Battle of the airport commute: CNBC tests Lyft, Uber Copter, Blade helicopter and mass transit in race to NYC’s busiest airport

Blade’s airport dealBlade’s airport helicopter service is $195 per seat anytime to any airport. BLADEUber Copter’s offerUber’s on-demand helicopter service, Uber Copter, doesn’t have fixed prices like Blade. The Uber service uses dual-engine aircraft that carry up to five passengers, with flights operated by HeliFlite a third-party charter company. BLADE – Blade, the Uber of helicopters is adding a new service to Teterboro, cutting a 45-minute drive from Manhattan to 4 minutes. Total cost for th


Blade’s airport dealBlade’s airport helicopter service is $195 per seat anytime to any airport. BLADEUber Copter’s offerUber’s on-demand helicopter service, Uber Copter, doesn’t have fixed prices like Blade. The Uber service uses dual-engine aircraft that carry up to five passengers, with flights operated by HeliFlite a third-party charter company. BLADE – Blade, the Uber of helicopters is adding a new service to Teterboro, cutting a 45-minute drive from Manhattan to 4 minutes. Total cost for th
Battle of the airport commute: CNBC tests Lyft, Uber Copter, Blade helicopter and mass transit in race to NYC’s busiest airport Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: ray parisi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airport, uber, mass, copter, jfk, lyft, total, nycs, blade, manhattan, service, minutes, helicopter, tests, terminal, cost, transit, race


Battle of the airport commute: CNBC tests Lyft, Uber Copter, Blade helicopter and mass transit in race to NYC's busiest airport

Few things are more annoying than suffering through the bumper-to-bumper traffic along the 10 to 20 miles that separate Manhattan from its three metro area airports. Two companies are now offering a cure for that God-awful commute: “affordable” chopper rides to New York’s three major airports — John F. Kennedy International Airport, Newark Liberty International and La Guardia, which served a combined 137.7 million passengers last year, according to the Port Authority of NY & NJ. That’s a lot of people clogging up roadways to make their flights. We tested the best way to cut that commute time, taking to the roads, air and rail to find out the fastest and most cost-efficient way to get to and from your terminal.

Blade is offering $95 private chopper rides to avoid pope congestion. Source: Blade

On-demand choppers

Two companies are making the dream of zooming over horrible traffic at 120 knots an hour a reality for New Yorkers. Blade Urban Mobility started offering on-demand helicopter service to New York-area airports this spring, followed by Uber Copter on July 9. Both companies allow users to book a chopper via an app on their smartphone. It’s almost as easy as ordering a car. The companies work like an on-demand car-pooling service for helicopters. Users reserve a seat over a window of time and then share the ride with other passengers. The competition and shared costs have turned a luxury once reserved for the super wealthy into one that’s still pricey, but more affordable than ever.

Blade’s airport deal

Blade’s airport helicopter service is $195 per seat anytime to any airport. The Bell 407GXP choppers can carry up to six passengers and operate from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday thru Friday and Sundays from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. The company flies back and forth from three helipads in Manhattan and typically offers on-demand flights several times an hour: Wall Street to LaGuardia

30th Street to JFK

Street to JFK and East 34th St. to Newark. Passengers can take one commercial carry-on that weighs up to 25 pounds per passenger and one personal item on board. Checked luggage is extra. Tote Taxi will shuttle two extra pieces of checked luggage weighing up to 200 pounds combined to JFK or LaGuardia for an additional $85 or Newark for $120. Blade users have to get themselves to the helipad, but a Blade SUV picks up clients at the JFK heliport and drops them at their terminal. Users can reserve seats on the app in real time and as far out as December. For return trips, the company’s website says it will monitor a user’s commercial flight’s arrival time so he or she can be transported to the next available Blade helicopter. And the company is also offering yearly memberships called Airport Pass with an up-front fee of $295 or $795 that reduces the price of every seat you book by $50 and $100 respectively.

BLADE

Uber Copter’s offer

Uber’s on-demand helicopter service, Uber Copter, doesn’t have fixed prices like Blade. It’s determined based on demand and is a bit pricier. The average cost typically ranges between $200 to $225, but could be more, depending on demand, Uber spokesman Matt Wing said. The deal includes an UberX, the app’s budget car option, that picks users up in select areas of New York, currently parts of lower Manhattan and the West Side. It drops them off at the Wall Street helipad to catch a chopper to JFK where another Uber vehicle transfers clients to their terminal. According to the company’s website, the service only operates between Wall Street and JFK during afternoon rush hours from Monday to Friday. It’s only available to Uber’s platinum and diamond reward members, lower status users won’t even see the chopper option on their apps, but Wing said Uber plans to expand to a wider user base. Uber’s service can be ordered in real time or up to five days in advance. Passengers can bring one carry-on weighing 40 pounds or less, plus a personal bag. The Uber service uses dual-engine aircraft that carry up to five passengers, with flights operated by HeliFlite a third-party charter company.

