard and Schwab got into the business. The total assets under robo management grew 15% last year to $257 billion, according to research firm Aite Group, and could top $1 trillion by 2023. “The big variable is how aggressively the big firms push their digital platforms,” said Alois Pirker, senior analyst at Aite. “The offerings are getting more sophisticated and it’s a viable segment in the RIA space.”

It’s also a small drop in the $83.7 trillion bucket of assets managed by nearly 13,000 RIAs across the country, according to the Investment Advisor Association. What robo-advisors don’t do is talk to people about how to achieve their goals and how to adjust their plans when life changes occur. “We give investment advice and we manage portfolios but we spend much more time on financial planning,” Yeske said. “A small minority of the population will be happy with automated advice via a web browser, but we help people deal with stress and help them modify their behavior. “We engage with them as human beings.” Where technology is having a bigger effect is in the operations of firms and the way advisors interact with clients. Asked what the biggest challenge facing firms is, financial planner Michelle Perry Higgins, principal at California Financial Advisors in San Ramon, California — ranked No. 7 on the CNBC FA 100 list of top-rated wealth management firms — cited “technology, technology, technology — staying on the cutting edge with technology while not losing the personal touch with our clients.”

NicoElNino | iStock | Getty Images

The power of software to help manage customer relationships and investment portfolios, handle back-office functions and even draft financial plans enables advisors to serve more clients and spend more time with them. Firms that don’t invest in technology will have trouble keeping up. “Technology can help amplify the human component that is so crucial to successful relationships,” Zohlen said. “Advisors have to embrace digital solutions and meet clients where they are in life.”

The rapid advancement of technology is both a blessing and a curse to the financial advisory space. Cory Robinson vice president, Tom Johnson Investment Management

For millennials, whose income and wealth is increasing most rapidly, that means online. “They will sometimes let me buy them a cup of coffee, but all my millennial clients want to interact via video conference,” Zohlen said. “Advisors need the systems to deliver services and interact with clients in new ways.” But technology also comes with risk, cautions financial advisor Cory Robinson, vice president and portfolio manager at CNBC FA 100-ranked firm Tom Johnson Investment Management in Oklahoma City. “The rapid advancement of technology is both a blessing and a curse to the financial advisory space,” he said. “It can be used to make advisory practices more efficient; it can automate communicating with clients; it can make it easier for firms to effectively service smaller clients.” “It also empowers cybercriminals to be able to execute more effective scams and attacks,” he added. “Cybersecurity of client data is going to be a huge challenge going forward.”

Pattanaphong Khuankaew / EyeEm | EyeEm | Getty Images

Fiduciary rules

The endless debate on how to regulate investment brokers and financial advisors still appears years away from resolution. The Securities and Exchange Commission passed a rule, known as Regulation Best Interest, that establishes a new standard of conduct for brokers. Instead of offering advice and products that are “suitable” to investors, brokers are now required to make recommendations that are in their clients’ “best interests” and must disclose potential conflicts of interest such as product commissions and bonuses. While the new rule may be an improvement over the suitability standard, it is still not the full fiduciary obligation that applies to RIAs, who can be sued for breaching their duty. That leaves RIAs as the only advisors operating under the fiduciary standard of the 1940 Investment Advisors Act. However, Reg BI still leaves investors potentially vulnerable to conflicted advice depending on the interpretation of “best interests.”

The fiduciary train has left the station. Whether the wirehouses and broker-dealers like it or not, it’s coming. Evelyn Zohlen head of Inspired Financial

“Reg BI doesn’t rise to the level of a true fiduciary standard,” Yeske said. “If someone looks like a fiduciary but isn’t one, it’s a problem.” Zohlen also thinks the new rule fails to provide any more clarity for investors about the differences between brokers and RIAs. “The rule muddies the water further,” she said. “It makes it easier for advisors to claim they’re doing something that they’re not.” Lawsuits have been filed to stop the rule. Regardless of how the regulatory environment plays out, RIAs are confident that they are on the right side of the argument. “The fiduciary train has left the station,” Zohlen said. “Whether the wirehouses and broker-dealers like it or not, it’s coming. “Ten years from now, anyone calling themselves a financial planner will be under a fiduciary duty.”

