This map shows how Amazon’s warehouses are rapidly expanding across the country

One major way Amazon has been able to achieve this goal is by building out a sprawling network of warehouses around the country. Amazon launched its warehouse network in 1997 with two fulfillment centers in Seattle, Washington and New Castle, Delaware. This map shows where Amazon’s fulfillment centers are scattered across the country. Amazon said it has more than 110 active fulfillment centers in the US and more than 185 centers globally. Amazon has opened the most fulfillment centers in Califor


One major way Amazon has been able to achieve this goal is by building out a sprawling network of warehouses around the country.
Amazon launched its warehouse network in 1997 with two fulfillment centers in Seattle, Washington and New Castle, Delaware.
This map shows where Amazon’s fulfillment centers are scattered across the country.
Amazon said it has more than 110 active fulfillment centers in the US and more than 185 centers globally.
Amazon has opened the most fulfillment centers in Califor
This map shows how Amazon’s warehouses are rapidly expanding across the country Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-19  Authors: nate rattner annie palmer, nate rattner, annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, locations, shows, expanding, country, warehouses, amazons, washington, company, rapidly, amazon, network, way, fulfillment, map, centers


This map shows how Amazon's warehouses are rapidly expanding across the country

Amazon has transformed online shopping by making the delivery process fast, cheap and relatively painless for consumers.

One major way Amazon has been able to achieve this goal is by building out a sprawling network of warehouses around the country. These facilities are typically at least 100,000 square feet in size and house all kinds of product inventory.

Amazon launched its warehouse network in 1997 with two fulfillment centers in Seattle, Washington and New Castle, Delaware. The company began adding new locations at a rapid pace in 2005, according to MWPVL International, a supply chain and logistics consulting firm.

Within the last two decades, Amazon fulfillment centers have popped up in almost every corner of the U.S., as the company has pushed to bring items closer to customers to enable faster deliveries. Amazon doubled down on that effort last April when it announced it would shorten Prime’s two-day free shipping plan to one day.

This map shows where Amazon’s fulfillment centers are scattered across the country. Amazon said it has more than 110 active fulfillment centers in the US and more than 185 centers globally. Of the centers on the map, 33 are planned locations that have either been confirmed by Amazon or published in media reports.

Amazon has opened the most fulfillment centers in California and it appears to be planning many future locations across the southern US.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-19  Authors: nate rattner annie palmer, nate rattner, annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, locations, shows, expanding, country, warehouses, amazons, washington, company, rapidly, amazon, network, way, fulfillment, map, centers


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Amazon reportedly wants to turn your hand into a credit card

People shop at the newly opened Amazon Go Store on May 07, 2019 in New York City. The cashier-less store, the first of this type of store, called Amazon Go, accepts cash and is the 12th such store in the United States located at Brookfield Place in downtown New York. The company already has major plans to expand its Amazon Go stores, which allow shoppers to buy without cashiers or checkout, as well as its voice payment service called Amazon Pay. Amazon will have to address concerns from card iss


People shop at the newly opened Amazon Go Store on May 07, 2019 in New York City.
The cashier-less store, the first of this type of store, called Amazon Go, accepts cash and is the 12th such store in the United States located at Brookfield Place in downtown New York.
The company already has major plans to expand its Amazon Go stores, which allow shoppers to buy without cashiers or checkout, as well as its voice payment service called Amazon Pay.
Amazon will have to address concerns from card iss
Amazon reportedly wants to turn your hand into a credit card Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-18  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wants, reportedly, credit, store, terminals, working, hand, turn, wall, company, amazons, street, stores, amazon, card


Amazon reportedly wants to turn your hand into a credit card

People shop at the newly opened Amazon Go Store on May 07, 2019 in New York City. The cashier-less store, the first of this type of store, called Amazon Go, accepts cash and is the 12th such store in the United States located at Brookfield Place in downtown New York.

Technology giant Amazon is working to allow customers to connect their credit card information to their hands, so that they can scan for purchases with their palms at checkout areas in physical stores, people familiar with the project told The Wall Street Journal.

While Amazon’s plan is in the early stages, the company has reportedly begun working with Visa on testing out the terminals, and has discussed the project with Mastercard, JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo and Synchrony Financial.

The company previously filed a patent for a “non-contact biometric identification system” that features a “hand scanner” to produce a picture of a person’s palm.

