In break from typical contract process, Air Force awards more than $20 million from hotel ballroom

Secretary of the Air Force Barbara Barrett speaks during the commencement of the U.S. Air Force Space Pitch Day, Nov. 5, 2019, San Francisco. SAN FRANCISCO — Outside a hotel ballroom in the heart of downtown San Francisco, the U.S. Air Force awarded $22.5 million in government contracts to small companies focused on space technologies. The two-day inaugural event, dubbed Space Pitch Day, is a break from the typical monthslong government contract process. Following their pitches, the Air Force ha


Secretary of the Air Force Barbara Barrett speaks during the commencement of the U.S. Air Force Space Pitch Day, Nov. 5, 2019, San Francisco.
SAN FRANCISCO — Outside a hotel ballroom in the heart of downtown San Francisco, the U.S. Air Force awarded $22.5 million in government contracts to small companies focused on space technologies.
The two-day inaugural event, dubbed Space Pitch Day, is a break from the typical monthslong government contract process.
Following their pitches, the Air Force ha
In break from typical contract process, Air Force awards more than $20 million from hotel ballroom Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pitch, roper, air, san, awards, space, process, hotel, million, force, break, small, contract, companies, typical, ballroom


In break from typical contract process, Air Force awards more than $20 million from hotel ballroom

Secretary of the Air Force Barbara Barrett speaks during the commencement of the U.S. Air Force Space Pitch Day, Nov. 5, 2019, San Francisco.

SAN FRANCISCO — Outside a hotel ballroom in the heart of downtown San Francisco, the U.S. Air Force awarded $22.5 million in government contracts to small companies focused on space technologies.

The two-day inaugural event, dubbed Space Pitch Day, is a break from the typical monthslong government contract process. Instead, the Air Force’s approach was to design an event to give small business owners the opportunity to meet with and pitch their ideas directly to the military’s acquisition team outside of the Pentagon.

Following their pitches, the Air Force had the opportunity to extend an on-the-spot government contract. What’s more, companies could then receive initial payment from the contract via a government credit card swipe on a Square reader.

The push for an unlikely venue and unusual contract process are credited to Will Roper, the Air Force’s acquisition head.

“It’s not enough to develop and procure systems anymore. We’ve got to get in the business of buying ideas and generating ideas,” Roper told a small group of reporters in San Francisco. “That’s part of what we are doing here. We want to be where innovation is happening,” he said.

Before the Air Force rolled out the Pitch Day series, Roper bristled at the notion that critics might question the process. He explained that while the rapid pace will likely come as a surprise for people accustomed to hearing about government waste in the acquisition process, this event was tailored to small businesses that require immediate financing.

“For those that think the credit card is a gimmick, well, they need to come down and work with companies for whom money matters,” Roper said earlier this year. “That paycheck today means they are now focused on our mission and not making payroll,” he added, noting that otherwise, companies would have to take out bank loans in the months leading up to receiving government contracts.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pitch, roper, air, san, awards, space, process, hotel, million, force, break, small, contract, companies, typical, ballroom


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Bloomberg takes the air out of Biden, political reporters agree

Bloomberg takes the air out of Biden, political reporters agreeBen White, Politico chief economic correspondent, and Brian Schwartz, CNBC, join ‘The Exchange’ to discuss a possibility of a Bloomberg presidential candidacy and what it would mean for the other candidates.


Bloomberg takes the air out of Biden, political reporters agreeBen White, Politico chief economic correspondent, and Brian Schwartz, CNBC, join ‘The Exchange’ to discuss a possibility of a Bloomberg presidential candidacy and what it would mean for the other candidates.
Bloomberg takes the air out of Biden, political reporters agree Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, biden, reporters, political, politico, white, air, takes, mean, presidential, possibility, agree, schwartz, bloomberg


Bloomberg takes the air out of Biden, political reporters agree

Bloomberg takes the air out of Biden, political reporters agree

Ben White, Politico chief economic correspondent, and Brian Schwartz, CNBC, join ‘The Exchange’ to discuss a possibility of a Bloomberg presidential candidacy and what it would mean for the other candidates.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, biden, reporters, political, politico, white, air, takes, mean, presidential, possibility, agree, schwartz, bloomberg


