I asked Facebook if I could work part-time from home after I had my baby. They said no—so I quit

I was incredibly lucky to work there for five months while pregnant with my third baby. (Pictured above: Eliza and her daughter; Photo: Eliot Khuner) When it was time to return to work, I asked HR if I could work part-time from home, while my baby was young. I also wrote another letter about my experience and shared it on Facebook in an internal group for all Facebook employees. I asked him what he would do: “Would you lead this company and the US in supporting working parents? Remote work, part


I was incredibly lucky to work there for five months while pregnant with my third baby. (Pictured above: Eliza and her daughter; Photo: Eliot Khuner) When it was time to return to work, I asked HR if I could work part-time from home, while my baby was young. I also wrote another letter about my experience and shared it on Facebook in an internal group for all Facebook employees. I asked him what he would do: “Would you lead this company and the US in supporting working parents? Remote work, part
I asked Facebook if I could work part-time from home after I had my baby. They said no—so I quit Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-21  Authors: eliza khuner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, asked, leave, need, kids, noso, employees, company, working, day, parttime, parents, quit, facebook, work, baby


I asked Facebook if I could work part-time from home after I had my baby. They said no—so I quit

A year ago, I had to make the hardest decision of my life: Choose between my dream job and my baby girl. I loved being a data scientist in Facebook’s Social Good department. The open culture and shared sense that we could reach so many people and improve their lives made me enjoy my work even more. Facebook’s benefits for new parents were quite generous — even by US standards — including four months’ paid leave, $4,000 in “baby cash,” partial reimbursement of childcare expenses and ample lactation rooms in every building. I was incredibly lucky to work there for five months while pregnant with my third baby. My 5-year-old and 3-year-old spent the day with a patchwork of family members and babysitters, while my husband worked as a software developer. Working full-time left me just enough time to feed my kids, tuck them into bed and catch enough sleep for myself and my unborn baby. I was both exhilarated and exhausted. After my daughter was born, I soaked up as much time with her as I could. I loved her tiny yawns and delicious toes — and dreaded the end of my leave. During wakeful nights of nursing, my mind ran in circles scheming on how to return full-time. I wished for on-site child care so I could bring her to work and take nursing breaks. Maybe I could leave early and make up the hours after my kids went to bed. I’d catch up on missed sleep over the weekends. Holding the baby who saw me as her world, I tried to convince myself that I could leave her all day. I couldn’t. (Pictured above: Eliza and her daughter; Photo: Eliot Khuner) When it was time to return to work, I asked HR if I could work part-time from home, while my baby was young. They said no. How about unpaid leave until she’s a bit older? Also no. Heavyhearted, I submitted my resignation letter. I also wrote another letter about my experience and shared it on Facebook in an internal group for all Facebook employees. I told them I knew the company could do better. Almost instantly, my phone buzzed with a comment. Then again, and again. Hundreds of employees wrote to say, “Me, too.” Mothers said they cried every day dropping their babies off at daycare, that it physically hurt to be apart. Fathers said they longed to be in their children’s lives more. Young women were afraid to risk their career; some said they were freezing their eggs, while others said they simply gave up on their dreams of ever having kids. My post received over 5,000 likes, 700 comments, and 80 shares on Facebook. Employees called for CEO Mark Zuckerberg to answer. COO Sheryl Sandberg chimed in, explaining that it was something they wanted to do, but that it just wasn’t the right time. Reading through the comments, I thought about how, in Sandberg’s book “Lean In,” she urged companies to accommodate women and mothers, but conspicuously never mentioned part-time options or extended parental leave.

An in-office, 40-hour workweek requirement is at odds with the human need for family and community.

Three days later, I stood in front of Zuckerberg with my baby strapped to my chest and told him, “I see the posters here every day that say, ‘What would you do if you weren’t afraid?'” I asked him what he would do: “Would you lead this company and the US in supporting working parents? Would you give us the chance to show you how kick-ass and loyal we can be with fewer hours at our desks — if you weren’t afraid?” I challenged him to stop making us choose. Zuckerberg’s response was no different than Sandberg’s. He valued time with kids and thought it was important, he said, but offering more options for parents couldn’t happen right now. I walked away still feeling torn, but knowing that I wasn’t alone in needing more time. An in-office, 40-hour workweek requirement is at odds with the human need for family and community. When I shared my story with the public last year, the widespread response proved once again how common my struggle was. Thousands of parents said they want more time to care for their babies. Laszlo Bock, former SVP of People Operations at Google, posted my story on his LinkedIn page. “Surprising that even the wealthiest companies don’t offer more flexible and compelling situations for moms,” he wrote in the caption. A few commented on how spoiled I sounded, and that the company isn’t obligated to pay for my child. “I hope you get the time to care for your loved ones when you need it. You deserve it. Everyone does,” I wrote back. (Pictured above: Eliza and her second son; Photo: Eliot Khuner) One person said that it was unfair of me to ask a company I had worked at for less than a year for a flexible schedule. I responded by saying that I did disclose my pregnancy — and the fact that I had two young children — before I was given an offer. “They were terrific about it and super supportive. I also stated clearly from the start that I would happily take a pay cut in exchange for fewer hours, but they said that had to be worked out with my team,” I added. “That’s why I went ahead and asked for it after my daughter was born.”

If such a successful company refuses to acknowledge this, then what chance do the rest of working families have?

I know I’m unusually fortunate to have a partner who supports our family while I care for my kids. Most working Americans do not have this option, much less paid leave of any length. The US is the only industrialized nation that doesn’t require employers to provide paid leave for new parents. Only eight states and 40% of employers in the US currently offer any paid parental leave. But a company that boasts three meals a day for employees and a redwood grove inside one of its offices, I would assume, has the resources to accommodate parents who need more time with their children. If such a successful company refuses to acknowledge this, then what chance do the rest of working families have? (Pictured above: Eliza and her oldest son; Photo: Eliot Khuner) Time to care and connect is something we all need. Remote work, part-time hours and longer leave need to be an option for everyone. In recent years, more mothers have shared publicly how they stepped down, having buckled under the stress of juggling work and care-taking. Tech companies lament lack of diversity with words not backed by action; policy change has been depressingly sluggish. Telecommuting, working off-hours and job-sharing are all within reach thanks to technology, yet leaders resist taking the leap. Companies that push the boundaries of what’s possible with their products turn conservative when it comes to supporting families. If you want to keep parents and get the best from your employees, expand your idea of work beyond the nine-to-five desk model. For every parent who protests, there are many more who suffer silently because they can’t afford to lose their job or cut their hours.