BLADE – Blade, the Uber of helicopters is adding a new service to Teterboro, cutting a 45-minute drive from Manhattan to 4 minutes. Source: Blade

Blade’s airport chopper

On Blade’s website, a promotional video suggests the airborne commute from Manhattan to JFK is 5 minutes, but that’s just time in the air. It doesn’t include time getting to the helipad or from the airport helipad to your terminal. CNBC sent four employees to test each service in an airport run during rush hour from Sullivan Street between Spring and Prince Streets in lower Manhattan to Kennedy Airport, the Big Apple’s busiest airport, which served 61.6 million passengers last year. The four modes of transportation measured were Uber Copter, Blade chopper, Lyft car service and mass transit. Each employee started their rush-hour commute from Manhattan’s Soho neighborhood at precisely 3:50 p.m. on a Wednesday in July. The finish line was JFK’s Terminal 8, an international terminal for American Airlines, British Airways and others that served 9 million passengers alone last year. Here are the results:

Uber Copter

CNBC producer Jessi Joseph scheduled an Uber Copter ride the day before, selecting a time window of 4 p.m. to 4:10 p.m. Her budget UberX was scheduled to pick her up at 3:52 p.m. and estimated her arrival at JFK Terminal 8 at between 4:47 p.m. and 4:52 p.m. On the day of the commute her driver arrived two minutes early. She departed from lower Manhattan at 3:50 p.m. and drove for 17 minutes to the Wall Street heliport. After checking in, she waited 18 minutes to board her chopper. Her helicopter took off at 4:25 p.m. Her total time in the air was 7 minutes and 7 seconds. At JFK, she waited 3 minutes for another Uber to pick her up and take her to Terminal 8. Her arrival time was 4:42 p.m., earlier than the the app’s estimate, bringing her total travel time to 52 minutes. Total cost for the all-inclusive Uber Copter deal: $228.57 or about $4.40 per minute.

Blade

BLADE

I reserved a Blade helicopter flight the day before with a time window of 4:11 p.m. to 4:50 p.m. The app processed my request and delivered a flight time of 4:25 p.m. I got into a Yellow Cab in Soho at 3:50 p.m., which took 17 minutes and cost $17.15, including tip. Check-in at the Blade lounge took seconds, leaving no time for a complimentary cocktail since my 4:25 p.m. departure was moved up to 4:10 p.m. because everyone arrived early at the helipad. The flight, which is promoted on the company’s website as “5 minutes” was 8 minutes and 12 seconds from liftoff to landing. Blade’s CEO Rob Wiesenthal tells CNBC flight times can be impacted by wind, weather and even temperature. A Blade SUV was ready and waiting at the JFK helipad, and within minutes I was delivered to Terminal 8. My total travel time from lower Manhattan was 42 minutes and the tab included $17.15 plus $195 for my seat in the Blade chopper. Total cost for the Blade airport commute was $212.15 or about $5.05 per minute.

Comparing the time and cost of four real-world commutes from Lower Manhattan to JFK Airport.

Mass transit

CNBC intern Phillip Minton walked about a minute to the Spring Street subway station. He took seven-minute ride on the uptown E train to Penn Station for $2.75 where he connected to a Long Island Rail Road train to Jamaica, which cost $7.75 and took about 19 minutes. The cost rises to $10.75 during peak hours.

A Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) train Spencer Platt | Getty Images

The AirTrain to Kennedy’s Terminal 8 cost $5 and took 16 minutes. Total travel time from lower Manhattan to Terminal 8 via mass transit was 66 minutes, the subway fare plus the tickets for the LIRR and Air Train cost a total of $15.50 or about 24 cents per minute.

Lyft

CNBC producer Erica Wright selected a Lux Black Lyft at 3:50 p.m. The company’s luxury black car took nearly six minutes to arrive at the same location in Soho. Waze originally estimated her drive would take an hour and 24 minutes, but it took just 63 minutes. Her total wait time, plus travel time from lower Manhattan to Terminal 8, was 72 minutes.

Lyft pricing is dynamic and on the the company’s site the cost estimate ranged from $140 to $160. Her final fare was $151.80, bringing her total cost for car service to about $2.11 per minute.

Reality check


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: ray parisi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airport, uber, mass, copter, jfk, lyft, total, nycs, blade, manhattan, service, minutes, helicopter, tests, terminal, cost, transit, race


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Shares of Cathay Pacific rebound, but the airline may still be in a ‘very tough place’

A view from a Cathy Pacific Jet which see another Cathay Pacific Jet Park in Hong Kong International Airport in Hong Kong, China. 23 May 2019 NurPhoto | Getty ImagesShares of Hong Kong airline Cathay Pacific rebounded in Wednesday morning trade. “It’s very, very hard for us to know what’s going to happen in the next upcoming days or even upcoming weeks simply because right now Cathay Pacific is unfortunately stuck in a very, very, very tough place.” Shares of Cathay Pacific jumped more than 2.5%


A view from a Cathy Pacific Jet which see another Cathay Pacific Jet Park in Hong Kong International Airport in Hong Kong, China. 23 May 2019 NurPhoto | Getty ImagesShares of Hong Kong airline Cathay Pacific rebounded in Wednesday morning trade. “It’s very, very hard for us to know what’s going to happen in the next upcoming days or even upcoming weeks simply because right now Cathay Pacific is unfortunately stuck in a very, very, very tough place.” Shares of Cathay Pacific jumped more than 2.5%
Shares of Cathay Pacific rebound, but the airline may still be in a ‘very tough place’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, safety, pacific, airline, international, airport, rebound, shares, kong, cathay, china, airlines, aviation, hong, tough, place


Shares of Cathay Pacific rebound, but the airline may still be in a 'very tough place'

A view from a Cathy Pacific Jet which see another Cathay Pacific Jet Park in Hong Kong International Airport in Hong Kong, China. 23 May 2019 NurPhoto | Getty Images

Shares of Hong Kong airline Cathay Pacific rebounded in Wednesday morning trade. Still, “much uncertainty” remains ahead in the market, according to Luya You, analyst for transportation research at Bocom International. “We believe … the most prudent way to treat the stock right now is to downgrade to neutral,” You — who disclosed ownership in Cathay Pacific stock — told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Wednesday. “It’s very, very hard for us to know what’s going to happen in the next upcoming days or even upcoming weeks simply because right now Cathay Pacific is unfortunately stuck in a very, very, very tough place.” Shares of Cathay Pacific jumped more than 2.5% in morning trade on Wednesday.