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

This $65 bottle of eco-vodka removes carbon dioxide from the air

Each bottle of Air Co. vodka, which launched Thursday, soaks up as much carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as eight fully grown trees, according to Air Co. co-founder Gregory Constantine. “In other words, each bottle removes one pound of carbon dioxide from the air through its entire life cycle,” Constantine tells CNBC Make It. The vodka, which costs $65 for a 750 ml bottle, is made from only two ingredients, carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas) and water. That’s unlike traditional vodka, which is


Each bottle of Air Co. vodka, which launched Thursday, soaks up as much carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as eight fully grown trees, according to Air Co. co-founder Gregory Constantine.
“In other words, each bottle removes one pound of carbon dioxide from the air through its entire life cycle,” Constantine tells CNBC Make It.
The vodka, which costs $65 for a 750 ml bottle, is made from only two ingredients, carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas) and water.
That’s unlike traditional vodka, which is
This $65 bottle of eco-vodka removes carbon dioxide from the air Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: make it
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, removes, water, process, air, dioxide, bottle, ecovodka, traditional, carbon, vodka, oxygen, tells


This $65 bottle of eco-vodka removes carbon dioxide from the air

Each bottle of Air Co. vodka, which launched Thursday, soaks up as much carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as eight fully grown trees, according to Air Co. co-founder Gregory Constantine.

“In other words, each bottle removes one pound of carbon dioxide from the air through its entire life cycle,” Constantine tells CNBC Make It.

The vodka, which costs $65 for a 750 ml bottle, is made from only two ingredients, carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas) and water. That’s unlike traditional vodka, which is typically made by fermenting grains such as corn, potato and wheat. Producing a typical bottle of vodka could create around 13 pounds of greenhouse gases, according to Fast Company, while Air Co.’s product is carbon negative, removing a pound of carbon from the air with every bottle produced.

Air Co. says its patented system works by using (renewable solar) electricity to turn carbon from the air into pure ethanol.

Its process is “inspired by photosynthesis in nature, where plants breathe in CO2. They take up water, and they use energy in the form of sunlight to make things like sugars and to make other higher-value hydrocarbons, with oxygen as the sole by-product. Same thing with our process: The only by-product is oxygen,” electrochemist and co-founder Stafford Sheehan told Fast Company.

“The process uses the same principles as photosynthesis in plants but does so more efficiently,” Constantine tells CNBC Make It.

Air Co.’s technology splits water into hydrogen and oxygen, then combines the hydrogen with carbon dioxide (collected from factories near its Brooklyn, New York headquarters), which creates alcohol and water, only emitting oxygen into the atmosphere. The water is then removed via distilling, leaving behind the alcohol. Air Co. says its vodka is also free of the impurities that can left behind from the grains used in traditional vodka production.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: make it
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, removes, water, process, air, dioxide, bottle, ecovodka, traditional, carbon, vodka, oxygen, tells


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

See inside 9 over-the-top closets, including one that’s three levels and has its own champagne bar

There’s a floating staircase in the middle, and Roemer loves champagne so much, she put a bar in the closet. “It cost me about $500,000 to do the closet,” Roemer tells CNBC. Closet inspired by ChanelThe Air Jordan room isn’t the only amazing closet in that South Florida mansion — that’s just the “his” closet. St. Moritz ClosetA massive St. Moritz house that was once the most expensive home for sale in Switzerland has a pretty impressive master closet. Walk-in master closet designed and imported


There’s a floating staircase in the middle, and Roemer loves champagne so much, she put a bar in the closet.
“It cost me about $500,000 to do the closet,” Roemer tells CNBC.
Closet inspired by ChanelThe Air Jordan room isn’t the only amazing closet in that South Florida mansion — that’s just the “his” closet.
St. Moritz ClosetA massive St. Moritz house that was once the most expensive home for sale in Switzerland has a pretty impressive master closet.
Walk-in master closet designed and imported
See inside 9 over-the-top closets, including one that’s three levels and has its own champagne bar Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-05  Authors: christopher dilella
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, including, air, jordan, thats, house, overthetop, bar, champagne, million, worth, tells, levels, roemer, florida, closets, inside, master, closet


See inside 9 over-the-top closets, including one that's three levels and has its own champagne bar

Get ready for some serious closet envy. From a closet that’s as big as house to a closet custom made to hold over $100,000 worth of unworn Air Jordan sneakers, these are some of the most over the top closets in the world.

3,000-square foot closet inspired by Neiman Marcus

In Houston, Texas, entrepreneur Theresa Roemer designed her “she cave” closet “to look like you were walking into a little miniature Neiman Marcus boutique,” she tells CNBC.

