Southwest Airlines yanks Boeing 737 Max from schedules through early November with no end in sight to grounding

A number of Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are parked at Southern California Logistics Airport on March 27, 2019 in Victorville, California. Southwest Airlines is waiting out a global grounding of MAX 8 and MAX 9 aircraft at the airport. Uncertainty over when regulators will allow the Boeing 737 Max to fly again following two deadly crashes prompted Southwest Airlines, the largest U.S. operator of the jets, to remove them from its schedules through early November — a month longer tha


A number of Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are parked at Southern California Logistics Airport on March 27, 2019 in Victorville, California. Southwest Airlines is waiting out a global grounding of MAX 8 and MAX 9 aircraft at the airport. Uncertainty over when regulators will allow the Boeing 737 Max to fly again following two deadly crashes prompted Southwest Airlines, the largest U.S. operator of the jets, to remove them from its schedules through early November — a month longer tha
Southwest Airlines yanks Boeing 737 Max from schedules through early November with no end in sight to grounding Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, schedule, yanks, boeing, month, flights, schedules, end, early, california, airlines, crashes, max, planes, sight, grounding, southwest


Southwest Airlines yanks Boeing 737 Max from schedules through early November with no end in sight to grounding

A number of Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are parked at Southern California Logistics Airport on March 27, 2019 in Victorville, California. Southwest Airlines is waiting out a global grounding of MAX 8 and MAX 9 aircraft at the airport.

Uncertainty over when regulators will allow the Boeing 737 Max to fly again following two deadly crashes prompted Southwest Airlines, the largest U.S. operator of the jets, to remove them from its schedules through early November — a month longer than it estimated in late June.

Southwest’s move follows similar schedule changes announced over the last week by American and United.

Southwest said Thursday it will cancel about 180 flights a day out of about 4,000 flights because of the schedule change. Last month, the Dallas-based airline said it was targeting October for the planes’ return, which would have meant 150 daily flight cancellations.

The planes have been grounded since mid-March after two fatal crashes within five months killed 346 people.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, schedule, yanks, boeing, month, flights, schedules, end, early, california, airlines, crashes, max, planes, sight, grounding, southwest


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Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: United Airlines and more

Check out the companies making headlines after the bell:United Airlines ticked up in after-hours trading after the company’s second-quarter earnings surpassed Wall Street’s expectations and showed profit up more than 50% from a year ago. The airline reported adjusted earnings per share of $4.2, topping the $4.09 per share estimate from analysts surveyed by Refinitiv. The second-quarter revenue was $11.4 billion, close to 6% above what it was a year ago and just above the $11.36 billion forecast


Check out the companies making headlines after the bell:United Airlines ticked up in after-hours trading after the company’s second-quarter earnings surpassed Wall Street’s expectations and showed profit up more than 50% from a year ago. The airline reported adjusted earnings per share of $4.2, topping the $4.09 per share estimate from analysts surveyed by Refinitiv. The second-quarter revenue was $11.4 billion, close to 6% above what it was a year ago and just above the $11.36 billion forecast
Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: United Airlines and more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: mallika mitra, kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, united, earnings, stocks, revenue, second, airlines, share, reported, secondquarter, hours, quarter, billion, million, moves, biggest, analysts, making


Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: United Airlines and more

Check out the companies making headlines after the bell:

United Airlines ticked up in after-hours trading after the company’s second-quarter earnings surpassed Wall Street’s expectations and showed profit up more than 50% from a year ago. The airline reported adjusted earnings per share of $4.2, topping the $4.09 per share estimate from analysts surveyed by Refinitiv. The second-quarter revenue was $11.4 billion, close to 6% above what it was a year ago and just above the $11.36 billion forecast by analysts.

Shares of CSX fell more than 6% after the transportation company’s second quarter earnings missed estimates. CSX reported earnings per share of $1.08 on revenue of $3.06 billion. Analysts were expecting earnings per share of $1.11 on revenue of $3.14 billion, according to Refinitiv.

