Author Ryan Holiday: How ‘stillness’ can help you become a better investor

But developing a sense of “stillness” may help you do it, says author Ryan Holiday. Being disciplined, even-keeled, and less emotional about your money can help with investing, too. One role model in investing stillness: Legendary investor Warren Buffett, who has called the stock market “a device for transferring money from the impatient to the patient.” Buffett “has to be really patient, which requires stillness,” Holiday says. Ryan Holiday Author, ‘Stillness Is the Key’Putting your finances on


But developing a sense of “stillness” may help you do it, says author Ryan Holiday. Being disciplined, even-keeled, and less emotional about your money can help with investing, too. One role model in investing stillness: Legendary investor Warren Buffett, who has called the stock market “a device for transferring money from the impatient to the patient.” Buffett “has to be really patient, which requires stillness,” Holiday says. Ryan Holiday Author, ‘Stillness Is the Key’Putting your finances on
Author Ryan Holiday: How ‘stillness’ can help you become a better investor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: sam becker, ramit sethi, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sense, market, author, holiday, better, things, requires, investor, help, stillness, ryan, investing, emotional, investment


Author Ryan Holiday: How 'stillness' can help you become a better investor

Staying focused on your investment goals while ignoring the ups and downs of the market isn’t easy. But developing a sense of “stillness” may help you do it, says author Ryan Holiday. Holiday’s new book, “Stillness Is the Key,” highlights how numerous historical figures — including JFK, Johnny Cash, and Leonardo da Vinci — used a strategic sense of patience, among other things, to achieve their goals. Being disciplined, even-keeled, and less emotional about your money can help with investing, too. “We know that the best investment strategy is long term. It’s indifferent to the day-to-day fluctuations of the market. It’s not emotional. It’s logical. It’s value-based,” Holiday tells Grow. The most dangerous aspect of investing, he says, is that investors “get way too excited when things are good. This is where bubbles and irrational exuberance comes from.”

One role model in investing stillness: Legendary investor Warren Buffett, who has called the stock market “a device for transferring money from the impatient to the patient.” Buffett “has to be really patient, which requires stillness,” Holiday says. “It requires him to see things that other people don’t see. It requires him to be wrong for extended periods of time, until he’s proven right.” Developing a sense of stillness and discipline like Buffett’s takes practice. Here are two ways you can strengthen this attribute as an investor:

Take emotion out of investment decisions

Feelings, both good and bad, can cause investors to make rash decisions. The goal is “not being jerked around by your emotions,” Holiday says, and “having some semblance of self-control.” In practice, this means that you don’t panic if the markets start to fall — and you don’t get giddy if they continue to climb. You try to keep your head down and stick to your plan, no matter what’s going on in the news.

We know that the best investment strategy is long term: It’s indifferent to the day-to-day fluctuations of the market. It’s not emotional. It’s logical. Ryan Holiday Author, ‘Stillness Is the Key’

Putting your finances on autopilot can help you take the emotion out of your investing decisions. Setting up recurring contributions to your investment or retirement accounts can keep you consistent and ensure that you’re benefiting from dollar-cost averaging, too. You can also work on building up your emergency fund and even try writing yourself a motivation letter to help you keep a steady emotional state when the markets get bumpy.

Limit how frequently you monitor your portfolio


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: sam becker, ramit sethi, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sense, market, author, holiday, better, things, requires, investor, help, stillness, ryan, investing, emotional, investment


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

‘Million Dollar Listing’ star Ryan Serhant: The best piece of investing advice I ever got

Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both p


Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both p
‘Million Dollar Listing’ star Ryan Serhant: The best piece of investing advice I ever got Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, star, investing, advice, listing, serhant, piece, dollar, invest, youre, million, best, real, things, ryan, really, estate, actually, going


'Million Dollar Listing' star Ryan Serhant: The best piece of investing advice I ever got

Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. But when it comes to his own money, he’s fairly conservative. He saves a lot, and he knows the value of a dollar. When it comes to investing, he sticks to a pretty simple strategy: Invest in what you know. Serhant recently sat down with the Grow team to discuss the most valuable investing advice he’s received, how he learned about money at a young age, and more. Here is his story, as told to senior reporter Sam Becker.

Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’

The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. Things you use. Things you could see yourself using; things you actually like. Don’t invest in stuff that doesn’t interest you, because then you’re not going to follow up on it. You’re not going to be as active an investor. So, I invest in things or products that I enjoy, use, or think are really interesting. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both physical products as well as software — [and] investing in real estate.

When it comes to real estate, I used to really think that to be a wise investor, you have to invest what you actually have to spend, so don’t spend more than you can afford. But I’ve found that to be incorrect. The best investments I’ve made are the ones that actually push me outside of my comfort level. Because you need to work more. You need to do more to actually get a return on this investment. And that’s worked really, really well for me.