CNBC

Roemer’s closet is three stories and 3,000 square feet. There’s a floating staircase in the middle, and Roemer loves champagne so much, she put a bar in the closet. “It cost me about $500,000 to do the closet,” Roemer tells CNBC. “That was my budget [to decorate] the house, and I spent that on just the closet.”

Theresa Roemer’s Houston closet has a champagne bar on the second level. Theresa Roemer

The first floor of Roemer’s closet is wall-to-wall handbags. The second level is for shoes, including more than $200,000 worth of of Christian Louboutins, according to Roemer. The third level is devoted to Roemer’s collection of fur coats worth half a million dollars, she says.

Air Jordans-only closet

The owner of the $19 million South Florida mega-mansion that houses this closet calls it the “Air Jordan room,” because it holds a collection of never worn Air Jordan sneakers worth over $100,000.

Douglas Elliman

“[The owner] has a completely different closet for the shoes he wears everyday,” says real estate agent Senada Adzem.

Closet inspired by Chanel

The Air Jordan room isn’t the only amazing closet in that South Florida mansion — that’s just the “his” closet. The “hers” closet is just as impressive and was inspired by a Chanel boutique.

Douglas Elliman

“You know you’ve made it when you have a ladder in your own closet,” broker Adzem tells CNBC.

St. Moritz Closet

A massive St. Moritz house that was once the most expensive home for sale in Switzerland has a pretty impressive master closet.

The deceiving exterior of a St. Moritz home that has seven levels, most of them hidden underground. Source: Senada Adzem

The walk-in is in the master suite.

Master bedroom Source: Senada Adzem

A wall slides open to reveal a closet with walls painted in 24-karat gold.

Douglas Elliman

The ‘king’ of closets

Notorious poker player and social media star Dan Bilzerian — the self-proclaimed “King of Instagram” — transformed the master closet of his 31,000-square-foot Bel Air, California mansion into a showroom for his six-figure bong collection.

CNBC

It’s filled with hand-blown glass pipes, some of which cost as much as a car.

CNBC

Fun fact: Before it was a bong room, it was actually home to his partially paralyzed cat, Slitherpuss.

Hollywood Hills closet with a view

The largest home in the Hollywood Hills is this $43.9 million mansion.

The over 20,000 sq. ft. residence unfolds over 3 levels. The Agency

Inside the 2,800-square-foot master suite is a massive walk-in closet.

Walk-in master closet designed and imported from Italy. The Agency

“This huge closet [was] imported from Lake Como in Italy,” says luxury broker David Parnes. “Even your clothes have a crazy view!”

Mohamed Hadid’s closet

This $50 million mega-mansion in Beverly Hills was the childhood home of Gigi and Bella Hadid.

Hadid House Coldwell Banker / The Agency

Their father, Mohamed Hadid, has a master closet that looks like a small department store with sections for his entire wardrobe — from sweaters and dress shirts to shoes and watches.

CNBC

The closet that Patron tequila built

This mega-mansion on “Billionaire’s Row” in Manalapan, Florida, was once owned by the former CEO of Patron, Ed Brown, and his wife, Ashley.

Source: Andy Frame Photography

Before they sold it, Ashley gave CNBC a tour of her 1,500 square foot closet with cool lighting and shelves overflowing with clothes and designer heels.

CNBC

Celine Dion’s closet

On Jupiter Island, Florida is the diva-sized closet Celine Dion built. One wing of the closet can fit 586 pairs of shoes.

CNBC

There’s also an area for gowns…

CNBC

… and a “deep closet,” that looks like a dry cleaner store.

CNBC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-05  Authors: christopher dilella
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, including, air, jordan, thats, house, overthetop, bar, champagne, million, worth, tells, levels, roemer, florida, closets, inside, master, closet


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Elon Musk: SpaceX is chasing the ‘holy grail’ of completely reusing a rocket

Elon Musk, chief executive officer of Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) and Tesla Inc., speaks during an event at the SpaceX launch facility in Cameron County, Texas, U.S., on Saturday, Sept. 28, 2019. This is the holy grail,” Musk said, speaking with Lt. Gen. John Thompson at the Air Force’s Space Pitch Day event. As Musk said, “It’s absolutely profound to have a reusable rocket.” Musk described Starship, the next-generation rocket SpaceX is developing, as the key to fully reusing a


