Surveillance videos show alleged criminals attacking ATMs — and the crime is getting more common

The U.S. Secret Service gave CNBC surveillance video from two incidents that showed people attacking ATMs in broad daylight. These are two alleged criminals that dressed up as ATM workers to attack an ATM, according to the U.S. Secret Service. And there was pedestrian traffic,” said Greg Naranjo, a Secret Service special agent in charge from the Miami field office. Greg Naranjo is a Secret Service special agent in charge from the Miami field office. “When that street thug walks away with the mon


The U.S. Secret Service gave CNBC surveillance video from two incidents that showed people attacking ATMs in broad daylight. These are two alleged criminals that dressed up as ATM workers to attack an ATM, according to the U.S. Secret Service. And there was pedestrian traffic,” said Greg Naranjo, a Secret Service special agent in charge from the Miami field office. Greg Naranjo is a Secret Service special agent in charge from the Miami field office. “When that street thug walks away with the mon
Surveillance videos show alleged criminals attacking ATMs — and the crime is getting more common Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: jennifer schlesinger andrea day, jennifer schlesinger, andrea day
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, attacking, alleged, atm, theyre, secret, money, ibm, attacks, criminals, videos, common, service, xforce, getting, crime, source, atms, surveillance


Surveillance videos show alleged criminals attacking ATMs — and the crime is getting more common

The recent Capital One breach of more than 100 million customer records has left consumers worrying about banking safety. But the threats extend far beyond customer records, as hackers are increasingly finding ways to attack ATMs. “We know for a fact that ATM crime and fraud does cost the banking industry and financial services industry billions of dollars per year,” said David Tente the executive director for the U.S. and Americas for the ATM Industry Association, ATMIA. The trade group includes financial institutions as well as ATM manufacturers. The U.S. Secret Service gave CNBC surveillance video from two incidents that showed people attacking ATMs in broad daylight.

These are two alleged criminals that dressed up as ATM workers to attack an ATM, according to the U.S. Secret Service. Source: U.S. Secret Service

“I’ve seen surveillance footage of technicians dressed up as actual technicians come up to a department store where the ATM was located right by the front door. And there was pedestrian traffic,” said Greg Naranjo, a Secret Service special agent in charge from the Miami field office. “And they’re working on this ATM for approximately 30 minutes when they finally install their device and depart and then have the cashing crew come in and cash out the machine,” These attacks and others cost $3.5 million between late 2017 and early 2018, according to the Secret Service, which protects Americans from financial crimes.

Greg Naranjo is a Secret Service special agent in charge from the Miami field office. Source: CNBC

For these physical attacks, one criminal plants a device on the back of the ATM, which is one reason why . Depending on how it’s programmed, the machine could just spit out cash. But most of the time, criminal accomplices walk up and insert a card and enter a PIN to make it look like they’re real customers. To learn how to pull the attacks off, Naranjo says, criminal gangs have set up training facilities in South and Central America. “They have stolen machines from banks. They have training rooms with different types of ATMs,” he said. Physical attacks like these are on the rise. In a recent survey of ATM operators that the ATMIA shared with CNBC, 57 percent of respondents said physical attacks are increasing. The survey also found that stand-alone ATMs not connected to a bank were the most common for fraud. Stores and shopping malls were other common locations for fraud.

David Tente is the executive director for the U.S. and Americas for the ATM Industry Association, ATMIA. Source: CNBC

Physical attacks are not the only threat ATMs need to watch out for. Hackers can remotely access a bank’s servers to get it to allow ATM transactions, according to IBM Security’s X-Force Red, a team that does penetration testing. “We intercept the traffic, the response from the bank and change the ‘deny’ response to an approval,” said David Byrne, the global head of methodology for X-Force Red.

David Byrne is a global hacking methodology expert for IBM Security’s X-Force Red. He demonstrates how to refill an ATM. Source: CNBC

CNBC visited IBM’s ATM testing lab outside Toronto where the team demonstrated how this attack worked. Byrne demonstrated how a CNBC reporter could take out money using a grocery loyalty card and an old student ID. Any card with a magnetic stripe would work.

ATMs inside IBM Security’s ATM testing lab outside Toronto, Canada. Source: CNBC

“The street thug that the hacker mastermind sends out could conceivably sit here and just collect money after money after money until the ATM is empty,” said Charles Henderson, the global managing partner of X-Force Red. “When that street thug walks away with the money from an ATM, they’re gone forever.” IBM has seen a 500 percent increase in ATM testing demand from banks. “They’re seeing the attacks in the wild, and they’re trying to get ahead of the criminals,” Henderson said. “The thing about these machines is they’re very often connected to the internet…That’s a very important vulnerability, and one that we exploit in a lot of our ATM testing.”