Right now Cathay Pacific is unfortunately stuck in a very, very, very tough place Luya You Analyst for transportation research at Bocom International

Cathay in the spotlight amid protests

You’s comments came as Hong Kong continues to be rocked by protests that have lasted for weeks and have seen outbursts of violence. Recent rounds have left operations at the city’s airport disrupted for two days. For its part, Cathay Pacific has come under increased scrutiny from Beijing, with the Chinese aviation regulatory body issuing a “major aviation safety risk warning” to the airline last week. The Civil Aviation Authority said that “on multiple occasions,” Cathay’s flight personnel have participated in “violent assault,” according to CNBC’s translation. “The incidents pose a serious threat to aviation safety, causing adverse social impact and as a result is increasing inbound aviation safety threats from Hong Kong to the mainland,” it said. It also ordered the carrier to provide identification information for its crew on mainland-bound flights, and said that crew members that do not receive the authority’s approval won’t be allowed into its airspace, including on flights bound for other destinations. Asked if other airlines could benefit from the misfortunes of Cathay Pacific, You said it was possible but “it’s a little bit too early” at the moment, as the Chinese aviation authority was “still waiting” to see the carrier’s response. “If things do significantly … deteriorate then potentially yes, you know, the other airlines such as Air China, China Southern, even foreign airlines at Hong Kong International Airport could benefit from any displaced demand that goes from Cathay to anywhere else,” she said.

‘Very critical period’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: eustance huang
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Hong Kong protesters offer apologies, China doubles down after airport clash

Pro-democracy protestors block the entrance to the airport terminals after a scuffle with police at Hong Kong’s international airport late on August 13, 2019. China said on Wednesday Hong Kong’s protest movement had reached “near terrorism” and more street clashes followed ugly scenes the previous day when protesters set upon men they suspected of being government sympathizers. Ten weeks of increasingly violent confrontation between police and protesters have plunged Hong Kong into its worst cri


Pro-democracy protestors block the entrance to the airport terminals after a scuffle with police at Hong Kong’s international airport late on August 13, 2019. China said on Wednesday Hong Kong’s protest movement had reached “near terrorism” and more street clashes followed ugly scenes the previous day when protesters set upon men they suspected of being government sympathizers. Ten weeks of increasingly violent confrontation between police and protesters have plunged Hong Kong into its worst cri
Hong Kong protesters offer apologies, China doubles down after airport clash Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: everett rosenfeld
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kongs, doubles, protesters, scenes, chinese, hong, china, apologies, movement, offer, clash, kong, late, demonstrators, airport


Hong Kong protesters offer apologies, China doubles down after airport clash

Pro-democracy protestors block the entrance to the airport terminals after a scuffle with police at Hong Kong’s international airport late on August 13, 2019.

China said on Wednesday Hong Kong’s protest movement had reached “near terrorism” and more street clashes followed ugly scenes the previous day when protesters set upon men they suspected of being government sympathizers.

The United States said it was deeply concerned at news of Chinese police forces gathering near the border, urged Hong Kong’s government to respect freedom of speech, and issued a travel advisory urging caution when visiting the city.

By nightfall, police and protesters were again facing off on the streets, with riot officers shooting tear gas almost immediately as their response to demonstrators toughens.

Ten weeks of increasingly violent confrontation between police and protesters have plunged Hong Kong into its worst crisis since it reverted from British to Chinese rule in 1997.

Flights resumed on Wednesday amid heightened security at Hong Kong airport, which is one of the world’s busiest, after two days of disruptions sparked by protesters swarming the airport and, late Tuesday, detaining there two men they suspected opposed them.

China’s Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office in Beijing called the behavior at the airport no different to terrorism and said it must be severely punished.

“We’re deeply sorry about what happened yesterday,” read a banner held up by a group of a few dozen demonstrators in the airport arrivals hall in the morning.

“We were desperate and we made imperfect decisions. Please accept our apologies,” the banner said.

In chaotic scenes that would once have been unthinkable for Hong Kong, a peaceful sit-in at the airport turned violent late on Tuesday as protesters confronted and held a man they believed was an undercover Chinese agent.

Busloads of riot police arrived in response, clashing with furious demonstrators before withdrawing once the man was removed, and leaving the terminal briefly in control of activists who then detained a Chinese reporter for a short time.

It was not clear whether the scenes of violence might have eroded the broad support the movement has so far attracted in Hong Kong, a major financial hub. The protests have also hit the city’s faltering economy.

“We promise to reflect and to improve,” protesters said in one message distributed on social media app Telegram.

“Sorry we were too reckless … we are only afraid of losing your support to the whole movement due to our mistake, and that you give up on fighting.”

They also showed little sign of relenting in their protests, which began in opposition to a now-suspended bill that would have allowed the extradition of suspects for trial in mainland China, but have swelled into wider calls for democracy.