‘The best investment I ever made’

The best investment I ever made: I invest in my business all the time. I invested in our YouTube vlog, and I think it’s funny because before I started the vlog on YouTube, everyone thought it was stupid and crazy. Including me. Actually, mostly me. I thought it was dumb. Just another form of social media. I was just sick and tired of it and I had no idea what it was going to do to our business. But it is a massive way of driving business and driving brand awareness. So, by investing the money that I did into the vlog, more people buy my book, more people buy the course, more people reach out to me to buy and sell homes.

Don’t invest in stuff that doesn’t interest you, because then you’re not going to follow up on it. You’re not going to be as active an investor. Ryan Serhant Real estate broker, author, and TV star

How being ‘broke’ led to his real estate career


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, star, investing, advice, listing, serhant, piece, dollar, invest, youre, million, best, real, things, ryan, really, estate, actually, going


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

October can be spooky for investors — here’s why experts say not to worry

October has a spooky reputation with investors, but experts say there’s no need to fear the stock market. This month has sometimes been horrifying, historically: Over the past century, three of the darkest days on Wall Street all happened during October. That day, now known as “Black Monday,” “was the worst single-day drop, percentage-wise, in history.” There’s another reason October has a bad reputation, says Lambert: “Market volatility, historically, is higher” in October. “Volatility implies


October has a spooky reputation with investors, but experts say there’s no need to fear the stock market. This month has sometimes been horrifying, historically: Over the past century, three of the darkest days on Wall Street all happened during October. That day, now known as “Black Monday,” “was the worst single-day drop, percentage-wise, in history.” There’s another reason October has a bad reputation, says Lambert: “Market volatility, historically, is higher” in October. “Volatility implies
October can be spooky for investors — here’s why experts say not to worry Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, say, spooky, reputation, worst, historically, fear, volatility, worry, great, market, day, heres, lambert, financial, experts


October can be spooky for investors — here's why experts say not to worry

October has a spooky reputation with investors, but experts say there’s no need to fear the stock market.

This month has sometimes been horrifying, historically: Over the past century, three of the darkest days on Wall Street all happened during October.

“The big one is October 1987, when the Dow plunged 22% in a single day,” says Jason Lambert, the president and CEO of Northwest Financial & Tax Solutions, near Portland, Oregon. That day, now known as “Black Monday,” “was the worst single-day drop, percentage-wise, in history.”

The Great Depression began after a market crash in October 1929 and the financial crisis that sparked the Great Recession started with an October market meltdown in 2008.

There’s another reason October has a bad reputation, says Lambert: “Market volatility, historically, is higher” in October. “Volatility implies fear,” he says, “even if it doesn’t mean that the market is moving up or down.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, say, spooky, reputation, worst, historically, fear, volatility, worry, great, market, day, heres, lambert, financial, experts


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest

Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience in


Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience in
25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, invest, investing, everyday, rapunzl, gage, founder, stock, app, helping, tech, money, users, school, 25yearold, ariel, teach, americans, financial


25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest

Like a lot of kids, Myles Gage was into sneakers when he was growing up. But his mom suggested an unusual rule: For every pair of Nikes that Gage owned, he should own a share of Nike stock. Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. The platform makes a game out of the markets: Users get $10,000 fictitious dollars to buy and sell stocks, which helps them learn how the markets work and start to experience the excitement and potential benefit of investing. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future.

Learning early to be ‘financially literate’

Gage says his parents made a lot of financial mistakes and they wanted to make sure their kids didn’t follow in their footsteps: “They wanted us to be financially literate and in a position to make better decisions.” That’s partly why Gage’s mother, who worked for the Chicago Parks District, found a way to get him and his brother, Mario, into Ariel Community Academy, a specialized public school for students K-8 with a focus on financial education. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience investing in stocks. Attending Ariel made a huge difference in Gage’s life: “The only reason I know about the stock market is because of Ariel Community Academy,” he says.

The only reason I know about the stock market is because of Ariel Community Academy. Myles Gage CFO, Rapunzl Investments

That knowledge paid off: It helped Gage win a full-ride scholarship to the University of Chicago Laboratory School, a prestigious private high school. “I wrote an essay about how I planned to finance my college tuition. And the main point of that was that I was going to liquidate my stock portfolio,” he says. “I don’t think the judges were expecting a 14-year-old to be talking about liquidating a portfolio, let alone one from the south side of Chicago.”

The origins of Rapunzl

As a high school freshman in 2008, Gage immediately bonded with another student, Brian Curcio. While discussing the stock market and the budding financial crisis, the two came up with the idea of a stock market game, using fictional money, to teach people how the markets work. Over the next few years, the economy recovered. Some investors, who had money to buy stocks when the markets bottomed out, started to see strong returns. Average Americans, however, were often missing out. Gage didn’t think that profits should belong only to a select few, hidden away at the top of a tower like the character of Rapunzel in the 1812 Brothers Grimm fairy tale. Rapunzl the app, Gage and Curcio decided, would make investing accessible. It would give anybody the chance to learn, to figure out how the stock markets work. Then, when users were comfortable, they could actually start investing.