Charles Henderson is the global managing partner of IBM Security’s X-Force Red. Source: CNBC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: jennifer schlesinger andrea day, jennifer schlesinger, andrea day
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, attacking, alleged, atm, theyre, secret, money, ibm, attacks, criminals, videos, common, service, xforce, getting, crime, source, atms, surveillance


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How one entrepreneur’s American dream turned into a copycat nightmare

The copycat straws sell for as little as a dollar when sold at wholesale. Cohen showed CNBC copycat straws that did not pop into position to allow drinking the same way her company’s straws did. A copycat straw purchased by CNBC Beijing. CNBCCNBC Beijing purchased a copycat straw and asked Chinese product designer Bruce Qin to test it. Qin said the cleaning tool in the copycat straw seemed like it would break easily.


The copycat straws sell for as little as a dollar when sold at wholesale. Cohen showed CNBC copycat straws that did not pop into position to allow drinking the same way her company’s straws did. A copycat straw purchased by CNBC Beijing. CNBCCNBC Beijing purchased a copycat straw and asked Chinese product designer Bruce Qin to test it. Qin said the cleaning tool in the copycat straw seemed like it would break easily.
How one entrepreneur’s American dream turned into a copycat nightmare Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: jennifer schlesinger andrea day bianca fortis euni, jennifer schlesinger, andrea day, bianca fortis, eunice yoon, lilian wu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, entrepreneurs, nightmare, american, finalstraw, straw, straws, turned, cohen, kickstarter, copycat, dream, influencers, product


How one entrepreneur's American dream turned into a copycat nightmare

The business started out beyond Emma Cohen’s wildest dreams, but soon she discovered a threat to the brand she was building. Her company, FinalStraw, makes an environmentally friendly reusable straw. It took off on crowdfunding website Kickstarter about year ago. And then a few months later, in October, it got to pitch its product on ABC’s “Shark Tank.” But soon after launching, Cohen realized she had an unexpected problem — loads of counterfeits were coming to market from across the globe. “The whole point of the company is to reduce single-use plastic waste. And when people get one of these [knockoff straws], and they open it up, and it doesn’t work, and it only cost $5, guess where it’s going? It’s going in the trash,” said Cohen, FinalStraw’s CEO. “The entire mission of what we’re trying to do as a company has been defeated by these fake FinalStraws.” By comparison, FinalStraw sells its collapsible straw for $25. It comes in a carrying case with a cleaning brush. In 2018, the brand made $5 million in revenue, according to Cohen. FinalStraw’s problem isn’t unique. Copycatters are monitoring crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter and watching for trendy products to go viral, according to Amedeo Ferraro, an intellectual property attorney. The situation is an example of U.S. complaints about China’s theft of intellectual property. That’s one issue in the trade war between Washington and Beijing. “We were just hoping and praying to sell enough straws that we wouldn’t have to make them ourselves,” said Cohen, who co-founded FinalStraw with Miles Pepper, reflecting on the decision to use Kickstarter. “And within 48 hours of launching the Kickstarter, we’d raised over $200,000,” she said. “We went from zero to 60 real fast.” FinalStraw was hoping for just $12,500 but quickly surpassed that goal. The company ultimately raised nearly $1.9 million on Kickstarter, but within weeks Cohen said she began seeing copies coming from China. On “Shark Tank,” Cohen and her partner received two offers but did not make a deal. One of the Sharks asked about counterfeiting.

FinalStraw founders Emma Rose Cohen and Miles Pepper pitch on ABC’s “Shark Tank.” Eric McCandless | Getty Images

“It took us about nine months to create the tooling, get the product ready to manufacture. They were able to do it a matter of weeks,” she said. FinalStraw launched on Kickstarter with a provisional U.S. patent. After raising funds, the company applied for and was granted a utility patent. Still, it’s an ongoing battle. “A patent is only as good as its enforcement,” Cohen said. “It’s essentially a nice, shiny, expensive piece of paper that we then need to go out and enforce.” On Chinese e-commerce site Alibaba and other major retail websites, CNBC found many listings for what appear to be knockoff FinalStraws. One was even using images from the brand’s Kickstarter campaign. One company located in Shenzhen, China, responded to an email from CNBC and said that it could make the straws and emailed pictures that look similar to FinalStraw. CNBC called the contact listed on Alibaba to visit the factory and get more information but the spokeswoman declined to comment.

A building in Shenzhen, China, the city where many companies making copycat FinalStraws are listed as being located in. CNBC

CNBC sent a team to Shenzhen to find other companies selling similar straws online. At least one of companies was not at the address listed online. Chinese laws allow different companies to register under one address, depending on the business scope. The team also visited a factory that produces similar straws but could not enter. A contact from another company that sells similar straws online, told CNBC by phone that the idea for the straw came from a crowdfunding internet company. The contact who only gave his last name Wu also said the straw is mainly sold in Europe and America. The copycat straws sell for as little as a dollar when sold at wholesale. Cohen says the price different comes down to quality. “We get angry emails all the time from customers who are confused as to why the quality of the product that they ordered is terrible,” Cohen said. “The scariest thing is that there is no regulation on the materials that they’re using. There’s no quality control.” Cohen showed CNBC copycat straws that did not pop into position to allow drinking the same way her company’s straws did.

