Even most Americans with $10,000 to invest couldn’t answer these 3 money questions

There’s a lot of confusion about how retirement savings accounts work, even among those who are more well-prepared for retirement. That’s what TD Ameritrade concluded after a 2019 survey that The Harris Poll conducted for them asked U.S. adults with at least $10,000 in investable assets to answer questions about 401(k) plans and individual retirement accounts (IRAs). These three questions were particularly tricky and stumped at least half of all respondents:1. What’s the contribution limit for e


There’s a lot of confusion about how retirement savings accounts work, even among those who are more well-prepared for retirement. That’s what TD Ameritrade concluded after a 2019 survey that The Harris Poll conducted for them asked U.S. adults with at least $10,000 in investable assets to answer questions about 401(k) plans and individual retirement accounts (IRAs). These three questions were particularly tricky and stumped at least half of all respondents:1. What’s the contribution limit for e
Even most Americans with $10,000 to invest couldn’t answer these 3 money questions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-22  Authors: kathleen elkins, nbc, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, answer, retirement, 10000, whats, wellprepared, tricky, 2019, 401k, americans, invest, accounts, work, money, couldnt, questions


Even most Americans with $10,000 to invest couldn't answer these 3 money questions

There’s a lot of confusion about how retirement savings accounts work, even among those who are more well-prepared for retirement.

That’s what TD Ameritrade concluded after a 2019 survey that The Harris Poll conducted for them asked U.S. adults with at least $10,000 in investable assets to answer questions about 401(k) plans and individual retirement accounts (IRAs).

These three questions were particularly tricky and stumped at least half of all respondents:

1. What’s the contribution limit for employees who participate in a 401(k) in 2019 (excluding catch-up contributions)?

Just 19 percent of respondents selected the correct answer: $19,000.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-22  Authors: kathleen elkins, nbc, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, answer, retirement, 10000, whats, wellprepared, tricky, 2019, 401k, americans, invest, accounts, work, money, couldnt, questions


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More than 53 million Americans shop while drunk — here’s how much it’s costing them

The amount of money that Americans are spending while intoxicated is sobering — and they’re purchasing everything from cars to pets. Millennials spent the most on drunk purchases over the last year, averaging $1,047. Gen Xers spent an average of $469 drunk shopping and baby boomers $466. Shoes and clothes is the second most common drunk purchase at 43 percent, followed by cigarettes at 30 percent. For its study, Finder surveyed 2,100 U.S. adults in February to gauge drunken shopping tendencies.


The amount of money that Americans are spending while intoxicated is sobering — and they’re purchasing everything from cars to pets. Millennials spent the most on drunk purchases over the last year, averaging $1,047. Gen Xers spent an average of $469 drunk shopping and baby boomers $466. Shoes and clothes is the second most common drunk purchase at 43 percent, followed by cigarettes at 30 percent. For its study, Finder surveyed 2,100 U.S. adults in February to gauge drunken shopping tendencies.
More than 53 million Americans shop while drunk — here’s how much it’s costing them Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shop, drunken, purchase, finder, spent, 53, heres, survey, shopping, costing, purchases, americans, drunk, intoxicated, million


More than 53 million Americans shop while drunk — here's how much it's costing them

The amount of money that Americans are spending while intoxicated is sobering — and they’re purchasing everything from cars to pets.

A recent survey from personal finance website Finder.com found that 26 percent of Americans — about 53.4 million people — admit to shopping while under the influence of alcohol and collectively, Americans spent $39.4 billion on drunk purchases in the past 12 months, an increase from last year’s $30.43 billion.

That means the average American drunk-shopper spent $736 while intoxicated over the last year.

Millennials spent the most on drunk purchases over the last year, averaging $1,047. Gen Xers spent an average of $469 drunk shopping and baby boomers $466.

So what are people buying? The most popular booze-fueled purchase is food, according to the survey, with 52 percent caving in to their cravings.

Shoes and clothes is the second most common drunk purchase at 43 percent, followed by cigarettes at 30 percent. Other things people admitted to paying for while intoxicated include gambling (28 percent) and narcotics (10 percent).