How the app got funded

Through their college years, the two met frequently to refine the concept for Rapunzl. They settled on an idea that would allow users to simulate a stock portfolio without risking real money. But to make their idea come to life, real money is exactly what the two young entrepreneurs needed. So, after graduating in 2016, they organized their ideas and started looking around for seed funding.

Myles Gage with Rapunzl cofounder Brian Curcio. Courtesy Rapunzl Investments LLC

“We put a mini-pitch deck together and shopped it around to our friends and family, and were able to muster up funds to develop a prototype,” Gage says. They hired a Canadian developer who created an early version of the app and made it available for download in April 2017. Around that time, Rapunzl also did another round of fundraising, which netted the company enough money to continue perfecting the platform. Several months later, the founders brought in a third partner, Chris Thomas, as the company’s CTO.

‘Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl’

To attract users and take aim at their mission of creating a new generation of confident, financially literate investors, Gage and the team headed back to school — literally. Rapunzl partnered with the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and started sponsoring conferences, plus essay and investing competitions at schools around the Chicago area. The team also met with John Rogers, the chairman and CEO of Ariel Investments — which also funds and sponsors Ariel Community Academy — who agreed to sponsor the competitions and provide prize money. In 2018, Rapunzl was involved in competitions in more than 70 Chicago-area schools, comprising more than 2,000 students.

Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl that aim to tackle financial illiteracy and close the achievement gap. Arne Duncan Former U.S. Secretary of Education

Rapunzl is building on its success in Chicago schools by expanding. Last year, it sponsored competitions in Los Angeles, Boston, and New York, with plans for more cities next year, and colleges, too. It has even managed to catch the attention of former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. “Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl that aim to tackle financial illiteracy and close the achievement gap,” Duncan said, following an announcement about Rapunzl partnering with investing firm Wedbush. Duncan, who doesn’t have any current connection to the app, did play a role in developing the curriculum at Ariel Community Academy.

The app and its founders hope to make a difference

So far, the Rapunzl team has focused their efforts on generating interest in the platform and getting young users hooked on trading. The app doesn’t currently drive revenue, though, and Gage is hopeful that will change. He says at some point in 2020, the platform will be monetized through affiliate marketing and premium subscriptions.

Courtesy Rapunzl Investments LLC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, invest, investing, everyday, rapunzl, gage, founder, stock, app, helping, tech, money, users, school, 25yearold, ariel, teach, americans, financial


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

4 ways to save money on housing, even as costs keep going up

“Total housing costs shouldn’t exceed 28%,” says Heather Winston, a certified financial planner at retirement plan provider Principal, referring to the “28/36 rule” used by some advisors to help determine home affordability. How to save money on housingHere are some ways you may be able to save some money whether you’re a homeowner or a renter. Invest in upgrades Making some small changes around the house may help you save money on your utility bills. You can use your negotiation skills to save


“Total housing costs shouldn’t exceed 28%,” says Heather Winston, a certified financial planner at retirement plan provider Principal, referring to the “28/36 rule” used by some advisors to help determine home affordability. How to save money on housingHere are some ways you may be able to save some money whether you’re a homeowner or a renter. Invest in upgrades Making some small changes around the house may help you save money on your utility bills. You can use your negotiation skills to save
4 ways to save money on housing, even as costs keep going up Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, housing, costs, negotiate, youre, utility, going, rent, upgrades, ways, consider, money, save, shouldnt


4 ways to save money on housing, even as costs keep going up

Housing can be the single biggest monthly expense in your budget. Your rent or mortgage payment can eat up a significant portion of your income, and it can be particularly difficult to figure out how to spend less on where you live. In some places, especially cities with high rents and astronomical home prices, keeping housing costs manageable is incredibly difficult. Ideally, experts say you should be spending only around a quarter of your income on housing-related costs. “Total housing costs shouldn’t exceed 28%,” says Heather Winston, a certified financial planner at retirement plan provider Principal, referring to the “28/36 rule” used by some advisors to help determine home affordability. “That’s superhard, especially for young people in an expensive real estate market,” Winston says.

How to save money on housing

Here are some ways you may be able to save some money whether you’re a homeowner or a renter. 1. Consider refinancing The current economic environment is friendly to homeowners looking to refinance, so it may be a good idea to consider your options. Mortgage rates are falling, which opens up an opportunity for homeowners to refinance and potentially lower your payments. Rates are 1.25 percentage points lower than they were in October 2018, which could save those with a $300,000 mortgage as much as $2,700 per year.