A copycat straw purchased by CNBC Beijing. CNBC

CNBC Beijing purchased a copycat straw and asked Chinese product designer Bruce Qin to test it. “It’s not a good product,” he said. The real FinalStraw comes with a cleaning tool and a drying case so it can reused over and over. Qin said the cleaning tool in the copycat straw seemed like it would break easily. Alibaba originally agreed to an interview with CNBC but then declined hours before it was scheduled. “Protecting the IP of rights holders around the world is critical to our business. … We remove any IP infringing listings, period. Rights holders can enforce their IP rights outside China, e.g. U.S. patent rights, on our cross-border platform,” an Alibaba spokesperson said in part in a statement sent by email. “The fact that 180,000 brands and millions of SMBs [small and midsize businesses] operate on Alibaba’s platforms demonstrates the trust they place in us, and we will continue to work tirelessly to protect brands of all sizes and consumers.” After CNBC contacted Alibaba, the company began helping FinalStraw. “Once we understood the nature of their IP, we worked quickly and collaboratively with FinalStraw to remove suspected infringing listings, and continue to closely partner with them on the removal of the few that require additional analysis,” the spokesperson said. The battle with the copycats has cost the company millions, according to Cohen. FinalStraw has 16 contractors working for the company, three of whom work to fight fraud. Cohen says she is also paying two attorneys. “It’s also very burdensome on our resources, because this is time that my staff could be spending doing way more productive things, versus just fighting off these knockoffs,” Cohen said.

Some of the impostors set up fake websites that look like the real one. Cohen showed CNBC one website that showed the same bio and images of the company’s team that the real website does. The copycats even copied the picture of Cohen’s dog. Cohen and her team are working to take down the impostors. “Most of them were offshore. And it was, first of all, very difficult to find a person. They have good ways of hiding,” said Ferraro, who works with FinalStraw. “Once we finally got to them, wrote to them, some of them were taken down. But then they started popping up again.” Ads for the fake straws also can be found on social media.

Emma Cohen the CEO and co-founder of FinalStraw with her straw (left) and a copycat (right). CNBC

“We were seeing advertisements. And they were all using our own materials. But they were directing to different websites,” Cohen said. “Social media is a weapon for these impostors. They can use it at their discretion however they want. And there’s nobody out there that’s really enforcing it.” Some of the posts were by people known as influencers, people who are paid by companies to make posts promoting companies. Many of these influencers have meme accounts where they post funny images or videos and often stay anonymous. Use of influencers is a growing part of marketing. Eight-six percent of marketers used influencers in 2017, the latest numbers available, according to Linqia, a marketing agency that connects brands with influencers. It can be difficult for influencers working with small businesses to tell which ad requests are legitimate. One influencer, Emily, who posted a fake FinalStraw ad, said she had no idea the ad was fake until CNBC contacted her. The influencer asked CNBC not to use her last name because her account is anonymous. She has over 1 million followers. CNBC is not naming her account since it contains adult content. Emily said she was approached by a company to post the straw on her account. She said originally she did not respond, but when they contacted her again a few months later and had customer reviews, she agreed to post the ad and received a payment for an undisclosed amount. Emily said that while she does try to determine whether a product is legitimate, digging to find that information can be hard work. “I don’t know if it’s me, but I’m a trusting person,” she said in a phone interview. “Why would someone spend this money on an ad that’s not legitimate?” Another account, Funny.window, posted a video with Cohen and the straw in it, but linked to a different seller. “I can’t know who the real legitimate of a product is [sic],” Eugene, who runs the account, said in an email. Funny.window has 1.2 million followers. Other influencers take a different approach. Joey Hickson, who has about 17 million followers across three accounts — including his popular meme account @lmao — has a team of people helping to manage his business, which makes it easier to weed out bad actors. He said both Instagram, as well as influencers, need to work to stop the proliferation of ads for fake products. “We can’t just put all the blame on Instagram, because that’s not fair,” he said. “I think we have our own social compass that we should look at.” Justin Keller, Hickson’s manager, said there is very little regulation of these types of transactions. “It’s the Wild West,” he said. “It’s like a gold rush.”

