This service has helped nearly 800,000 couples raise over $600 million for their honeymoons

How Honeyfund replaces physical giftsHoneyfund’s online registry system acts as a crowdfunding website where couples can raise money for their honeymoon. Honeyfund has since gained even more traction and as of 2018, nearly 800,000 couples had signed up. The e-commerce site allows couples to register for experiences in addition to physical wedding gifts. People wonder whether it’s wrong to ask for money rather than wedding gifts. Crowdfunded wedding gifts are here to stay


How Honeyfund replaces physical giftsHoneyfund’s online registry system acts as a crowdfunding website where couples can raise money for their honeymoon. Honeyfund has since gained even more traction and as of 2018, nearly 800,000 couples had signed up. The e-commerce site allows couples to register for experiences in addition to physical wedding gifts. People wonder whether it’s wrong to ask for money rather than wedding gifts. Crowdfunded wedding gifts are here to stay
This service has helped nearly 800,000 couples raise over $600 million for their honeymoons Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, raise, money, asking, wedding, million, honeyfund, helped, service, 600, guests, register, honeymoons, 800000, honeymoon, gifts, nearly, couples, cash


This service has helped nearly 800,000 couples raise over $600 million for their honeymoons

In 2011, the average honeymoon cost $4,466, according to wedding website The Knot. At that time, more than half (62%) of the estimated 1.4 million couples who went on honeymoons annually paid for at least 90% of their honeymoon expenses themselves. In 2017, the average honeymoon cost had climbed to $5,432. But by then, more people had started asking for wedding gifts in the form of honeymoon contributions rather than traditional presents, a trend that continues to grow. Honeyfund is a popular online platform that facilitates this kind of gifting experience. Here’s how it works.

How Honeyfund replaces physical gifts

Honeyfund’s online registry system acts as a crowdfunding website where couples can raise money for their honeymoon. Once users sign up and sync their bank account, friends and family can begin sending money directly to the recipients, along with a personalized note. The registered couple’s bank account is verified prior to any funds going live and contributors aren’t charged any processing fees when they give. However, those on the receiving end are charged around 2% on average, depending on their account’s setup. If raising money for your honeymoon isn’t your style, Honeyfund can be used to facilitate other goals, such as a down payment on a home, donations to a specific charity or money for the wedding itself. Sara Margulis and her husband, Josh Margulis, started the company in 2006. They took the idea from personal experience: When they realized they wouldn’t have enough money left over after paying for their wedding to go on their dream honeymoon, the couple ended up crowdfunding more than $5,000 to put toward their trip to Fiji. The positive feedback they received from it showed them the need for a registry that serves those who value experiences over things. The company grew quickly and in 2014, the pair pitched Honeyfund to a panel of judges on ABC’s “Shark Tank,” where they won a deal with Kevin O’Leary. Honeyfund has since gained even more traction and as of 2018, nearly 800,000 couples had signed up. Through the platform, more than $600 million has been gifted to newlyweds for their honeymoons.

Honeyfund isn’t the only company replacing traditional wedding registries. Zola, which launched in 2013, takes a modern approach to wedding gifting. The e-commerce site allows couples to register for experiences in addition to physical wedding gifts. It also offers charity registries as an alternative to asking for gifts. It’s free to register for engaged couples, but like Honeyfund, there is 2.5% processing fee on cash gifts that can be paid by the guests or the couple.

Is it okay to ask friends to pay for your honeymoon?

The Honeyfund concept has been known to stir up emotions surrounding the traditional wedding experience. People wonder whether it’s wrong to ask for money rather than wedding gifts. On Weddingwire, a global connector of engaged couples and local wedding professionals, there is an ongoing forum titled: “Is Honeyfund: Tacky or Not?” Opinions are split. Some respondents were concerned about the processing fee, with one woman saying that couples “should just ask for cash” directly from guests if that is what they want. Another woman supports the service, saying that there are ways around the fee “if you read the fine print.” There also seems to be a generational divide surrounding the approach, which I experienced firsthand while planning my own wedding. While my 30-year-old former boss said that I should definitely register with Honeyfund, my 61-year-old mother questioned the concept. “Do people really do that?” she asked, and insisted that I register with Macy’s in order to appease any guests who might find Honeyfund confusing. In an effort to please all parties, my fiancé and I registered with Honeyfund, Macy’s and Zola, even though we live in a studio apartment with little space for any more physical items.