2. Invest in upgrades Making some small changes around the house may help you save money on your utility bills. Salvador Nobre Veiga, a 32-year-old living in Pennsylvania, told Grow earlier this year that he was able to reduce his annual utility costs by 66% by making upgrades to his house. For Nobre Veiga, investing in additional insulation, energy-efficient light bulbs, and a smart thermostat saved him hundreds of dollars per year. These are upgrades you can consider, too, whether you’re a homeowner or a renter. Utility bills cost the average household in the U.S. around $2,000 per year, so a few small upgrades can potentially save you hundreds of dollars annually. 3. Negotiate You can negotiate the price of almost anything. The trouble is, many people find it uncomfortable, so they just accept the terms they’re offered. But you shouldn’t be afraid to ask for a better deal. You can use your negotiation skills to save money in other areas, too. Homeowners can negotiate with their insurance companies or contractors to save money on certain bills. Renters may be able to negotiate reductions in rent in exchange for making upgrades or repairs to properties, or in exchange for signing longer leases. It never hurts to ask — just remember to be nice.

4. Consider moving If you run out of options and can’t find a way for your current living situation to make financial sense, it may be in your best interest to move. For renters, this will be easier — though you still may have to pay a fee if you break your lease. But even that might save you money if you can find a significantly less expensive place to rent or share. Selling a house is a much bigger project, and it can take both an emotional and a financial toll. You can always look at other options, such as selling equity in your home to help you get by, before deciding to put your home on the market. Even if you’re open to moving, make sure you shift to a place you can better afford so you won’t end up finding yourself in a worse, or equally difficult, situation. And you probably shouldn’t hold out hope that your rent or home prices will decrease in the near future.

Housing costs keep going up


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, housing, costs, negotiate, youre, utility, going, rent, upgrades, ways, consider, money, save, shouldnt


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Grocery chain CEO who ate expired food for a year says ignoring some sell-by dates can save you ‘a ton of money’

Three years ago, Scott Nash, the founder and CEO of Mom’s Organic Market, a grocery store chain, found a six-month-old yogurt in his fridge. He has made it his mission to show that expiration dates often don’t actually indicate that food has spoiled. Nash suggests freezing meat that’s past the expiration date. Raw eggs Ground meats* Hot dogs Lunch meats Fresh steaks* Fresh chops* Fresh roasts* Whole chicken Lean fish Fatty fish 0 months 3 6 9 12 *Includes beef, turkey, veal, pork, and lamb. Raw


Three years ago, Scott Nash, the founder and CEO of Mom’s Organic Market, a grocery store chain, found a six-month-old yogurt in his fridge. He has made it his mission to show that expiration dates often don’t actually indicate that food has spoiled. Nash suggests freezing meat that’s past the expiration date. Raw eggs Ground meats* Hot dogs Lunch meats Fresh steaks* Fresh chops* Fresh roasts* Whole chicken Lean fish Fatty fish 0 months 3 6 9 12 *Includes beef, turkey, veal, pork, and lamb. Raw
Grocery chain CEO who ate expired food for a year says ignoring some sell-by dates can save you ‘a ton of money’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: sofia pitt, scott nash, anna-louise jackson, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grocery, fresh, ignoring, plastic, ton, expired, sellby, freezing, foods, away, meat, meats, months, dates, money, save, nash, food, chain


Grocery chain CEO who ate expired food for a year says ignoring some sell-by dates can save you 'a ton of money'

Three years ago, Scott Nash, the founder and CEO of Mom’s Organic Market, a grocery store chain, found a six-month-old yogurt in his fridge. He peeled off the lid, and to his surprise found that the yogurt smelled fine and it wasn’t moldy. He ate it and waited. He felt fine. From there, he undertook an experiment. Nash, who calls himself a “staunch environmentalist,” spent the next year eating past-date food and blogging about it. He has made it his mission to show that expiration dates often don’t actually indicate that food has spoiled. By making consumers think otherwise, he argues, those dates contribute to America’s food waste problem. Americans throw away a staggering $218 billion worth of food a year, which averages out to a cost of $1,800 for a family of four. “As someone who has spent 30-plus years in the grocery business, I believe the main culprit, and the easiest way to make the most progress [in reducing food waste], is to overhaul our food product dating system and guidelines,” Nash wrote on his blog.

Mom’s Organic Market CEO and founder Scott Nash speaks at national “Keep Hives Alive Tour” on June 22, 2016. Courtesy Scott Nash

There is no federal regulation that says manufacturers have to include expiration dates on the packaging, except for infant formula. Manufacturers mostly use their discretion to pick the “best by,” “sell by,” and “use by” dates printed on their products, so the chosen date can be a reflection of when the food company recommends using the product for peak quality rather than an indication of how safe it is to eat the labeled food. Nash shares with Grow the tricks he learned during his experiment that, he says, can help you avoid “throwing money in the garbage.” The CEO also shares a quiche recipe that he says serves as “a great vehicle for getting rid of stuff.”