Joey Hickson, an Instagram influencer, and his manager, Justin Keller. CNBC

“We review every IP report we receive and take action to protect rights holders when someone has used their IP without permission,” an Instagram spokesperson said in a statement sent by email. “When it comes to partnering with brands, we encourage creators to act responsibly and with integrity.” The FBI said the agency has seen similar incidents. “One of the prime examples of that is the hoverboards that came onto the scene a couple Christmases ago, where the counterfeiters — actually the hazardous devices that are being marketed as genuine products — got to market before the actual genuine product did, and obviously those products were dangerous and could catch fire,” said Steven Shapiro, unit chief for the FBI’s intellectual property rights unit. To protect their business, companies may want to consider other methods of funding besides crowdfunding or make sure its intellectual property is secure before launching. “If there is another alternative source of funding like private venture capital or any other way of funding, I would suggest doing that first. But that isn’t something that’s available to everyone,” Ferraro said. FinalStraw is still working on getting a patent and trademark in China. Not having them makes it more difficult for it to fight copycats there. It’s a problem Chinese product designer Qin knows very well. He said his own designs have been knocked off by local factories. “Without a Chinese patent, you probably would be copycatted,” Qin said. Kickstarter said it is aware of copycats that have happened to other entrepreneurs who launched on its site. “It depends on the product. But if you’re coming to Kickstarter to raise funding, you probably want to have all of your protection in place before you launch. That is very important,” said Clarissa Redwine, Kickstarter’s senior design and technology outreach lead. “Once you launch your product is out there in the world.”

Emma Cohen the CEO and co-founder of FinalStraw with her dog. CNBC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: jennifer schlesinger andrea day bianca fortis euni, jennifer schlesinger, andrea day, bianca fortis, eunice yoon, lilian wu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, entrepreneurs, nightmare, american, finalstraw, straw, straws, turned, cohen, kickstarter, copycat, dream, influencers, product


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Here’s how the trade war could lead to a boom in counterfeit goods

As the trade war between the U.S. and China has continued to heat up, Chinese nationals potentially could turn to a surprising way around tariffs: increasing the number of counterfeit goods, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Trade groups have warned Congress that tariffs could increase costs and drain resources available to fight illicit counterfeits. They also caution that consumers may knowingly or unknowingly seek counterfeit goods as legitimate goods become more expensive. Si


As the trade war between the U.S. and China has continued to heat up, Chinese nationals potentially could turn to a surprising way around tariffs: increasing the number of counterfeit goods, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Trade groups have warned Congress that tariffs could increase costs and drain resources available to fight illicit counterfeits. They also caution that consumers may knowingly or unknowingly seek counterfeit goods as legitimate goods become more expensive. Si
Here’s how the trade war could lead to a boom in counterfeit goods Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: jennifer schlesinger, andrea day, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, goods, according, product, trade, heres, tariffs, shapiro, products, lead, counterfeit, boom, ways, war, unit


Here's how the trade war could lead to a boom in counterfeit goods

As the trade war between the U.S. and China has continued to heat up, Chinese nationals potentially could turn to a surprising way around tariffs: increasing the number of counterfeit goods, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Trade groups have warned Congress that tariffs could increase costs and drain resources available to fight illicit counterfeits. They also caution that consumers may knowingly or unknowingly seek counterfeit goods as legitimate goods become more expensive. Six trade groups sent a letter to the House Ways and Means Committee with the warning in June, according to World Trademark Review.

Counterfeit goods cost the U.S. economy an estimated $600 billion a year, or 3 percent of the U.S. gross domestic product, according to Steve Shapiro, the unit chief for the FBI’s intellectual property rights unit. Twenty-four federal and international law enforcement agencies work together to stop the illegal products. But booming e-commerce sales are adding to the flood of products agencies must monitor, and counterfeiters are increasingly learning how to make harder-to-spot fakes or finding new ways around the systems that were put in place to prevent fraudulent products.

“Every day I come into the office and I see new product categories that criminals are manufacturing fraudulently,” Shapiro said.

Shipments from China are including an ever-increasing number of counterfeit items, according to Frank Russo, the port director for Customs and Border Protection at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: jennifer schlesinger, andrea day, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, goods, according, product, trade, heres, tariffs, shapiro, products, lead, counterfeit, boom, ways, war, unit


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Privacy policies give companies lots of room to collect, share data

“What really terrified me about this was that in the Sonicare privacy policy, they tell you they’re going to share this information,” he said. “The Sonicare app provides personalized advice to users on how to improve their brushing and oral hygiene habits based on their personal data… Based on the personal data, the user will be able to receive personalized services, e.g. As for the third parties, Philips told CNBC, “This section of our Sonicare app Privacy Notice describes the option for our us


“What really terrified me about this was that in the Sonicare privacy policy, they tell you they’re going to share this information,” he said. “The Sonicare app provides personalized advice to users on how to improve their brushing and oral hygiene habits based on their personal data… Based on the personal data, the user will be able to receive personalized services, e.g. As for the third parties, Philips told CNBC, “This section of our Sonicare app Privacy Notice describes the option for our us
Privacy policies give companies lots of room to collect, share data Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-07  Authors: jennifer schlesinger, andrea day, getty images, future publishing, future, zhang peng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sonicare, policies, privacy, room, users, philips, companies, share, personal, parties, app, user, collect, lots, data


Privacy policies give companies lots of room to collect, share data

Urbelis is concerned about the sharing of information. “What really terrified me about this was that in the Sonicare privacy policy, they tell you they’re going to share this information,” he said.

A Philips spokesperson said the data collected is used for personalization.