Seattle Genetics rose as much as 8% after the biotechnology company released mixed second quarter earnings. The company reported a second-quarter loss of 49 cents per share on revenue of $218.5 million. Analysts had expected a loss per share of 39 cents on revenue of $189.8 million.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: mallika mitra, kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, united, earnings, stocks, revenue, second, airlines, share, reported, secondquarter, hours, quarter, billion, million, moves, biggest, analysts, making


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United Airlines extends Boeing 737 Max cancellations to early November

United Airlines on Friday said it will extend its Boeing 737 Max groundings through Nov. 3, amounting to 2,100 cancellations in September and 2,900 in October. United, which has 14 Max jets in its fleet, had previously removed the jets from its schedule through Aug. 3. “We are continuing to work through the schedule to try and swap and upgauge aircraft to mitigate the disruption caused by the grounding of the MAX,” United said in a statement. The 737 Max has been grounded worldwide since mid-Mar


United Airlines on Friday said it will extend its Boeing 737 Max groundings through Nov. 3, amounting to 2,100 cancellations in September and 2,900 in October. United, which has 14 Max jets in its fleet, had previously removed the jets from its schedule through Aug. 3. “We are continuing to work through the schedule to try and swap and upgauge aircraft to mitigate the disruption caused by the grounding of the MAX,” United said in a statement. The 737 Max has been grounded worldwide since mid-Mar
United Airlines extends Boeing 737 Max cancellations to early November Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cancellations, schedule, boeing, united, early, 737, likely, removed, max, software, try, extends, jets, airlines


United Airlines extends Boeing 737 Max cancellations to early November

United Airlines on Friday said it will extend its Boeing 737 Max groundings through Nov. 3, amounting to 2,100 cancellations in September and 2,900 in October.

United, which has 14 Max jets in its fleet, had previously removed the jets from its schedule through Aug. 3.

“We are continuing to work through the schedule to try and swap and upgauge aircraft to mitigate the disruption caused by the grounding of the MAX,” United said in a statement.

“We continue to automatically book affected customers on alternate flights. If we are unable to place them on a different flight, we will proactively reach out to try and offer other options.”

The 737 Max has been grounded worldwide since mid-March, after its anti-stall software was implicated in two deadly crashes in October and March.

Other major airlines including American and Southwest have canceled thousands of flights during the busy summer travel season, and have further removed the Max from schedules through Sept. 3 and Oct. 1, respectively. Those airlines will likely further extend cancellations.

United reports second-quarter results after the market closes on Tuesday. Delta Air Lines, which does not fly the 737 Max, said on Thursday that it’s seeing a small benefit as rivals grapple with the grounding.

Boeing deliveries are stopped until aviation regulators approve the jet’s return to service. The airplane maker said in June that it would likely take until September or later to introduce a new software fix after the Federal Aviation Administration identified a new software issue a month ago.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cancellations, schedule, boeing, united, early, 737, likely, removed, max, software, try, extends, jets, airlines


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Ryanair’s O’Leary says airlines are already paying ‘penal’ taxes for carbon emissions

The bosses of Europe’s biggest airlines have denied that their firms don’t pay a fair share of tax on air travel. “We are paying, on behalf of our customers, a penal level on aviation taxes,” said O’Leary, speaking in his role as chairman of the lobby group A4E (Airlines for Europe). In 2018 A4E airlines paid over 5 billion euros ($5.6 billion) in aviation and environmental taxes to Brussels or individual governments. Also speaking at the press conference was Willie Walsh, the CEO of Internation


The bosses of Europe’s biggest airlines have denied that their firms don’t pay a fair share of tax on air travel. “We are paying, on behalf of our customers, a penal level on aviation taxes,” said O’Leary, speaking in his role as chairman of the lobby group A4E (Airlines for Europe). In 2018 A4E airlines paid over 5 billion euros ($5.6 billion) in aviation and environmental taxes to Brussels or individual governments. Also speaking at the press conference was Willie Walsh, the CEO of Internation
Ryanair’s O’Leary says airlines are already paying ‘penal’ taxes for carbon emissions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airlines, european, ryanairs, taxes, air, oleary, penal, carbon, traffic, speaking, ryanair, walsh, tax, emissions, paying


Ryanair's O'Leary says airlines are already paying 'penal' taxes for carbon emissions

A Boeing 737-8AS (EI-EBN) of Ryanair is taxing while a fuel truck refille another plane in Brussels-Charleroi Airport on July 8, 2019.