Use your senses to determine if food has gone bad

Certain foods can last years beyond their expiration dates, primarily items like grains and dried foods. “Canned goods and jarred goods last for decades. They’re airtight and preserved,” says Nash. If a can appears warped or bloated, though, toss it. Grains like crackers or cereal might be edible past the expiration date, but they do eventually become rancid. “You’ll smell it if grains go bad … but you can also touch them to see if they’re stale,” Nash says. The point is that you can usually use your senses to determine if something’s no longer fit to eat. “If it smells bad, throw it away. If it looks moldy, throw it away,” says Nash. “It’s that simple.”

If it smells bad, throw it away. If it looks moldy, throw it away. … It’s that simple. Scott Nash CEO of Mom’s Organic Grocery

Meat, dairy, and eggs have a shorter shelf life. If you’re in doubt about these, he says, there are a few techniques you can use to test for freshness. “You can pour half-and-half into hot water and see if it curdles” before pouring it into your coffee and ruining your whole cup, he says. If an egg floats in a bowl of water, it’s gone bad.

When you can safely cut off mold

Mold can make certain foods dangerous to consumers. Other foods are fine, though, after mold is removed. Hard cheese with mold, for example, can still be edible if you remove the mold because it doesn’t penetrate the whole product. To use the cheese, the U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends cutting off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot. Firm fruits and vegetables like cabbage, bell peppers, and carrots are also safe to use after getting rid of the moldy spot with the same technique. If you want to play it even safer, Nash says, cook the product after removing the mold: “Make a grilled cheese. Cook with that cheese instead of eating it with crackers.” And the same goes for butter, he says: “If it’s expired, cook with it to kill the bacteria.”

As someone who has spent 30-plus years in the grocery business, I believe the main culprit (and the easiest way to make the most progress) is to overhaul our food product dating system and guidelines. Scott Nash Mom’s Organic Market founder & CEO

The dish on beef

Uncooked beef with a foul odor, slimy texture, or sticky or tacky feel, is best thrown out, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. But if refrigerated meat looks and smells slightly funky, it’s not necessarily unsafe. If you have ground beef that you want to salvage, try cooking it and adding tomato sauce: “The acid in the tomatoes helps preserve the meat for an extra two weeks in the refrigerator,” says Nash. Nash suggests freezing meat that’s past the expiration date. Keep in mind that the government has stricter guidelines, though. Here’s how the Food and Drug Administration recommends you freeze foods and how long they can last.

The HTML5 Herald How long to store food in the freezer If freezing meat or poultry in its original package longer than two months, cover it with airtight heavy-duty foil, freezer paper, or plastic wrap; or place inside a plastic bag. Raw eggs Ground meats* Hot dogs Lunch meats Fresh steaks* Fresh chops* Fresh roasts* Whole chicken Lean fish Fatty fish 0 months 3 6 9 12 *Includes beef, turkey, veal, pork, and lamb. Note: Because freezing at the recommended 0 F (-18 C) keeps food safe indefinitely, the storage times are for quality only. kiersten schmidt | grow Source: fda How long to store food in the freezer If freezing meat or poultry in its original package longer than two months, cover it with airtight heavy-duty foil, freezer paper, or plastic wrap; or place inside a plastic bag. Raw eggs Ground meats* Hot dogs Lunch meats Fresh steaks* Fresh chops* Fresh roasts* Whole chicken Lean fish Fatty fish 0 months 3 6 9 12 *Includes beef, turkey, veal, pork, and lamb. Note: Because freezing at the recommended 0 F (-18 C) keeps food safe indefinitely, the storage times are for quality only. kiersten schmidt | grow Source: fda How long to store food in the freezer If freezing meat or poultry in its original package longer than two months, cover it with airtight heavy-duty foil, freezer paper, or plastic wrap; or place inside a plastic bag. Raw eggs Ground meats* Hot dogs Lunch meats Fresh steaks* Fresh chops* Fresh roasts* Whole chicken Lean fish Fatty fish 0 months 3 6 9 12 *Includes beef, turkey, veal, pork, and lamb. Note: Because freezing at the recommended 0 F (-18 C) keeps food safe indefinitely, the storage times are for quality only. Graphic: kiersten schmidt | grow Source: FDA

Food for thought

Though these and other techniques worked for Nash, who didn’t suffer ill effects from his experiment, make sure to do your own research to determine what you’re comfortable with, and to always use your own good judgment. If you’re wavering about whether to keep certain foods around, remember that you can make most foods last by freezing them while fresh. Frozen foods generally won’t go bad because bacteria and other pathogens can’t grow at those temperatures. Nash also points out that while he took his food waste reduction strategy to extreme, “the other extreme is constantly throwing away perfectly fine stuff because of that arbitrary, stupid date.” And food waste is taking a toll on the planet: It’s an often overlooked driver of climate change. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 30% of food is wasted globally, contributing 8% of total global greenhouse gas emissions. If food waste were a country, it would come in third after the United States and China in terms of the impact on global warming. In other words, your choice is not all or nothing, says Nash: “If you at least stop throwing away canned or jarred goods, that would go a long way.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: sofia pitt, scott nash, anna-louise jackson, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grocery, fresh, ignoring, plastic, ton, expired, sellby, freezing, foods, away, meat, meats, months, dates, money, save, nash, food, chain


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Jean Chatzky: When setting goals, ask, ‘What do I want my money to do for me?’