In all of our lives, we’re meant to build both our careers and our communities. I’m calling for the time and space to do both


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-21  Authors: eliza khuner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, asked, leave, need, kids, noso, employees, company, working, day, parttime, parents, quit, facebook, work, baby


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I bought my first car on Craigslist—here’s exactly what the process was like in 6 steps

That’s when I decided to try Craigslist, which lets you search for used cars and trucks for sale in your city. The VIN is a 17-digit number that’s assigned to every car in the U.S. and allows you to pull a Carfax vehicle history report. I inspected the interior and exterior of the vehicle, asked about the features, reviewed the maintenance records and took it out for a spin. I bought car insuranceTo register the car in my name, I would need proof of insurance. Don’t miss: 3 important questions t


That’s when I decided to try Craigslist, which lets you search for used cars and trucks for sale in your city. The VIN is a 17-digit number that’s assigned to every car in the U.S. and allows you to pull a Carfax vehicle history report. I inspected the interior and exterior of the vehicle, asked about the features, reviewed the maintenance records and took it out for a spin. I bought car insuranceTo register the car in my name, I would need proof of insurance. Don’t miss: 3 important questions t
I bought my first car on Craigslist—here’s exactly what the process was like in 6 steps Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buy, car, process, used, asked, vehicle, cars, bought, history, dealerships, buying, steps, craigslistheres, exactly, seller


I bought my first car on Craigslist—here's exactly what the process was like in 6 steps

Having lived in New York City for the past five years, it’s been a while since I’ve had a car — and all of the expenses that come with one: insurance, gas and maintenance, to name a few. But when I moved to Los Angeles this month, where pretty much everybody drives, all of that changed. I’ve never bought a car on my own (my parents helped me navigate the process in high school) and I had no idea where to start, so I consulted experts about steps to take, common mistakes and negotiation tactics. I didn’t intend to buy on Craigslist — I’d never even used the site before — but wound up finding exactly what I wanted within the budget I had set. Here’s what the process was like.

1. I figured out exactly what I wanted

According to the experts, before you walk into a dealership or start test-driving cars, you should know exactly what type of vehicle you want to buy. Settling on something within your budget that is right for you and your lifestyle is important for two reasons: If you’re shopping at dealerships and show indecisiveness, “you’re at the mercy of the salesperson,” former car salesman David Weliver, who now runs personal finance website Money Under 30, told me. If the sales rep is good at their job, they’ll play off your emotions and steer you towards something that’s more profitable for them and more expensive for you. Secondly, if you don’t pick a car within your budget ahead of time, by the time you start test-driving, it’ll be easier to convince yourself to buy more than you can afford.

I knew that I wanted a small SUV with decent gas mileage. I also knew that I wanted to buy used and keep the total cost under $12,000 so that I could pay in cash and avoid financing the car. That in mind, I settled on the Toyota RAV4, which I’d driven as a rental car before and liked. Since I didn’t have many specific requirements or must-have features, I didn’t labor over choosing the perfect model. If you want to put more time and effort into the selection process, you can use tools like Edmunds.com and Kelley Blue Book to research different cars, read reviews and compare models side-by-side.

2. I shopped around

Once you know what you want, experts recommend getting quotes from at least three dealerships. Using Kelley Blue Book, which lets you search for specific used cars in your area, I reached out to a few dealerships and asked for the total selling price of the car I was interested in. Immediately after I expressed interest, emails, phone calls and even text messages from sales reps started flooding in. It was overwhelming, hectic and felt disingenuous. That’s when I decided to try Craigslist, which lets you search for used cars and trucks for sale in your city. After sifting through a few listings on the site, I was drawn to one RAV4 in particular and emailed the seller asking if it was still for sale. He confirmed it was so I called him up for more information. It was also cheaper than most of the listings I’d seen at dealerships. That lined up with what Matt Jones, the senior manager of insights at Edmunds, told me: “Private party tends to cost less than buying from a dealership.” That’s because dealerships have certain rules and standards they have to adhere to when selling used cars — the brakes have to work, for example — and you pay a premium for that. “You have no recourse if you buy a car from a person,” he said. “If you buy a car from a dealership, you have a little bit of recourse. The downside is, it will cost you more.” Buying from a private seller would mean more work on my end in terms of making sure I was buying a car with solid bones, but it seemed well worth it.

3. I asked for the VIN and other key information

With such a major purchase, I didn’t want to just communicate via email. Talking to the seller on the phone, and hearing about the vehicle history and why he was selling the car, gave me confidence that it was a legitimate listing and priced fairly. As it turns out, we even had a mutual connection.

Talking to the seller on the phone, and hearing about the vehicle history and why he was selling the car, gave me confidence that it was a legit listing and priced fairly.

From our conversation, it sounded like a well-maintained car, but he also sent me the VIN (vehicle identification number) so I could do my own due diligence. The VIN is a 17-digit number that’s assigned to every car in the U.S. and allows you to pull a Carfax vehicle history report. The report checks for things like accident history, service and repair history, estimated miles driven per year and recall information. It’s a good way of confirming that what the seller is telling you about the car is true. I ran the report for $43.54, which the seller offered to reimburse if I ended up buying the car, and it lined up with everything that he told me about it. I also asked if he had the title and maintenance records. He had both.

4. I test drove the car

Since the seller had the proper documentation and the car, a 2007 model with about 108,000 miles on it, was well within my budget, I expressed interest and asked to test drive it.

We met in a public place — the parking lot of a supermarket — in broad daylight. I also brought my mom along. I inspected the interior and exterior of the vehicle, asked about the features, reviewed the maintenance records and took it out for a spin. I had zero complaints and told him I’d take it.