I don’t feel Honeyfund sends the old-school negative message that a couple is asking their guests to pay for an ‘over-the-top honeymoon’ like the solicitation of cash in the past. Suzanne Reinhard luxury destination wedding planner

However, top wedding professionals say it’s perfectly acceptable to ask your friends and family to fund your honeymoon. “I don’t feel Honeyfund sends the old-school negative message that a couple is asking their guests to pay for an ‘over-the-top honeymoon’ like the solicitation of cash in the past,” Suzanne Reinhard, luxury destination wedding planner, told Vogue in 2017.

Crowdfunded wedding gifts are here to stay


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, raise, money, asking, wedding, million, honeyfund, helped, service, 600, guests, register, honeymoons, 800000, honeymoon, gifts, nearly, couples, cash


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China media says Hong Kong protesters are ‘asking for self-destruction’ as military assembles nearby

Anti-government protesters attend a demonstration at Hong Kong Airport, China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | ReutersChinese propaganda outlets warned on Tuesday that protesters in Hong Kong are “asking for self-destruction,” as they released a video showing military vehicles amassing near the border of the city. Hong Kong’s airport reopened Tuesday early morning after airport authorities canceled all flights on Monday, blaming demonstrators’ disruption to regular operations. Despite that reopen


Anti-government protesters attend a demonstration at Hong Kong Airport, China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | ReutersChinese propaganda outlets warned on Tuesday that protesters in Hong Kong are “asking for self-destruction,” as they released a video showing military vehicles amassing near the border of the city. Hong Kong’s airport reopened Tuesday early morning after airport authorities canceled all flights on Monday, blaming demonstrators’ disruption to regular operations. Despite that reopen
China media says Hong Kong protesters are ‘asking for self-destruction’ as military assembles nearby Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, media, assembles, protesters, peoples, asking, hong, china, airport, beijing, selfdestruction, military, kong, nearby, city


China media says Hong Kong protesters are 'asking for self-destruction' as military assembles nearby

Anti-government protesters attend a demonstration at Hong Kong Airport, China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | Reuters

Chinese propaganda outlets warned on Tuesday that protesters in Hong Kong are “asking for self-destruction,” as they released a video showing military vehicles amassing near the border of the city. Meanwhile, the city’s embattled leader, Carrie Lam, told the news media on Tuesday that “lawbreaking activities in the name of freedom” were damaging the rule of law and that the Asian financial hub’s recovery from anti-government protests could take a long time. Her comments came after Beijing said widespread anti-government protests in the semi-autonomous city showed “sprouts of terrorism,” and such violence must be severely punished, “without leniency, without mercy.” Hong Kong’s airport reopened Tuesday early morning after airport authorities canceled all flights on Monday, blaming demonstrators’ disruption to regular operations. Another sit-in is expected to take place at the airport, a major global hub, on Tuesday. Despite that reopening, Hong Kong flag carrier Cathay Pacific said it had cancelled over 200 flights to and out of the airport for the day, according to its website. The protest at the airport, while disruptive, was largely peaceful. That’s in contrast to Sunday night, where protesters appeared to have thrown Molotov cocktails at police stations around the city and dozens of protesters were arrested.