The survey revealed a few drastic drunken purchases too, like 14 percent of people who booked a vacation, 12 percent who bought a pet, 10 percent who bought a car, 6 percent who purchased artwork and 5 percent who splurged on a motorbike.

However according to Finder, the number of people buying stuff after boozing is on the decline, down from 46 percent of Americans in 2018.

For its study, Finder surveyed 2,100 U.S. adults in February to gauge drunken shopping tendencies.

Don’t miss: 10 cities where mortgage payments are cheaper than rent

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shop, drunken, purchase, finder, spent, 53, heres, survey, shopping, costing, purchases, americans, drunk, intoxicated, million


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This is the No. 1 reason Americans file for bankruptcy—here’s how to make sure you’re in good shape

Even with health insurance, more and more individuals are finding that they cannot afford their medical bills. The data showed that an estimated 530,000 families turn to bankruptcy each year because of high medical bills. (Other reasons behind bankruptcy included high mortgages or foreclosure, spending or living beyond one’s means, student loans and divorce.) If you’re drowning in medical bills, the important thing here is to know that you have options. Here are some helpful tips to help you cop


Even with health insurance, more and more individuals are finding that they cannot afford their medical bills. The data showed that an estimated 530,000 families turn to bankruptcy each year because of high medical bills. (Other reasons behind bankruptcy included high mortgages or foreclosure, spending or living beyond one’s means, student loans and divorce.) If you’re drowning in medical bills, the important thing here is to know that you have options. Here are some helpful tips to help you cop
This is the No. 1 reason Americans file for bankruptcy—here’s how to make sure you’re in good shape Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19  Authors: jennifer streaks, caitlin rhea spaulding
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, care, bankruptcyheres, youre, shape, high, bills, bankruptcy, insurance, american, pay, reason, file, sure, bankruptcies, good, medical, health, americans


This is the No. 1 reason Americans file for bankruptcy—here's how to make sure you're in good shape

Even with health insurance, more and more individuals are finding that they cannot afford their medical bills.

A recent study published as an editorial in the American Journal of Public Health found that 66.5 percent of all bankruptcies filed by Americans were tied to medical issues (due to high costs or time out of work). The data showed that an estimated 530,000 families turn to bankruptcy each year because of high medical bills.

(Other reasons behind bankruptcy included high mortgages or foreclosure, spending or living beyond one’s means, student loans and divorce.)

“Despite gains in coverage and access to care from the Affordable Care Act, our findings suggest that it did not change the proportion of bankruptcies with medical causes,” the authors wrote.

Even worse, 57 percent of American adults say they’ve been surprised by a medical bill they thought would be covered by insurance, according to a survey from the research group NORC at the University of Chicago. This leaves many scrambling to find a way to pay their bills — on top essential expenses like mortgage, food and utility costs.

Unfortunately, those who can’t pay off debt fast enough eventually have their bills turned over to a collection agency, which is bad news for their credit score. If you’re drowning in medical bills, the important thing here is to know that you have options. Here are some helpful tips to help you cope with high medical bills:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19  Authors: jennifer streaks, caitlin rhea spaulding
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, care, bankruptcyheres, youre, shape, high, bills, bankruptcy, insurance, american, pay, reason, file, sure, bankruptcies, good, medical, health, americans


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70% of Americans with credit card debt admit they can’t pay it off this year

Almost half of Americans carry a balance on their credit cards, a new survey finds, and paying it off is proving a challenge: Only about 30 percent of people with credit card debt say they’ll be able to wipe it out this year. A new survey of 1,000 credit card users by real estate data company Clever found that 47 percent of Americans carry a monthly balance on their credit cards. Of them, over 70 percent say that balance is more than $1,000 on average. Over half of those surveyed, 56 percent, sa


Almost half of Americans carry a balance on their credit cards, a new survey finds, and paying it off is proving a challenge: Only about 30 percent of people with credit card debt say they’ll be able to wipe it out this year. A new survey of 1,000 credit card users by real estate data company Clever found that 47 percent of Americans carry a monthly balance on their credit cards. Of them, over 70 percent say that balance is more than $1,000 on average. Over half of those surveyed, 56 percent, sa
70% of Americans with credit card debt admit they can’t pay it off this year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, survey, card, say, 70, carry, credit, theyll, cant, pay, monthly, debt, balance, admit, americans


70% of Americans with credit card debt admit they can't pay it off this year

Almost half of Americans carry a balance on their credit cards, a new survey finds, and paying it off is proving a challenge: Only about 30 percent of people with credit card debt say they’ll be able to wipe it out this year.