5. I bought car insurance

To register the car in my name, I would need proof of insurance. I got a few quotes from different providers and settled on one that met my needs for about $60 a month. The process took no longer than an hour.

6. I transferred the title and registered the car

The day after the test drive, I met the seller at the bank and wrote him a check for $7,849, the cost of the car. He wasn’t open to negotiating the price — he used Kelley Blue Book and CarGurus to price it fairly, which I double-checked — but did reimburse me for the Carfax and threw in some nice add-ons, like floor mats, a car charger and a tire inflator. We both signed the title, making me the official owner, and he handed over the keys. Next, I headed to the DMV to change the registration to my name and get new plates. To do so, I needed proof of insurance, my drivers license and $5 in cash for the notary fee. In total, I owed $317.89 at the DMV. Here’s the breakdown of the fees: Registration fee : $36

: $36 Certificate of Title : $52

: $52 Highway-use tax (HUT) : $142.50

: $142.50 Property tax : $67.39

: $67.39 Vehicle fee: $20 The final step was for the seller to remove his plates and for me to install mine. Here’s one last pro tip: Bring a screwdriver. Don’t miss: 3 important questions to ask before buying a used car Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buy, car, process, used, asked, vehicle, cars, bought, history, dealerships, buying, steps, craigslistheres, exactly, seller


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Senators ask Jeff Bezos to explain how Amazon recommends products

Two high-profile Senate Democrats are asking Amazon for answers about its “Amazon’s Choice” badge, saying the recommendation engine could potentially be deceiving consumers into buying “inferior” products. “The badge may be misleading consumers into thinking the products that receive this distinction are the best available products, when in fact some of these products are of an inferior quality,” the senators said. In July, Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-NJ) and Rep. Jan Shackowsky (D-IL) asked Amaz


Two high-profile Senate Democrats are asking Amazon for answers about its “Amazon’s Choice” badge, saying the recommendation engine could potentially be deceiving consumers into buying “inferior” products. “The badge may be misleading consumers into thinking the products that receive this distinction are the best available products, when in fact some of these products are of an inferior quality,” the senators said. In July, Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-NJ) and Rep. Jan Shackowsky (D-IL) asked Amaz
Senators ask Jeff Bezos to explain how Amazon recommends products Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12  Authors: eugene kim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, asked, choice, amazon, program, recommends, tech, senators, jeff, bezos, amazons, review, recommendation, ask, badge, products, explain


Senators ask Jeff Bezos to explain how Amazon recommends products

Two high-profile Senate Democrats are asking Amazon for answers about its “Amazon’s Choice” badge, saying the recommendation engine could potentially be deceiving consumers into buying “inferior” products.

In a letter to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos on Monday, Sen. Bob Menendez (D-NJ) and Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) asked for more clarity on how the Amazon’s Choice program works, citing a recent BuzzFeed report that showed it often endorses defective or poor quality items.

“The badge may be misleading consumers into thinking the products that receive this distinction are the best available products, when in fact some of these products are of an inferior quality,” the senators said.

The letter is the latest example of Washington’s growing concern of Big Tech, specifically regarding the control Amazon has over consumer behavior as more shopping activity moves online and to mobile devices. In December, Blumenthal wrote a letter to Bezos arguing that Amazon’s policy of blocking third-party sellers from offering lower prices on rival sites would “stifle market competition.” Three months later, Amazon removed that policy.

In July, Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-NJ) and Rep. Jan Shackowsky (D-IL) asked Amazon to address the widespread “fraudulent and deceptive” review problem on its marketplace. And last week, a group led by Menendez asked Amazon to better enforce its policy of banning gun-related product sales, following a Washington Post report that found sales of those products on its site.

Amazon introduced Amazon’s Choice in 2015, creating a recommendation program that places a badge next to select “highly rated, well-priced” products, according to the company. The program has faced scrutiny lately, with multiple reports raising questions about how the recommendation engine works and why it’s endorsing products of poor quality.

The senators asked for a “detailed explanation” on the selection process for the Amazon’s Choice badge, including the algorithm used to make the determination and whether employees actually review each item before assigning the distinction. They’re also asking what Amazon is doing to verify user reviews, which could affect what products get the badge, and if any financial compensation is involved in the process.

In addition to increased lawmaker interest in Amazon’s power, the company is facing antitrust investigations in both the U.S. and EU. In July, the EU’s Competition Commission announced a formal antitrust probe into Amazon over its use of third-party seller data. The U.S. Justice Department then said it was opening a review of several giant tech companies, which likely includes Amazon.

Amazon didn’t respond to a request for comment.

WATCH: Kara Swisher isn’t holding her breath on Big Tech regulation


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12  Authors: eugene kim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, asked, choice, amazon, program, recommends, tech, senators, jeff, bezos, amazons, review, recommendation, ask, badge, products, explain


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Why the coming sabbatical of Amazon’s Hollywood chief has Wall Street on edge

In March, four months before Amazon’s Jeff Blackburn announced that he was taking a year-long sabbatical from the company, the executive was asked to address a key business question during an all-hands staff meeting. Blackburn, a senior vice president and member of CEO Jeff Bezos’s exclusive S-Team, oversees Amazon’s video-streaming service, which is shelling out billions of dollars to outbid Netflix and others for exclusive content. An employee asked Blackburn if top executives still believed t


In March, four months before Amazon’s Jeff Blackburn announced that he was taking a year-long sabbatical from the company, the executive was asked to address a key business question during an all-hands staff meeting. Blackburn, a senior vice president and member of CEO Jeff Bezos’s exclusive S-Team, oversees Amazon’s video-streaming service, which is shelling out billions of dollars to outbid Netflix and others for exclusive content. An employee asked Blackburn if top executives still believed t
Why the coming sabbatical of Amazon’s Hollywood chief has Wall Street on edge Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-02  Authors: eugene kim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chief, asked, amazons, coming, blackburn, jeff, exclusive, edge, work, wall, vice, hollywood, sabbatical, prime, video, videostreaming, street


Why the coming sabbatical of Amazon's Hollywood chief has Wall Street on edge

Senior Vice President of Business Development at Amazon Jeff Blackburn (R) and Anne Blackburn attend the The IMDb Dinner Party at the Sundance Film Festival presented by Dolby on January 28, 2019 in Park City, Utah.