RIA consolidation: The big get bigger

Size does matter in the RIA business — all the more so in the rapidly changing technology environment. There are thousands of small RIA shops, many of them sole practitioners, that lack the resources to stay competitive and have no successor to carry on their business. Many hope to sell their practices to other advisors, yet many likely won’t. “The small shops are in a tough position,” Pirker said. “Most of the advisors are in the late stages of their careers and if they don’t invest in their firms, it will be hard to sell. “Most of those practices will probably fade away.”

fizkes | iStock | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: andrew osterland
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financial, clients, advice, space, technology, rias, despite, fiduciary, touch, change, investment, personal, yeske, firms, dramatic, advisors, dominate


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

‘Million Dollar Listing’ star Ryan Serhant: The best piece of investing advice I ever got

Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both p


Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both p
‘Million Dollar Listing’ star Ryan Serhant: The best piece of investing advice I ever got Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, star, investing, advice, listing, serhant, piece, dollar, invest, youre, million, best, real, things, ryan, really, estate, actually, going


'Million Dollar Listing' star Ryan Serhant: The best piece of investing advice I ever got

Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. But when it comes to his own money, he’s fairly conservative. He saves a lot, and he knows the value of a dollar. When it comes to investing, he sticks to a pretty simple strategy: Invest in what you know. Serhant recently sat down with the Grow team to discuss the most valuable investing advice he’s received, how he learned about money at a young age, and more. Here is his story, as told to senior reporter Sam Becker.

Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’

The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. Things you use. Things you could see yourself using; things you actually like. Don’t invest in stuff that doesn’t interest you, because then you’re not going to follow up on it. You’re not going to be as active an investor. So, I invest in things or products that I enjoy, use, or think are really interesting. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both physical products as well as software — [and] investing in real estate.

When it comes to real estate, I used to really think that to be a wise investor, you have to invest what you actually have to spend, so don’t spend more than you can afford. But I’ve found that to be incorrect. The best investments I’ve made are the ones that actually push me outside of my comfort level. Because you need to work more. You need to do more to actually get a return on this investment. And that’s worked really, really well for me.

‘The best investment I ever made’

The best investment I ever made: I invest in my business all the time. I invested in our YouTube vlog, and I think it’s funny because before I started the vlog on YouTube, everyone thought it was stupid and crazy. Including me. Actually, mostly me. I thought it was dumb. Just another form of social media. I was just sick and tired of it and I had no idea what it was going to do to our business. But it is a massive way of driving business and driving brand awareness. So, by investing the money that I did into the vlog, more people buy my book, more people buy the course, more people reach out to me to buy and sell homes.

Don’t invest in stuff that doesn’t interest you, because then you’re not going to follow up on it. You’re not going to be as active an investor. Ryan Serhant Real estate broker, author, and TV star

How being ‘broke’ led to his real estate career


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, star, investing, advice, listing, serhant, piece, dollar, invest, youre, million, best, real, things, ryan, really, estate, actually, going


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Kourtney Kardashian recalls the best money advice she’s ever received

Attorney Robert Kardashian (C) and daughter Kourtney Kardashian (R) attending Nineth Annual ‘A Time For Heroes’ E. Glaser Pediatric AIDS Association Benefit on June 7, 1998 at Ken Roberts home in Brentwood, California. Ron Galella, Ltd. | Ron Galella Collection | Getty ImagesKourtney Kardashian has received a lot of financial advice throughout the years. Kourtney Kardashian entrepreneurYet she’s not the wealthiest of the Kardashian empire, which is led by her mother, Kris Jenner, and includes he


Attorney Robert Kardashian (C) and daughter Kourtney Kardashian (R) attending Nineth Annual ‘A Time For Heroes’ E. Glaser Pediatric AIDS Association Benefit on June 7, 1998 at Ken Roberts home in Brentwood, California. Ron Galella, Ltd. | Ron Galella Collection | Getty ImagesKourtney Kardashian has received a lot of financial advice throughout the years. Kourtney Kardashian entrepreneurYet she’s not the wealthiest of the Kardashian empire, which is led by her mother, Kris Jenner, and includes he
Kourtney Kardashian recalls the best money advice she’s ever received Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: nia warfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kourtney, business, kardashian, kim, shes, money, mother, received, recalls, best, told, advice, jenner, getty