Elon Musk, chief executive officer of Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) and Tesla Inc., speaks during an event at the SpaceX launch facility in Cameron County, Texas, U.S., on Saturday, Sept. 28, 2019.
This is the holy grail,” Musk said, speaking with Lt. Gen. John Thompson at the Air Force’s Space Pitch Day event.
As Musk said, “It’s absolutely profound to have a reusable rocket.”
Musk described Starship, the next-generation rocket SpaceX is developing, as the key to fully reusing a
Elon Musk: SpaceX is chasing the ‘holy grail’ of completely reusing a rocket Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-05  Authors: michael sheetz amanda macias, michael sheetz, amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, elon, cost, reusing, air, rocket, reusable, completely, space, holy, musk, fully, chasing, launch, starship, grail, spacex


Elon Musk: SpaceX is chasing the 'holy grail' of completely reusing a rocket

Elon Musk, chief executive officer of Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) and Tesla Inc., speaks during an event at the SpaceX launch facility in Cameron County, Texas, U.S., on Saturday, Sept. 28, 2019.

SAN FRANCISCO — In a conversation with the top U.S. Air Force officer on space research and acquisition, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk on Tuesday explained why his company is on an aggressive timeline to develop a massive rocket capable of launching and landing multiple times, like an commercial aircraft.

“With respect to space, I think there’s really just one problem, which is a fully and rapidly reusable orbital rocket. This is the holy grail,” Musk said, speaking with Lt. Gen. John Thompson at the Air Force’s Space Pitch Day event.

“SpaceX has made some progress in reusing the booster,” Musk said. But that’s still only part of the rocket. As Musk said, “It’s absolutely profound to have a reusable rocket.”

“A giant reusable craft costs much less than a small expendable craft,” Musk said.

Musk described Starship, the next-generation rocket SpaceX is developing, as the key to fully reusing a rocket. He said Starship is a “pretty ambitious” project, as it represents the culmination of Musk’s vision for SpaceX: Capable of sending people to-and-from the moon and Mars.

SpaceX President Gwynne Shotwell said at a recent event that SpaceX wants to have Starship in orbit next year. ” We want to land it on the moon before 2022 with cargo and with people shortly thereafter,” she said.

If SpaceX can repeatedly launch and land its Starship rocket, it could make space travel more akin to air travel, with only minor maintenance needed between flights and fuel as the main cost for an airplane. A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket comes with a price tag of $62 million per launch and up. But, if Starship can achieve being a fully reusable rocket, Musk touted the rocket’s $900,000 fuel cost as the significant cost for its launch — a fraction of today’s launch costs.

“It’s the thing that needs to be made,” Musk said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-05  Authors: michael sheetz amanda macias, michael sheetz, amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, elon, cost, reusing, air, rocket, reusable, completely, space, holy, musk, fully, chasing, launch, starship, grail, spacex


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

How algae could improve the air quality of our towns and cities

Architectural and urban design practice ecoLogicStudio has produced what it describes as a “photosynthetic building cladding system.” “The design of this cavity is such that we can inoculate, or introduce, dirty air from the bottom,” he added. “The air naturally rises through and comes into contact with the molecules of the algae, which cleans it. Poletto went on to explain why micro algae were useful for the system. “Now, when you’re doing restoration, retrofit, the inside of the building is ea


Architectural and urban design practice ecoLogicStudio has produced what it describes as a “photosynthetic building cladding system.”
“The design of this cavity is such that we can inoculate, or introduce, dirty air from the bottom,” he added.
“The air naturally rises through and comes into contact with the molecules of the algae, which cleans it.
Poletto went on to explain why micro algae were useful for the system.
“Now, when you’re doing restoration, retrofit, the inside of the building is ea
How algae could improve the air quality of our towns and cities Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-01  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, air, energy, cities, co2, technology, buildings, went, quality, urban, towns, building, system, algae, improve


How algae could improve the air quality of our towns and cities

From smart thermostats that can be managed using our cellphones to energy efficient lightbulbs and rooftop solar panels, today’s buildings use a wide range of technology to reduce their environmental impact.

In London, a system has been developed which could transform the way buildings look and behave.

Architectural and urban design practice ecoLogicStudio has produced what it describes as a “photosynthetic building cladding system.”

Called PhotoSynthetica, it uses solar energy to take carbon dioxide (CO2) and other pollutants out of the atmosphere. The panels of the system harbor a solution containing algae microbes.

In the latest episode of CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy” Marco Poletto, ecoLogicStudio’s director, described how one of the bio-plastic prototypes works.