“The Sonicare app provides personalized advice to users on how to improve their brushing and oral hygiene habits based on their personal data… Based on the personal data, the user will be able to receive personalized services, e.g. set personal goals, follow progress and receive oral care recommendations,” said Philips spokeswoman Natasha Best in an email. “The Privacy Notice is aimed at transparency on this point, as it describes in detail which data will be received by Philips… For clarity, we wish to underline that some of the data fields to create a MyPhilips account (such as gender, age) are optional, so a user can decide to provide those data, or choose not to.”

As for the third parties, Philips told CNBC, “This section of our Sonicare app Privacy Notice describes the option for our users to indicate their wish to share their personal data with other parties (i.e. independent third parties), who will then process the user’s personal data for their own purposes and provide their own services to the user. The Privacy Notice describes who these parties are and informs the app users that Philips will only share their data with these independent third parties at the users’ request. In these cases, the app will ask for the user’s consent before sharing any data.”

Kasdan flagged Starbucks’ app and website for collecting much information that has nothing to do with serving coffee.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-07  Authors: jennifer schlesinger, andrea day, getty images, future publishing, future, zhang peng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sonicare, policies, privacy, room, users, philips, companies, share, personal, parties, app, user, collect, lots, data


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Robocallers tried to cash in on the federal government shutdown

Robocallers were trying to cash in on the recent partial federal government shutdown. “I have an important update regarding your IRS tax debt. The recent government shutdown is affecting your standing with the IRS and although some IRS operations are down, billing and collections remain active. “I was actually calling because in lieu of the government shutdown, backed federal taxes are now being dismissed at just an unstoppable rate. If the government shuts down again, Quilici expects the same t


Robocallers were trying to cash in on the recent partial federal government shutdown. “I have an important update regarding your IRS tax debt. The recent government shutdown is affecting your standing with the IRS and although some IRS operations are down, billing and collections remain active. “I was actually calling because in lieu of the government shutdown, backed federal taxes are now being dismissed at just an unstoppable rate. If the government shuts down again, Quilici expects the same t
Robocallers tried to cash in on the federal government shutdown Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: jennifer schlesinger, andrea day, chip somodevilla, getty images, joe raedle, sarinyapinngam, istock
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, robocallers, irs, scammers, shutdown, cash, calls, robocalls, tried, taxes, quilici, tax, shut, federal


Robocallers tried to cash in on the federal government shutdown

The phone rings and you run to pick it up, only to hear an automated recording. You are not alone.

There are approximately 5 billion robocalls made every month, according to robocall blocking app, YouMail. That number has been consistent, but the context of those calls changes. The most recent scam? Robocallers were trying to cash in on the recent partial federal government shutdown.

“The robocallers are marketers. You can think of them as marketers in the wrong business,” said Alex Quilici, CEO of YouMail. “They are always testing different ways to get people to respond to their calls.”

Days after the shutdown, two robocalls began about taxes.

“I have an important update regarding your IRS tax debt. The recent government shutdown is affecting your standing with the IRS and although some IRS operations are down, billing and collections remain active. So give me a call back at this number,” said one recording given to CNBC by YouMail.

The second call was also about taxes.

“I was actually calling because in lieu of the government shutdown, backed federal taxes are now being dismissed at just an unstoppable rate. We can take advantage of the situation and help you clear out not just your federal back taxes but also some state tax issues you might be facing. When you get this message please give me a call back,” said another recording given to CNBC by YouMail.

YouMail estimates more than 1 million people got the call with many people receiving it more than once. Quilici says with these type of calls, 3 to 5 percent of receivers call back.

“Some fraction of those people are going to get scammed and it’s going to be for real money,” Quilici said.

During the shutdown, if consumers tried to add their number to the Do Not Call Registry, a list of people who do not want to be called by telemarketers maintained by the Federal Trade Commission, they found the website shutdown. The websites to file complaints with the FTC or the Federal Communication Commission, which also has oversight of robocalls, were also shut. The websites quickly came back once the government reopened.

This message appeared when trying to file a robocall complaint on the FCC’s website.

If the government were shutdown longer, Quilici expects there could have been greater effects.

“The real impact for all of this is the long-term enforcement. So had the government shut down for a long time, the FCC isn’t chasing the bad guys,” he said.

“These two examples make clear robocallers read the news and leverage events to dupe people and get their money. They are very similar to the IRS scam calls that scare people into thinking they owe back taxes, when they do not. Because of the government shutdown, the FTC was not funded and could not receive complaints from consumers. But, we are open and very much want people to report [such calls] to the FTC at donotcall.gov. These complaints are critical to our law enforcement work,” said Lois Greisman, associate director of the FTC’s division of marketing practices.

The FCC directed CNBC to its website.

The FCC is working to, as Chairman Ajit Pai said, “stop the scourge of illegal robocalls.” He has made combating unlawful robocalls and malicious caller ID spoofing his “top consumer protection priority,” the website reads. “Chairman Pai has launched several important public policy initiatives to help combat unlawful robocalls and malicious caller ID spoofing. The Commission under his leadership has also taken unprecedented enforcement actions to punish those who flout consumer protection laws.”