Kourtney Kardashian recalls the best money advice she's ever received

Attorney Robert Kardashian (C) and daughter Kourtney Kardashian (R) attending Nineth Annual ‘A Time For Heroes’ E. Glaser Pediatric AIDS Association Benefit on June 7, 1998 at Ken Roberts home in Brentwood, California. Ron Galella, Ltd. | Ron Galella Collection | Getty Images

Kourtney Kardashian has received a lot of financial advice throughout the years. But the one she keeps close to her heart is from her late father, lawyer Robert Kardashian. It came long before her family was launched into stratospheric fame. “The biggest thing that my dad always told us was just that money doesn’t buy happiness. He would drill that into our heads,” the entrepreneur and reality TV star told CNBC recently at the Create & Cultivate conference in San Francisco. The event aims to encourage female entrepreneurship by discussing topics such as how to raise money for your business and the importance of financial literacy. These days the eldest of the Kardashian clan and mother of three has an estimated net worth of around $35 million, according to a report from Money.com, and boasts close to 82 million followers on Instagram.

It’s much easier to have someone negotiate on your behalf, but meeting people [in person] and negotiating yourself will always be the best. Kourtney Kardashian entrepreneur

Yet she’s not the wealthiest of the Kardashian empire, which is led by her mother, Kris Jenner, and includes her siblings Kim Kardashian West, Khloe Kardashian, Rob Kardashian, Kendall Jenner and Kylie Jenner. It’s Kylie Jenner who comes in at the top — in March Forbes named her the world’s youngest self-made billionaire. While each have their own personal projects, much of the family’s fame stems from their hit E! reality TV series “Keeping up with the Kardashians,” which is currently airing its 17th season.

Kevin Mazur | Getty Images Entertainment | Getty Images

Kourtney’s latest business venture is the online health and wellness website Poosh. Before that, she and sisters Kim and Khloe ran their DASH boutique chain – and briefly created a spin-off show for its employees. DASH shuttered its doors last spring after nearly 12 years in business. During that time, Kourtney simultaneously launched a child clothing store, Smooch, with her mother and was in business for six years before closing down in 2009. She said she’s excited to see Poosh still evolve, even in different ways than she expected. “I think with new business ventures, sometimes they can, you know, take a little bit [longer] to return than you expected,” Kardashian said. “If it’s not the right thing, people have a short attention span and you [just] move on to the next,” she said. Although the Kardashian name typically brings to mind a life of luxury and posh Calabasas mansions, Kourtney said she was required to have a job every summer growing up, including a stint as a retail associate at a Guess store on Rodeo Drive. “Kim [Kardashian] was big on spending [her money] on clothes, so I would borrow hers and then I spent mine on traveling,” she said. “I would say that stays true to who we are today.” She also remembers some of the earliest advice she received about handling money. “I had this boyfriend after college, and I swear he was the one who taught me everything about credit,” Kardashian said. “I bought my own car when I was with him.” Her then boyfriend also encouraged her to be more conscious of her spending by giving her small increments of cash and then having her report back where and how she used it.

(L to R) : Kourtney Kardashian, Allison Statter, CEO of Blended Strategy Group Source: Smith House Photo


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: nia warfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kourtney, business, kardashian, kim, shes, money, mother, received, recalls, best, told, advice, jenner, getty


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Ask a Manager: This advice can help if a boss wants you to ‘cry a little’ or make a feelings chart

As companies start to recognize that their employees’ mental health issues may be work-related, many are attempting to help workers deal with them. “[Companies] have taken the message that increased openness about mental health is a good thing — but their execution is terrible,” she says. One of her letter writers says their manager created a feelings chart where different emojis represented different mental states. [Companies] have taken the message that increased openness about mental health i


As companies start to recognize that their employees’ mental health issues may be work-related, many are attempting to help workers deal with them. “[Companies] have taken the message that increased openness about mental health is a good thing — but their execution is terrible,” she says. One of her letter writers says their manager created a feelings chart where different emojis represented different mental states. [Companies] have taken the message that increased openness about mental health i
Ask a Manager: This advice can help if a boss wants you to ‘cry a little’ or make a feelings chart Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: aditi shrikant, ivana pino, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boss, little, ask, chart, manager, feelings, health, poem, help, good, green, letter, advice, mental, wants, work, cry, employees, managers