The news offers a look into Amazon’s ideas on transforming the way people shop in brick-and-mortar stores, and how it could work with credit card companies to further integrate itself into people’s financial lives.

The company already has major plans to expand its Amazon Go stores, which allow shoppers to buy without cashiers or checkout, as well as its voice payment service called Amazon Pay.

Amazon will have to address concerns from card issuers and customers over how terminals would detect fraud and the amount of personal information the company will receive from the scans.

Data collected from the terminals would be stored on Amazon’s cloud and used to study consumers’ Amazon.com spending habits, according to The Journal.

An Amazon spokesperson declined CNBC’s request to comment.

Read the full report in the Wall Street Journal


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-18  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wants, reportedly, credit, store, terminals, working, hand, turn, wall, company, amazons, street, stores, amazon, card


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Wall Street sees Amazon rejoining the trillion-dollar club later this year

The e-commerce giant currently has a market cap of $931 billion, but analysts on Wall Street are betting Amazon will be back in the club soon. Apple has a market value of $1.38 trillion, Microsoft has a market value of $1.27 trillion and the group’s newest member, Alphabet, has a market value around $1.0 trillion. There’s an exclusive club on Wall Street and it might let Amazon back in this year. This means analysts on Wall Street expect Amazon’s market value to reach about $1.08 trillion by yea


The e-commerce giant currently has a market cap of $931 billion, but analysts on Wall Street are betting Amazon will be back in the club soon.
Apple has a market value of $1.38 trillion, Microsoft has a market value of $1.27 trillion and the group’s newest member, Alphabet, has a market value around $1.0 trillion.
There’s an exclusive club on Wall Street and it might let Amazon back in this year.
This means analysts on Wall Street expect Amazon’s market value to reach about $1.08 trillion by yea
Wall Street sees Amazon rejoining the trillion-dollar club later this year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trilliondollar, rejoining, share, trillion, wall, later, sees, market, amazon, stock, value, price, street, club


Wall Street sees Amazon rejoining the trillion-dollar club later this year

Trailing closely behind is Jeff Bezos-led Amazon. The e-commerce giant currently has a market cap of $931 billion, but analysts on Wall Street are betting Amazon will be back in the club soon.

The so-called trillion-dollar club, which includes tech giants Apple , Microsoft and now Google-parent Alphabet , is the group of companies with a market value of $1 trillion or more. Apple has a market value of $1.38 trillion, Microsoft has a market value of $1.27 trillion and the group’s newest member, Alphabet, has a market value around $1.0 trillion.

There’s an exclusive club on Wall Street and it might let Amazon back in this year.

The average 12-month price target for Amazon is $2,188 per share, a 16.5% upside to its current share price, according to FactSet. This means analysts on Wall Street expect Amazon’s market value to reach about $1.08 trillion by year-end. (This projection does not account for share buybacks. Amazon’s market cap could come in a bit smaller if Amazon buys back its own stock, reducing share count.)

In September 2018, Amazon joined the trillion-dollar club for the first time, but has since lost some of its value because of heavy investments in last mile and 1-day delivery, grocery delivery and content for its streaming platform Amazon Prime Video.

“Amazon’s high-margin businesses continue to allow Amazon to drive greater profitability while still continuing to invest,” Morgan Stanley equity analyst Brian Nowak said in a note to clients on Thursday. Morgan Stanley raised its price target for Amazon to $2,200 per share from $2,100.

UBS hiked its price target for Amazon to $2,305 from $2,100 on Friday, more than 20% upside to Thursday’s closing price of $1,877 per share. UBS is bullish on Amazon’s investment in 1-Day Prime shipping, which will likely result in increased purchase frequency, the firm said.

But UBS said Amazon is the most hotly debated stock among investors after last quarter earnings showed a miss on Amazon’s cloud business’ sales, which could be a drag on future earnings as it has provided the bulk of Amazon’s operating income for the past four years.

Plus, Amazon has come under fire from politicians for its disruption of the retail industry. Despite the “break-up of big tech” threats for Washington, Wall Street remains bullish on the stock that has grown almost 3000% in the past two decades.

Amazon is almost universally loved on Wall Street. Of the 50 analysts that cover the stock, 47 recommend buying the stock, according to FactSet. Three analysts have a hold rating.

If Amazon tops $1 trillion, it is unlikely any tech giants will sneak into the club anytime soon. The next closest candidate is social media company Facebook, with a market value of $632.6 billion. Analysts, on average, see Facebook’s market value increasing in the next 12 months is to $697.1 billion, according to FactSet.