Robocallers also take advantage of other news.

“The last election we saw the student loan scammers talk about how President [Donald] Trump was going to force people to pay back their money right away,” Quilici said. “We’ve seen with Obamacare when there’s the deadline December 15 the scam calls pick up rapidly.”

The scammers can also take advantage of the government being open. “I actually expect to see more about the government being back open and we can now help you than we saw about the government being shut down,” Quilici said.

If the government shuts down again, Quilici expects the same tax calls to start up.

The scammers behind the calls can be from anywhere, even the U.S., but Quilici says they most commonly come from India. To make the calls sound more professional, he says they sometimes hire voiceover talent from the U.S. online.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: jennifer schlesinger, andrea day, chip somodevilla, getty images, joe raedle, sarinyapinngam, istock
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, robocallers, irs, scammers, shutdown, cash, calls, robocalls, tried, taxes, quilici, tax, shut, federal


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2-factor authentication may be hackable, expert says

Mitnick showed CNBC that he was able to enter that code into his browser. Mitnick used LinkedIn to demo the attack for CNBC, but said many other websites are also vulnerable. The email he clicked on looked like a real LinkedIn connection request — but actually came from a fake domain, lnked.com. It’s the actual user… It’s a security flaw with the human,” Mitnick said. Another way to protect yourself is to pay close attention to email you get, even if you use two-factor authentication.


Mitnick showed CNBC that he was able to enter that code into his browser. Mitnick used LinkedIn to demo the attack for CNBC, but said many other websites are also vulnerable. The email he clicked on looked like a real LinkedIn connection request — but actually came from a fake domain, lnked.com. It’s the actual user… It’s a security flaw with the human,” Mitnick said. Another way to protect yourself is to pay close attention to email you get, even if you use two-factor authentication.
2-factor authentication may be hackable, expert says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-04  Authors: jennifer schlesinger, andrea day
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, used, linkedin, vulnerable, authentication, expert, mitnick, human, members, protect, engineering, 2factor, hackable, security


2-factor authentication may be hackable, expert says

Mitnick showed CNBC that he was able to enter that code into his browser. “When I hit refresh I’m going to be magically logged into the victims account,” he said.

Mitnick used LinkedIn to demo the attack for CNBC, but said many other websites are also vulnerable. The email he clicked on looked like a real LinkedIn connection request — but actually came from a fake domain, lnked.com. He said most people may not realize the difference.

“It’s not LinkedIn that’s vulnerable. It’s the actual user… It’s a security flaw with the human,” Mitnick said.

In a statement, Mary-Katharine Juric, a LinkedIn spokesperson, told CNBC that the professional network took Mitnick’s demonstration “very seriously,” and that LinkedIn has “a number of technical measures in place to protect our members from fraudulent activity including phishing scams.”

She added: “When we detect this type of activity, we work to quickly remove it and prevent future re-occurrences. We strongly encourage members to report any messages or postings they believe are scams, and utilize our member help center as a resource to educate and protect themselves from frauds online.”

This attack is part of what is known as social engineering, when hackers take advantage of human behavior to get you to do something, like click on a link. Another way to protect yourself is to pay close attention to email you get, even if you use two-factor authentication.

“Social engineering if you do it right can be used to get into almost anything,” said Stu Sjouwerman, KnowBe4’S CEO.

To protect from attacks like this one, some companies are making tools called security keys.

Instead of sending a code to your cell phone, security keys — which look like a keychain — contain a hardware chip, and use Bluetooth or USB to be the additional factor needed to log into your account. Recently, Google released its own version of the device, which it calls the Titan Security Key.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-04  Authors: jennifer schlesinger, andrea day
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, used, linkedin, vulnerable, authentication, expert, mitnick, human, members, protect, engineering, 2factor, hackable, security


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Hackers using identity theft tactics to scam businesses out of data

Most people are familiar with identity theft, which happens when someone pretends to be someone else to make purchases, apply for credit or even get their tax refund. However, an increasing number of criminals are doing the same thing, but stealing business data. Business identity theft was up 46 percent year-over-year in 2017, the latest numbers available, according to data and analytics company Dun & Bradstreet. “Criminals have a perception that it’s easier to find a business’s data than it is


Most people are familiar with identity theft, which happens when someone pretends to be someone else to make purchases, apply for credit or even get their tax refund. However, an increasing number of criminals are doing the same thing, but stealing business data. Business identity theft was up 46 percent year-over-year in 2017, the latest numbers available, according to data and analytics company Dun & Bradstreet. “Criminals have a perception that it’s easier to find a business’s data than it is
Hackers using identity theft tactics to scam businesses out of data Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-21  Authors: jennifer schlesinger, andrea day, thomas samson, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, identity, data, perception, shapiro, company, hackers, using, theft, scam, tactics, businesses, business, recent, according


Hackers using identity theft tactics to scam businesses out of data

Most people are familiar with identity theft, which happens when someone pretends to be someone else to make purchases, apply for credit or even get their tax refund.