“The sun shines through the curtain and activates … photosynthesis,” he said. “The design of this cavity is such that we can inoculate, or introduce, dirty air from the bottom,” he added.

“The air naturally rises through and comes into contact with the molecules of the algae, which cleans it. And then clean air and oxygen is released from the top back into the atmosphere.”

Poletto went on to explain why micro algae were useful for the system. “Their ability to capture CO2 is 10 times higher than large trees and that’s because their entire body is photosynthetic,” he said.

“So when we integrated it in our technology, even a thin layer has the same capacity to absorb CO2 as a micro forest. This offers renewed potential for integrating carbon capturing technology into dense and polluted urban environments.”

Ideas like PhotoSynthetica could become important in the years ahead, as governments and businesses look to transform the built environment and make it more sustainable.

Speaking to CNBC, Derek Clements-Croome, an emeritus professor at the University of Reading, emphasized the importance of adapting and adding to existing buildings to make them more sustainable.

“I mean, this is very important that we do this because over 80% of the buildings that will be present in 2050 are already here now with us,” he said.

“Now, when you’re doing restoration, retrofit, the inside of the building is easier to cope with,” he went on to explain. “It’s usually the shell of the building which is the most challenging part.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-01  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, air, energy, cities, co2, technology, buildings, went, quality, urban, towns, building, system, algae, improve


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

High-tech California relies on a startup in Utah to see how smoky its air is

Peacock said he’s stopped using an air quality map run by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and others because the government’s map can’t compete with the neighborhood-level information from PurpleAir. People in California are increasingly calling for quality data about air quality as wildfires have become bigger, more common and more intense. “Air quality sensors are *yet another case* where decentralization and distributed systems outperform centralized services,” she wrote, directing p


Peacock said he’s stopped using an air quality map run by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and others because the government’s map can’t compete with the neighborhood-level information from PurpleAir.
People in California are increasingly calling for quality data about air quality as wildfires have become bigger, more common and more intense.
“Air quality sensors are *yet another case* where decentralization and distributed systems outperform centralized services,” she wrote, directing p
High-tech California relies on a startup in Utah to see how smoky its air is Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: david ingram, jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, california, monitors, quality, smoky, hightech, utah, information, map, data, air, relies, measure, wildfire, startup


High-tech California relies on a startup in Utah to see how smoky its air is

A firefighter gives orders as he battles the wind-driven Kincade Fire in Windsor, California, October 27, 2019.

When software engineer Kyle Peacock wanted to know how bad the air was from nearby wildfires, he didn’t turn to government monitors or even the local tech giants.

He went instead to the website of a tiny Utah company that’s the talk of the nation’s tech capital whenever wildfire smoke fills the air.

The company, PurpleAir, employs seven people and began as a home project of its founder in 2015. But by crowdsourcing data from inexpensive air quality monitors in people’s homes and businesses, the company’s online map has quickly become an essential if unlikely source of information in a region choked by smoke — and a case in point for the tech community’s larger frustrations with what many see as mismanagement by California’s government and national gridlock.

“PurpleAir is kind of my go-to for measuring the risk for going outdoors,” Peacock, 27, said in an interview.

The website is generating buzz on social media including Twitter, Facebook and Slack, where people share screenshots of the latest map as they plan how much time they’ll spend outside that day. PurpleAir’s founder, Adrian Dybwad, said he saw a 100-fold increase in traffic to his map after wildfire season began this year.

It follows a robust tradition of crowdsourcing in the tech industry, from volunteer-edited Wikipedia articles to the traffic information and mapping app Waze.

Peacock said he’s stopped using an air quality map run by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and others because the government’s map can’t compete with the neighborhood-level information from PurpleAir.

“What really matters is: Right where you are, what is it like?” he said.

People in California are increasingly calling for quality data about air quality as wildfires have become bigger, more common and more intense. The Kincade fire north of San Francisco forced almost 200,000 people from their homes this month, marking the third year in a row of intense fires in the northern part of the state.

The crowdsourcing approach has a certain appeal in Silicon Valley, where frustration about the inefficiency of government in California and nationally can sometimes boil over into a feeling that traditional bureaucracies can’t do anything right.

“If you’re using @AIRNow by the U.S. gov’t EPA it is giving you inaccurate — and dangerous — information,” Caterina Fake, a venture capitalist who co-founded the photo service Flickr, on Monday.