Beijing’s clear message

On Monday, Chinese officials focused on what they described as “deranged acts” by the protesters, including throwing gasoline bombs, saying they marked the emergence of terrorism in the Chinese city. “Radical Hong Kong protesters have repeatedly used extremely dangerous tools to attack police officers,” Yang Guang, a spokesman for the Chinese government’s Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, said in a news briefing on Monday, according to Chinese state broadcaster CCTV. China’s media is sending a clear signal to the protesters. On Monday afternoon, Chinese state-owned English tabloid the Global Times tweeted a video showing the People’s Armed Police assembling in Shenzhen, a city bordering Hong Kong, about a 1.5 hour- drive away. The People’s Daily, the official newspaper of China’s Communist Party, posted on Chinese social media a statement saying the People’s Armed Police are in Shenzhen prepared to handle “riots, disturbance, major violence and crime and terrorism-related social security issues.” In a Tuesday social media post from the Global Times‘ Chinese edition, the outlet said “if Hong Kong rioters cannot read the signal of having armed police gathering in Shenzhen, then they are asking for self-destruction,” according to a CNBC translation. China is “implying they might send in the People’s Liberation Army or issue direct intervention but they don’t want to,” according to Ben Bland, a director at Sydney-based policy think tank Lowy Institute. “(Beijing) hopes that the signals will scare protesters to back down,” but if and when Beijing decides to deploy troops they will not “advertise it,” he told CNBC. This is all part of a “delicate dance between China and Hong Kong” that’s reached a critical point because there is almost no common ground or overlapping interests between the protesters and Beijing, Bland added. Although China’s leaders do not want to deploy the PLA, they are “willing to do it if they have to,” the Asia politics expert said. Hong Kong’s former governor, Chris Patten, said on Tuesday that if China intervened in the city, it would be a “catastrophe” and that Chinese President Xi Jinping should see the wisdom of trying to bring people together. Patten called on British Prime Minister Boris Johnson to garner support from its allies to ensure Beijing does not intervene.

Protests continue


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, media, assembles, protesters, peoples, asking, hong, china, airport, beijing, selfdestruction, military, kong, nearby, city


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Stop asking, ‘Can I pick your brain?’ Harvard researchers say this is how successful people ask for advice

Offering advice is a sign of good leadership, and asking for advice is a sign of intelligence. Identify the type of advice you’re seekingImmediately after your opening line, address the topic of your problem in the form a question. In order to craft a question with great precision, ask yourself: What type of advice am I seeking? “Though friendship, accessibility and non-threatening personalities all impart high levels of comfort and trust, they might have no relation to the quality or thoughtful


Offering advice is a sign of good leadership, and asking for advice is a sign of intelligence. Identify the type of advice you’re seekingImmediately after your opening line, address the topic of your problem in the form a question. In order to craft a question with great precision, ask yourself: What type of advice am I seeking? “Though friendship, accessibility and non-threatening personalities all impart high levels of comfort and trust, they might have no relation to the quality or thoughtful
Stop asking, ‘Can I pick your brain?’ Harvard researchers say this is how successful people ask for advice Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: gary burnison
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, guidance, researchers, brain, problem, youre, type, question, stop, outcomes, advice, pick, harvard, margolis, say, successful, asking, conversation, ask


Stop asking, 'Can I pick your brain?' Harvard researchers say this is how successful people ask for advice

“Can I pick your brain?” Five words that make up the most thoughtless, irritating and generic way to ask for advice — and any person who is a rock star in their industry has heard it more than a dozen times. The phrase, while well-intentioned, is overused, vague and way too open-ended. When conversations start this way, there’s no telling where it’ll go or how long it’ll take. Don’t get me wrong: I’m all for giving — and receiving — advice. Offering advice is a sign of good leadership, and asking for advice is a sign of intelligence. If the exchange goes well, both parties benefit. “The whole interaction is a subtle and intricate art. It requires emotional intelligence, self-awareness, restraint, diplomacy and patience,” Harvard Business School professors Joshua D. Margolis and David A. Garvin wrote in a 2015 Harvard Business Review article. But the process can derail in many ways. It can quickly lead to “frustration, decision gridlock, subpar solutions, frayed relationships and thwarted personal development,” according to Margolis and Garvin. To avoid those consequences, here’s some guidance on how to ask for advice without annoying the other person:

Start with a positive tone

The way you initiate the conversation is everything. Instead of starting with, “Can I pick your brain,” shift the language to a more positive tone. When in doubt, I recommend: “I’d love your advice.” No-frills, friendly and simple.