Ask a Manager: This advice can help if a boss wants you to 'cry a little' or make a feelings chart

Work is a common stressor for 61% of Americans, right behind money at 62%, according to a 2017 report by the American Psychological Association. As companies start to recognize that their employees’ mental health issues may be work-related, many are attempting to help workers deal with them. A healthier workforce could save them money in the long run: After all, one study projected that, between 2016 and 2030, a lack of treatment for anxiety and depression could cost the world 12 billion days worth of work and $925 billion per year. Alison Green, founder of the advice column Ask a Manager, tells Grow that in the last two years she’s seen an uptick in questions about how to deal with workplace activities that are supposed to improve your mental health but in practice can be pretty uncomfortable. “[Companies] have taken the message that increased openness about mental health is a good thing — but their execution is terrible,” she says. One of her letter writers says their manager created a feelings chart where different emojis represented different mental states. Employees had to place a sticker with their name on it on the emoji that best represented their emotions that day. Another letter writer says their manager asked them to write and share with their colleagues a poem that should reveal a personal trauma. “Make yourself cry a little” were the manager’s instructions.

[Companies] have taken the message that increased openness about mental health is a good thing — but their execution is terrible. Alison Green Ask a Manager columnist

These kinds of activities may be awkward but they aren’t illogical. The ability to be authentic at work does improve job satisfaction, performance, and employee engagement, according to a 2013 study. But you can’t mandate that people share personal details with their coworkers, Green says. “It’s important for managers to recognize that they’re managing humans with lives outside of work, but I think some employers have decided vulnerability at work is good for forming connections,” she says. “But it’s requiring it ⁠— that’s the problem. You can’t require people to be vulnerable at work.” The power dynamic between employees and managers makes it unacceptable, says psychologist Lisa Marie Bobby, clinical director of Growing Self Counseling and Coaching in Boulder, Colorado. A boss cannot demand emotional intimacy the same way they cannot demand physical intimacy. “This is like an emotionally traumatizing twin sister of sexual harassment,” she says.

You can’t require people to be vulnerable at work. Alison Green Ask a Manager columnist

In both of the above-mentioned cases, Green offered the same advice: You can push back on such activities. You might also poll fellow coworkers to see if they, too, were made uneasy. About the first letter writer’s feelings chart, she observed that managers sometimes don’t know what they should be to their employees. They “have an amorphous idea that they’re some combination of parent/doctor/therapist/martinet/king.” With the poem, she added, it was also OK for the letter writer to “ignore some of the instructions” and only write a poem they felt comfortable sharing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: aditi shrikant, ivana pino, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boss, little, ask, chart, manager, feelings, health, poem, help, good, green, letter, advice, mental, wants, work, cry, employees, managers


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Harvard researchers say business leaders are making this one simple mistake with employees

Offering advice to workers is more effective than giving feedback, according to research from Harvard Business School. Harvard researchers reached the conclusion in an August report after conducting four separate experiments. 1,438 participants took part in the study, which included a field-based experiment, were asked to provide feedback or advice about someone’s task performance. The findings showed that people offered more “critical and actionable input” when giving advice. The report therefo


Offering advice to workers is more effective than giving feedback, according to research from Harvard Business School. Harvard researchers reached the conclusion in an August report after conducting four separate experiments. 1,438 participants took part in the study, which included a field-based experiment, were asked to provide feedback or advice about someone’s task performance. The findings showed that people offered more “critical and actionable input” when giving advice. The report therefo
Harvard researchers say business leaders are making this one simple mistake with employees Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, offering, advice, business, employees, researchers, feedback, making, mistake, constructive, say, experiment, report, input, past, harvard, simple, giving, leaders


Harvard researchers say business leaders are making this one simple mistake with employees

Offering advice to workers is more effective than giving feedback, according to research from Harvard Business School.

Harvard researchers reached the conclusion in an August report after conducting four separate experiments. 1,438 participants took part in the study, which included a field-based experiment, were asked to provide feedback or advice about someone’s task performance.