Hundreds attended a demonstration in the residential area of Sham Shui Po, where police arrived and quickly used tear gas after protesters pointed lasers at the police station.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: everett rosenfeld
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kongs, doubles, protesters, scenes, chinese, hong, china, apologies, movement, offer, clash, kong, late, demonstrators, airport


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China media says Hong Kong protesters are ‘asking for self-destruction’ as military assembles nearby

Anti-government protesters attend a demonstration at Hong Kong Airport, China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | ReutersChinese propaganda outlets warned on Tuesday that protesters in Hong Kong are “asking for self-destruction,” as they released a video showing military vehicles amassing near the border of the city. Hong Kong’s airport reopened Tuesday early morning after airport authorities canceled all flights on Monday, blaming demonstrators’ disruption to regular operations. Despite that reopen


Anti-government protesters attend a demonstration at Hong Kong Airport, China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | ReutersChinese propaganda outlets warned on Tuesday that protesters in Hong Kong are “asking for self-destruction,” as they released a video showing military vehicles amassing near the border of the city. Hong Kong’s airport reopened Tuesday early morning after airport authorities canceled all flights on Monday, blaming demonstrators’ disruption to regular operations. Despite that reopen
China media says Hong Kong protesters are ‘asking for self-destruction’ as military assembles nearby Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, media, assembles, protesters, peoples, asking, hong, china, airport, beijing, selfdestruction, military, kong, nearby, city


China media says Hong Kong protesters are 'asking for self-destruction' as military assembles nearby

Anti-government protesters attend a demonstration at Hong Kong Airport, China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | Reuters

Chinese propaganda outlets warned on Tuesday that protesters in Hong Kong are “asking for self-destruction,” as they released a video showing military vehicles amassing near the border of the city. Meanwhile, the city’s embattled leader, Carrie Lam, told the news media on Tuesday that “lawbreaking activities in the name of freedom” were damaging the rule of law and that the Asian financial hub’s recovery from anti-government protests could take a long time. Her comments came after Beijing said widespread anti-government protests in the semi-autonomous city showed “sprouts of terrorism,” and such violence must be severely punished, “without leniency, without mercy.” Hong Kong’s airport reopened Tuesday early morning after airport authorities canceled all flights on Monday, blaming demonstrators’ disruption to regular operations. Another sit-in is expected to take place at the airport, a major global hub, on Tuesday. Despite that reopening, Hong Kong flag carrier Cathay Pacific said it had cancelled over 200 flights to and out of the airport for the day, according to its website. The protest at the airport, while disruptive, was largely peaceful. That’s in contrast to Sunday night, where protesters appeared to have thrown Molotov cocktails at police stations around the city and dozens of protesters were arrested.

Beijing’s clear message

On Monday, Chinese officials focused on what they described as “deranged acts” by the protesters, including throwing gasoline bombs, saying they marked the emergence of terrorism in the Chinese city. “Radical Hong Kong protesters have repeatedly used extremely dangerous tools to attack police officers,” Yang Guang, a spokesman for the Chinese government’s Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, said in a news briefing on Monday, according to Chinese state broadcaster CCTV. China’s media is sending a clear signal to the protesters. On Monday afternoon, Chinese state-owned English tabloid the Global Times tweeted a video showing the People’s Armed Police assembling in Shenzhen, a city bordering Hong Kong, about a 1.5 hour- drive away. The People’s Daily, the official newspaper of China’s Communist Party, posted on Chinese social media a statement saying the People’s Armed Police are in Shenzhen prepared to handle “riots, disturbance, major violence and crime and terrorism-related social security issues.” In a Tuesday social media post from the Global Times‘ Chinese edition, the outlet said “if Hong Kong rioters cannot read the signal of having armed police gathering in Shenzhen, then they are asking for self-destruction,” according to a CNBC translation. China is “implying they might send in the People’s Liberation Army or issue direct intervention but they don’t want to,” according to Ben Bland, a director at Sydney-based policy think tank Lowy Institute. “(Beijing) hopes that the signals will scare protesters to back down,” but if and when Beijing decides to deploy troops they will not “advertise it,” he told CNBC. This is all part of a “delicate dance between China and Hong Kong” that’s reached a critical point because there is almost no common ground or overlapping interests between the protesters and Beijing, Bland added. Although China’s leaders do not want to deploy the PLA, they are “willing to do it if they have to,” the Asia politics expert said. Hong Kong’s former governor, Chris Patten, said on Tuesday that if China intervened in the city, it would be a “catastrophe” and that Chinese President Xi Jinping should see the wisdom of trying to bring people together. Patten called on British Prime Minister Boris Johnson to garner support from its allies to ensure Beijing does not intervene.

Protests continue


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: grace shao
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Hong Kong airport returns to calm, after riot police clashed with protesters earlier

Riot police disperse anti-extradition bill protesters during a mass demonstration after a woman was shot in the eye, at the Hong Kong international airport, in Hong Kong China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | ReutersThe Hong Kong airport returned to calm as most protesters left the airport early Wednesday morning. At the airport, protesters discussed among themselves whether they should simply block all access to the facility. On Tuesday, President Donald Trump tweeted that U.S. intelligence info


Riot police disperse anti-extradition bill protesters during a mass demonstration after a woman was shot in the eye, at the Hong Kong international airport, in Hong Kong China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | ReutersThe Hong Kong airport returned to calm as most protesters left the airport early Wednesday morning. At the airport, protesters discussed among themselves whether they should simply block all access to the facility. On Tuesday, President Donald Trump tweeted that U.S. intelligence info
Hong Kong airport returns to calm, after riot police clashed with protesters earlier Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: matt clinch
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Hong Kong airport returns to calm, after riot police clashed with protesters earlier

Riot police disperse anti-extradition bill protesters during a mass demonstration after a woman was shot in the eye, at the Hong Kong international airport, in Hong Kong China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | Reuters

The Hong Kong airport returned to calm as most protesters left the airport early Wednesday morning. Earlier, riot police clashed with pro-democracy protesters late Tuesday night, moving into the terminal where the demonstrators had shut down operations at the busy transport hub for two straight days. The Tuesday night demonstrations involved officers armed with pepper spray and batons confronting the protesters who used luggage carts to barricade entrances to the airport terminal. Police took several people into a police van waiting at the entrance to the airport’s arrivals hall. Police said they tried to help ambulance officers reach an injured man whom protesters had detained on suspicion of being an undercover agent. Protesters also detained a second man who they suspected of being an undercover agent. After emptying out his belongings, they found a blue T-shirt that has been worn by pro-Beijing supporters that they said was evidence he was a spy.