The bosses of Europe’s biggest airlines have denied that their firms don’t pay a fair share of tax on air travel.

Share prices of European carriers slumped Wednesday after France’s transport ministry announced a new tax on domestic and international air travel that involves landing or taking off within the country.

The French government has been pressing the EU to take stiffer action against airlines and it is expected that the Netherlands will soon announce measures of its own.

Speaking at a press conference late Wednesday, Ryanair chief executive Michael O’Leary said there was a campaign of bias and misinformation around efforts by airlines and that carriers in Europe were not getting a “free ride.”

“We are paying, on behalf of our customers, a penal level on aviation taxes,” said O’Leary, speaking in his role as chairman of the lobby group A4E (Airlines for Europe).

The Ryanair chief said shipping accounted for more than double of global CO2 emissions, but plane operators were being unfairly maligned.

“Nobody runs articles saying let’s tax the ferries and the boats. It is always ‘tax the planes.'”

O’Leary said new taxes were regressive as they damaged free movement and peripheral European economies.

In 2018 A4E airlines paid over 5 billion euros ($5.6 billion) in aviation and environmental taxes to Brussels or individual governments.

Also speaking at the press conference was Willie Walsh, the CEO of International Airlines Group (IAG), the owner of British Airways.

Walsh addressed the fractured nature of European airspace as a key area in which carbon emissions could be reduced, calling for an overhaul to the bloc’s air traffic control system.

“We could do it tomorrow, yet politicians have been discussing this issue for over 18 years. It is now time for action,” Walsh said.

The executive said an integrated European air traffic control system would lead to quicker journeys, and fewer emissions with as much as 18 million tons of C02 removed from the skies each year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airlines, european, ryanairs, taxes, air, oleary, penal, carbon, traffic, speaking, ryanair, walsh, tax, emissions, paying


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Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Apple, Verizon, Best Buy, airlines & more

J.P. Morgan said the company’s fundamentals look more “stable.” Johnson Controls produces electronics and HVAC equipment for buildings. “We upgrade from UW to N on JCI, as the stock has de-rated and fundamentals look more stable now vs peers, with management executing the Battery divestiture in the least dilutive way possible (buybacks vs expensive M&A), lending confidence it will not overpay for premium valued assets. “


J.P. Morgan said the company’s fundamentals look more “stable.” Johnson Controls produces electronics and HVAC equipment for buildings. “We upgrade from UW to N on JCI, as the stock has de-rated and fundamentals look more stable now vs peers, with management executing the Battery divestiture in the least dilutive way possible (buybacks vs expensive M&A), lending confidence it will not overpay for premium valued assets. “
Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Apple, Verizon, Best Buy, airlines & more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-08  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, biggest, stock, way, airlines, best, analyst, stable, upgrade, vs, buy, produces, calls, uw, fundamentals, verizon, valued, day, apple, look


Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Apple, Verizon, Best Buy, airlines & more

J.P. Morgan said the company’s fundamentals look more “stable.” Johnson Controls produces electronics and HVAC equipment for buildings.

“We upgrade from UW to N on JCI, as the stock has de-rated and fundamentals look more stable now vs peers, with management executing the Battery divestiture in the least dilutive way possible (buybacks vs expensive M&A), lending confidence it will not overpay for premium valued assets. “


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-08  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, biggest, stock, way, airlines, best, analyst, stable, upgrade, vs, buy, produces, calls, uw, fundamentals, verizon, valued, day, apple, look


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This is the difference between ‘basic economy’ and ‘economy plus’ on a plane