The findings showed that people offered more “critical and actionable input” when giving advice. In one experiment, where people were asked to offer input on a job application for a tutoring position, those providing advice presented 34% more ideas for improvement and 56% more suggestions as to how to do so.

Feedback, on the other hand, put the focus on how an employee had performed in the past, as opposed to offering a constructive, “clear path forward.” Honing in on past performance was also found more likely to restrict and narrow a person’s understanding of the task.

The report also said feedback was normally limited to specific times in the year — at work in the form of annual and quarterly reviews, or at school when students were awarded grades.

Some employees also said the feedback they received was “overly positive and lacks usefulness.”

The report therefore concluded employees in search of constructive feedback could benefit from seeking advice.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, offering, advice, business, employees, researchers, feedback, making, mistake, constructive, say, experiment, report, input, past, harvard, simple, giving, leaders


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Five groundbreaking Latino CEOs share their advice for success

Berto Guerra Jr., CEO & Chairman of Avanzar Interior Technologies stands on the floor of his San Antonio manufacturing plant”¡Si, se puede!” Three words launched five Latino CEOs in San Antonio on their joint venture to success. Frank Herrera, CEO of Hero Logistics | Provides in-house logistics. Grow sought out their best advice for young Latino entrepreneurs searching for their own route to success. “I think all the Compadres come from underserved communities and somehow, somebody gave us an op


Berto Guerra Jr., CEO & Chairman of Avanzar Interior Technologies stands on the floor of his San Antonio manufacturing plant”¡Si, se puede!” Three words launched five Latino CEOs in San Antonio on their joint venture to success. Frank Herrera, CEO of Hero Logistics | Provides in-house logistics. Grow sought out their best advice for young Latino entrepreneurs searching for their own route to success. “I think all the Compadres come from underserved communities and somehow, somebody gave us an op
Five groundbreaking Latino CEOs share their advice for success Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: brandon gomez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, compadres, share, latinos, san, groundbreaking, truck, advice, herrera, latino, guerra, santana, chairman, success, ceos, ceo


Five groundbreaking Latino CEOs share their advice for success

Berto Guerra Jr., CEO & Chairman of Avanzar Interior Technologies stands on the floor of his San Antonio manufacturing plant

“¡Si, se puede!” Yes, you can. Three words launched five Latino CEOs in San Antonio on their joint venture to success. At 18% of the U.S. population, Latinos are responsible for 82% of the growth in the U.S. labor force since the financial crisis. That’s according to the Latino Donor Collective U.S. Latino GDP Report, prepared by researchers at the California Lutheran University Center for Economic Research & Forecasting and UCLA Center for the Study of Latino Health & Culture. Yet how are Latinos — a group growing six times faster than non-Latino populations — preparing themselves to assume executive leadership roles?

Meet the ‘Five Compadres’

Toyota’s Five Compadres, Tier 1 suppliers for its San Antonio pickup truck production plant. From left: Frank Herrera, Berto Guerra, Rosa Santana, Fernando Reyes and Max Navarro.

Frank Herrera, CEO of Hero Logistics | Provides in-house logistics. Berto Guerra Jr., chairman and CEO of Avanzar Interior Technologies | Manufactures vehicle seating. Rosa Santana, owner and CEO of Forma Automotive, became Toyota’s first-ever Hispanic woman-owned direct Tier 1 supplier | Provides fully assembled truck beds for Tacoma trucks. Fernando Reyes, founder of Reyes Automotive Group | Produces injection molding and carpeting for the pickup trucks. Max Navarro, founder and chairman of Vutex | Assembles parts kits for conveyance to the assembly line. The group is made up of a lawyer, a STEM professional, a staffing expert and two multiventure entrepreneurs, all established Latino business leaders from diverse industries. And while the five had no automotive manufacturing experience, Toyota still approached them to become the company’s first Latino manufacturers to provide products directly to the company with no middlemen — otherwise known as Tier 1 suppliers. Toyota decided in 2003 to purchase 2,600 acres of ranch land in predominantly Latino (64%) San Antonio, and build its new Tundra and Tacoma pickup truck production plant. Among the company’s first tasks was to identify and train local businessmen. Today, the Compadres’ businesses assemble various auto components, including wheels, tires and fully constructed truck beds to vehicle interiors, including carpeting and plastics. CNBC Invest in You: Ready. Set. Grow sought out their best advice for young Latino entrepreneurs searching for their own route to success.