—with reporting CNBC’s Nate Rattner and Michael Bloom.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trilliondollar, rejoining, share, trillion, wall, later, sees, market, amazon, stock, value, price, street, club


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Here are Friday’s biggest analyst calls of the day: Apple, Amazon, Netflix, Pinterest & more

Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during an announcement of new products at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference Monday, June 4, 2018, in San Jose, Calif. Here are the biggest calls on Wall Street on Friday:UBS said in its downgrade that Twitter’s ongoing investments into safety, security, and advertising technology could be an earnings headwind for 2020. “As we enter 2020, we see TWTR at a bit of a crossroads – we con’t to hear from ad industry contacts that 2020 should be a year where TWTR’s plat


Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during an announcement of new products at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference Monday, June 4, 2018, in San Jose, Calif.
Here are the biggest calls on Wall Street on Friday:UBS said in its downgrade that Twitter’s ongoing investments into safety, security, and advertising technology could be an earnings headwind for 2020.
“As we enter 2020, we see TWTR at a bit of a crossroads – we con’t to hear from ad industry contacts that 2020 should be a year where TWTR’s plat
Here are Friday’s biggest analyst calls of the day: Apple, Amazon, Netflix, Pinterest & more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, day, tim, calls, analyst, twtr, worldwide, investments, pinterest, fridays, biggest, 2020, wall, twitters, amazon, twtrs, apple, netflix


Here are Friday's biggest analyst calls of the day: Apple, Amazon, Netflix, Pinterest & more

Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during an announcement of new products at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference Monday, June 4, 2018, in San Jose, Calif.

Here are the biggest calls on Wall Street on Friday:

UBS said in its downgrade that Twitter’s ongoing investments into safety, security, and advertising technology could be an earnings headwind for 2020.

“As we enter 2020, we see TWTR at a bit of a crossroads – we con’t to hear from ad industry contacts that 2020 should be a year where TWTR’s platform is set to capitalize on large scale global events (Olympics, European football championship & US election) but exiting from its ‘buggy’ summer we think TWTR mgmt also is likely to persist with investments around safety/security and ad tech stack.”

Read more about this call here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, day, tim, calls, analyst, twtr, worldwide, investments, pinterest, fridays, biggest, 2020, wall, twitters, amazon, twtrs, apple, netflix


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PopSockets CEO says Amazon uses ‘bullying with a smile’ to press for lower prices

Popular phone accessory maker PopSockets accused Amazon of “strong-arming” it and failing to remove fake products. “One of the strangest relationships I’ve had with a retailer is with Amazon,” Barnett said. “Like any brand, however, PopSockets is free to choose which retailers it supplies and chose to stop selling directly through Amazon,” the spokesperson said. PopSockets is just one of many brands that have publicly expressed their dissatisfaction with selling products on Amazon’s marketplace.


Popular phone accessory maker PopSockets accused Amazon of “strong-arming” it and failing to remove fake products.
“One of the strangest relationships I’ve had with a retailer is with Amazon,” Barnett said.
“Like any brand, however, PopSockets is free to choose which retailers it supplies and chose to stop selling directly through Amazon,” the spokesperson said.
PopSockets is just one of many brands that have publicly expressed their dissatisfaction with selling products on Amazon’s marketplace.
PopSockets CEO says Amazon uses ‘bullying with a smile’ to press for lower prices Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tactics, relationship, ceo, bullying, barnett, prices, uses, amazon, selling, popsockets, sell, directly, company, products, lower, smile, press


PopSockets CEO says Amazon uses 'bullying with a smile' to press for lower prices

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos attends a commemoration ceremony held in front of Saudi consulate on the first anniversary of his murder, in Istanbul, Turkey on October 02, 2019.

Popular phone accessory maker PopSockets accused Amazon of “strong-arming” it and failing to remove fake products.

David Barnett, CEO of PopSockets, testified during a House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee hearing on competition in the digital economy in Colorado on Friday. Barnett claims Amazon pressured PopSockets to lower the price of its products on the platform and said if it failed to do so, the company would source product from the “grey market,” or third-party sellers. PopSockets sells grips that attach to the back of cellphones.

“One of the strangest relationships I’ve had with a retailer is with Amazon,” Barnett said. “The agreement appears to be negotiated in good faith, but what happens is there are phone calls where we get bullying with a smile.”