In March, four months before Amazon’s Jeff Blackburn announced that he was taking a year-long sabbatical from the company, the executive was asked to address a key business question during an all-hands staff meeting.

Blackburn, a senior vice president and member of CEO Jeff Bezos’s exclusive S-Team, oversees Amazon’s video-streaming service, which is shelling out billions of dollars to outbid Netflix and others for exclusive content. An employee asked Blackburn if top executives still believed those investments make sense.

“Is the executive team — the S-team — behind it?” Blackburn rhetorically asked in response. “Absolutely. There was a breakthrough year in 2018 in terms of just Prime member engagement with our Prime originals.”

At the meeting, a recording of which was obtained by CNBC, Blackburn went on to praise the video team’s work, including the writers of the upcoming “Lord of the Rings” series that reportedly cost Amazon $250 million for exclusive rights. He also explained how much he loved talking about Amazon’s Prime Video service, saying he could “do it for a long time.”

That was then. In an email announcement to employees on Wednesday, Blackburn said he was taking a year off, citing burnout after over two decades of nonstop work, including the last seven as the prime architect of its video-streaming effort. Critically, Blackburn will no longer be a part of the video team’s plan for 2020, a year that promises to the be the most competitive yet for the industry with Disney, Apple, and Comcast’s NBCUniversal all slated to launch new video-streaming apps. HBO and Netflix, meanwhile, are getting even more aggressive.

“Blackburn’s sabbatical could not come at a worse time for Bezos & Co.,” said Dan Ives, an analyst at Wedbush Securities, in an email to CNBC. “They lose a key cog in the wheel during his absence.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-02  Authors: eugene kim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chief, asked, amazons, coming, blackburn, jeff, exclusive, edge, work, wall, vice, hollywood, sabbatical, prime, video, videostreaming, street


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Facebook currency chief faces withering questioning from Democrats in Congress

Joshua Roberts | ReutersFacebook’s crypto chief David Marcus faced skepticism Wednesday from lawmakers at a House Financial Services Committee hearing on the company’s plans for the digital currency Libra. He asked Marcus if he considers Libra a security, commodity or an exchange-traded fund. GovernanceSome representatives asked Marcus about how the 27 organizations that make up Libra’s governing body alongside Facebook were chosen. Rep. Anthony Gonzalez, R-O.H., also asked Marcus how many of th


Joshua Roberts | ReutersFacebook’s crypto chief David Marcus faced skepticism Wednesday from lawmakers at a House Financial Services Committee hearing on the company’s plans for the digital currency Libra. He asked Marcus if he considers Libra a security, commodity or an exchange-traded fund. GovernanceSome representatives asked Marcus about how the 27 organizations that make up Libra’s governing body alongside Facebook were chosen. Rep. Anthony Gonzalez, R-O.H., also asked Marcus how many of th
Facebook currency chief faces withering questioning from Democrats in Congress Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, democrats, youre, committee, currency, withering, facebook, rep, questioning, thats, marcus, chief, faces, asked, congress, libra, financial


Facebook currency chief faces withering questioning from Democrats in Congress

David Marcus, CEO of Facebook’s Calibra, testifies to the House Financial Services Committee hearing on “Examining Facebook’s Proposed Cryptocurrency and Its Impact on Consumers, Investors, and the American Financial System” on Capitol Hill in Washington, July 17, 2019. Joshua Roberts | Reuters

Facebook’s crypto chief David Marcus faced skepticism Wednesday from lawmakers at a House Financial Services Committee hearing on the company’s plans for the digital currency Libra. The hearing’s tone was far more harsh than the one Marcus testified at Tuesday before the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs. Several members of congress on the House committee expressed skepticism over Facebook’s decision to delve into a digital currency and financial services before it has tackled other problems around privacy and election meddling. Rep. Brad Sherman, D-Calif., had the harshest and most absurd critique of Libra, comparing its potential consequences to the terrorist attacks on 9/11. “We’re told by some that innovation is always good,” Sherman said. “The most innovative thing that’s happened this century is when Osama bin Laden came up with the innovative idea of flying two airplanes into towers. That’s the most consequential innovation, although this may do more to endanger America than even that.” Sherman called for Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg to face congress and said the executive, “needs to be an advocate for privacy and so he is creating a device which will provide privacy to drug dealers, human traffickers, terrorists, tax evaders and sanctions evaders.” Other members of the committee were less dire, but they were still critical of Facebook’s plans for Libra. “This is not Silicon Valley,” Rep. Nydia Velasquez, D-N.Y., told Marcus. “You cannot work out problems as you go.” Velasquez, Chairwoman Maxine Waters, D-Calif., and Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., asked Marcus if he would commit to refraining from moving forward with Libra until policymakers put appropriate regulations in place. Clarifying his response, Marcus told Waters, “I committed to waiting for us to have all the appropriate regulatory approvals and have addressed all concerns before moving forward.” “That’s not a commitment,” Waters responded. Maloney asked if Marcus would commit to a pilot program to launch Libra to 1 million users with regulatory oversight. Marcus said that Facebook came out with this plan and a white paper prior to Libra’s full release in order to go through regulators. “I don’t think you should launch Libra at all because the creation of a new currency is a core government function,” Maloney said. “But at the very least you should agree to do this small pilot program first.”

‘What is a Libra?’