Max Navarro: No experience? No problem!

The jump into manufacturing was not easy. “A lot of us had business background, but none of us knew how to build a truck,” said Navarro, founder and chairman of Vutex, the first San Antonio-based Hispanic-owned scientific research firm. “But we all brought together some kind of common denominator that helped each other grow.” Navarro said that lack of experience often leads to a self-doubting, “can’t do” mentality, yet for him, no experience is no problem. Toyota’s Texas plant, with the help of the Compadres’ companies, now produces more than 200,000 pickup trucks annually. “Ultimately, we answered that $64,000 question, ‘Are people going to be able to manufacture trucks in San Antonio?'” said Navarro. “There’s no doubt in my mind that question has been answered. Yes.”

Berto Guerra Jr: Surround yourself with smarter people

In the beginning, the Compadres were paired with seasoned Tier 1 Toyota suppliers to form joint ventures. They traveled all over the U.S. and to Japan to learn the businesses, the suppliers’ processes and the “Toyota Way.” “One piece of advice my father always gave me was ‘Don’t be afraid to surround yourself with people who are smarter than you,'” said Guerra, chairman and CEO of Avanzar Interior Technologies. Guerra grew up in San Antonio with his family and lived in a small room behind his father’s barbershop. His father gave Guerra his first job — greeting customers as they walked in and offering them a shoe-shine in return for a few cents. Humility was a lesson Guerra learned from an early age. “There’s no shame in acknowledging when you need help,” said Guerra. “Especially when the help of others guarantees your long-term success.”

Rosa Santana: Believe in yourself and lift up others

Rosa Santana, Forma Automotive CEO & Santana Group Founder Santana Group

The four original Compadres became five in 2014 when Rosa Santana, the first “comadre,” joined the team a decade after the Texas plant opened. With her, she brought more than three decades of staffing industry experience and previously provided human-resource services to her now-fellow Compadres. “I think all the Compadres come from underserved communities and somehow, somebody gave us an opportunity,” said Santana, CEO of Forma Automotive. Santana now serves as a direct provider of fully assembled truck beds. “Sometimes I think Latinos, especially Latina women, think we can’t do as well, or we are not equipped to be leaders,” she said. “We have to do everything to empower ourselves and empower our people.”

Frank Herrera: The Latino agenda is the U.S. agenda

“We must understand that we are advancing not only the Latino cause, but equally as important, the U.S. cause,” said Herrera, owner and president of Herrera Law Firm and chairman of Hero Assemblers and Hero logistics. An estimated 55 million Latinos live in the U.S., according to the U.S. Census Bureau. That number represents 18% of the country’s population, and officially makes Latinos America’s largest ethnic or racial minority. Herrera said Latinos need to leverage their role in the workforce by understanding themselves to be a key driver of future U.S. economic growth. “If the United States 100 years from now will be predominantly Latino, then we have to prepare ourselves to assume those leadership roles.”

Fernando Reyes: Remember, “si, se puede”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: brandon gomez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, compadres, share, latinos, san, groundbreaking, truck, advice, herrera, latino, guerra, santana, chairman, success, ceos, ceo


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Mythbusters’ Adam Savage: This is my biggest piece of advice and my first paying job

1 Hour AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Adam Savage reveals his best advice he can give to any builder or young person looking to succeed and details what his first job was when he was just 12 years old.


1 Hour AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Adam Savage reveals his best advice he can give to any builder or young person looking to succeed and details what his first job was when he was just 12 years old.
Mythbusters’ Adam Savage: This is my biggest piece of advice and my first paying job Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reveals, adam, succeed, flash, enabled, job, paying, piece, mythbusters, biggest, advice, browser, site, view, young, try, savage


Mythbusters' Adam Savage: This is my biggest piece of advice and my first paying job

1 Hour Ago

To view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again.