An Amazon spokesperson told CNBC in a statement that the company sought to continue working with PopSockets to provide “competitive prices, availability, broad selection and fast delivery” for those products to its customers.

“Like any brand, however, PopSockets is free to choose which retailers it supplies and chose to stop selling directly through Amazon,” the spokesperson said. “Even so, we’ve continued to work with PopSockets to address our shared concerns about counterfeit, and continue to have a relationship with PopSockets through Merch by Amazon, which enables other sellers to create customized PopSockets for sale.”

Barnett said Amazon uses a variety of tactics to “bully” businesses, such as threatening to send excess inventory back at a cost to the company. He also disputed Amazon’s argument that there are other online marketplaces for businesses to sell their goods.

“We sell on the Walmart platform, sales are 1/38th of the sales we had on Amazon when we had a relationship,” Barnett said. “And Target it’s even less. These are small fractions.”

PopSockets is just one of many brands that have publicly expressed their dissatisfaction with selling products on Amazon’s marketplace. In 2018, PopSockets attempted to stop selling directly with Amazon, citing the aggressive pricing atmosphere and other controlling tactics, such as not allowing PopSockets to sell its products through a distributor. Barnett said PopSockets is now “testing” a direct selling relationship with Amazon.

Amazon said it requires some popular, widely available brands to sell to it directly to guarantee it’s offering the lowest prices compared to those offered at other stores.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tactics, relationship, ceo, bullying, barnett, prices, uses, amazon, selling, popsockets, sell, directly, company, products, lower, smile, press


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Execs tell Congress how they’ve been burned by tech giants in a rare public rebuke

Sonos CEO Patrick Spence, PopSockets CEO David Barnett, Basecamp CTO David Heinemeier Hansson and Tile General Counsel Kirsten Daru took the stand. On Friday, executives from four companies aired their grievances about the Big Tech giants to Congress without the protection of a closed door. Like any brand, however, PopSockets is free to choose which retailers it supplies and chose to stop selling directly through Amazon. The witnesses described some of the tactics that could make smaller players


Sonos CEO Patrick Spence, PopSockets CEO David Barnett, Basecamp CTO David Heinemeier Hansson and Tile General Counsel Kirsten Daru took the stand.
On Friday, executives from four companies aired their grievances about the Big Tech giants to Congress without the protection of a closed door.
Like any brand, however, PopSockets is free to choose which retailers it supplies and chose to stop selling directly through Amazon.
The witnesses described some of the tactics that could make smaller players
Execs tell Congress how they’ve been burned by tech giants in a rare public rebuke Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, giants, congress, amazon, developers, execs, big, spence, tell, rare, public, companies, rebuke, tech, apple, sonos, theyve, app, popsockets, burned, google


Execs tell Congress how they've been burned by tech giants in a rare public rebuke

But witnesses at Friday’s testimony to the House Antitrust Subcommittee at the University of Colorado said they felt they were in a position to speak out despite potential risks to their businesses. Sonos CEO Patrick Spence, PopSockets CEO David Barnett, Basecamp CTO David Heinemeier Hansson and Tile General Counsel Kirsten Daru took the stand.

While criticisms of Facebook , Google , Apple and Amazon are far from uncommon these days among academics and politicians, as well as privately by developers and advertisers, it’s more rare to see these concerns raised publicly by companies that still rely on Big Tech’s services.

On Friday, executives from four companies aired their grievances about the Big Tech giants to Congress without the protection of a closed door.

An Amazon spokesperson said in a statement, “We sought to continue working with Popsockets as a vendor to ensure that we could provide competitive prices, availability, broad selection and fast delivery for those products to our customers. Like any brand, however, PopSockets is free to choose which retailers it supplies and chose to stop selling directly through Amazon. Even so, we’ve continued to work with PopSockets to address our shared concerns about counterfeit, and continue to have a relationship with PopSockets through Merch by Amazon, which enables other sellers to create customized PopSockets for sale.”

The witnesses described some of the tactics that could make smaller players who rely on the large tech firms’ services wary of coming forward. Barnett accused Amazon of what he called “bullying with a smile,” for example. He claimed Amazon executives would call to pressure the company to lower prices on the platform or risk Amazon sourcing PopSocket products from third-party sellers. PopSockets ultimately ended their relationship with Amazon, but Barnett said they continued to have trouble communicating with the company after that about resolving their balance.