Earlier in the day, authorities were forced to cancel all remaining flights as the city’s pro-Beijing leader warned that the protesters had pushed events onto a “path of no return.” After a brief period when flights were able to take off and land, the airport authority suspended check-in services for departing flights as of 4:30 p.m. Departing flights that had completed the process were able to continue to operate. It said it did not expect arriving flights to be affected, although dozens were already canceled. The authority advised people not to come to the airport, one of the world’s busiest. More than 200 flights were canceled Monday and the airport was effectively shut down with no flights taking off or landing. Passengers have been forced to stay in the city while airlines tried to find other ways to get them to their destinations. For Grace Bendal, a 43-year-old contractor from the Philippines, Tuesday was the second straight day she came to the airport only to learn flights were canceled. She spent the weekend in Hong Kong with her primary school-age children, who were eager to return to classes. She said they have already missed two days of school and the extra day in the city has cost her around 3,000 Hong Kong dollars ($400). Though there were no airline employees at check-in counters Tuesday evening, Bendal said she and her children planned to stay at the airport all night. “I cannot blame them, because they are fighting for something,” Bendal said of the protesters. “But then it’s not right if we are the ones suffering.” The airport disruptions are an escalation of a summer of demonstrations aimed at what many Hong Kong residents see as an increasing erosion of the freedoms they were promised in 1997 when Communist Party-ruled mainland China took over what had been a British colony. The protests have built on an opposition movement that shut down much of the city for seven weeks in 2014 before it eventually fizzled and its leaders were jailed on public disturbance charges. The central government in Beijing has ominously characterized the current protest movement as something approaching “terrorism” that poses an “existential threat” to citizens. While Beijing tends to define terrorism broadly, extending it especially to nonviolent movements opposing government policies in minority regions such as Tibet and Xinjiang, its use of the term in relation to Hong Kong raised the prospect of greater violence and the possible suspension of legal rights for those detained.

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam said the instability, chaos and violence have placed the city on a “path of no return.” The black-clad demonstrators have shown no sign of letting up on their campaign to force Lam’s administration to respond to their demands, including that she step down and scrap proposed legislation under which some suspects could be sent to mainland China, where critics say they could face torture and unfair or politically charged trials. Lam has rejected all calls for dialogue, part of what analysts say is a strategy to wear down the opposition movement through police action while prompting demonstrators to take more violent and extreme actions that will turn the Hong Kong public against them. At the airport, protesters discussed among themselves whether they should simply block all access to the facility. Meanwhile, paramilitary police were assembling across the border in the city of Shenzhen for exercises that some saw as a threat to increase force against the mostly young protesters who have turned out by the thousands in the past 10 weeks. On Tuesday, President Donald Trump tweeted that U.S. intelligence informed him that Chinese troops were being moved to the Hong Kong border.

Anti-government protesters try to prevent a passenger from breaching a barricade in front of departure gates, during a demonstration at Hong Kong Airport, China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | Reuters


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: matt clinch
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Hong Kong airport cancels all flights for the remainder of the day due to protests

Hong Kong International Airport, one of the world’s busiest terminals, has canceled all departures for the remainder of the day, citing serious disruption due to protests. The airport authority said Monday it had canceled all flights not yet checked in by the afternoon. Around 5,000 anti-government protesters had been demonstrating at the airport for a fourth day on Monday. Some activists had reportedly moved to the departure area and caused disruption, according to the Hong Kong police. The air


Hong Kong International Airport, one of the world’s busiest terminals, has canceled all departures for the remainder of the day, citing serious disruption due to protests. The airport authority said Monday it had canceled all flights not yet checked in by the afternoon. Around 5,000 anti-government protesters had been demonstrating at the airport for a fourth day on Monday. Some activists had reportedly moved to the departure area and caused disruption, according to the Hong Kong police. The air
Hong Kong airport cancels all flights for the remainder of the day due to protests Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12  Authors: matt clinch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airport, cancels, remainder, canceled, serious, flights, day, public, hong, international, disruption, kong, protests, car


Hong Kong airport cancels all flights for the remainder of the day due to protests

Hong Kong International Airport, one of the world’s busiest terminals, has canceled all departures for the remainder of the day, citing serious disruption due to protests.

The airport authority said Monday it had canceled all flights not yet checked in by the afternoon. Around 5,000 anti-government protesters had been demonstrating at the airport for a fourth day on Monday. Some activists had reportedly moved to the departure area and caused disruption, according to the Hong Kong police. The police declined to say if it would move to clear the demonstrators.

The airport authority said in a statement: “Airport operations at Hong Kong International Airport have been seriously disrupted as a result of the public assembly at the airport today.”