Adam Savage reveals his best advice he can give to any builder or young person looking to succeed and details what his first job was when he was just 12 years old.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reveals, adam, succeed, flash, enabled, job, paying, piece, mythbusters, biggest, advice, browser, site, view, young, try, savage


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

The best career advice Laverne Cox ever received —and what she tells others

In 2012, at the age of 40, Laverne Cox was ready to give up on her acting career after years of trying to make it in Hollywood. Months later, she landed the part of Sophia Burset, a trans woman who is in prison for credit-card fraud. Before Cox decided to quit acting, she says she remembered the advice of one of her early mentors, and she says it’s still the best career advice that she has been given. Cox says her mother taught her to “work really, really hard” for what she wanted in life, even


In 2012, at the age of 40, Laverne Cox was ready to give up on her acting career after years of trying to make it in Hollywood. Months later, she landed the part of Sophia Burset, a trans woman who is in prison for credit-card fraud. Before Cox decided to quit acting, she says she remembered the advice of one of her early mentors, and she says it’s still the best career advice that she has been given. Cox says her mother taught her to “work really, really hard” for what she wanted in life, even
The best career advice Laverne Cox ever received —and what she tells others Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, career, decided, woman, wanted, try, advice, tells, best, trans, work, cox, acting, received, laverne


The best career advice Laverne Cox ever received —and what she tells others

In 2012, at the age of 40, Laverne Cox was ready to give up on her acting career after years of trying to make it in Hollywood.

“How many black trans women over 40 had careers in 2012 as actors?” Cox says to CNBC Make It at Advertising Week in New York City. “So I thought, OK, it’s time for me to do something else.”

But she says the “universe” had something else in mind, and she got the call to audition for the Netflix series “Orange is the New Black.” Months later, she landed the part of Sophia Burset, a trans woman who is in prison for credit-card fraud.

In 2014, Cox became the first transgender person to be nominated for an Emmy Award and the first trans to appear on the cover of Time Magazine.

The experience has taught Cox, “[You have] to keep showing up,” she says.

Before Cox decided to quit acting, she says she remembered the advice of one of her early mentors, and she says it’s still the best career advice that she has been given.

“Don’t ever give up,” Cox says. “I would call [my mentor], and she would say the people who make it in this business are the people who are persistent.”

And that doesn’t just go for acting. Cox says she advises people who want to succeed to stay engaged in their chosen career and try to learn every aspect of it, because once that door “does open, you need to be prepared to walk through it.”

“There’s a lot of hard work and perseverance around putting yourself in the right place and [also] a little bit of luck,” Cox says.

Cox, who grew up in Mobile, Alabama, says she gets her drive from her single mother, Gloria Cox, who worked two or three jobs to support her and her twin brother growing up. Cox says her mother taught her to “work really, really hard” for what she wanted in life, even through the hardships.

At the age of 11, Cox says, she attempted suicide after developing feelings for her male classmates and was repeatedly bullied for not acting like the other young boys in her grade. Later, during her college years, Cox decided to begin to medically transition to female and continue her path to become an actress.

She says after she landed a successful platform as an actress, she decided to use it to help others.

“I still don’t know how long I’ll have this platform, so I wanted to try to make a difference while I have it,” Cox says. “I’m passionate about humanizing trans people in the LGBTQ community. But then I’m also a person of color, and so I approach the world that way as well, and I’m a woman, so I just allow myself to exist in the intersection of all those places unapologetically and always proceeding with love.”

Like this story? Like CNBC Make It on Facebook.

Don’t miss: The world’s first transgender pro boxer is now the face of iconic boxing brand Everlast. Here’s how he did it


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, career, decided, woman, wanted, try, advice, tells, best, trans, work, cox, acting, received, laverne


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

‘Make yourself uncomfortable’: Best Buy CEO Corie Barry’s advice to women in business

Barry’s advice to other women in business is “make yourself uncomfortable, and to take sometimes, the jobs no one else wants.” “Have those uncomfortable moments. Corie Barry Best Buy, CEOShe has spent the vast majority of her career at Best Buy, after two years as an auditor with Deloitte & Touche. Have those uncomfortable moments. “You have a choice, you can decide you’re going to miss, or you can decide that you’re going to maximize the opportunity.”