“I feel that this is a big enough issue that people need to speak out,” Spence told lawmakers. “We have a responsibility to speak for those that can’t.”

Spence said his company is “in the fortunate position where I think we’re strong enough financially” to speak out, though he said he is still “taking a risk.” Sonos filed suit against Google for patent infringement last week and alleges Amazon behaved similarly but that it does not have the capacity to sue both simultaneously.

Spence said companies like Google and Amazon use their dominance to both subsidize products in new markets they are entering and impose restrictions on third-parties to maintain their dominance. In his opening remarks, Spence accused Google of refusing to let Sonos integrate Google Assistant into its products if it implemented a feature that lets users host multiple voice assistants at the same time. As a result, Spence said, Sonos customers must choose a single voice assistant on their devices through an app (he said Amazon, which lets Sonos users access Alexa, did not place similar restrictions on that feature).

“There’s such a dominant power that exists with these companies that when Google or companies like that are asking for these things, you really, even for a company of our size, feel that you have no choice but to provide them,” Spence said.

A Google spokesperson said in a statement that “Sonos has made misleading statements about our history of working together. Our technology and devices were designed independently. We deny their claims vigorously, and will be defending against them.”

Hansson, the Basecamp CTO, blasted Facebook and Google’s advertising models, focusing in particular on Google’s search advertising, which he called a “shakedown.” Despite working to build a good reputation online for 20 years to show up in the first page of search results, Hansson said, “the only thing that matters is whether you buy the advertisement” at the top of the results.

“For trademarked terms like the name of a business, our policy balances the interest of both users and advertisers,” a Google spokeperson told CNBC is response to Hansson’s statements. “Like other platforms, we allow competitors to bid on trademarked terms because it offers users more choice when they are searching. However, if a trademark owner files a complaint, we will block competitors from using their business name in the actual ad text.”

Facebook declined to comment comment on the hearing.

Daru, of Tile, lodged her complaints against Apple for its restrictions on its App Store and for creating a product similar to Tile’s item-finding technology. Daru said the competition in itself isn’t the problem, but unlike a third-party app like Tile, Apple’s own “Find My” apps ship by default on Apple devices. Daru also said Apple’s new requirements for developers, which it touts as privacy advancements, further entrench its own technology instead.

Competing with Apple is like “playing a soccer game,” said Daru. “You might be the best team in the league, but you’re playing against a team that owns the field, the ball, the stadium and the entire league and they can change the rules of the game … at any time.”

In a statement, Apple said, “In regard to third-party apps, we created the App Store with two goals in mind: that it be a safe and trusted place for customers to discover and download apps, and a great business opportunity for all developers. We continually work with developers and take their feedback on how to help protect user privacy while also providing the tools developers need to make the best app experiences.”

Lawmakers wrapped up the hearing by asking what they could do to alleviate the stress the witnesses have felt from Big Tech firms.

“These dominant companies can infringe the intellectual property and invention of other companies and they do it calculating the fact that if they have to pay down the road, if that’s enforced later on, they’ll pay the fee and by that point the competition will be out of it and they’ll be so dominant that it’s a rounding error at the end of the day,” Spence said. “So swift action on that front and material action is something that I think would help.”

“We don’t have the resources to fight Amazon. We didn’t sue Amazon. We never will sue Amazon,” Barnett said. “We could use some help.”

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WATCH: How US antitrust law works, and what it means for Big Tech


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, giants, congress, amazon, developers, execs, big, spence, tell, rare, public, companies, rebuke, tech, apple, sonos, theyve, app, popsockets, burned, google


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Tennessee Gov. Lee to sign anti-LGBTQ adoption bill despite Amazon, Nike opposition

Bill Lee speaks during a Gospel Music Association ceremony in Nashville. He plans to sign an adoption bill that the LGBTQ community and many businesses say is discriminatory. Bill Lee’s plans to sign an anti-LGBTQ adoption bill into law. Dubbed the “Slate of Hate” by activists, the proposals have prompted several businesses to reaffirm their opposition to anti-LGBTQ laws. In April of last year, 11 companies signed a letter in coalition with the Human Rights Campaign denouncing Tennessee’s anti-L