A new survey of 1,000 credit card users by real estate data company Clever found that 47 percent of Americans carry a monthly balance on their credit cards. Of them, over 70 percent say that balance is more than $1,000 on average.

Over half of those surveyed, 56 percent, say they’ve had credit card debt for at least a year. And most will continue to carry it for years to come. Almost 20 percent estimate it will take them more than three years to pay off their debt, while roughly 8 percent say they don’t know when they’ll be able to pay it down.

“It’s a big issue,” Ted Rossman, credit industry expert for CreditCards.com, tells CNBC Make It. Especially now: The average credit card APR sits at a record-high 17.65 percent, so the interest accrued on monthly balances can quickly add up.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, survey, card, say, 70, carry, credit, theyll, cant, pay, monthly, debt, balance, admit, americans


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Only half of Americans have access to a 401(k)—here’s how to save for retirement if you don’t

Using a 401(k) plan to save for retirement is an attractive option: You get tax advantages, the funds are automatically taken out of your paycheck for you and sometimes your company even matches your contribution up to a certain amount, which is essentially free money. But many Americans don’t have access to this specific retirement tool. “Roughly half of all households are offered work-based retirement plans at their current jobs,” researchers at the Stanford Center on Longevity point out in a


Using a 401(k) plan to save for retirement is an attractive option: You get tax advantages, the funds are automatically taken out of your paycheck for you and sometimes your company even matches your contribution up to a certain amount, which is essentially free money. But many Americans don’t have access to this specific retirement tool. “Roughly half of all households are offered work-based retirement plans at their current jobs,” researchers at the Stanford Center on Longevity point out in a
Only half of Americans have access to a 401(k)—here’s how to save for retirement if you don’t Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: kathleen elkins, -nick holeman, certified financial planner at betterment
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, retirement, 401kheres, access, americans, plan, half, current, way, using, tool, dont, team, taxdeferred, save, plans, workbased


Only half of Americans have access to a 401(k)—here's how to save for retirement if you don't

Using a 401(k) plan to save for retirement is an attractive option: You get tax advantages, the funds are automatically taken out of your paycheck for you and sometimes your company even matches your contribution up to a certain amount, which is essentially free money.

But many Americans don’t have access to this specific retirement tool. “Roughly half of all households are offered work-based retirement plans at their current jobs,” researchers at the Stanford Center on Longevity point out in a 2018 report, “Seeing Our Way to Financial Security in the Age of Longevity.”

“A family is considered eligible to participate in a work-based retirement plan if either spouse/partner is included in any pension or retirement plan or any tax-deferred savings plan connected with their current job,” the research team notes.

Here’s the Center’s breakdown of eligibility and participation in work-based retirement plans for families at different ages:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: kathleen elkins, -nick holeman, certified financial planner at betterment
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, retirement, 401kheres, access, americans, plan, half, current, way, using, tool, dont, team, taxdeferred, save, plans, workbased


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Here’s the No. 1 reason why Americans are struggling to save money—and it’s not debt

More than one in five working American adults, or 21 percent, don’t set aside any of their annual income for short-term or long-term goals. That’s according to a new survey from Bankrate.com, which asked 1,000 of them how much of their annual income they save for retirement, emergencies and other financial goals. And those who do save, Bankrate finds, aren’t putting away a lot: Another 20 percent save only 5 percent or less of what they make, while 28 percent save 6 to 10 percent. Besides expens


More than one in five working American adults, or 21 percent, don’t set aside any of their annual income for short-term or long-term goals. That’s according to a new survey from Bankrate.com, which asked 1,000 of them how much of their annual income they save for retirement, emergencies and other financial goals. And those who do save, Bankrate finds, aren’t putting away a lot: Another 20 percent save only 5 percent or less of what they make, while 28 percent save 6 to 10 percent. Besides expens
Here’s the No. 1 reason why Americans are struggling to save money—and it’s not debt Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, struggling, bankrate, heres, income, reason, say, dont, americans, save, saving, survey, 16, moneyand, debt, working, retirement


Here's the No. 1 reason why Americans are struggling to save money—and it's not debt

More than one in five working American adults, or 21 percent, don’t set aside any of their annual income for short-term or long-term goals.