Identify the type of advice you’re seeking

Immediately after your opening line, address the topic of your problem in the form a question. In order to craft a question with great precision, ask yourself: What type of advice am I seeking? What does my problem involve? What are my desired outcomes? Below are the four general types of advice, according to Garvin and Margolis’ research: Type of advice: Discrete

What it involves: Exploring options for a single decision

Desired outcomes: Recommendations in favor of or against specific options

Example question: “Where should we build the new factory — in China, Brazil or Eastern Europe?” Type of advice: Counsel

What it involves: Providing guidance on how to approach a complex or unfamiliar situation

Desired outcomes: A framework or process for navigating the situation

Example question: “How should I handle my domineering supervisor?” Type of advice: Coaching

What it involves: Enhancing skills, self-awareness and self-management

Desired outcomes: Task proficiency; personal and professional development

Example question: “How can I work more collaboratively with my peers?” Type of advice: Mentoring

What it involves: Providing opportunities, guidance and protection to aid career success

Desire outcomes: A relationship dedicated to building and sustaining professional and personal effectiveness and to career advancement

Example question: “How can I get more exposure for my project?” Just the other day, someone approached me for guidance, and her execution was perfect: “I’d love your advice. My company is asking me to relocate. There are several factors to consider and I’m not sure if I should do it. Do you have 45 minutes to chat?” Forty-five minutes is a lot, I know, but I appreciated the fact that she acknowledged it would be a longer conversation. I happily blocked off some time on my calendar and we ended up talking for an hour.

Come prepared with specific details

As you move further into the conversation, it’s important to clearly define the problem. Otherwise, you’re doing what I like to call a “bait-and-switch.” (This is another reason why you should never ask to pick someone’s brain; it makes the other person assume that the exchange will only take a few minutes. But more often than not, it ends up being a deep dive.) According to Margolis and Garvin, when you don’t come prepared with specific details about your problem, you’re more likely to end up “telling a lengthy, blow-by-blow story” that might cause the advice giver to tune out, lose focus or misidentify the core problem that needs solving. Simply put, don’t come into the conversation empty-handed. Put realistic guardrails on the conversation and include any essential background information that your advisor might not be familiar with. Providing specific details also keeps the conversation pleasant and interesting.

Ask the right person

Several field studies have discovered that advice seekers are more likely to ask for guidance from people they feel comfortable with, like a close friend or family member. “Though friendship, accessibility and non-threatening personalities all impart high levels of comfort and trust, they might have no relation to the quality or thoughtfulness of the advice,” Margolis and Garvin wrote. This is especially true if you’re seeking career-related advice. Think creatively about the expertise you need. Who will bring in the most valuable insight? Who has the most knowledge that’s relevant to your problem? For example, if you’re asking a seasoned CEO for advice involving your personal life, don’t expect to have lunch with Yoda. Your advisor is offering up valuable time to listen and provide professional feedback, not to hear you vent for an hour.

Don’t ask everyone

Things can backfire quickly if you run around asking a bunch of people for advice. Clearly, you won’t be able to follow everyone’s advice. “Research shows that those whose advice you don’t take may have a worse view of you afterward. They may even see you as less competent or avoid you, ” according to Hayley Blunden, a PhD student at Harvard Business School and co-author of the 2018 study, “The Interpersonal Costs of Ignoring Advice.” For example, a marketing executive who is widely respected is pleased when you ask her what to do about a particular situation, but is then less pleased when she finds out you didn’t do it. Remember, you’re not running a Gallup poll (but if you really are, then just say so).

Don’t assume you already know the answers

Garvin and Margolis pointed out that people often have a hard time “assessing their own competence and place too much faith in their intuition.” As a result, they end up asking for advice simply to gain validation or praise. Those who have a tendency to do this often believe they’ve already solved the problem, but just want confirmation or recognition from their bosses or peers. “It’s a dangerous game to play because they risk alienating their advisers when it becomes evident — and it will — that they’re requesting guidance just for show or to avoid additional work,” the professors noted.

Be grateful


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: gary burnison
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, guidance, researchers, brain, problem, youre, type, question, stop, outcomes, advice, pick, harvard, margolis, say, successful, asking, conversation, ask


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New social media bill is asking for already available data: NYT’s Ed Lee

New social media bill is asking for already available data: NYT’s Ed Lee21 Hours AgoEd Lee, New York Times corporate media reporter, Sen. Rick Scott (R-Fla.) and CNBC’s Julia Boorstin join CNBC’s “Squawk Box” to discuss a new bill that would force tech companies to disclose the type of infomration they collect on users.