Most people don’t set out on a road trip without settling on the route they’ll take — but chances are they haven’t done the same with their financial goals. A variety of surveys, including recent ones from Fidelity and Charles Schwab, show that at least 75% of Americans don’t have a financial plan. “People don’t lay out paths that get themselves to retirement, to having money put away for college tuition, even to having a basic emergency fund,” says Jean Chatzky, CEO of HerMoney.com and bestsell


Most people don’t set out on a road trip without settling on the route they’ll take — but chances are they haven’t done the same with their financial goals. A variety of surveys, including recent ones from Fidelity and Charles Schwab, show that at least 75% of Americans don’t have a financial plan. “People don’t lay out paths that get themselves to retirement, to having money put away for college tuition, even to having a basic emergency fund,” says Jean Chatzky, CEO of HerMoney.com and bestsell
Jean Chatzky: When setting goals, ask, ‘What do I want my money to do for me?’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: anna-louise jackson, myelle lansat, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plan, ask, setting, winging, dont, goals, retirement, financial, chatzky, step, money, jean, start


Jean Chatzky: When setting goals, ask, 'What do I want my money to do for me?'

Most people don’t set out on a road trip without settling on the route they’ll take — but chances are they haven’t done the same with their financial goals. A variety of surveys, including recent ones from Fidelity and Charles Schwab, show that at least 75% of Americans don’t have a financial plan. “People don’t lay out paths that get themselves to retirement, to having money put away for college tuition, even to having a basic emergency fund,” says Jean Chatzky, CEO of HerMoney.com and bestselling author of books including “Women with Money.” Without a plan for their financial future, many people end up winging it, and that can make them ill-prepared for retirement or any emergencies that might pop up. Don’t feel discouraged if you find the process of trying to create a plan overwhelming, either, says Chatzky: “It’s a challenge for most human beings.” Here are two of her tips for making the process simpler.

1. Figure out the right goals for you

If you’re among those who have been winging it, the first step to take is to figure out what your goals are, Chatzky recommends. Your goals may well be personal, like buying a home, planning for a family, or saving for retirement. “Take a step back and say, ‘What do I want my money to do for me this year?'” she says. “‘What do I want it to do for me in a couple of years? What do I want it to do for me five or 10 years down the road?'”

With those aims in mind, you’ll need to divvy up your money each month so that you can start saving up, and investing, for short-, medium, and long-term goals. If you’ve never created a personal budget, many experts recommend the 50/30/20 rule. It suggests you allocate 50% of your take-home pay to basic living expenses, 30% to discretionary spending, and the remaining 20% to savings and investments.

2. ‘Be really structured’

The earlier you can start planning your future, the better, as the money moves you make in your 20s and 30s will shape the rest of your life. Still, many small steps — such as the ones we outlined in Grow’s 30-day easy money makeover — can help you save or earn more at any time in life. And while you may have ideas for your goals, it’s important to really think through what you want. “Give yourself a little bit of time and a little bit of space, either with yourself or with a partner if you have one, to just focus,” Chatzky says. And then ask yourself: “‘What do I want and how can I use my limited resources in order to accomplish those things?'”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: anna-louise jackson, myelle lansat, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plan, ask, setting, winging, dont, goals, retirement, financial, chatzky, step, money, jean, start


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

What it’s like to ring the bell at the New York Stock Exchange

The New York Stock Exchange welcomes Citizens Financial Group (NYSE: CFG) in celebration of its 5th anniversary of listing. Evolution of a daily ritualThe New York Stock Exchange is open five days a week, save nine recognized holidays. The New York Stock Exchange, founded in 1792, has become synonymous with Wall Street, where it’s located. Uber and Levi Strauss are among the companies that have debuted on the New York Stock Exchange this year. Uber Technologies CEO Dara Khosrowshahi stands outsi


The New York Stock Exchange welcomes Citizens Financial Group (NYSE: CFG) in celebration of its 5th anniversary of listing. Evolution of a daily ritualThe New York Stock Exchange is open five days a week, save nine recognized holidays. The New York Stock Exchange, founded in 1792, has become synonymous with Wall Street, where it’s located. Uber and Levi Strauss are among the companies that have debuted on the New York Stock Exchange this year. Uber Technologies CEO Dara Khosrowshahi stands outsi
What it’s like to ring the bell at the New York Stock Exchange Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financial, bell, ring, companies, conner, exchange, york, floor, trading, stock


What it's like to ring the bell at the New York Stock Exchange

The New York Stock Exchange welcomes Citizens Financial Group (NYSE: CFG) in celebration of its 5th anniversary of listing. Bruce Van Saun, CEO, joined by Betty Liu, NYSE Executive Vice Chairman, rings The Closing Bell®.