That’s according to a new survey from Bankrate.com, which asked 1,000 of them how much of their annual income they save for retirement, emergencies and other financial goals.

And those who do save, Bankrate finds, aren’t putting away a lot: Another 20 percent save only 5 percent or less of what they make, while 28 percent save 6 to 10 percent. Just 16 percent are saving more than 15 percent of their income — and even that, experts say, probably isn’t enough to make sure you have both an emergency fund and enough money socked away to retire by 65.

What’s keeping Americans from saving? When Bankrate asked survey participants, the No. 1 response was “expenses.”

That makes sense, given that day-to-day costs continue to soar. Middle class life is now 30 percent more expensive than it was 20 years ago. The cost of big-ticket items like college, housing and child care has risen precipitously: The cost of public universities doubled between 1996 and 2016 and housing prices in popular cities have quadrupled, Alissa Quart, author and executive director of the Economic Hardship Reporting Project, tells CNBC Make It.

Meanwhile, salaries have largely stagnated, so they don’t go as far as they once did to cover the necessities, Quart points out.

Besides expenses, 16 percent of working adults say they don’t have a “good enough job” to be able to save, which presumably means they aren’t earning enough.

Another 16 percent say they “haven’t gotten to it.” This is a more common answer among younger people, Bankrate notes: “Twenty-two percent of millennials (ages 23-38) feel this way.”

While retirement may feel too far off to start saving for when you’re young, the longer you put off planning for your golden years, the further behind you’ll fall.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, struggling, bankrate, heres, income, reason, say, dont, americans, save, saving, survey, 16, moneyand, debt, working, retirement


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7 in 10 Americans are avoiding difficult conversations at work — here’s how to tackle them

She outlined three tips to prepare yourself for a difficult conversation at work. Expect the best, but prepare for the worstWhile you will be hoping for the best possible resolution to your conversation, it’s helpful to prepare yourself for a potential negative outcome. That way, you will be better able to keep your emotions in check and avoid escalating the situation, Sheehan noted. “Try to think through the worst-case scenarios and prepare for how you might respond in that situation. Say it ou


She outlined three tips to prepare yourself for a difficult conversation at work. Expect the best, but prepare for the worstWhile you will be hoping for the best possible resolution to your conversation, it’s helpful to prepare yourself for a potential negative outcome. That way, you will be better able to keep your emotions in check and avoid escalating the situation, Sheehan noted. “Try to think through the worst-case scenarios and prepare for how you might respond in that situation. Say it ou
7 in 10 Americans are avoiding difficult conversations at work — here’s how to tackle them Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: karen gilchrist, -tohervey, ceo of bravely
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tackle, difficult, try, heres, say, americans, situation, important, avoiding, conversation, best, think, work, conversations, prepare, sheehan, way


7 in 10 Americans are avoiding difficult conversations at work — here's how to tackle them

Nevertheless, approaching difficult conversations is not only an important workplace skill, it could also be what enables your next step forward, said Sarah Sheehan, Bravely’s chief customer officer, who co-founded the company with Hervey as a platform for confidential professional advice.

She outlined three tips to prepare yourself for a difficult conversation at work.

1. Consider viewpoints beyond your own

“It’s easy to think about yourself and only yourself when you’re dealing with something challenging at work, but take the time to think through how someone might see it from the other side, and whether certain circumstances could be creating the situation at hand,” said Sheehan.

Your manager is a person, too, noted Sheehan, so sometimes the best thing you can do is to put yourself in their shoes and try to think things through from a new perspective.

2. Expect the best, but prepare for the worst

While you will be hoping for the best possible resolution to your conversation, it’s helpful to prepare yourself for a potential negative outcome. That way, you will be better able to keep your emotions in check and avoid escalating the situation, Sheehan noted.

“Try to think through the worst-case scenarios and prepare for how you might respond in that situation. That way, you might be less likely to react with emotion,” she said.