“Economy Plus” is the latest way for airlines to upcharge consumers. And now, many domestic carriers are slicing up their economy class offerings into basic, standard and plus, further complicating the already complex ticketing process. Basic economyAll of these categories vary by carrier, but typically a basic economy ticket is the least expensive and most restrictive. Passengers who buy a United basic economy ticket, for example, cannot upgrade their seat, board last and can only bring on one


“Economy Plus” is the latest way for airlines to upcharge consumers. And now, many domestic carriers are slicing up their economy class offerings into basic, standard and plus, further complicating the already complex ticketing process. Basic economyAll of these categories vary by carrier, but typically a basic economy ticket is the least expensive and most restrictive. Passengers who buy a United basic economy ticket, for example, cannot upgrade their seat, board last and can only bring on one
This is the difference between ‘basic economy’ and ‘economy plus’ on a plane Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, passengers, ticket, offerings, plane, airlines, basic, seat, select, united, difference, plus, economy


This is the difference between 'basic economy' and 'economy plus' on a plane

“Economy Plus” is the latest way for airlines to upcharge consumers.

It can feel like you need an advanced degree to price out the best airline ticket. Between different tiers of seat selection, offerings like Wi-Fi and paying per additional inch of legroom, there are countless add-ons that increase a passenger’s ticket price. And now, many domestic carriers are slicing up their economy class offerings into basic, standard and plus, further complicating the already complex ticketing process. It’s the latest way airlines are upcharging customers with à la carte flight offerings. Here’s how to parse the terminology for the basics of economy ticketing for non-business travelers.

Basic economy

All of these categories vary by carrier, but typically a basic economy ticket is the least expensive and most restrictive. Passengers usually cannot select a seat, will have less legroom than other designations and sometimes will not be able to stow a bag in the overhead bins. Passengers who buy a United basic economy ticket, for example, cannot upgrade their seat, board last and can only bring on one personal item, which must fit under a seat. Main cabin tickets are a step up from basic economy, and, at least on American, Delta and United, include the use of overhead bin space and seat selection in the cost of a more expensive ticket.

Preferred seating

Selecting a seat with a main cabin ticket doesn’t always mean that you’re guaranteed more legroom or an aisle or window. With preferred seating, airlines charge customers even more to have access to seats closer to the front of the plane, or anywhere but the middle seat. Prices to select a seat range from $9 to over $100 in some cases, and major U.S. airlines including, American, Delta and United, all charge customers if they want to select a seat ahead of time. Preferred seating is different from an upgrade to a premium or business class seat, and is worth the cost for passengers who want to avoid a middle seat or exit the plane more quickly upon arrival. But paying to select a seat doesn’t necessarily mean more legroom.

Economy plus


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, passengers, ticket, offerings, plane, airlines, basic, seat, select, united, difference, plus, economy


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Here’s who bought what at this year’s Paris Air Show

PARIS – The 2019 Paris Air Show will run until Sunday as Le Bourget Airport, situated in the city’s northern suburbs, opens its doors to the public. It is hard to be certain of the true sales value of Boeing’s Paris Air Show but after the IAG rescue act, the list price total looks, like Airbus, to have trickled past $35 billion. Based on Embarer’s catalog pricing, the firm has taken orders of 78 aircraft, worth around $4.6 billion, during the Paris Air Show this week. An Embraer E195 jet airline


PARIS – The 2019 Paris Air Show will run until Sunday as Le Bourget Airport, situated in the city’s northern suburbs, opens its doors to the public. It is hard to be certain of the true sales value of Boeing’s Paris Air Show but after the IAG rescue act, the list price total looks, like Airbus, to have trickled past $35 billion. Based on Embarer’s catalog pricing, the firm has taken orders of 78 aircraft, worth around $4.6 billion, during the Paris Air Show this week. An Embraer E195 jet airline
Here’s who bought what at this year’s Paris Air Show Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, firm, aircraft, orders, airline, air, paris, airways, plane, price, airlines, bought, heres


Here's who bought what at this year's Paris Air Show

PARIS – The 2019 Paris Air Show will run until Sunday as Le Bourget Airport, situated in the city’s northern suburbs, opens its doors to the public. While the aircraft and technology will remain on full display, all the big airline representatives and major plane manufacturers will leave, drawing the back room negotiations and mega deals to a close. With the big announcements now made, CNBC takes a look at some of the contracts and promises announced in the commercial aviation sector since Monday.