Lawmakers asked Marcus to clarify how to qualify Libra and the system around it. “What is a Libra?” asked ranking member Patrick McHenry, R-N.C. He asked Marcus if he considers Libra a security, commodity or an exchange-traded fund. Marcus said he does not consider Libra a security or ETF, and said it could possibly be considered a commodity. McHenry asked if Libra will be more like PayPal, of which Marcus previously served as president, or Western Union. Marcus said it would depend on the transaction, but it would usually be more akin to PayPal. Rep. Ed Perlmutter, D-Colo., also drilled down on whether Libra is more like a bank or an app like Venmo. He highlighted the tension lawmakers feel over the new currency. “We all have this same question for you and that’s the resistance you’re feeling because we think you’re a bank, but you’re not quite like a bank,” Perlmutter said. “And if you’re a bank, we regulate the heck out of you because we’ve seen a lot of people lose money where there hasn’t been regulation. So that’s the resistance that I feel, I want to support your innovation I want to support the efficiency that you people believe you’re bringing to the table. But I also don’t want anybody getting hurt here.” In response to a question from Rep. Scott Tipton, R-C.O., Marcus said the project is not planning to offer banking services, but acknowledged that banking regulation would be in order if it were. Throughout the hearing, Marcus stressed the focus of Libra is “payments” rather than banking.

Impact on the U.S. Dollar

Lawmakers also expressed concern about the impact of Libra on the strength of the U.S. dollar. “Tell me how Libra will not undermine sovereign currencies and the power of central banks. Or is the point, is the very point, to undermine central bakers and to provide greater freedom away from central banking?” Rep. Andy Barr, R-K.Y. asked. “I want to be very clear, we do not want to compete with the dollar or with sovereign currencies,” Marcus said. “This is why they make the reserve. And even in our wildest dreams, never will we come anywhere close from the size of any of the currencies that you mentioned.” Marcus did not directly answer a question from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., asking whether currency or Libra should be a public good. The Libra white paper does claim global currency “should be designed and governed as a public good.” Rep. Michael San Nicolas, D-Guam, said he didn’t believe that Facebook had not made projections about the average value users will hold in Libra. He said the potentially vast reach could disproportionately impact the U.S. because it holds a large portion of the global gross domestic product in dollars compared to its relative population size. “That’s money that’s being sucked out of the U.S. financial system and being put into whatever this cabal is putting together in terms of Libra and Calibra,” San Nicolas said. “Once we impact disproportionately U.S. dollar demand by sucking dollars into Libras, interest rates will have to rise to attract dollar denominated investors, higher interest rates will injure the U.S. economy and U.S. jobs, higher interest rates, perhaps more importantly, will raise the financing cost of funding U.S. military operations and national security.”

Governance

Some representatives asked Marcus about how the 27 organizations that make up Libra’s governing body alongside Facebook were chosen. “Who picked the founding members of this governance over the currency?” Ocasio-Cortez asked after Marcus responded that the members were not democratically elected. “The membership is open based on certain criteria,” Marcus said. “The first 27 other companies that have joined are the companies that have shared the desire to come and build this network and solve problems.” Rep. Anthony Gonzalez, R-O.H., also asked Marcus how many of the member groups Facebook recruited to the association. Marcus only said the company approached “a wide range of companies.” Rep. Katie Porter, D-Calif., asked which agency would be in charge of regulating the 1:1 backing of the Libra’s reserve. “What’s to stop the association from changing the contents of the basket to say 100% Venezuelan bolivars at the stated exchange rate?” Porter asked. “And that would again have the effect of making the Libra currency worthless.” “That is why we believe we need the right oversight for the reserve,” Marcus said, adding that the group is working with the G7 working group to determine who will be in charge of regulation.

Other Concerns


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, democrats, youre, committee, currency, withering, facebook, rep, questioning, thats, marcus, chief, faces, asked, congress, libra, financial


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Billionaire investor Peter Thiel reportedly says the FBI and CIA should investigate Google

Billionaire investor Peter Thiel said Sunday that the FBI and the CIA should investigate if Google has been infiltrated by Chinese intelligence, according to a report from Axios. “Number one, how many foreign intelligence agencies have infiltrated your Manhattan Project for AI (artificial intelligence)?” Thiel reportedly asked. “Number two, does Google’s senior management consider itself to have been thoroughly infiltrated by Chinese intelligence?” He said those questions “need to be asked by th


Billionaire investor Peter Thiel said Sunday that the FBI and the CIA should investigate if Google has been infiltrated by Chinese intelligence, according to a report from Axios. “Number one, how many foreign intelligence agencies have infiltrated your Manhattan Project for AI (artificial intelligence)?” Thiel reportedly asked. “Number two, does Google’s senior management consider itself to have been thoroughly infiltrated by Chinese intelligence?” He said those questions “need to be asked by th
Billionaire investor Peter Thiel reportedly says the FBI and CIA should investigate Google Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reportedly, investigate, google, intelligence, cia, washington, fbi, thoroughly, thiel, peter, chinese, asked, infiltrated, questions, investor, billionaire


Billionaire investor Peter Thiel reportedly says the FBI and CIA should investigate Google

Billionaire investor Peter Thiel said Sunday that the FBI and the CIA should investigate if Google has been infiltrated by Chinese intelligence, according to a report from Axios.

Thiel, a Facebook board member, was speaking at the National Conservatism Conference in Washington, D.C. and his speech focused on three questions that should be presented to the tech giant, Axios said.

“Number one, how many foreign intelligence agencies have infiltrated your Manhattan Project for AI (artificial intelligence)?” Thiel reportedly asked. “Number two, does Google’s senior management consider itself to have been thoroughly infiltrated by Chinese intelligence?”

He said those questions “need to be asked by the FBI, by the CIA.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reportedly, investigate, google, intelligence, cia, washington, fbi, thoroughly, thiel, peter, chinese, asked, infiltrated, questions, investor, billionaire


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Amazon asked some advertisers to increase spend on Prime Day by at least 100%

Amazon doesn’t just make money from product sales on Prime Day: advertising will earn it a ton of cash too. Last year, Amazon Prime Day broke records for the e-commerce giant, with people buying more than 100 million products during the 36-hour sale starting July 16. Debbie Ellison, the chief digital officer at marketing agency Geometry U.K., said that one of its clients was asked to at least double its ad spend for Prime Day. “But what they are seeing is that if they do start to invest more hea


Amazon doesn’t just make money from product sales on Prime Day: advertising will earn it a ton of cash too. Last year, Amazon Prime Day broke records for the e-commerce giant, with people buying more than 100 million products during the 36-hour sale starting July 16. Debbie Ellison, the chief digital officer at marketing agency Geometry U.K., said that one of its clients was asked to at least double its ad spend for Prime Day. “But what they are seeing is that if they do start to invest more hea
Amazon asked some advertisers to increase spend on Prime Day by at least 100% Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, 100, ads, increase, spend, advertisers, day, sales, asked, told, prime, products, advertising