3. Say it out loud

Finally, try rehearsing the conversation, either to yourself or someone else, to hone your message and perfect your delivery, said Sheehan.

“It will no doubt feel awkward at first,” she said, adding that “forcing yourself to say the words will help you hone how you deliver it, control the tone (which is super important!), and ensure you stick the landing.”

Don’t miss: Think your boss hates you? You could be onto something

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: karen gilchrist, -tohervey, ceo of bravely
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tackle, difficult, try, heres, say, americans, situation, important, avoiding, conversation, best, think, work, conversations, prepare, sheehan, way


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Here’s how many working Americans aren’t saving any money for retirement or emergencies at all

Working Americans are still struggling when it comes to saving money for both their short-term and long-term goals: More than one in five (21 percent) don’t save any of their annual income. That’s according to a new survey from Bankrate.com, which asked 1,000 working American adults how much of their annual income they set aside for retirement, emergencies and other financial goals. And that’s if you start saving as early as age 25. “Millennials and Gen Xers, on the other hand, are more likely t


Working Americans are still struggling when it comes to saving money for both their short-term and long-term goals: More than one in five (21 percent) don’t save any of their annual income. That’s according to a new survey from Bankrate.com, which asked 1,000 working American adults how much of their annual income they set aside for retirement, emergencies and other financial goals. And that’s if you start saving as early as age 25. “Millennials and Gen Xers, on the other hand, are more likely t
Here’s how many working Americans aren’t saving any money for retirement or emergencies at all Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, survey, heres, age, americans, start, working, retirement, income, arent, annual, aside, saving, set, emergencies, money, save


Here's how many working Americans aren't saving any money for retirement or emergencies at all

Working Americans are still struggling when it comes to saving money for both their short-term and long-term goals: More than one in five (21 percent) don’t save any of their annual income.

That’s according to a new survey from Bankrate.com, which asked 1,000 working American adults how much of their annual income they set aside for retirement, emergencies and other financial goals.

And those who do save, Bankrate finds, aren’t setting aside a lot: 20 percent save only 5 percent or less of what they make, and 28 percent save 6 to 10 percent. Just 16 percent are saving more than 15 percent of their income.

Experts generally recommend earmarking 10 to 20 percent of your income just for retirement savings.

Researchers at the Stanford Center on Longevity project that, if you want to retire at age 65 and maintain your standard of living, you need to put 10 to 17 percent of your current income into a retirement account. And that’s if you start saving as early as age 25.

Bankrate’s survey, which looks at short-term and long-term savings, suggests that most Americans aren’t saving enough. After all, 69 percent of Americans are saving 10 percent or less or their income.

Younger people, in particular, are having a hard time: “Older households (age 55 and above) are more likely than other age groups to be saving more than 10 percent of their annual income,” Bankrate reports. “Millennials and Gen Xers, on the other hand, are more likely to say they’re not saving any money at all.”

The survey also offers insight into why much of the population is lagging behind. When Bankrate asked survey participants why they aren’t saving more money, the most popular response was “expenses,” followed by “haven’t gotten to it” and “job isn’t good enough.”

Sure enough, day-to-day costs continue to soar. Middle class life is now 30 percent more expensive than it was 20 years ago. The cost of big-ticket items like college, housing and child care has risen precipitously: The cost of public universities doubled between 1996 and 2016 and housing prices in popular cities have quadrupled, Alissa Quart, author and executive director of the Economic Hardship Reporting Project, tells CNBC Make It.

Meanwhile, salaries, which have stagnated, don’t go as far as they once did to cover the necessities, Quart points out.

While all of this makes it more difficult to set aside money for the future, the longer you put off planning for your golden years, the further behind you’ll fall.

The good news is there are ways to make progress without feeling cash-strapped or committing to any drastic lifestyle changes. Here are three effective strategies:

1. Start as soon as possible. The sooner you begin saving and investing your money, the less you’ll have to save each month to reach your goals, thanks to the power of compound interest.