Airbus

In the months leading up to the show, Airbus had few orders coming on to its books. Observers predicted that the firm, enjoying its 50th anniversary, would be keen to announce deals under the Parisian sun. The European plane maker kicked off Monday with a double-whammy press conference – first announcing the launch of its widely anticipated A321XLR and backing that up with 27 initial orders for the plane from Air Lease Corporation. The single-aisle plane is seen as an economic solution to airlines who want to serve long distances between smaller cities, and it gathered momentum throughout the week.

Airbus A321XLR Soruce: Airbus

50 XLR orders came in from American Airlines and 32 from Indigo Partners, the U.S. private equity fund run by airline investor Bill Franke. Other buyers of the XLR included Lebanon’s Middle East, Philippines’ Cebu Pacific Airlines, Qantas Airways and British Airways parent, IAG. The A320 and A321 new engine option (neo), on which the XLR is based, also proved popular with Airbus inking contracts with China Airlines, Cebu Pacific Airlines, and Saudi Arabian airlines. Virgin Atlantic signed up to 14 wide-body A330neos and said it would look at the option to buy six more. Virgin says it sees the expansion of Heathrow airport as an opportunity to become a second flag carrier out of the U.K. after British Airways. Contract value of the deals is not released but the sticker price before negotiation for completely new Airbus sales looks to have exceeded $35 billion.

Boeing

Boeing’s commercial aircraft team has had well documented problems leading up to this year’s Paris Air Show The grounding of the 737 Max plane following two fatal crashes has seen airline interest grind to a halt. Some felt the U.S, plane manufacturer might offer a steep discount to get some fresh momentum and belief behind the Max but after the opening Monday, typically a busy day for air show orders, Boeing had sold no new planes. Tuesday started slowly too until the aircraft maker announced that it had sold 20 of its 787-9 and 787-10 Dreamliner jets to Korean Air, marking its first plane sale since March.

A Boeing 787 Dreamliner in flight. Boeing Company | Paul Weatherman

Other orders came from China Airlines and Qatar Airways who bought six and five respectively of Boeing’s 777 freighter model. Blushes were spared when Boeing roared back with a huge 200 plane order by IAG for, crucially, the 737 Max. Observers speculated that the British Airways parent likely secured a huge discount to the list price of $24 billion, as well as noting that the deal was only a letter of intent rather than any firm order. Added to that were deals with GECAS for ten 737-800 converted freighters and a commitment by Air lease Corporation to buy 5 wide body 787 Dreamliners. It is hard to be certain of the true sales value of Boeing’s Paris Air Show but after the IAG rescue act, the list price total looks, like Airbus, to have trickled past $35 billion.

Best of the rest

Of the smaller manufacturers, Brazilian firm Embraer saved the best until last with a Wednesday evening deal to sell 15 of its E195 E2 jets to KLM. The Dutch airline, who will use the planes on its sister airline “Cityhopper,” also has an option to buy 20 more. Based on Embarer’s catalog pricing, the firm has taken orders of 78 aircraft, worth around $4.6 billion, during the Paris Air Show this week.

An Embraer E195 jet airliner on display at the 2019 Paris Air Show opened at Le Bourget Airport. Marina Lystseva | TASS | Getty Images

Meanwhile, the Japanese planemaker Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation announced it’s in discussions with an unnamed U.S. airline over the sale of its SpaceJet M100 aircraft. The aviation firm revealed at the Paris Air Show this week that the narrow-body regional plane should be ready for market in 2023. Moving all the way down in size, Israeli start-up Eviation said it was shaking up the airline industry with the launch of its 9 passenger all-electric plane. The battery-powered plane has yet to begin flight testing but already has a buyer. U.S. regional airline Cape Air is set to buy a “double-digit” number of the plane which has a list price of around $4 million each. First deliveries of the Eviation are set for 2022.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, firm, aircraft, orders, airline, air, paris, airways, plane, price, airlines, bought, heres