“Air quality sensors are *yet another case* where decentralization and distributed systems outperform centralized services,” she wrote, directing people to PurpleAir.

Some of the government monitors in the Bay Area even produced incorrect readings in recent days, according to .

The EPA said in a statement that its web traffic had also increased several orders of magnitude in the past week. The agency maintained that its instruments and those of state and local authorities remain of higher quality than PurpleAir’s, but it said it also realizes that its data isn’t available everywhere.

“In these extreme wildfire situations, we understand that residents will consult a variety of sources,” the agency said.

Finding out information related to wildfires has been difficult in other ways. The California utility company PG&E, which has been cutting power to some customers in a bid to avoid sparking new fires, admitted in a report on Oct. 25 that its website crashed several times as users looked for outage details. It pledged to improve.

PG&E has warned that rolling blackouts will continue for years, deepening the sense in California’s tech community that they can’t rely on traditional systems of authority.

“Researching power wall & home generator options due to the recent shutdowns, & the obvious global warming/wildfire trends that will eventually lead to savvy homeowners building off the grid systems,” tech investor Jason Calacanis. “Government is only getting worse in California — oh yeah, earthquakes.”

The investor James Beshara “California, the land of no plastic straws and no electricity.”

Unofficial sources of authority like PurpleAir’s may be the beneficiaries of this pushback.

The EPA and state and local authorities have built a nationwide network to measure air quality, using instruments that can cost in the tens of thousands of dollars. The instruments, which receive regular maintenance and calibration to ensure accuracy, measure types of pollution such as ozone that less expensive monitors can’t detect.

But there’s a trade-off. Because the high-quality monitors are so expensive, there aren’t enough of them to give most people a detailed picture near where they live or work.

PurpleAir, by contrast, pulls data from the small, privately owned monitors that it sells to homeowners or businesses. What the monitors may lack in sophistication is made up in numbers, with some 3,000 monitors in California, according to the company. The map averages nearby monitors so that outliers aren’t as noticeable.

Robert Harley, an engineering professor who studies air quality at the University of California, Berkeley, said the “gold standard” for measuring pollution remains the government data. But he said that he has used PurpleAir, too, and that in locations where there’s a large enough number of sensors around to take an average, “they’re quite good.”

The operation started in 2015, when Dybwad said he began building the air quality monitors for himself and for neighbors to measure dust from a gravel pit near his home. Word spread around the Salt Lake City area, and he began selling them. His outdoor monitors, which use lasers to measure particles in the air, sell for $229 to $259.

Soot and other particles from smoky air can have lasting health consequences, in addition to the more immediate breathing problems, discomfort and disruption to daily life.

Outside California’s wildfire season, local government groups and environmental advocates have used the PurpleAir monitors to “democratize” pollution data.

“We didn’t set out to do better than the government’s own monitoring,” Dybwad said. “We set out to satisfy our own curiosity.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: david ingram, jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, california, monitors, quality, smoky, hightech, utah, information, map, data, air, relies, measure, wildfire, startup


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

In fiery Senate hearing, Boeing admits its safety assessments of 737 Max fell short

Boeing executives admitted to lawmakers in a tense hearing on Capitol Hill on Tuesday that the company made mistakes in developing its troubled 737 Max plane, grounded worldwide after two crashes killed 346 people. An Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max crashed in March, less than five months later, killing all 157 people on board. Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., the state where the 737 Max is produced, asked Muilenburg and the commercial airplane unit’s chief engineer whether its safety assumptions and as


Boeing executives admitted to lawmakers in a tense hearing on Capitol Hill on Tuesday that the company made mistakes in developing its troubled 737 Max plane, grounded worldwide after two crashes killed 346 people.
An Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max crashed in March, less than five months later, killing all 157 people on board.
Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., the state where the 737 Max is produced, asked Muilenburg and the commercial airplane unit’s chief engineer whether its safety assumptions and as
In fiery Senate hearing, Boeing admits its safety assessments of 737 Max fell short Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeing, fiery, assessments, fell, crashes, pilots, air, hearing, max, muilenburg, admits, system, senate, planes, safety, plane, short


In fiery Senate hearing, Boeing admits its safety assessments of 737 Max fell short

Boeing executives admitted to lawmakers in a tense hearing on Capitol Hill on Tuesday that the company made mistakes in developing its troubled 737 Max plane, grounded worldwide after two crashes killed 346 people.

It was Boeing’s most public admission that it botched the design of its highest-selling plane.