“The traffic to the airport is very congested, and the car park spaces at all car parks are already full. Members of the public are advised not to come to the airport,” it added. It later advised all passengers to leave the terminal building as soon as possible.

The increasingly violent protests since June have plunged the Asian financial hub into its most serious crisis in decades and are one of the biggest popular challenges to Chinese leader Xi Jinping since he came to power in 2012.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12  Authors: matt clinch
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Hundreds of protesters sit in at Hong Kong airport to reiterate their ‘five demands’

Several hundreds of protesters, many of them young and donning black T-shirts, handed out anti-government flyers in more than 16 languages to arrival passengers at the Hong Kong International Airport on Friday. “Please forgive us for the ‘unexpected’ Hong Kong,” the English leaflets read. Yet for this Hong Kong, we fight,” the flyers said according to Reuters. Protesters said they wanted to reiterate their demands and put their case “in front of an international audience,” according to social me


Several hundreds of protesters, many of them young and donning black T-shirts, handed out anti-government flyers in more than 16 languages to arrival passengers at the Hong Kong International Airport on Friday. “Please forgive us for the ‘unexpected’ Hong Kong,” the English leaflets read. Yet for this Hong Kong, we fight,” the flyers said according to Reuters. Protesters said they wanted to reiterate their demands and put their case “in front of an international audience,” according to social me
Hundreds of protesters sit in at Hong Kong airport to reiterate their ‘five demands’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, international, demands, flyers, protesters, travel, airport, retraction, hong, hundreds, kong, sit, reiterate, terminal, passengers, according


Hundreds of protesters sit in at Hong Kong airport to reiterate their 'five demands'

Several hundreds of protesters, many of them young and donning black T-shirts, handed out anti-government flyers in more than 16 languages to arrival passengers at the Hong Kong International Airport on Friday.

“Please forgive us for the ‘unexpected’ Hong Kong,” the English leaflets read. “You’ve arrived in a broken, torn-apart city, not the one you have once pictured. Yet for this Hong Kong, we fight,” the flyers said according to Reuters.

Protesters said they wanted to reiterate their demands and put their case “in front of an international audience,” according to social media posts from demonstrators.

The massive travel hub connects the city to more than 220 global destinations and served 74.7 million passengers last year, according to the airport’s website.

Airport authorities said only departing passengers with travel documents will be allowed to enter Terminal 1 on Friday morning, as the airport braces for what protesters are describing as a three-day event. The terminal serves long-haul flights.

Online platforms such as Instagram, Telegram, Airdrop and local Hong Kong forums have become the main means of organization among protesters because they give some anonymity to users.

The demands were originally released in July, a day after a small group of protesters stormed the Hong Kong legislature:

a full withdrawal of a proposed bill that would allow Hong Kong people to be extradited to mainland China

a retraction of any characterization of the movement as a “riot”

a retraction of charges against anti-extradition protesters

an independent committee to investigate the Hong Kong police’s use of force

universal suffrage in elections for the city’s chief executive officer and legislature by 2020

So far, Hong Kong authorities have given no concessions, though Chief Executive Carrie Lam “suspended” the extradition bill last month.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, international, demands, flyers, protesters, travel, airport, retraction, hong, hundreds, kong, sit, reiterate, terminal, passengers, according


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American tries to woo business travelers with better seats and faster airport screening

American Airlines is courting international business travelers with priority treatment on the ground as the airline aims to bring in more revenue from the lucrative passengers. These passengers traveling under corporate contracts will also be prioritized during disruptions such as weather or other operational problems. American rolled out those perks in April for corporate travelers booked on American flights. The airline is also planning to allow corporate travelers to book a preferred seat on


American Airlines is courting international business travelers with priority treatment on the ground as the airline aims to bring in more revenue from the lucrative passengers. These passengers traveling under corporate contracts will also be prioritized during disruptions such as weather or other operational problems. American rolled out those perks in April for corporate travelers booked on American flights. The airline is also planning to allow corporate travelers to book a preferred seat on
American tries to woo business travelers with better seats and faster airport screening Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-05  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, woo, airport, travelers, business, corporate, passengers, american, seats, perks, max, screening, airlines, preferred, priority, faster, revenue, tries, better


American tries to woo business travelers with better seats and faster airport screening

American Airlines is courting international business travelers with priority treatment on the ground as the airline aims to bring in more revenue from the lucrative passengers.

American is extending perks like free access to preferred seats, those toward the front of the coach cabin that generally carry a fee, and priority access for airport security lines, ticket counters and boarding for passengers booked through American on its trans-Atlantic partner airlines British Airways, Finnair and Spain’s Iberia.

These passengers traveling under corporate contracts will also be prioritized during disruptions such as weather or other operational problems. American has been grappling with a host of cancellations this summer from storms, the worldwide grounding of the Boeing 737 Max and what it has called an “illegal work slowdown” by the unions representing its mechanics.

American rolled out those perks in April for corporate travelers booked on American flights. The airline is also planning to allow corporate travelers to book a preferred seat on its website and app.

The moves are part of a battle between carriers for important corporate customers, who are generally willing to pay more to book close to the date of travel. American lost some market share to competitors after the Max was grounded in mid-March but bounced back in the middle of the second quarter, the airline’s head of revenue management, Don Casey, said on an earnings call last month.

Since regulators grounded the Max planes after a crash in Indonesia in October and another in Ethiopia in March, airlines have been trying to find ways to protect high-paying corporate travelers’ trips by consolidating flights on key business routes.

“On a year-over-year basis, there hasn’t been a very material change in the completion factor for corporate customers,” Casey said American’s call in July. “So, we’ve done a good job of figuring out … what to cancel.”