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American Airlines becomes first US airline to order new Airbus plane

American Airlines has agreed to order 50 of Airbus’ longest-range, single aisle aircraft, a big endorsement for the planes that Boeing’s chief rival unveiled earlier this week. IAG also ordered 14 Airbus XLR planes for its Iberia and Aer Lingus airlines. Neither American Airlines nor Airbus would disclose the financial terms of the deal, but American Airlines president Robert Isom said the XLR will initially cost the airline more than the A321neo. American is the first U.S.-based airline to orde


American Airlines has agreed to order 50 of Airbus’ longest-range, single aisle aircraft, a big endorsement for the planes that Boeing’s chief rival unveiled earlier this week. IAG also ordered 14 Airbus XLR planes for its Iberia and Aer Lingus airlines. Neither American Airlines nor Airbus would disclose the financial terms of the deal, but American Airlines president Robert Isom said the XLR will initially cost the airline more than the A321neo. American is the first U.S.-based airline to orde
American Airlines becomes first US airline to order new Airbus plane Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: phil lebeau leslie josephs, phil lebeau, leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, planes, xlr, airbus, american, plane, airlines, boeing, airline, order, routes, air


American Airlines becomes first US airline to order new Airbus plane

American Airlines has agreed to order 50 of Airbus’ longest-range, single aisle aircraft, a big endorsement for the planes that Boeing’s chief rival unveiled earlier this week.

The deal for the A321XLR jetliners, announced at the Paris Air Show on Wednesday, makes the Fort Worth-based airline the first major U.S. carrier to agree to buy the longest-range narrowbody plane Airbus now offers. Under the agreement, American will convert 30 of its orders for the smaller Airbus A321neo in favor of the longer-range model, and order an 20 additional A321XLRs.

The planes could replace some older aircraft like Boeing 757s. The new planes are aimed at longer routes where there aren’t enough travelers to support the expense of operating a larger twin-aisle jet.

American’s endorsement of the new Airbus planes comes as Boeing is mulling an all-new double-aisle plane targeting mid-range routes. Analysts had expected Boeing to unveil the new offering at the Paris Air Show. But hopes faded as the Chicago-based company has been hobbled by the crisis left by two fatal crashes of its best-selling 737 Max planes, which have been grounded since mid-March.

Boeing did win a surprise vote of confidence in the 737 Max during this year’s air show with a 200-plane order from British Airways’ parent International Consolidated Airlines Group, the first order for the beleaguered jets since they were grounded three months ago. IAG also ordered 14 Airbus XLR planes for its Iberia and Aer Lingus airlines.

Neither American Airlines nor Airbus would disclose the financial terms of the deal, but American Airlines president Robert Isom said the XLR will initially cost the airline more than the A321neo.

“My feeling is this aircraft certainly gives us much greater utility in the long run and at the end of the day will be worth quite bit more to us,” Isom said in a video discussing the deal released by American Airlines.

The 321XLR is expected to open more routes between the U.S. and smaller, secondary cities in Europe. For example, American could fly it between Philadelphia and Basel, Switzerland. “This opportunity, with the enhancements being made to the XLR are really cool,” said Isom.

Since Airbus announced plans for the plane on Monday, the company has racked up eight orders for more than 160 XLRs. Air Lease Corporation, which leases hundreds of airplanes to airlines around the world, placed the initial order for 27 XLRs. Air Lease CEO John Plueger told CNBC the plane is “a blockbuster.”

American is the first U.S.-based airline to order the newest Airbus plane, but Denver-based Frontier Airlines will also be flying the XLR shortly after deliveries begin in 2023. Frontier’s parent company, private equity firm, Indigo Partners placed an order for 50 XLR planes, with initial plans to put 18 of them into Frontier’s fleet, and the others in its stable of discount carriers in Latin America and Europe.