However, an increasing number of criminals are doing the same thing, but stealing business data.

Business identity theft was up 46 percent year-over-year in 2017, the latest numbers available, according to data and analytics company Dun & Bradstreet.

Cyber-criminals “actually take on their client lists or the special sauce that makes that company operate and compete with them directly. In other instances, they’re pretending to be that business,” Steven Shapiro, a unit chief at the FBI, told CNBC in a recent interview.

At stake are businesses’ brand, reputation and trade secrets. One recent case cost the company $1 billion in market share and hundreds of jobs, according to the FBI.

“Criminals have a perception that it’s easier to find a business’s data than it is for individuals. There’s also a perception that businesses have deeper pockets than an individual would in an identity theft situation,” said Shapiro.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-21  Authors: jennifer schlesinger, andrea day, thomas samson, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, identity, data, perception, shapiro, company, hackers, using, theft, scam, tactics, businesses, business, recent, according


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Mining software isn’t just for cryptocurrency — it could also be used to steal corporate secrets

“With this attack, people are using a tool, a crypto miner that they’re used to seeing on their network. But they’re not used to responding to it as though it is a legitimate threat, like a botnet or a Trojan,” Kent said in an interview with CNBC. “They can come in and they can steal files, they can steal intellectual property, they can steal credentials and then log in as maybe the CEO. Kent said he is unsure whether hackers are already using this technique to attack companies, but wanted to sh


“With this attack, people are using a tool, a crypto miner that they’re used to seeing on their network. But they’re not used to responding to it as though it is a legitimate threat, like a botnet or a Trojan,” Kent said in an interview with CNBC. “They can come in and they can steal files, they can steal intellectual property, they can steal credentials and then log in as maybe the CEO. Kent said he is unsure whether hackers are already using this technique to attack companies, but wanted to sh
Mining software isn’t just for cryptocurrency — it could also be used to steal corporate secrets Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-30  Authors: jennifer schlesinger, andrea day, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, software, attack, trojan, using, sophisticated, used, secrets, cryptocurrency, mining, corporate, unsure, tool, theyre, steal, isnt, wanted


Mining software isn't just for cryptocurrency — it could also be used to steal corporate secrets

“With this attack, people are using a tool, a crypto miner that they’re used to seeing on their network. But they’re not used to responding to it as though it is a legitimate threat, like a botnet or a Trojan,” Kent said in an interview with CNBC. “They can come in and they can steal files, they can steal intellectual property, they can steal credentials and then log in as maybe the CEO. Or they can download more software. They can bring down services.”

Kent said he is unsure whether hackers are already using this technique to attack companies, but wanted to share his research so businesses can be on guard.

“If I can do it, then absolutely an attacker could do it, whether they’re very sophisticated or not sophisticated at all,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-30  Authors: jennifer schlesinger, andrea day, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, software, attack, trojan, using, sophisticated, used, secrets, cryptocurrency, mining, corporate, unsure, tool, theyre, steal, isnt, wanted


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Buyer beware: Online retailer Adore Me’s subscription model under fire

When Cassie LaForest ordered a bra and underwear set online from Adore Me in 2015, she had no idea she was signing up for a monthly subscription until her debit card was declined at a Starbucks months later. “I saw all these negative charges over and over and over for Adore Me,” LaForest said, adding that she felt “completely blindsided.” LaForest didn’t realize she was automatically enrolled in a monthly subscription service, an increasingly common practice with online retailers that may catch


When Cassie LaForest ordered a bra and underwear set online from Adore Me in 2015, she had no idea she was signing up for a monthly subscription until her debit card was declined at a Starbucks months later. “I saw all these negative charges over and over and over for Adore Me,” LaForest said, adding that she felt “completely blindsided.” LaForest didn’t realize she was automatically enrolled in a monthly subscription service, an increasingly common practice with online retailers that may catch
Buyer beware: Online retailer Adore Me’s subscription model under fire Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-16  Authors: hannah kliot, andrea day, scott zamost, jasmine wu, jennifer schlesinger, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, monthly, retailer, mes, shoppers, buyer, adore, model, beware, underwear, online, subscription, laforest, billion, according, yearsubscription


Buyer beware: Online retailer Adore Me's subscription model under fire

When Cassie LaForest ordered a bra and underwear set online from Adore Me in 2015, she had no idea she was signing up for a monthly subscription until her debit card was declined at a Starbucks months later.

“I saw all these negative charges over and over and over for Adore Me,” LaForest said, adding that she felt “completely blindsided.”

LaForest didn’t realize she was automatically enrolled in a monthly subscription service, an increasingly common practice with online retailers that may catch shoppers off guard in the rush of holiday shopping this year. Online shoppers are projected to spend a record $7.7 billion this Cyber Monday, according to Adobe Insights, up 17.6 percent from last year.