For about three seconds — three very loud seconds — almost all you can hear on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange is the sound of a giant bell ringing. That brass bell, first rung some 100 years ago, is used to mark the start and close of trading each day at the world’s largest exchange. And if you happen to tune into CNBC or any other financial network around 9:30 a.m. or 4 p.m. New York time, you may see a group of people cheering and clapping along with the bell. What does it all mean? Here’s what happens behind the scenes of those bell-ringing ceremonies.

Evolution of a daily ritual

The New York Stock Exchange is open five days a week, save nine recognized holidays. That means that twice a day on about 250 days a year, there’s a need for someone to press the green button that controls bells in the four areas of the trading floor — and companies, charities, celebrities, and dignitaries typically participate in these events. In 1995, the exchange saw an opportunity to highlight some of its customers and use the bell-ringing as a publicity event — and in 2017, it moved the bell from the wall to the front of the podium. Prior to that, managers on the trading floors rang the bells as a matter of business to ensure trades didn’t occur outside market hours. While most of the trades are done via computer these days, there still are dozens of jacket-bedecked traders who buy and sell from the exchange. It’s not exactly raucous there, but the traders often banter as they monitor what’s happening in the stock market any particular day.

What it takes to ring the bell

The calendar of bell ringers is set about a month in advance, and there’s been an eclectic mix in recent weeks — including First Lady Melania Trump, and executives from companies like Estée Lauder, Ethan Allen, Salesforce, and J.P. Morgan Asset Management. Companies submit a bell-ringing request, and selections are largely made based on availability. The New York Stock Exchange, founded in 1792, has become synonymous with Wall Street, where it’s located. Only those companies with stocks or exchange-traded funds (ETFs) listed on the exchange can ring the bell. There are currently more than 6,000 stocks that are traded on this particular exchange, along with 2,000-plus ETFs. Charities and other groups apply, or are invited to attend. In addition to commemorating a special occasion, like a milestone anniversary or new product launch, companies debuting on the exchange for the first time with an initial public offering (IPO) ring the opening bell. After that, an executive will strike another bell on the trading floor with a gavel to signify the listing is ready for trade. Uber and Levi Strauss are among the companies that have debuted on the New York Stock Exchange this year.

Uber Technologies CEO Dara Khosrowshahi stands outside the New York Stock Exchange ahead of the company’s IPO May 10, 2019. Andrew Kelly | Reuters

Ringing the bell: ‘It’s a very, very neat experience’

In my years as an investing reporter, I’ve attended a number of bell-ringing ceremonies. But I watched from the main trading floor, far from the action that happens on the podium above. There, about 15 people crowd together to ring the bell during the market open or close. Brad Conner has been up on that podium twice. Back in 2014, the vice chairman for consumer banking helped to ring the opening bell when his employer — Citizens Financial Group, a financial institution based in Providence, Rhode Island — launched its IPO. The second time was in late September when he and his colleagues rang the closing bell to celebrate Citizens’ fifth anniversary as a publicly traded company. “I’ve been in corporate America and banking for 35 years,” Conner says. “I would have to say that both times [ringing the bell] were really memorable events in my career.”

It’s a very, very neat experience. Brad Conner vice chairman for consumer banking, Citizens Financial Group

But the ceremony itself can’t fully capture the significance of such an event, both for those on hand and the employees watching via live-stream back in the offices, Conner says. “There’s no question it made our colleagues very proud,” he says. “It made them feel like they’re part of a company that’s really something.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financial, bell, ring, companies, conner, exchange, york, floor, trading, stock


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Job gains, job losses, and other news affecting your money this week

Another week with an all-time high for the U.S. stock market within reach — and another week of no new records. While the House’s plans to start an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump could cause some market uncertainty, for now Wall Street is more focused on the U.S.-China trade war. Wall Street will closely track the monthly jobs report, along with some additional employment data, to get a sense of both job growth and job losses. The jobs report can also be informative because it s


Another week with an all-time high for the U.S. stock market within reach — and another week of no new records. While the House’s plans to start an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump could cause some market uncertainty, for now Wall Street is more focused on the U.S.-China trade war. Wall Street will closely track the monthly jobs report, along with some additional employment data, to get a sense of both job growth and job losses. The jobs report can also be informative because it s
Job gains, job losses, and other news affecting your money this week Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: anna-louise jackson, john schmidt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, market, affecting, number, report, losses, week, gains, street, wall, jobs, month, job, hiring, money, employment


Job gains, job losses, and other news affecting your money this week

Another week with an all-time high for the U.S. stock market within reach — and another week of no new records. While the House’s plans to start an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump could cause some market uncertainty, for now Wall Street is more focused on the U.S.-China trade war. And the next round of talks between leaders of the two countries has been set for mid-October. There has been some other positive news, too: Several key economic reports came in better than expected, including home sales and manufacturing activity. This week is all about the labor market. Wall Street will closely track the monthly jobs report, along with some additional employment data, to get a sense of both job growth and job losses. And traders care so much about whether companies are hiring or firing because this impacts broader economic growth. Here’s what to watch this week, and how the news could affect your wallet.