WATCH: The U.S. hasn’t had a fatal commercial plane crash in 10 years. Here’s why


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-05  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, woo, airport, travelers, business, corporate, passengers, american, seats, perks, max, screening, airlines, preferred, priority, faster, revenue, tries, better


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Delta says the next big battle between airlines will take place on the ground

PhotoAlto/Thierry Foulon | Brand X Pictures | Getty ImagesThere are some aspects of the airport experience that airlines can’t do anything about. For the airlines like Delta, it does not matter that some of the terminal experience is beyond their control. Delta is collecting as much data as it can from passengers to improve the travel experience. Wall Street is watchingWall Street is focusing more on the airport experience in its analysis of airline stocks. Delta is among the airlines that have


PhotoAlto/Thierry Foulon | Brand X Pictures | Getty ImagesThere are some aspects of the airport experience that airlines can’t do anything about. For the airlines like Delta, it does not matter that some of the terminal experience is beyond their control. Delta is collecting as much data as it can from passengers to improve the travel experience. Wall Street is watchingWall Street is focusing more on the airport experience in its analysis of airline stocks. Delta is among the airlines that have
Delta says the next big battle between airlines will take place on the ground Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-21  Authors: eric rosenbaum, leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, battle, ground, place, airport, experience, travel, jacobson, airports, making, delta, mayerowitz, big, airlines, airline


Delta says the next big battle between airlines will take place on the ground

The airline industry is experiencing strong financial performance — Delta Air Lines recently hit a record stock price, and United Airline Holdings grew profits in its latest earnings as the U.S. economy continues its decade-long run. In fact, airline industry conditions are so good, longtime airline-stock hater Warren Buffett of Berkshire Hathaway became one of the sector’s biggest investors in recent years after a wave of consolidation brought the fleets closer to the almost monopoly conditions he looks for in businesses. But other recent highs in air travel are not so positive: Airports all over the country are setting new records in monthly passenger levels, making the airport experience one of the worst “legs” in a traveler’s journey. As a result, major airlines flush with money for reinvestment are making the on-the-ground experience a greater focus of their efforts to out-compete rival carriers. “I think the next area of competition in air travel is in the airport,” Paul Jacobson, executive vice president and CFO of Delta said at the CNBC @Work Human Capital + Finance conference in Chicago last Tuesday. “How do you continue to streamline the on-the-ground experience. It is a big part of how passengers rate the experience.” In major metro areas the two biggest issues in airport satisfaction are access to the airport (with so many major airports far from city centers) and the terminal itself, at No. 1, according to J.D. Power. “The most common PR headline from any airport any month is ‘X airport sets new monthly passenger record,'” said Mike Taylor, J.D. Power’s travel practice leader. But that does not necessarily mean it is good PR with so many airports so dated.

PhotoAlto/Thierry Foulon | Brand X Pictures | Getty Images

There are some aspects of the airport experience that airlines can’t do anything about. Only 6% more airports have been built in the U.S. since 1980, despite 181% more domestic passengers. “They can’t build another four-lane highway to the airport,” Taylor said. “Most of the airports are shoehorned into areas never meant to handle this much traffic.” Those problems don’t end once at the airport, either: Many parking lots closest to terminals at some of the busiest U.S. airports are now completely full and closed on multiple days per week. This is the type of on-the-ground frustration that leads to missed flights, and missed flights lead to the blame being placed all around. “People are more stressed on the airport and airlines side of things, and they blame both,” Taylor said. For the airlines like Delta, it does not matter that some of the terminal experience is beyond their control. Taylor said that when an aircraft closes and sits on the ground because the FAA is holding them there, passengers do not complain about the FAA. “They paid the airline, and they pick up the cocktail napkin and swear at it.” For more on tech, transformation and the future of work, join CNBC at the @ Work: People + Machines Summit in San Francisco on Nov. 4. Leaders from Dropbox, Sas, McKinsey and more will teach us how to balance the needs of today with the possibilities of tomorrow, and the winning strategies to compete. Scott Mayerowitz, executive editorial director of travel information site The Points Guy, said the airport experience is unique in the travel journey as being so bad, and it is an important part of the journey that is underexamined. “Until my head hits the pillow in a hotel room, I am on the go, and it all matters,” Mayerowitz said. Delta is collecting as much data as it can from passengers to improve the travel experience. “We survey everything,” Jacobson told those attending the CNBC event in Chicago. “A lot of that comes down to the psychology of the customer and understanding what each leg in the journey makes the customer feel like.”