If you start at age 23, for instance, you only have to save about $14 a day to be a millionaire by age 67. That’s assuming a 6 percent average annual investment return. If you start at age 35, on the other hand, you’d have to set aside $30 a day to reach seven figures by age 67.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, survey, heres, age, americans, start, working, retirement, income, arent, annual, aside, saving, set, emergencies, money, save


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‘It’s terrible — the Brits were lied to’: Americans give their verdict on Brexit

Brexit might be changing the course of British and European history but that hasn’t stopped the Americans taking an interest — and having a say. Brexit faced a crucial week this week as May tried to get her Brexit deal approved by the U.K. Parliament. It failed to win enough support from British lawmakers for a second time but MPs also then voted to reject the option of leaving the EU without a deal. They are next going to vote on whether to delay Brexit altogether. WATCH: Niall Ferguson: Brexit


Brexit might be changing the course of British and European history but that hasn’t stopped the Americans taking an interest — and having a say. Brexit faced a crucial week this week as May tried to get her Brexit deal approved by the U.K. Parliament. It failed to win enough support from British lawmakers for a second time but MPs also then voted to reject the option of leaving the EU without a deal. They are next going to vote on whether to delay Brexit altogether. WATCH: Niall Ferguson: Brexit
‘It’s terrible — the Brits were lied to’: Americans give their verdict on Brexit Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: holly ellyatt, jordan malter, james d morgan, getty images entertainment, getty images, wiktor szymanowicz, barcroft media, marlene awaad, bloomberg, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, union, week, uk, deal, british, americans, verdict, terrible, brits, leaving, win, voted, brexit, lied, vote


'It's terrible — the Brits were lied to': Americans give their verdict on Brexit

Brexit might be changing the course of British and European history but that hasn’t stopped the Americans taking an interest — and having a say.

President Donald Trump has been characteristically forthright, commenting on both the opportunity that leaving the 28-member union could bring to the U.K. and U.S.’ relationship, and also on how badly he thought British Prime Minister Theresa May had handled the negotiations.

Brexit faced a crucial week this week as May tried to get her Brexit deal approved by the U.K. Parliament. It failed to win enough support from British lawmakers for a second time but MPs also then voted to reject the option of leaving the EU without a deal. They are next going to vote on whether to delay Brexit altogether.

WATCH: Niall Ferguson: Brexit has turned into a student asking for a paper extension


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: holly ellyatt, jordan malter, james d morgan, getty images entertainment, getty images, wiktor szymanowicz, barcroft media, marlene awaad, bloomberg, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, union, week, uk, deal, british, americans, verdict, terrible, brits, leaving, win, voted, brexit, lied, vote


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IRS has $1.4 billion in old tax refunds Americans may have overlooked

So how can you tell if some of those funds are yours? If you didn’t file a 2015 federal income tax return, the IRS said in a recent report, you may be due a check. “We’re trying to connect over a million people with their share of $1.4 billion in potentially unclaimed refunds for 2015,” said IRS Commissioner Charles Rettig. “Students, part-time workers and many others may have overlooked filing for 2015.” This time last year, there was around $1.1 billion in unclaimed refunds.


So how can you tell if some of those funds are yours? If you didn’t file a 2015 federal income tax return, the IRS said in a recent report, you may be due a check. “We’re trying to connect over a million people with their share of $1.4 billion in potentially unclaimed refunds for 2015,” said IRS Commissioner Charles Rettig. “Students, part-time workers and many others may have overlooked filing for 2015.” This time last year, there was around $1.1 billion in unclaimed refunds.
IRS has $1.4 billion in old tax refunds Americans may have overlooked Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: shawn m carter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, old, americans, 14, workers, overlooked, trying, students, billion, tell, 2015, refunds, irs, unclaimed


IRS has $1.4 billion in old tax refunds Americans may have overlooked

So how can you tell if some of those funds are yours? If you didn’t file a 2015 federal income tax return, the IRS said in a recent report, you may be due a check.

“We’re trying to connect over a million people with their share of $1.4 billion in potentially unclaimed refunds for 2015,” said IRS Commissioner Charles Rettig. “Students, part-time workers and many others may have overlooked filing for 2015.”

This time last year, there was around $1.1 billion in unclaimed refunds.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: shawn m carter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, old, americans, 14, workers, overlooked, trying, students, billion, tell, 2015, refunds, irs, unclaimed


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