Did hiring slow or accelerate?

What’s happening: There’s a slew of data in the Department of Labor’s monthly employment report, but the main headline number — the number of nonfarm jobs created — is what Wall Street awaits the first Friday of every month. Economists currently project that employers added more jobs in September than in August. Ahead of that is another employment report from payroll processor ADP on Wednesday that measures hiring gains at private companies — and economists currently project a decline from the prior month. Why it matters: Job growth has slowed this year. On average, employers have added about 158,000 jobs each month this year, the lowest since 2009. Lackluster hiring is one symptom of the weaker economic growth that led the Federal Reserve to cut interest rates twice over the summer. Some traders and policymakers think the Fed should lower interest rates further, and if employment data weakens, that might be justification for them to do so. What it means for you: While there continue to be gains in hiring, the U.S. economy is heading toward full employment, meaning almost everyone willing and able to work has a job. This could be good news for workers — economists expect that full employment could result in wage increases. The jobs report can also be informative because it shows which industries are hiring the most. Because this is one of the most-watched economic reports on Wall Street, any surprises can result in short-term swings in the stock market.

Layoffs are on the rise

What’s happening: The other big number that Wall Street tracks from the jobs report is the unemployment rate — and that’s been at 3.7% for the past three months, the lowest since 1969. Ahead of that is the weekly report detailing the number of Americans filing applications for unemployment benefits. Economists expect that number to be slightly higher for the report scheduled to be released on Thursday. What it means: The labor market remains relatively strong and jobless claims are near the lowest level in decades. But companies have been downsizing this year. Through August, employers have announced plans to cut more than 423,000 jobs, up 36% from the same period in 2018 and the highest eight month total since 2015, according to Challenger, Gray & Christmas, an executive outplacement firm. What it means for you: It can be helpful to monitor what industries are cutting back to get a better sense of the areas of weakness in the U.S. economy. Despite concerns in recent months that another recession could be coming, a slowdown doesn’t appear imminent. Either way, it can help to focus on steps you can take now to recession-proof your life.

The bottom line


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: anna-louise jackson, john schmidt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, market, affecting, number, report, losses, week, gains, street, wall, jobs, month, job, hiring, money, employment


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Here’s what a market benchmark is — and why it’s important

These indexes, which serve as important benchmarks for Wall Street, track the performance of hundreds, or even thousands, of companies. Watching them helps professional investors understand how the overall stock market, or specific sectors of it, are performing. Traders sometimes use the big ones, like the S&P 500 or the Dow Jones Industrial Average, as shorthand for the state of the entire economy. Even actively managed funds — which employ professional stock-pickers to select investments — use


These indexes, which serve as important benchmarks for Wall Street, track the performance of hundreds, or even thousands, of companies. Watching them helps professional investors understand how the overall stock market, or specific sectors of it, are performing. Traders sometimes use the big ones, like the S&P 500 or the Dow Jones Industrial Average, as shorthand for the state of the entire economy. Even actively managed funds — which employ professional stock-pickers to select investments — use
Here’s what a market benchmark is — and why it’s important Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-28  Authors: john schmidt, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, benchmarks, dow, important, benchmark, professional, 500, investments, overall, investors, performance, measure, market, heres


Here's what a market benchmark is — and why it's important

Pay attention to financial news and you’ll quickly realize that investing pros tend to measure our economy in terms of indexes: The Dow, for example, may be up 2% on a given day, or the S&P 500 may have fallen 30 points.

These indexes, which serve as important benchmarks for Wall Street, track the performance of hundreds, or even thousands, of companies. Watching them helps professional investors understand how the overall stock market, or specific sectors of it, are performing. Traders sometimes use the big ones, like the S&P 500 or the Dow Jones Industrial Average, as shorthand for the state of the entire economy.

There are also benchmarks that set the standard for investments ranging from small cap to bond funds. Even actively managed funds — which employ professional stock-pickers to select investments — use a comparison benchmark index to determine if their management is providing better returns than the overall market.

All this can be confusing for individual investors, as many people try to measure the performance of their portfolios against that of a broad index like the S&P 500 or the Dow. Here’s a closer look at how to think about what these benchmarks do, and don’t, mean in relation to your own investments.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-28  Authors: john schmidt, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, benchmarks, dow, important, benchmark, professional, 500, investments, overall, investors, performance, measure, market, heres


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post