New social media bill is asking for already available data: NYT’s Ed Lee21 Hours AgoEd Lee, New York Times corporate media reporter, Sen. Rick Scott (R-Fla.) and CNBC’s Julia Boorstin join CNBC’s “Squawk Box” to discuss a new bill that would force tech companies to disclose the type of infomration they collect on users.
New social media bill is asking for already available data: NYT’s Ed Lee Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, media, type, york, available, times, users, nyts, lee, ed, social, asking, cnbcs, tech, squawk, data, bill


New social media bill is asking for already available data: NYT's Ed Lee

New social media bill is asking for already available data: NYT’s Ed Lee

21 Hours Ago

Ed Lee, New York Times corporate media reporter, Sen. Rick Scott (R-Fla.) and CNBC’s Julia Boorstin join CNBC’s “Squawk Box” to discuss a new bill that would force tech companies to disclose the type of infomration they collect on users.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, media, type, york, available, times, users, nyts, lee, ed, social, asking, cnbcs, tech, squawk, data, bill


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The Pentagon is asking for a colossal $718 billion for its 2020 defense budget

WASHINGTON – The Pentagon is asking for $718 billion in its fiscal 2020 budget, a $33 billion or about 5 percent increase over what Congress enacted for fiscal year 2019. The White House officially released the broad details of President Donald Trump’s fiscal 2020 budget request on Monday, requesting a colossal $750 billion for national defense. The $718 billion budget is comprised of a base budget of $544.5 billion, $9.2 billion for emergency border funding and $164 billion for overseas conting


WASHINGTON – The Pentagon is asking for $718 billion in its fiscal 2020 budget, a $33 billion or about 5 percent increase over what Congress enacted for fiscal year 2019. The White House officially released the broad details of President Donald Trump’s fiscal 2020 budget request on Monday, requesting a colossal $750 billion for national defense. The $718 billion budget is comprised of a base budget of $544.5 billion, $9.2 billion for emergency border funding and $164 billion for overseas conting
The Pentagon is asking for a colossal $718 billion for its 2020 defense budget Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-12  Authors: amanda macias, department of defense photo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, colossal, 2020, missile, force, pentagon, weapons, asking, space, funding, hypersonic, budget, defense, billion, 718


The Pentagon is asking for a colossal $718 billion for its 2020 defense budget

WASHINGTON – The Pentagon is asking for $718 billion in its fiscal 2020 budget, a $33 billion or about 5 percent increase over what Congress enacted for fiscal year 2019.

The White House officially released the broad details of President Donald Trump’s fiscal 2020 budget request on Monday, requesting a colossal $750 billion for national defense. Approximately $30 billion will fund nuclear weapons programs under the Department of Energy as well as other agencies.

The $718 billion budget is comprised of a base budget of $544.5 billion, $9.2 billion for emergency border funding and $164 billion for overseas contingency operations funding, aka the war budget.

What’s more, the Department of Defense is asking Congress for $14.1 billion to invest in space operations and a key part of that is the first allocation of funding for a Space Force.

The Pentagon wants $72.4 million to establish a headquarters for Trump’s proposed Space Force. The $72.4 million represents about 0.01 percent of the Pentagon’s budget. President Donald Trump signed a directive last month ordering the Pentagon to draft legislation that would create the Space Force as a part of the U.S. Air Force. Space Force is slated to become the sixth military branch, the first in 72 years.

While the White House is asking for $8 billion over the next five years to establish the Space Force, U.S. Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson told CNBC last year that the new branch is likely to cost as much as $13 billion.

Of the total $14.1 billion for space investment, about $1.6 billion will fund improvements to space-based missile warning capabilities, a missing link in America’s layered missile defense system. What’s more, the Pentagon will invest an additional $13.6 billion in missile defense capabilities, of which $174 million will finance missile warning systems to address hypersonic threats.

The funding comes as Russia and China sprint to develop hypersonic weapons, a new breed of weapons that the U.S. currently cannot defend against.

Read more: Hypersonic weapons: What they are, and why the U.S. can’t defend against them

A hypersonic weapon is a missile that travels at Mach 5 or higher, which is at least five times faster than the speed of sound. That means a hypersonic weapon can travel about one mile per second.

So far, the Pentagon has awarded two multimillion-dollar hypersonic weapons contracts to Lockheed Martin last year.