After the Paris Air Show in June 2011 American Airlines announced a massive 460-plane order that included both Boeing planes and Airbus jets, American’s first order from the European manufacturer in more than 20 years. The Airbus order included 260 planes, half of them for the neo, or new-engine option that provided more fuel efficiency.

A month later, Boeing unveiled the 737 Max, its fuel-saving update to the line of planes that had been flying since the 1960s.

— CNBC’s Meghan Reeder also contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: phil lebeau leslie josephs, phil lebeau, leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, planes, xlr, airbus, american, plane, airlines, boeing, airline, order, routes, air


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American Airlines’ pilots union ‘concerned’ about fixes for Boeing 737 Max after crashes

An American Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 arriving from Washington’s Ronald Reagan National Airport is seen taxiing to its gate at the Miami International Airport on March 12, 2019 in Miami, Florida. American Airlines’ pilots union is planning to tell lawmakers on Wednesday that it is concerned about whether training materials and updates for the grounded Boeing 737 Max will be sufficient. Dan Carey, president of Allied Pilots Association, which represents some 15,000 American Airlines pilots, plans


An American Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 arriving from Washington’s Ronald Reagan National Airport is seen taxiing to its gate at the Miami International Airport on March 12, 2019 in Miami, Florida. American Airlines’ pilots union is planning to tell lawmakers on Wednesday that it is concerned about whether training materials and updates for the grounded Boeing 737 Max will be sufficient. Dan Carey, president of Allied Pilots Association, which represents some 15,000 American Airlines pilots, plans
American Airlines’ pilots union ‘concerned’ about fixes for Boeing 737 Max after crashes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pilots, simulator, represents, airlines, fixes, crashes, max, boeing, concerned, training, union, american, 737, plane


American Airlines' pilots union 'concerned' about fixes for Boeing 737 Max after crashes

An American Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 arriving from Washington’s Ronald Reagan National Airport is seen taxiing to its gate at the Miami International Airport on March 12, 2019 in Miami, Florida.

American Airlines’ pilots union is planning to tell lawmakers on Wednesday that it is concerned about whether training materials and updates for the grounded Boeing 737 Max will be sufficient.

A House aviation panel is scheduled to hear from pilots, flight attendants and airline representatives at its second hearing about the plane, which has been grounded worldwide since mid-March after two fatal crashes within five months of one another killed a total of 346 people.

Boeing is scrambling to win regulators’ approval to get the 737 Max, its best-selling aircraft ever, flying again and to win back public trust after several surveys showed travelers might try to avoid the plane.

Dan Carey, president of Allied Pilots Association, which represents some 15,000 American Airlines pilots, plans to tell lawmakers Wednesday that Boeing has “made significant positive changes with the new software fixes,” according to written testimony reviewed by CNBC.

“However, at APA we remained concerned about whether the new training protocol, materials and method of instruction suggested by Boeing are adequate to ensure that pilots across the globe flying the MAX fleet can do so in absolute complete safety,” he said in his statement.

American Airlines has “been working closely with our pilots on the APA national safety committee on the suggested training and other issues concerning returning the 737 MAX back to revenue service,” said American spokesman Ross Feinstein. “We appreciate their input and collaboration.”

Airlines that have the 737 Max in their fleets, including American, Southwest and United, have canceled thousands of flights during the peak summer travel season as the plane remains out of service.

Boeing has developed a software upgrade for the jets but regulators have yet to sign off on those changes.

Carey also questioned whether the Federal Aviation Administration can ensure that pilots receive enough training “as aircraft are becoming more and more technologically sophisticated.”

Carey told CNBC the union has requested simulator time in the sole Boeing 737 Max full-motion simulator in the U.S., which is located in Miami, and said American told the union it can receive the simulator time after the plane is certified by the FAA. The pilots previously used a stationary simulator near Boeing’s production facility near Seattle.

American ordered a 737 Max simulator that should arrive by the end of the year, Feinstein said.

The Association of Professional Flight Attendants, which represents American’s cabin crew and is not testifying in person at Wednesday’s hearing, sent testimony to the House panel that says the issue of trust must be addressed before the plane flies again.