Bill Lee speaks during a Gospel Music Association ceremony in Nashville.
He plans to sign an adoption bill that the LGBTQ community and many businesses say is discriminatory.
Bill Lee’s plans to sign an anti-LGBTQ adoption bill into law.
Dubbed the “Slate of Hate” by activists, the proposals have prompted several businesses to reaffirm their opposition to anti-LGBTQ laws.
In April of last year, 11 companies signed a letter in coalition with the Human Rights Campaign denouncing Tennessee’s anti-L
Tennessee Gov. Lee to sign anti-LGBTQ adoption bill despite Amazon, Nike opposition Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: sully barrett
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nashville, lee, businesses, tennessees, bill, sign, amazon, gov, opposition, lgbtq, states, plans, antilgbtq, tennessee, nike, despite, adoption


Tennessee Gov. Lee to sign anti-LGBTQ adoption bill despite Amazon, Nike opposition

Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee speaks during a Gospel Music Association ceremony in Nashville. He plans to sign an adoption bill that the LGBTQ community and many businesses say is discriminatory.

Businesses are expressing disappointment in response to Gov. Bill Lee’s plans to sign an anti-LGBTQ adoption bill into law. The bill protects businesses, adoption agencies and foster-care homes that exclude LGBTQ families and now allows them to use taxpayer dollars, and it has been opposed by major corporations since last April, when the state’s house passed the measure. It was passed by the state’s senate earlier this week.

Amazon, which plans to bring 5,000 jobs to Nashville as part of Tennessee’s largest jobs deal ever, said in a statement: “Amazon does not support this legislation. We have a long history of supporting equality and we’re opposed to laws that discriminate or encourage discrimination.”

The bill is the latest in a stream of Tennessee legislation that limits the rights of LGBTQ people and protects organizations that deny service to the LGBTQ community from legal consequences. Dubbed the “Slate of Hate” by activists, the proposals have prompted several businesses to reaffirm their opposition to anti-LGBTQ laws.

In April of last year, 11 companies signed a letter in coalition with the Human Rights Campaign denouncing Tennessee’s anti-LGBTQ legislative momentum, including Nike, Hilton, Lyft, IKEA, Marriott and several others. However, companies including Amazon contacted by CNBC did not indicate any change in plans in response to Lee’s announcement.

Warby Parker co-founder and co-CEO Dave Gilboa said in an email to CNBC, “Nashville is Warby Parker’s second home, and we want to see the city and state continue to thrive. We strongly urge Governor Lee to reconsider.”

A Nike spokesman said the company did not have anything to add beyond the HRC letter it signed in April. Hilton also declined to comment further.

Asurion, one of Nashville’s top 10 biggest employers, said in a statement that the bill “does not align with our company’s commitment to inclusion.” It declined to comment on potential business consequences.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: sully barrett
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nashville, lee, businesses, tennessees, bill, sign, amazon, gov, opposition, lgbtq, states, plans, antilgbtq, tennessee, nike, despite, adoption


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At age 30, Jeff Bezos thought this would be his one big regret in life

In 1994, Jeff Bezos worked at hedge fund D. E. Shaw, tasked with researching potential business opportunities involving the then brand-new internet landscape. I thought, ‘You know, when I’m 80, I’m not going to think about that. I knew for a fact, I have this idea, and if I don’t try, I’m going to regret having never tried,” he said. “And I know also, if I try and fail, I’ll never regret having tried and failed. Although he had a hunch regarding the growth of the internet, Bezos never expected A


In 1994, Jeff Bezos worked at hedge fund D. E. Shaw, tasked with researching potential business opportunities involving the then brand-new internet landscape.
I thought, ‘You know, when I’m 80, I’m not going to think about that.
I knew for a fact, I have this idea, and if I don’t try, I’m going to regret having never tried,” he said.
“And I know also, if I try and fail, I’ll never regret having tried and failed.
Although he had a hunch regarding the growth of the internet, Bezos never expected A
At age 30, Jeff Bezos thought this would be his one big regret in life Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, life, moment, thought, going, big, jeff, regret, bezos, idea, company, tried, internet, age


At age 30, Jeff Bezos thought this would be his one big regret in life

In 1994, Jeff Bezos worked at hedge fund D. E. Shaw, tasked with researching potential business opportunities involving the then brand-new internet landscape. That’s when Bezos found a staggering statistic that sparked an idea to start his own business.

“I found this fact on a website that the web was growing at 2,300 percent per year,” Bezos told CNBC in a 2001 interview. “The idea that sort of entranced me was this idea of building a bookstore online.”

Of course, Amazon grew from an online bookseller to an e-commerce behemoth with a market cap of more than $920 billion.