CNBC’s Michael Sheetz contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-12  Authors: amanda macias, department of defense photo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, colossal, 2020, missile, force, pentagon, weapons, asking, space, funding, hypersonic, budget, defense, billion, 718


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Stop asking ‘how are you?’ Harvard researchers say this is how successful people make small talk

The person asking doesn’t really want to know, and the person responding doesn’t tell the truth. But the key to making the most out of small talk, according to Harvard researchers, is to simply ask the other person follow-up questions. In a series of experiments, researchers analyzed more than 300 online conversations and found that those who were asked more meaningful follow-up questions (a.k.a. “When people are instructed to ask more questions, they are perceived as higher in responsiveness, a


The person asking doesn’t really want to know, and the person responding doesn’t tell the truth. But the key to making the most out of small talk, according to Harvard researchers, is to simply ask the other person follow-up questions. In a series of experiments, researchers analyzed more than 300 online conversations and found that those who were asked more meaningful follow-up questions (a.k.a. “When people are instructed to ask more questions, they are perceived as higher in responsiveness, a
Stop asking ‘how are you?’ Harvard researchers say this is how successful people make small talk Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-07  Authors: gary burnison, nbc, getty images, jin lee, bloomberg, -gary burnison, ceo, korn ferry
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, harvard, small, talk, person, meaningful, stop, doesnt, say, ask, zero, followup, world, wroteso, asking, successful, researchers, questions


Stop asking 'how are you?' Harvard researchers say this is how successful people make small talk

“How are you?” These are the three most useless words in the world of communication. The person asking doesn’t really want to know, and the person responding doesn’t tell the truth. What follows is a lost opportunity and meaningless exchange with zero connection.

But the key to making the most out of small talk, according to Harvard researchers, is to simply ask the other person follow-up questions. In a series of experiments, researchers analyzed more than 300 online conversations and found that those who were asked more meaningful follow-up questions (a.k.a. questions that aren’t “how are you?” or “what do you do?”), found the other person much more likable.

“When people are instructed to ask more questions, they are perceived as higher in responsiveness, an interpersonal construct that captures listening, understanding, validation and care,” the researchers wrote.

So how do you move from tongue-tied to being a charismatic and interesting person? It depends on the question you start with, and then you can focus on the stream of follow-up questions.

Here are seven tactics to having a meaningful conversation:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-07  Authors: gary burnison, nbc, getty images, jin lee, bloomberg, -gary burnison, ceo, korn ferry
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, harvard, small, talk, person, meaningful, stop, doesnt, say, ask, zero, followup, world, wroteso, asking, successful, researchers, questions


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The No. 1 hidden perk millennials should be asking for, but most don’t

On the surface, having more time off might seem like a slacker’s dream, a company’s nightmare and a country’s road to GDP hell. But number of studies have that without these brain breaks, we’re more prone to becoming unproductive, unimaginative, short-sighted, narrow-minded and disconnected. People between the ages of 20 and 34 are at higher risk of serious diseases when they don’t take breaks, according to a study published in the medical journal Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine. Ac


On the surface, having more time off might seem like a slacker’s dream, a company’s nightmare and a country’s road to GDP hell. But number of studies have that without these brain breaks, we’re more prone to becoming unproductive, unimaginative, short-sighted, narrow-minded and disconnected. People between the ages of 20 and 34 are at higher risk of serious diseases when they don’t take breaks, according to a study published in the medical journal Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine. Ac
The No. 1 hidden perk millennials should be asking for, but most don’t Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: srini pillay, victoriiabulyha, -srini pillay, md, ceo of neurobusiness group
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unimaginative, days, perk, dont, millennials, breaks, younger, vacation, work, wellbeing, unused, unproductive, according, hidden, asking


The No. 1 hidden perk millennials should be asking for, but most don't

On the surface, having more time off might seem like a slacker’s dream, a company’s nightmare and a country’s road to GDP hell. But number of studies have that without these brain breaks, we’re more prone to becoming unproductive, unimaginative, short-sighted, narrow-minded and disconnected.

Millennials, especially, should take note and advocate for more time off. People between the ages of 20 and 34 are at higher risk of serious diseases when they don’t take breaks, according to a study published in the medical journal Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine. The benefits of time off are extensive. Simply taking four nights of vacation can reduce stress and improve well-being — and these positive effects can be seen up to 45 days later.