Amazon asked some advertisers to increase spend on Prime Day by at least 100%

Amazon doesn’t just make money from product sales on Prime Day: advertising will earn it a ton of cash too. Last year, Amazon Prime Day broke records for the e-commerce giant, with people buying more than 100 million products during the 36-hour sale starting July 16. In 2019, the shopping event on July 15 and 16 will add Prime subscribers and is an opportunity for Amazon to push companies to spend more on advertising, some experts told CNBC. Amazon made $2.72 billion in its “other” segment in the first-quarter of the year, consisting primarily of advertising sales, though the growth rate in revenue slowed compared to the same period last year. Debbie Ellison, the chief digital officer at marketing agency Geometry U.K., said that one of its clients was asked to at least double its ad spend for Prime Day. “One of our CPG (consumer packaged goods) clients was asked recently by Amazon to increase its budget by a minimum of 100% to ensure that it did not lose market share during this key sales period. In the case of this client, its products are not natural deals for Prime Day so taking part would only reduce their overall margin,” she told CNBC by email. Geometry advised the client not to increase its ad spend for the shopping event.

“Brands which over-invest in ad spend during Prime Day tend to sit in the electronic & computing and beauty & personal care categories, where they typically achieve between a 50% and 60% sales uplift during this time,” Ellison added. Companies can advertise on Amazon in a few ways, including sponsored listings in search results (like Google’s paid-for search results, labeled ‘Ad’) or with display ads or videos that run the full width of the site. Amazon also has a “demand-side platform,” (DSP) software that automatically chooses the most relevant ads to show shoppers, as well as where they are placed. Brands using the DSP can have ads appear on other sites owned by Amazon, such as movie database IMDb. Jim Cridlin, global head of innovation at media agency Mindshare, noted that Amazon will boost the visibility of advertisers who spend more on the platform — and those who push people to its deals on Amazon via advertising elsewhere. But while Amazon’s pitch to advertisers has got “more sophisticated,” Mindshare has not yet seen the level of “additional support” advertisers provide Alibaba around Singles’ Day, he told CNBC by email. “We are starting to see advertisers (to whom Amazon is a critical partner) doing more on their owned and social channels to support the sales event,” he added.

Advertising is becoming “a far more crucial” part of a company’s overall sales performance on Amazon, according to Malcolm Pinkerton, vice-president of ecommerce and digital insights at Kantar. While Prime Day is an opportunity for Amazon to encourage more ad spending, businesses are using it strategically, by promoting exclusive offers or launch products, he told CNBC by phone. “But what they are seeing is that if they do start to invest more heavily through Amazon advertising, there’s a noticeable halo effect after Prime Day,” he added. Sellers are likely to increase budgets for sponsored listings, according to Jake Schwarzbaum, co-founder of Velocity Sellers, a company that helps businesses sell on Amazon. He also expects companies that have invested in Amazon Storefronts, a new part of the site that highlights small businesses, and those with extra product information — known as A+ Content — to do well this year. “Prime Day is not about profit for Amazon sellers. It is primarily an opportunity for new product introductions, expanding online market share, as well as helping sellers find new customers to increase brand loyalty,” he told CNBC by email.

Toys, beauty, computing, apparel and kitchen goods were the most-shopped on Amazon during Prime Day in 2018 and some of them are also products that Amazon sells under its private label brands. People can buy AmazonBasics USB cables and water filter cartridges or fashion under its Find by Amazon label, for example, although in April it scaled down promotions of private-label brands following regulatory scrutiny and calls of unfair advantage. “Brands should focus on pushing products that do not directly compete with Amazon’s or promote those products on other platforms,” said Inbal Lavi, chief executive of marketing company Webpals Group, in an email to CNBC. She advocated using Amazon’s lighting deals and coupons features to encourage people to shop. As well as heavily promoting Prime Day on its website, Amazon is also investing in ads of its own — some of which will appear on Google Shopping, Google’s retail search function. While this means Amazon is paying to advertise with Google, the online traffic that goes back to Amazon means it is likely to benefit because people will click on ads on its website. Amazon had not responded to CNBC’s request for comment at the time of publication.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, 100, ads, increase, spend, advertisers, day, sales, asked, told, prime, products, advertising


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Trump abandons fight to put citizenship question on census, says he can get data from existing records

And another lawyer who battled the administration over the citizenship question suggested that Trump’s order could have no practical consequences. “The Supreme Court ultimately affirmed our right to ask the citizenship question, and very strongly it was affirmed,” the president said. “Accordingly, the Department will promptly inform the courts that the Government will not include a citizenship question on the 2020 decennial census.” “We are absolutely moving forward, as we must, because of the i


And another lawyer who battled the administration over the citizenship question suggested that Trump’s order could have no practical consequences. “The Supreme Court ultimately affirmed our right to ask the citizenship question, and very strongly it was affirmed,” the president said. “Accordingly, the Department will promptly inform the courts that the Government will not include a citizenship question on the 2020 decennial census.” “We are absolutely moving forward, as we must, because of the i
Trump abandons fight to put citizenship question on census, says he can get data from existing records Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: dan mangan tucker higgins, dan mangan, tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, question, fight, citizenship, federal, records, data, census, abandons, order, asked, existing, supreme, department, court


Trump abandons fight to put citizenship question on census, says he can get data from existing records

US President Donald Trump waves as he arrives at the White House after a trip to Asia on June 30, 2019 in Washington, DC.

President Donald Trump on Thursday dropped a fight to put a citizenship question on the upcoming 2020 census — but ordered federal agencies to give the Commerce Department all records they have that are related to how many citizens and non-citizens live in the United States.

Trump did not, as had he had been expected earlier in the day, issue an executive order mandating that the question to be asked on the census.

Legal experts had said such an order would not likely survive court challenges.