But at age 30, when Bezos was deciding what to do about his idea — stick with his stable New York City job or give it up to start his own business — he tried to imagine what he would regret more, leaving Wall Street, or staying.

“I pictured myself 80 years old, thinking back on my life in a quiet moment of reflection,” he during a fireside chat in India on Wednesday. “Would I regret leaving this company in the middle of the year? And walking away from my annual bonus?

“All of those things that in the moment can be very confusing. I thought, ‘You know, when I’m 80, I’m not going to think about that. I’m not even going to remember it.'”

Bezos said he was “trying to figure out how to make this decision, because in the moment, personal life decisions, those choices, can be very challenging,” he said Wednesday.

“I wanted not to have regrets. I knew for a fact, I have this idea, and if I don’t try, I’m going to regret having never tried,” he said. “And I know also, if I try and fail, I’ll never regret having tried and failed.

“As soon as I thought about it that way, I knew I had to try.”

At the time it was a risky move, as the internet was not well known, despite its rapid rate of growth.

“Anything growing that fast, even if its baseline usage was tiny, it’s going to be big. I looked at that, and I was like ‘I should come up with a business idea on the internet and let the internet grow around this,'” he said during a September 2018 episode of “The David Rubenstein Show: Peer-to-Peer Conversations.”

He added, “I picked books because books is super unusual in one respect, which is that there are more book items in the book category than there are items in any other category.”

Bezos took the leap of faith, quit his job and moved to the suburbs of Seattle, where he started working on Amazon in his garage.

His decision paid off – Amazon grew quickly, going public in 1997 with $16 million in revenue and 180,000 customers spanning more than 100 countries, according to its SEC filing.

Although he had a hunch regarding the growth of the internet, Bezos never expected Amazon to grow to the extent it has today.

“What’s actually happened over the last 25 years is way beyond my expectations. I was delivering the packages myself, we were selling books. I was hoping to build a company, but not the company you see today,” he said Wednesday.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, life, moment, thought, going, big, jeff, regret, bezos, idea, company, tried, internet, age


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Jeff Bezos says this is what he would have done if Amazon didn’t work out

Twenty-six years ago, Jeff Bezos had an idea that inspired him to quit his stable job at a hedge fund in New York. He moved to the suburbs of Seattle to work out of his garage and build a business that would ultimately become Amazon. Bezos launched the business as an online book seller in 1995, and today the e-commerce behemoth has a market capitalization of over $926 billion. “What’s actually happened over the last 25 years [at Amazon] is way beyond my expectations,” Bezos said during a firesid


Twenty-six years ago, Jeff Bezos had an idea that inspired him to quit his stable job at a hedge fund in New York.
He moved to the suburbs of Seattle to work out of his garage and build a business that would ultimately become Amazon.
Bezos launched the business as an online book seller in 1995, and today the e-commerce behemoth has a market capitalization of over $926 billion.
“What’s actually happened over the last 25 years [at Amazon] is way beyond my expectations,” Bezos said during a firesid
Jeff Bezos says this is what he would have done if Amazon didn’t work out Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, idea, bezos, amazon, work, business, company, went, way, software, jeff, didnt, according, job


Jeff Bezos says this is what he would have done if Amazon didn't work out

Twenty-six years ago, Jeff Bezos had an idea that inspired him to quit his stable job at a hedge fund in New York. He moved to the suburbs of Seattle to work out of his garage and build a business that would ultimately become Amazon.

Bezos launched the business as an online book seller in 1995, and today the e-commerce behemoth has a market capitalization of over $926 billion.

“What’s actually happened over the last 25 years [at Amazon] is way beyond my expectations,” Bezos said during a fireside chat in India on Wednesday. “I was hoping to build a company, but not a company like what you see today.”

So Bezos’ gamble paid off in a huge way, but if it hadn’t worked out? What would he have done?

“I would be an extremely happy software programmer somewhere,” Bezos said Wednesday.

(He would, however, be a lot less rich. Today, the average salary for a software programmer is around $92,000 per year, according to Glassdoor. Bezos’ current net worth is $116 billion, according to Forbes.)

“We all have passions, and you don’t get to choose them,” Bezos said at the 2016 Pathfinder Awards. His has always been computers, according to Wired.

In fact, a young Bezos set out pursue a career involving computers and automation. He graduated from Princeton University in 1986 with a degree in electrical engineering and computer science.