Unfortunately, “vacation shame” is common among younger generations. According to a 2017 survey from Allianz Travel Insurance, as many as 25 percent of millennials reported feeling nervous when requesting time, and as a result, were more inclined to leave remaining vacation days unused. Another report found that more the half of millennial employees think they’ll impress their bosses by looking like a martyr at work.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: srini pillay, victoriiabulyha, -srini pillay, md, ceo of neurobusiness group
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unimaginative, days, perk, dont, millennials, breaks, younger, vacation, work, wellbeing, unused, unproductive, according, hidden, asking


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The No. 1 hidden perk millennials should be asking for, but most don’t

On the surface, having more time off might seem like a slacker’s dream, a company’s nightmare and a country’s road to GDP hell. But number of studies have that without these brain breaks, we’re more prone to becoming unproductive, unimaginative, short-sighted, narrow-minded and disconnected. People between the ages of 20 and 34 are at higher risk of serious diseases when they don’t take breaks, according to a study published in the medical journal Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine. Ac


On the surface, having more time off might seem like a slacker’s dream, a company’s nightmare and a country’s road to GDP hell. But number of studies have that without these brain breaks, we’re more prone to becoming unproductive, unimaginative, short-sighted, narrow-minded and disconnected. People between the ages of 20 and 34 are at higher risk of serious diseases when they don’t take breaks, according to a study published in the medical journal Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine. Ac
The No. 1 hidden perk millennials should be asking for, but most don’t Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: srini pillay, victoriiabulyha, -srini pillay, md, ceo of neurobusiness group
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unimaginative, days, perk, dont, millennials, breaks, younger, vacation, work, wellbeing, unused, unproductive, according, hidden, asking


The No. 1 hidden perk millennials should be asking for, but most don't

On the surface, having more time off might seem like a slacker’s dream, a company’s nightmare and a country’s road to GDP hell. But number of studies have that without these brain breaks, we’re more prone to becoming unproductive, unimaginative, short-sighted, narrow-minded and disconnected.

Millennials, especially, should take note and advocate for more time off. People between the ages of 20 and 34 are at higher risk of serious diseases when they don’t take breaks, according to a study published in the medical journal Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine. The benefits of time off are extensive. Simply taking four nights of vacation can reduce stress and improve well-being — and these positive effects can be seen up to 45 days later.

Unfortunately, “vacation shame” is common among younger generations. According to a 2017 survey from Allianz Travel Insurance, as many as 25 percent of millennials reported feeling nervous when requesting time, and as a result, were more inclined to leave remaining vacation days unused. Another report found that more the half of millennial employees think they’ll impress their bosses by looking like a martyr at work.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: srini pillay, victoriiabulyha, -srini pillay, md, ceo of neurobusiness group
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unimaginative, days, perk, dont, millennials, breaks, younger, vacation, work, wellbeing, unused, unproductive, according, hidden, asking


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Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says asking herself this question at 18 changed the direction of her life

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the youngest woman ever elected to Congress, says she was close to skipping out on a life in politics, until her world changed at 18. When Ocasio-Cortez was a sophomore at Boston University, her father died of lung cancer. At the time she was pre-med track, and studying biochemistry, but she says the tragic event made her question what she really wanted to achieve in her life. And I wanted to examine issues on a more macro scale, which led me to start studying public he


Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the youngest woman ever elected to Congress, says she was close to skipping out on a life in politics, until her world changed at 18. When Ocasio-Cortez was a sophomore at Boston University, her father died of lung cancer. At the time she was pre-med track, and studying biochemistry, but she says the tragic event made her question what she really wanted to achieve in her life. And I wanted to examine issues on a more macro scale, which led me to start studying public he
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says asking herself this question at 18 changed the direction of her life Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-22  Authors: kerri anne renzulli, atilgan ozdil, anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, alexandria, wanted, woman, ocasiocortez, asking, 18, direction, father, life, really, forced, went, work, university, question, youngest, changed


Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says asking herself this question at 18 changed the direction of her life

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the youngest woman ever elected to Congress, says she was close to skipping out on a life in politics, until her world changed at 18.