Attorney General William Barr said at the press conference with Trump that the question will not be asked on the census, acknowledging that a recent Supreme Court ruling had made doing so difficult, if not impossible.

“We’re not going to jeopardize our ability to carry out the census,” Barr said.

Trump defended his original plan to have the question asked, and claimed that his order directing agencies to share citizenship data would make the actual count of non-citizen “far more accurate” than it would have been if the question was on the census.

But Dale Ho, director of the ACLU’s Voting Rights Project, who argued the Supreme Court case challenging the citizenship question, said afterwards: “Trump’s attempt to weaponize the census ends not with a bang but a whimper.”

“He lost in the Supreme Court, which saw through his lie about needing the question for the Voting Rights Act,” Ho said. “It is clear he simply wanted to sow fear in immigrant communities and turbocharge Republican gerrymandering efforts by diluting the political influence of Latino communities.”

Ho added: “Now he’s backing down and taking the option that he rejected more than a year ago. Trump may claim victory today, but this is nothing short of a total, humiliating defeat for him and his administration.”

And another lawyer who battled the administration over the citizenship question suggested that Trump’s order could have no practical consequences.

“I don’t know quite what he is referring to because existing law allows, in fact, encourages the Census Bureau to obtain information from other federal agencies,” said John Libby, a partner at the law firm Manatt, who was part of a team that successfully argued against the addition of the question in federal court in California.

“I don’t want to characterize its effectiveness or lack of effectiveness, but it is pretty consistent with existing law.”

Trump repeatedly said during the day Thursday that asking someone what their citizenship was should not be controversial, and was something that the government was entitled to know to function properly.

“The Department of Commerce sensibly decided to include a citizenship question on the 2020 census as has been done many, many times throughout the history of the United States,” Trump said. “Unfortunately this effort was delayed by meritless litigation.”

“The Supreme Court ultimately affirmed our right to ask the citizenship question, and very strongly it was affirmed,” the president said. “But the Supreme Court also ruled that we must provide further explanation that would have produced even more litigation.”

The president said those delays “would have prevented us from completing the census on time.”

He called the situation “deeply regrettable.”

“I am hereby ordering every department and agency in the federal government to provide the Department of Commerce with all requested records regarding the number of citizens and noncitizens in our country,” Trump said.

“They must furnish all legally accessible records in their possession immediately. We will utilize these vast federal databases to gain a full, complete and accurate count of the noncitizen population, including databases maintained by the Department of Homeland Security and the Social Security Administration.”

Justice Department spokesman Kerri Kupec said, in a statement “The Supreme Court held that [Commerce] Secretary [Wilbur] Ross reasonably concluded that including the citizenship question on the 2020 decennial census would provide the most complete and accurate citizenship information, but it invalidated his decision to include that question on other grounds.”

“The Department of Justice disagrees with the Supreme Court’s decision. Today’s Executive Order represents an alternative path to collecting the best citizenship data now available, which is vital for informed policymaking and numerous other reasons,” Kupec said. “Accordingly, the Department will promptly inform the courts that the Government will not include a citizenship question on the 2020 decennial census.”

Earlier in the day, the president had been expected at that press event to announce an executive action mandating that participants in the census be asked if they are a U.S. citizen or not.

The Supreme Court in a decision last month effectively barred the Trump administration from adding such a question to the census, as it had planned to do.

Last week, administration officials said census forms would be printed without the question.

But on the heels of their comments, Trump announced on Twitter that he would not abandon the effort to add the question.

“We are absolutely moving forward, as we must, because of the importance of the answer to this question,” Trump wrote.

He later told reporters, when asked if he would issue an executive order: “We’re thinking about doing that.”

“It’s one of the ways,” he added. “We have four or five ways we can do it. It’s one of the ways and we’re thinking about doing it very seriously.”

Justice Department lawyers told a federal judge last Friday that they would continue legal efforts to add the citizenship question.

But in their filing that offered no explanation of how the Justice Department believed it could win that fight.

Earlier this week, two federal judges dealt the Trump administration a setback by refusing to replace the lawyers who had handled the cases with new attorneys, saying the Justice Department had failed to justify the switch.

— CNBC’s Kevin Breuninger contributed to this report


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: dan mangan tucker higgins, dan mangan, tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, question, fight, citizenship, federal, records, data, census, abandons, order, asked, existing, supreme, department, court


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Regulators hungry for evidence as FDA weighs allowing CBD in food, dietary supplements

FDA regulators trying to learn more about the cannabis compound held the agency’s first hearing on it Friday. Speakers pushed the FDA to set up a regulatory framework to legally add CBD to food products and dietary supplements. Most speakers agreed the FDA should establish at least some oversight over the manufacturing processes, quality assurance and labeling of CBD products. Schiller asked. Some presenters held up quality issues as evidence of why the FDA needs to regulate CBD products.


FDA regulators trying to learn more about the cannabis compound held the agency’s first hearing on it Friday. Speakers pushed the FDA to set up a regulatory framework to legally add CBD to food products and dietary supplements. Most speakers agreed the FDA should establish at least some oversight over the manufacturing processes, quality assurance and labeling of CBD products. Schiller asked. Some presenters held up quality issues as evidence of why the FDA needs to regulate CBD products.
Regulators hungry for evidence as FDA weighs allowing CBD in food, dietary supplements Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: angelica lavito
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hearing, schiller, allowing, hungry, regulators, asked, dietary, products, food, evidence, fda, supplements, cbd, weighs, cannabis, snyder, data


Regulators hungry for evidence as FDA weighs allowing CBD in food, dietary supplements