After graduation Bezos turned down job offers from a few technology companies, including Intel, Bell Labs and Anderson Consulting, and went to work “debugging code” at a telecommunications start-up called Fitel, according to Wired. After two years, Bezos left Fitel to be a software developer at Bankers Trust (which since has been acquired by Deutsche Bank).

From there, Bezos planned to leave the bank and commit to finding a job in tech, as he originally wanted, rather than continuing in financial services. But instead in 1990 he went to work for hedge fund D. E. Shaw after clicking with founder David Shaw, who was also a computer scientist.

There, Bezos was put in charge of researching potential business opportunities in what was a relatively new landscape: the internet. During a brainstorming session, Bezos came up with the idea to sell books on the internet.

Shaw actually discouraged him from leaving the company to pursue his own business, Bezos recalled on Wednesday.

“When I told my boss about this, he listened to me patiently and said, ‘it’s a great idea, but for somebody who did not have a job already,'” Bezos said.

But “I knew if I tried and failed, I would never regret it,” said Bezos.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, idea, bezos, amazon, work, business, company, went, way, software, jeff, didnt, according, job


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Amazon reportedly wanted to secure $1 billion in incentives on top of HQ2 deal

The company set the lofty incentive goal in 2017 as it experienced high capital investment costs, according to the Journal. Executives hoped to secure $1 billion worth of incentives to pursue real estate projects, on top of the inducements it expected to receive for its second headquarters, called HQ2. Amazon ultimately abandoned the plan after it was unable to secure $1 billion in incentives and decided it wasn’t the right course of action, the Journal said. It’s unclear what kinds of incentive


The company set the lofty incentive goal in 2017 as it experienced high capital investment costs, according to the Journal.
Executives hoped to secure $1 billion worth of incentives to pursue real estate projects, on top of the inducements it expected to receive for its second headquarters, called HQ2.
Amazon ultimately abandoned the plan after it was unable to secure $1 billion in incentives and decided it wasn’t the right course of action, the Journal said.
It’s unclear what kinds of incentive
Amazon reportedly wanted to secure $1 billion in incentives on top of HQ2 deal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deal, reportedly, set, amazon, expected, journal, secure, billion, tax, incentives, company, receive, million, hq2, wanted


Amazon reportedly wanted to secure $1 billion in incentives on top of HQ2 deal

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos and his senior executive team sought $1 billion in economic incentives for real estate projects around the country, on top of what the company expected to receive for HQ2, The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday.

The company set the lofty incentive goal in 2017 as it experienced high capital investment costs, according to the Journal. Executives hoped to secure $1 billion worth of incentives to pursue real estate projects, on top of the inducements it expected to receive for its second headquarters, called HQ2.

Amazon ultimately abandoned the plan after it was unable to secure $1 billion in incentives and decided it wasn’t the right course of action, the Journal said. It’s unclear what kinds of incentives Amazon had hoped to secure.

An Amazon spokesperson said the company doesn’t have goals for the amount of incentives it receives.

“Like many other companies, we are eligible to access incentive programs created and regulated by cities and states to attract new investors – as they know that these investments pay a long-term dividend in the form of jobs, new economic opportunity, and incremental tax revenue,” the spokesperson said. “The vast majority of these incentives are statutory and post-performance – Amazon is eligible only after having created and maintained a certain number of jobs within the community.”

In 2017, Amazon launched a nationwide search for its second headquarters, which kicked off a bidding war among states across the country. Officials tried to lure Amazon by offering copious incentives, such as tax credits and grants, in exchange for the promise of job creation and other investments from the company.

Amazon was forced to abandon its HQ2 plans in New York City’s Long Island City neighborhood after it faced local opposition. Before it pulled out, Amazon was set to receive $3 billion in incentives, as well as $800 million in tax credits and grants, according to a separate report from the Journal.

Construction is set to begin soon on Amazon’s second headquarters in northern Virginia. The company will receive about $573 million in performance-based incentives from the state and local government, as well as a $23 million cash grant paid over 15 years from the county, tied to expected increases in hotel tax revenue to the area.

Amazon is also building an Operations Center of Excellence in Nashville, Tennessee, where it’s expected to receive up to $102 million in performance-based incentives for its investment there.

Read the full report from The Wall Street Journal here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deal, reportedly, set, amazon, expected, journal, secure, billion, tax, incentives, company, receive, million, hq2, wanted


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