When Ocasio-Cortez was a sophomore at Boston University, her father died of lung cancer. At the time she was pre-med track, and studying biochemistry, but she says the tragic event made her question what she really wanted to achieve in her life.

“What the passing of my father did was, it didn’t change who I was, but I think it forced me to have a much more acute understanding [of myself],” she said in an interview with journalist and author Ta-Nehisi Coates at the fourth annual MLK Now event at Riverside Church in Harlem on Monday, Jan. 21. “It really clarified a lot of things, because having my father pass away at such a young age forced a lot of questions of mortality. What am I here for?”

That question was the start of her switch from a medical future to a political one.

“[My father] passed when he was 48 years old, and so it really forced me to grapple with questions of legacy and what is important and what do I want to do with my life at 18,” she continued. “I really started to feel when I was on this premedical route that it was going to take another 12 years for me to actually serve as a doctor, after residency and medical school and undergrad, and even then it would be on a case by case basis. And I wanted to examine issues on a more macro scale, which led me to start studying public health more.”

Ocasio-Cortez recounts that she then went to West Africa and did some maternal health work there that led her to ultimately make the final transition toward economics and policy. She graduated from Boston University in 2011 with a bachelor’s degree in international relations and economics.

She went on to work for the late Senator Ted Kennedy, act as an organizer for Bernie Sander’s presidential campaign and serve as an education director at the National Hispanic Institute all before launching her own election bid.

On Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018, at age 29, Ocasio-Cortez become the youngest woman in history to be elected to Congress, winning support from more than three-fourths of voters in New York’s 14th District. Along the way she had unseated Rep. Joe Crowley, the then-fourth-ranking House Democrat, who had represented the Bronx and Queens district for 10 terms, and shocked the Democratic Party establishment.

She has since continued to turn heads in Washington, D.C. with her proposal to introduce a marginal tax rate as high as 70 percent on income above $10 million, her comments about affording an apartment in the capital, and her new spot on the House Financial Services Committee, which oversees Wall Street and the financial industry.

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Don’t miss: Ocasio-Cortez’s 70% tax plan gets fierce response, but even Warren Buffett says rich should pay more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-22  Authors: kerri anne renzulli, atilgan ozdil, anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, alexandria, wanted, woman, ocasiocortez, asking, 18, direction, father, life, really, forced, went, work, university, question, youngest, changed


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Tony Robbins: This is the secret to getting a raise

If you want to up your salary, using popular negotiation strategies aren’t always going to do the trick, says life and business strategist Tony Robbins. The key to getting a raise comes down to the answer to one question: How can you add more value to your company? At the end of the day, “no technique is going to solve for not adding value,” Robbins tells CNBC Make It. What can I do to stand out from everybody else in this area — not just once, not twice, but all the time?” Speak to them and say


If you want to up your salary, using popular negotiation strategies aren’t always going to do the trick, says life and business strategist Tony Robbins. The key to getting a raise comes down to the answer to one question: How can you add more value to your company? At the end of the day, “no technique is going to solve for not adding value,” Robbins tells CNBC Make It. What can I do to stand out from everybody else in this area — not just once, not twice, but all the time?” Speak to them and say
Tony Robbins: This is the secret to getting a raise Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-16  Authors: kathleen elkins, getty images, jim spellman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, secret, robbins, going, value, money, tony, company, answer, conversations, way, raise, asking, adding, getting


Tony Robbins: This is the secret to getting a raise

If you want to up your salary, using popular negotiation strategies aren’t always going to do the trick, says life and business strategist Tony Robbins.

The key to getting a raise comes down to the answer to one question: How can you add more value to your company? There’s no substitute for that. At the end of the day, “no technique is going to solve for not adding value,” Robbins tells CNBC Make It.

That’s why, before asking your boss for more money, he advises that you start by asking yourself, “What can I do that people will value in this environment? What can I do to stand out from everybody else in this area — not just once, not twice, but all the time?”

A simple way to figure out the answer is to set up a meeting and tell your manager, “I want to know what would it take for me to grow in this company another level. Speak to them and say, ‘Here is my goal,'” says Robbins, adding, “I would have conversations like that before any conversations about money.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-16  Authors: kathleen elkins, getty images, jim spellman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, secret, robbins, going, value, money, tony, company, answer, conversations, way, raise, asking, adding, getting


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