Barry’s advice to other women in business is “make yourself uncomfortable, and to take sometimes, the jobs no one else wants.” “Have those uncomfortable moments. Corie Barry Best Buy, CEOShe has spent the vast majority of her career at Best Buy, after two years as an auditor with Deloitte & Touche. Have those uncomfortable moments. “You have a choice, you can decide you’re going to miss, or you can decide that you’re going to maximize the opportunity.”
‘Make yourself uncomfortable’: Best Buy CEO Corie Barry’s advice to women in business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-28  Authors: courtney reagan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, corie, business, buy, best, spent, women, ready, view, uncomfortable, youre, barry, going, barrys, moments, ceo, advice


'Make yourself uncomfortable': Best Buy CEO Corie Barry's advice to women in business

When executives at consumer-facing companies refer to their customer, it’s typically using the pronoun “she.” It’s ironic, that very few of those same companies are run by women. That’s not the case at Best Buy. Corie Barry took over the top job in June as the consumer electronics retailer’s first female chief executive, one of only 27 female CEOs in the S&P 500, according to Catalyst. At 44 years old, she is also the youngest female CEO in the Fortune 100. Barry’s advice to other women in business is “make yourself uncomfortable, and to take sometimes, the jobs no one else wants.”

“Have those uncomfortable moments. Because my strong personal belief is it is those moments that cause you to grow the most yourself, but that also differentiate you the most in your career.” Corie Barry Best Buy, CEO

She has spent the vast majority of her career at Best Buy, after two years as an auditor with Deloitte & Touche. In her nearly two decades at the consumer electronics retailer, Barry has held 15 different roles, including president of Geek Squad Services and chief financial officer. “My career path is anything but linear,” Barry said in an interview with CNBC. “I spent time in finance. I spent time actually living and working in the field in retail. I spent time running services. I started our strategic growth office. I’ve had the chance to run our technology teams.” Barry’s message to other women is to “speak up with the point of view in the room that may not be popular. Have those uncomfortable moments. Because my strong personal belief is it is those moments that cause you to grow the most yourself, but that also differentiate you the most in your career.” It’s also been beneficial to Barry and other women at Best Buy, that the company’s current and former leaders make a concerted effort to seek out diverse points of view and backgrounds. Hubert Joly addressed the topic at a CNBC Evolve event in June, just days after passing the CEO baton to Barry and transitioning to executive chairman. “If a boy — I’m going to say a ‘boy’ — is 80% ready for a promotion, he says: ‘I’m ready.’ If a woman is 125% ready for a promotion, she will say: ‘Oh, I’m not sure.’ So as a leader, you need to be able to recognize this and reach out to the women on the bench and say: ‘You know, Corie, you’re ready. And I’m going to support you.’ ” When asked about Joly’s example, Barry smiled, and pointed to studies that show this is true for women on the whole but in her experience, it can be true with other genders too. “It’s why I start with making yourself uncomfortable, because somewhere in here, you’re going to have to be willing to put yourself in a space that you don’t quite feel ready to fill, and then leverage all the resources around you to help you be successful.” While seven of Best Buy’s 13 board members are women, it’s also notable that the last four board members recruited are people of color.

“There’s two big systemic issues in my view: gender and then people of color, particularly, African Americans,” Joly said at the CNBC Evolve event. “The majority of [consumer] decisions are made by women … it’s a business imperative, it’s also a moral imperative, also a societal imperative.” He also explained the consumer electronics company tasked the board recruiters to bring in great African American candidates. “It brings enormous value and a much better environment,” he said. Ariel Investments co-CEO Mellody Hobson told him that infrared sensors on automatic sinks don’t always work as well with darker skin tones, something Joly didn’t know before that conversation. Seeking diverse viewpoints from leadership “is not a politically correct thing to do. This is vital from a business standpoint,” Joly said in the on-stage interview. “You have a choice, you can decide you’re going to miss, or you can decide that you’re going to maximize the opportunity.” Barry calls Best Buy’s board diversity “such a luxury” and noted the diversity is not only ethnic, but also spans backgrounds and expertise. “It’s proven,” she said. “When you have boards, when you have management teams with more diversity, you’re going to get better business outcomes because you’re taking into account so many points of view. And I fundamentally believe that’s true for us.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-28  Authors: courtney reagan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, corie, business, buy, best, spent, women, ready, view, uncomfortable, youre, barry, going, barrys, moments, ceo, advice


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post