SILVER SPRING, Md. — Food and Drug Administration regulators grilled manufacturers and advocates Friday for evidence that CBD actually does anything they claim it does. Companies are adding CBD, short for cannabidiol, to just about everything, including makeup, tea, pet treats and soft drinks — even though there’s little data to support the many claims of its benefits. FDA regulators trying to learn more about the cannabis compound held the agency’s first hearing on it Friday. More than 100 people testified at the hearing. Speakers pushed the FDA to set up a regulatory framework to legally add CBD to food products and dietary supplements. They praised CBD and the purported benefits — and FDA panelists repeatedly asked for data. Scientists warned of the little research and many potential risks CBD brings. Regulators requested data on how companies develop dosage recommendations for different people and purposes. They asked about the health benefits of CBD and why companies are adding them to consumer products. They also wanted to learn more about what happens when people use CBD in multiple products or when people give it to their pets. “The theme of the day is data, specifically about dosage, interactions and why are you putting this in products, and unfortunately, I don’t think anybody is giving good answers to that,” Jonathan Havens, co-chair of the cannabis law practice at Saul Ewing Arnstein & Lehr, told CNBC. Friday’s hearing highlighted the polarizing viewpoints on CBD. Some people praised the compound as a great discovery of our lifetimes, and others warned it could expose consumers to unnecessary and possibly lethal risks. Most speakers agreed the FDA should establish at least some oversight over the manufacturing processes, quality assurance and labeling of CBD products. The hearing ended without a consensus on how the agency would move forward. Friday’s public hearing was simply a listening session for the FDA. The agency will take public comments through July 2, and panelists encouraged presenters to submit more data.

Searching for answers

James Shults of Wildflower, a company that sells CBD products, including soaps and topicals, told FDA panelists that consumers need to trust the products they’re buying are safe. He said he plans to submit a citizen’s petition requesting regulation allowing CBD to be used in dietary supplements. Lowell Schiller, principal associate commissioner for policy and co-chairman of the FDA’s CBD working group, asked what the functional purpose of adding CBD to beauty products is. Shults said he’s not “100%” on the science. Schiller asked what Shults means when he says “effective.” “It delivers a more, a higher sense of personal attraction,” he said. “It’s more desirable in the product, not through clinical definitions but consumer opinion.” Andy Snyder, who writes e-letter Manward Press, criticized the FDA for acting too slowly on regulating CBD, saying most Americans will view CBD like Vitamin C or other common drugs or vitamins. Schiller asked whether Snyder was familiar with any data on CBD use in children and whether he’s supportive of it. Snyder said he’s a publisher, not a scientist, but he wouldn’t give CBD to his children. “Would you give your son or daughter Vitamin C?” Schiller asked. “I would,” Snyder replied. Schiller asked Susan Cromer, who owns retailer LilyHemp, what actions she takes to prevent youth access. Cromer said she requires shoppers to be at least 21, an age limit she set based on the minimum age to buy alcohol.

Possible risks

Scientists warned regulators how little they know about CBD. Igor Grant, from the University of California, San Diego’s Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research, presented research showing cannabis’ efficacy varies based on how people consume it. For example, the body absorbs it much quicker when people vape CBD than when they eat it, he said. “If you’re talking about putting some CBD salve on an elbow, maybe it helps, maybe it doesn’t. We don’t know,” he said. Bill Gurley, professor at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, presented a study that reviewed products in Mississippi labeled as containing CBD. The study found that numerous such products actually contained synthetic CBD. “This unregulated industry with high public demand and no requirements and oversight for quality that is skirting the edge of legality has ample room for nefarious activity,” said Michelle Peace, an assistant professor at Virginia Commonwealth University who specializes in forensic toxicology. Some presenters held up quality issues as evidence of why the FDA needs to regulate CBD products. Betsy Booren, Grocery Manufacturers Association’s senior vice president of science and technology, said the group and its members applaud the FDA for taking the first step in stakeholder engagement. The association represents large consumer products goods companies like Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, General Mills, Kellogg and Procter & Gamble. “As consumer interest for food, beverage, personal care and household products containing cannabis and cannabis derivatives continues to grow, the necessity for national uniform regulatory frameworks that protect public health is of critical importance,” Booren said.

First step


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: angelica lavito
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hearing, schiller, allowing, hungry, regulators, asked, dietary, products, food, evidence, fda, supplements, cbd, weighs, cannabis, snyder, data


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I quit Facebook — but it’s getting harder to resist the pull back in

I quit social media a few years ago to make my life better and easier, which it has. Her reply: “Well, a lot of people just put stuff on Facebook now.” She was right: There is a HUGELY active marketplace of used goods in our town on Facebook. In fact, she scores me stuff all the time for our little guy from some Facebook page where people give their old toys/clothes/furniture/you-name-it away … for free. She told me to look it up on the “Moms” page for our town — without any further explanatio


I quit social media a few years ago to make my life better and easier, which it has. Her reply: “Well, a lot of people just put stuff on Facebook now.” She was right: There is a HUGELY active marketplace of used goods in our town on Facebook. In fact, she scores me stuff all the time for our little guy from some Facebook page where people give their old toys/clothes/furniture/you-name-it away … for free. She told me to look it up on the “Moms” page for our town — without any further explanatio
I quit Facebook — but it’s getting harder to resist the pull back in Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-28  Authors: kelly evans
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wasnt, asked, facebook, pull, town, im, resist, went, getting, quit, page, weekend, harder, neighbor, stuff


I quit Facebook — but it's getting harder to resist the pull back in

I quit social media a few years ago to make my life better and easier, which it has.

But … that was as a late-twenty-something newly-engaged city dweller. Now (strange as it feels to say), I’m a married mom living in the ‘burbs. And let me tell you something: Facebook. Is. Everywhere.

It started when I was looking around for garage sales to get stuff on the cheap for our house. I asked my neighbor for strategies, since I wasn’t seeing that many of them. Her reply: “Well, a lot of people just put stuff on Facebook now.”

What?! She was right: There is a HUGELY active marketplace of used goods in our town on Facebook. In fact, she scores me stuff all the time for our little guy from some Facebook page where people give their old toys/clothes/furniture/you-name-it away … for free.

Meanwhile, another neighbor texted me over the weekend about a float in the Fourth of July parade this year that my son could join. She told me to look it up on the “Moms” page for our town — without any further explanation, since it was obviously a Facebook reference. I confessed to her that I’m not on Facebook, so she kindly went back to find it, take a photo of it, and text it to me — only for me to realize the organizer asked to be contacted … on Facebook.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-28  Authors: kelly evans
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wasnt, asked, facebook, pull, town, im, resist, went, getting, quit, page, weekend, harder, neighbor, stuff


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