Subscription e-commerce services, which allow shoppers to sign up to receive merchandise on a recurring basis, are booming. The industry’s top 16 companies generated $5.6 billion in revenue last year alone, with sales soaring more than 800 percent from 2013 to 2017, according to a recent McKinsey report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-16  Authors: hannah kliot, andrea day, scott zamost, jasmine wu, jennifer schlesinger, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, monthly, retailer, mes, shoppers, buyer, adore, model, beware, underwear, online, subscription, laforest, billion, according, yearsubscription


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Sheer terror hits victims of chilling ‘virtual kidnapping’ extortion schemes targeting the wealthy

“[We] receive virtual kidnapping [complaints] on a continual basis. The Delaware State Police had a sudden spike of nearly six calls earlier this year but Master Cpl. “We are investigating some instances of virtual kidnapping. As a retired Delaware state trooper, Al Ament is one of the last people you’d expect to fall for a virtual kidnapping scam, which is a testament to just how convincing it really is. The man demanded Ament pay $4,000 in exchange for his son, and Ament said he quickly lost h


“[We] receive virtual kidnapping [complaints] on a continual basis. The Delaware State Police had a sudden spike of nearly six calls earlier this year but Master Cpl. “We are investigating some instances of virtual kidnapping. As a retired Delaware state trooper, Al Ament is one of the last people you’d expect to fall for a virtual kidnapping scam, which is a testament to just how convincing it really is. The man demanded Ament pay $4,000 in exchange for his son, and Ament said he quickly lost h
Sheer terror hits victims of chilling ‘virtual kidnapping’ extortion schemes targeting the wealthy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-07  Authors: scott zamost, andrea day, hannah kliot, jasmine wu, jennifer schlesinger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bank, phone, virtual, ament, terror, targeting, delaware, state, wealthy, car, extortion, hits, son, sheer, schemes, departments, victims, kidnapping


Sheer terror hits victims of chilling 'virtual kidnapping' extortion schemes targeting the wealthy

Panicked, she rushed out of her classroom. Along the way, other school employees were signaling her that they had called the police. With the extortionist still on the line, she told them to find her daughter.

Jumping in her car, she drove to her bank. At a stoplight, she texted her husband frantically trying to find out if Abby was OK. As she pulled up to the bank, the caller demanded she go inside and withdraw as much money as possible. Suddenly, her daughter was on the other line.

“And so now on my phone, pops up her picture because her picture is tied to her contact in my phone — and at that moment, I just break down. I am sobbing in the car in front of the bank because I have her on the phone.”

She hung up, and was met outside her car by a police officer. She said the extortionist actually called back, but ended the call after the officer started talking to him.

The odds are that the extortionists won’t get caught. There has been only one U.S. federal prosecution, which was in 2015 involving a Mexican national who was already in prison in Mexico on unrelated charges. The scheme covered more than 40 victims in several states.

In Orange County, where Pogue was victimized, the sheriff’s office said it receives between five and six reports a month related to the extortion scheme.

CNBC contacted more than 40 police departments across the country, including those in the wealthiest ZIP codes and largest metropolitan areas, to see if they had received complaints. Thirteen police departments, including eight in California, plus those in Texas, Arizona, Massachusetts and Delaware have received complaints.

“[We] receive virtual kidnapping [complaints] on a continual basis. Generally they have been targeting individuals that are wealthy,” said Sgt. Max Subin of the Beverly Hills Police Department.

The Delaware State Police had a sudden spike of nearly six calls earlier this year but Master Cpl. Michael Austin said the true number is probably higher. “A lot of them go unreported because it’s sniffed out by the victim prior to it … or people [who fall for the scheme] are too embarrassed.”

Other departments also report that calls are on the rise. “We are investigating some instances of virtual kidnapping. As for a rise, this is a relatively new trend, so in that respect, we are seeing more recently than before,” said Sgt. Vince Lewis of the Phoenix Police.

Even law enforcement officers have been victims.

As a retired Delaware state trooper, Al Ament is one of the last people you’d expect to fall for a virtual kidnapping scam, which is a testament to just how convincing it really is. When he picked up the phone in March of this year, he heard a voice that sounded just like his 38-year-old son, who happened to be on a honeymoon abroad.

“You don’t know if it’s real or not. You don’t know if they’ve really kidnapped your family member or not,” Ament said.

The man demanded Ament pay $4,000 in exchange for his son, and Ament said he quickly lost his temper. “I used direct language: ‘If you harm my son, then I will hunt you down.’ The conversation escalated into screaming, and I got to a point where he hung up on me.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-07  Authors: scott zamost, andrea day, hannah kliot, jasmine wu, jennifer schlesinger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bank, phone, virtual, ament, terror, targeting, delaware, state, wealthy, car, extortion, hits, son, sheer, schemes, departments, victims, kidnapping


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