In a more than two-hour hearing before the Senate Commerce Committee, lawmakers railed against CEO Dennis Muilenburg for safety problems with the plane and for not sufficiently informing pilots about changes it made to the new Max model of the jetliner that Boeing debuted in 1967. It was the first of Muilenburg’s two appearances in Congress this week about the two air disasters.

Muilenburg took a remorseful tone, recognizing mistakes with the plane. At times, senators were in disbelief after Muilenburg said he didn’t know until about the details of e-mail messages between a former Boeing pilot and the FAA in which the pilot boasted about “jedi-mind tricking” regulators into approving training materials and instructing the FAA to delete a flight-control system implicated in the two crashes.

“Can you see that this raises much concern about the level of concern about the level of coziness between Boeing personnel and FAA regulators?” asked Sen. Roger Wicker, R.-Miss., chairman of the committee.

“I understand the concern there,” Muilenburg said. “I can tell you the comments, the values, the approaches described in those emails are counter to our values. So I understand the concern, share the concern.”

The hearing was conducted on the first anniversary of the first crash — a nearly brand-new Lion Air 737 Max that went down in the Java Sea in Indonesia, killing all 189 aboard. An Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max crashed in March, less than five months later, killing all 157 people on board.

Family members of victims both crashes were in attendance, at one point holding up large photographs of their loved ones.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn, said Boeing executives came to his office after the crashes and said they were the result of “pilot error.” Blumenthal called the crashes “the result of a pattern of deliberate concealment” by Boeing.

“Those pilots never had a chance. These loved ones never had a chance,” he said. “They were in flying coffins as a the result of Boeing deciding it was going to conceal MCAS from the pilots.”

He was referring to the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, which was implicated in both crashes.

Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., the state where the 737 Max is produced, asked Muilenburg and the commercial airplane unit’s chief engineer whether its safety assumptions and assessments were wrong.

“In hindsight, yes,” said Boeing chief engineer John Hamilton.

“I do want to know that you are improving the safety culture,” Cantwell said.

A central issue is the flight-control system known as MCAS that malfunctioned on both flights because it received erroneous data from a faulty sensor. The sensor measures the angle of attack, or the angle of the plane relative to oncoming air. If the nose is pointed too high, the plane could stall, so the system automatically pushes the nose of the planes down.

In both crashes, pilots battled the system that repeatedly pushed the nose of the planes down. Pilots complained that they didn’t know the system was even on the plane until after the first crash.

Boeing has developed software fixes for the planes and additional redundancies but regulators haven’t yet signed off on them. The grounding, now in its eighth month, has dented airline profits and curbed their growth plans.

Hamilton said Boeing didn’t “specifically” test an unintended activation of the system because of an issue with an angle-of-attack sensor.

The FAA last week shut down the Florida maintenance facility that worked on one of the Lion Air sensors.

Boeing has been highly criticized for its assumptions about the plane, including overestimating average pilots’ ability to safely fly planes amid a flurry of cockpit alerts, which occurred on the Lion Air jet.

“We relied on these longstanding industry standards of pilot response,” said Muilenburg, adding that was an area where “we found shortfall.”

The hearing adds to pressure on Muilenburg. Boeing’s board on Oct. 11 stripped him of his chairmanship. The company later fired the head of the commercial airplane unit as the grounding dragged on.

Boeing shares were up close to 1% after the hearing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeing, fiery, assessments, fell, crashes, pilots, air, hearing, max, muilenburg, admits, system, senate, planes, safety, plane, short


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Boeing has more problems than the 737 Max, Rep. John Garamendi warns

Boeing’s problems do not end with its grounded 737 Max jet, U.S. Rep. John Garamendi told CNBC on Tuesday. Specifically, Garamendi pointed to the KC-46, aerial refueling tankers made by Boeing. In September, the Air Force determined KC-46s could no longer carry passengers or cargo until issues with floor cargo restraints are resolved. There are ongoing problems,” Garamendi said, before incorrectly saying the plane has been delayed four years. Muilenburg will appear before Garamendi’s committee W


Boeing’s problems do not end with its grounded 737 Max jet, U.S. Rep. John Garamendi told CNBC on Tuesday.
Specifically, Garamendi pointed to the KC-46, aerial refueling tankers made by Boeing.
In September, the Air Force determined KC-46s could no longer carry passengers or cargo until issues with floor cargo restraints are resolved.
There are ongoing problems,” Garamendi said, before incorrectly saying the plane has been delayed four years.
Muilenburg will appear before Garamendi’s committee W
Boeing has more problems than the 737 Max, Rep. John Garamendi warns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jet, committee, rep, max, 737, kc46, air, cargo, force, warns, john, boeing, garamendi, problems


Boeing has more problems than the 737 Max, Rep. John Garamendi warns

Boeing’s problems do not end with its grounded 737 Max jet, U.S. Rep. John Garamendi told CNBC on Tuesday.