Wall Street is watching

Wall Street is focusing more on the airport experience in its analysis of airline stocks. Hunter Keay, a Wolfe Research analyst who covers Delta, wrote that the Delta CFO is correct in his focus on the airport as a competitive key. Keay wrote in a late 2018 research note that Delta’s major investment in “investment-starved airports” like New York City’s LaGuardia “are not so much an act of generosity but a strategic decision that we believe will further widen DAL’s competitive advantage to peers by driving up costs for marginal competitors there that lack scale, pricing power, or both. … This is literally a 20-year competitive advantage DAL is building today, arguably the hardest one yet for competitors to copy.” Delta is investing $12 billion over a five-year period investing in its airport infrastructure, primarily at New York City’s LaGuardia, Los Angeles International, Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, Salt Lake City International Airport and Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. “Airports have always been a challenge for airlines who haven’t been able to crack that code due to more pressing capital needs internally, fear of committing to longer-term, big dollar projects due to business cycle risk with questionable balance sheets, or the challenges of driving buy-in or consensus with the government agencies that run these airports. But it seems to us that DAL is figuring this thing out,” Keay wrote. One of the terminal chokepoints where Delta made an investment is through a stake it owns in biometric screening company Clear. Jacobson pointed to the Clear investment as part of its efforts to streamline the passenger experience through investments in technology. “We’ve made big bets in technology in the past few years thinking we can turn it around into revenue generation,” the Delta CFO said at the CNBC event. Jacobson said technology like Clear should ultimately improve the experience beyond the security checkpoint. “I think ultimately the technology around identification, whether facial recognition or fingerprints, is coming to all transactions,” Jacobson said. “Delta has recognized that security is a horrible headache for people,” Mayerowitz said. “Clear is at many more airports than before because of the Delta investment, and they’ve done saturation at their key hubs. ” Mayerowitz, who is a Clear member, added, “In two to three minutes at LGA or JFK, I can make it from the curb to the other side of security. Clear gets me to the front of the precheck line, and I just put my bag in and walk through and I’m done.”

The timing is right for airlines

A focus on future revenue is one of the reasons why Delta is making the investments now, before a recession hits and operating conditions weaken. Yael Taqqu, a senior partner at management consultant McKinsey, who spoke on a panel with Jacobson at CNBC’s @Work Human Capital + Finance conference, said investments like the ones Delta is making now are designed to be “revenue enhancements” out ahead of the next downturn. “In a downturn, the wedge between digital haves and have nots, which is already wide, will get wider,” said Taqqu. Taylor said the timing is right from an airline industry perspective too. “You have to have three things happen to really expand airports. The economy has to be good, the airline has to be making money, and policies have to be right. These days, we have all three of them working in the airlines favor. … When they are not making money, those things get put on hold. They would like to have everything set up for the passenger to be happy before getting on the craft.” Airlines also are running out of ways to improve and “disaggregate” — price-tier — the in-cabin experience. “Right now airlines have healthy profits and are reinvesting,” Mayerowitz said. “Delta likes to brag that they have the most inflight seatback TVs of any airline, and they’ve built a business around what they say is a superior product in the sky, and it commands a revenue premium, people willing to spend $10-$15 extra. But at the end of the day, there is only so much you can do to increase costs in the sky.” He added of Delta’s focus on the terminal, “They are right, especially as airlines cram more seats into planes and come up with hideous slim-line bathrooms just so they can get an extra row of seats in.” Delta is among the airlines that have cut down bathroom size in some cabins to add an extra back row.

Airports are just pretty bus terminals. There is only so much you can do. Scott Mayerowitz The Points Guy executive editorial director


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-21  Authors: eric rosenbaum, leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, battle, ground, place, airport, experience, travel, jacobson, airports, making, delta, mayerowitz, big, airlines, airline


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Mueller witness George Nader charged with transporting 14-year-old boy for sex, child porn

This 1998 frame from video provided by C-SPAN shows George Nader, president and editor of Middle East Insight. George Nader, a key witness in special counsel Robert Mueller’s probe, has been charged in a new federal indictment with transporting a 14-year-old boy for sex two decades ago, child porn and carrying obscene materials into the United States. The new charges against Nader, a 60-year-old Middle East power broker, were revealed Friday in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Vir


This 1998 frame from video provided by C-SPAN shows George Nader, president and editor of Middle East Insight. George Nader, a key witness in special counsel Robert Mueller’s probe, has been charged in a new federal indictment with transporting a 14-year-old boy for sex two decades ago, child porn and carrying obscene materials into the United States. The new charges against Nader, a 60-year-old Middle East power broker, were revealed Friday in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Vir
Mueller witness George Nader charged with transporting 14-year-old boy for sex, child porn Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, witness, transporting, charged, middle, nader, zayed, washington, prince, child, george, boy, mueller, sex, transportation, airport, united, porn


Mueller witness George Nader charged with transporting 14-year-old boy for sex, child porn

This 1998 frame from video provided by C-SPAN shows George Nader, president and editor of Middle East Insight. As an adviser to Abu Dhabi’s crown prince, Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Nader worked throughout 2017 with Elliott Broidy, a fundraiser for President Donald Trump, in a secretive lobbying effort to alter U.S. policy in the Middle East.

George Nader, a key witness in special counsel Robert Mueller’s probe, has been charged in a new federal indictment with transporting a 14-year-old boy for sex two decades ago, child porn and carrying obscene materials into the United States.

The new charges against Nader, a 60-year-old Middle East power broker, were revealed Friday in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia.

Nader — who has been an adviser to Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed Al-Nahyan of the United Arab Emirates — already was being held in jail without bail after his arrest at a New York City airport in early June on a charge of transporting child pornography.

The charge used to arrest Nader at that time was based on an allegation this iPhone contained images of minors engaged in sexually explicit conduct when he flew into Washington Dulles International Airport in January 2018.

That same allegation is contained in the new indictment charging him with transportation of visual depictions of minors, as well as another count accusing him of importation or transportation of obscene matters.

The third count accuses Nader of knowingly transporting a 14-year-old boy from Europe to Washington Dulles Airport in February 2000, and then allegedly engaging in sexual acts with that child after he took him to Nader’s home in Washington.

Nader, who remains detained without bail, is scheduled to go on trial in the case on September 30. He holds dual citizenship, in Lebanon and in the United States.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, witness, transporting, charged, middle, nader, zayed, washington, prince, child, george, boy, mueller, sex, transportation, airport, united, porn


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