“If the public does not believe that the process of returning the 737 Max 8 to service is not the result of a thorough, rigorous, and transparent safety-driven process, then this aircraft will likely be forever tainted,” the statement said.

The House panel is also scheduled to hear from Airlines for America, an industry group that represents most of the largest U.S. airlines; the Association of Flight Attendants, which represents United Airlines cabin crew members; and Capt. Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger, famed for his 2009 “Miracle on the Hudson” landing of a US Airways Airbus jet.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pilots, simulator, represents, airlines, fixes, crashes, max, boeing, concerned, training, union, american, 737, plane


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Boeing wins first 737 Max order since deadly crashes in a 200-plane vote of confidence

An aerial photo shows Boeing 737 MAX airplanes parked on the tarmac at the Boeing Factory in Renton, Washington, U.S. March 21, 2019. Boeing on Tuesday won its first order for 737 Max planes since the jets were grounded worldwide in March after two fatal crashes. International Consolidated Airlines Group, or IAG, signed a letter of intent at the Paris Air Show to order 200 Boeing 737 Max planes. Aviation authorities grounded the Boeing 737 Max worldwide after two crashes within five months kille


An aerial photo shows Boeing 737 MAX airplanes parked on the tarmac at the Boeing Factory in Renton, Washington, U.S. March 21, 2019. Boeing on Tuesday won its first order for 737 Max planes since the jets were grounded worldwide in March after two fatal crashes. International Consolidated Airlines Group, or IAG, signed a letter of intent at the Paris Air Show to order 200 Boeing 737 Max planes. Aviation authorities grounded the Boeing 737 Max worldwide after two crashes within five months kille
Boeing wins first 737 Max order since deadly crashes in a 200-plane vote of confidence Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wins, deadly, 200plane, airlines, vote, crashes, regulators, max, boeing, iag, confidence, jets, order, 737, planes, flights


Boeing wins first 737 Max order since deadly crashes in a 200-plane vote of confidence

An aerial photo shows Boeing 737 MAX airplanes parked on the tarmac at the Boeing Factory in Renton, Washington, U.S. March 21, 2019.

Boeing on Tuesday won its first order for 737 Max planes since the jets were grounded worldwide in March after two fatal crashes. The vote of confidence from British Airways’ parent sent shares of the manufacturer sharply higher.

International Consolidated Airlines Group, or IAG, signed a letter of intent at the Paris Air Show to order 200 Boeing 737 Max planes. Boeing won’t post the planes on its monthly order tally until the agreement is finalized.

Aviation authorities grounded the Boeing 737 Max worldwide after two crashes within five months killed a total of 346 people. Boeing and airlines are awaiting approval from regulators to resume flights with the jets, but officials have said they have no firm timeline so far.

Boeing shares surged 5.4% to close at $373.96, outpacing the broader market and leading the Dow Jones Industrial Average higher. It was their biggest one-day percentage gain in almost five months.

IAG will use the jets order, which includes the 737 Max 8 and the larger Max 10 that Boeing is developing, for short-haul flights across its airlines, which also include Iberia, Aer Lingus and low-cost carriers Vueling and Level. The group’s narrowbody fleet is mostly A320s made by Boeing’s chief rival, Airbus.

“We have every confidence in Boeing and expect that the aircraft will make a successful return to service in the coming months having received approval from the regulators,” said IAG CEO Willie Walsh.

Boeing cut production of the 737 Max, its best-selling aircraft ever, by one-fifth and suspended deliveries of the planes after they were grounded.

The surprise order is welcome news for Boeing, which entered the air show hamstrung by the fallout from the crashes. It faces several investigations and lawsuits, customer airlines that have had to cut flights during the peak summer travel season due to the planes’ grounding, and passengers who may be too skittish to fly the 737 Max once regulators give it a green light.

The order would be worth $24 billion at list prices, Boeing said, but airlines often receive discounts. The planes that IAG is planning to buy would be delivered between 2023 and 2027.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wins, deadly, 200plane, airlines, vote, crashes, regulators, max, boeing, iag, confidence, jets, order, 737, planes, flights


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