“Going forward, this is not the only issue,” the California Democrat said on “The Exchange.” “We have a serious problem with Boeing in the military side of it.”

Specifically, Garamendi pointed to the KC-46, aerial refueling tankers made by Boeing. The KC-46 experienced two years of delays and ran overbudget by $3 billion before the first one was delivered to the U.S. Air Force in January, but problems persist.

In September, the Air Force determined KC-46s could no longer carry passengers or cargo until issues with floor cargo restraints are resolved.

The KC-46 “doesn’t yet work. There are ongoing problems,” Garamendi said, before incorrectly saying the plane has been delayed four years. “So we’ve got a lot of problems with Boeing.”

Garamendi, who is member of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, made his remarks as Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg testified on Capitol Hill before the Senate Commerce Committee.

Muilenburg will appear before Garamendi’s committee Wednesday as the airplane manufacturer continues to address the fallout from two fatal crashes involving its 737 Max jet.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jet, committee, rep, max, 737, kc46, air, cargo, force, warns, john, boeing, garamendi, problems


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Indonesia’s report on Lion Air 737 MAX crash recommends redesign, better training

A Batik Air Boeing Co. 737 Max 8 aircraft, operated by Lion Air, center, sits on the tarmac at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Cenkareng, Indonesia, on Tuesday, March 12, 2019. The report into the crash of the Lion Air jet on Oct. 29, 2018 that killed all 189 people on board is due to be released publicly later on Friday. Less than five months after the Lion Air accident, an Ethiopian Airlines 737 MAX crashed, leading to a global grounding of the model and sparking a corporate crisis at


A Batik Air Boeing Co. 737 Max 8 aircraft, operated by Lion Air, center, sits on the tarmac at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Cenkareng, Indonesia, on Tuesday, March 12, 2019.
The report into the crash of the Lion Air jet on Oct. 29, 2018 that killed all 189 people on board is due to be released publicly later on Friday.
Less than five months after the Lion Air accident, an Ethiopian Airlines 737 MAX crashed, leading to a global grounding of the model and sparking a corporate crisis at
Indonesia’s report on Lion Air 737 MAX crash recommends redesign, better training Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-25
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, training, redesign, air, better, boeing, indonesias, 737, systems, maintenance, max, report, crash, lion, recommends, aircraft


Indonesia's report on Lion Air 737 MAX crash recommends redesign, better training

A Batik Air Boeing Co. 737 Max 8 aircraft, operated by Lion Air, center, sits on the tarmac at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Cenkareng, Indonesia, on Tuesday, March 12, 2019.

Indonesia has recommended closer scrutiny of automated control systems, better design of flight deck alerts and accounting for a more diverse pilot population in the wake of a Boeing 737 MAX crash, according to a copy of a final report seen by Reuters.

The report into the crash of the Lion Air jet on Oct. 29, 2018 that killed all 189 people on board is due to be released publicly later on Friday.

Less than five months after the Lion Air accident, an Ethiopian Airlines 737 MAX crashed, leading to a global grounding of the model and sparking a corporate crisis at Boeing, the world’s biggest planemaker.

Indonesian investigators on Wednesday told families of the victims that a mix of factors contributed to the crash, including mechanical and design issues and a lack of documentation about how systems would behave.

“Deficiencies” in the flight crew’s communication and manual control of the aircraft contributed to the crash, as did alerts and distractions in the cockpit, according to slides presented to the families.

The final report said the first officer was unfamiliar with procedures and had shown issues handling the aircraft during training.

The report also found that a critical sensor providing data to an anti-stall system had been miscalibrated by a repair shop in Florida and that there were strong indications that it was not tested during installation by Lion Air maintenance staff.

Lion Air should have grounded the jet following faults on earlier flights, the report said and added that 31 pages were missing from the airline’s October maintenance logs.

Lion Air did not respond to a request for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-25
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, training, redesign, air, better, boeing, indonesias, 737, systems, maintenance, max, report, crash, lion, recommends, aircraft


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post