Mike Pompeo cursed out NPR reporter for asking about removal of Ukraine ambassador, she says

But Pompeo declined to answer multiple questions from Kelly about Ukraine, saying he had only agreed to discuss the administration’s policies with regard to Iran. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo cursed out an NPR reporter after she pressed him to answer questions about the removal of former U.S. ambassador Marie Yovanovitch from her post in Ukraine, the outlet reported Friday . On a radio program for NPR that aired Friday, Kelly provided more details about her unrecorded exchange with Pompeo. The


But Pompeo declined to answer multiple questions from Kelly about Ukraine, saying he had only agreed to discuss the administration’s policies with regard to Iran.
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo cursed out an NPR reporter after she pressed him to answer questions about the removal of former U.S. ambassador Marie Yovanovitch from her post in Ukraine, the outlet reported Friday .
On a radio program for NPR that aired Friday, Kelly provided more details about her unrecorded exchange with Pompeo.
The
Mike Pompeo cursed out NPR reporter for asking about removal of Ukraine ambassador, she says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-24  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pompeo, cursed, mike, state, reported, removal, trumps, reporter, ambassador, trump, npr, iran, yovanovitch, questions, kelly, asking, ukraine


Mike Pompeo cursed out NPR reporter for asking about removal of Ukraine ambassador, she says

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks at the U.S. State Department

An aide to the Cabinet official asked Kelly to follow Pompeo to his living quarters at the State Department without a recording device, but did not specify that the ensuing exchange would be off the record, according to NPR.

NPR reported that “immediately after the questions on Ukraine, the interview concluded. Pompeo stood, leaned in and silently glared at Kelly for a period of several seconds before leaving the room.”

But Pompeo declined to answer multiple questions from Kelly about Ukraine, saying he had only agreed to discuss the administration’s policies with regard to Iran. Kelly disputed that those were the terms of the interview.

The reporter, “All Things Considered” co-host Mary Louise Kelly, interviewed Pompeo on Friday amid President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial in the Senate, which centers around the president’s dealings with Ukraine.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo cursed out an NPR reporter after she pressed him to answer questions about the removal of former U.S. ambassador Marie Yovanovitch from her post in Ukraine, the outlet reported Friday .

Mary Louise Kelly accepts the award for best reporter/correspondent/host – non-commercial for “All Things Considered” on “NPR News” at the 43rd annual Gracie Awards at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel on Tuesday, May 22, 2018, in Beverly Hills, Calif.

“Inside the room, Pompeo shouted his displeasure at being questioned about Ukraine,” NPR reported. “He used repeated expletives, according to Kelly, and asked, ‘Do you think Americans care about Ukraine?'”

On a radio program for NPR that aired Friday, Kelly provided more details about her unrecorded exchange with Pompeo.

“I was taken to the Secretary’s private living room, where he was waiting, and where he shouted at me for about the same amount of time as the interview itself had lasted,” Kelly said.

“He used the F word in that sentence, and many others. He asked if I could find Ukraine on a map I said yes. He called out for his aides to bring him a map of the world with no writing, no countries marked,” Kelly said.

“I pointed to Ukraine,” she said. “He put the map away. He said, ‘People will hear about this,’ and then he turned and said he had things to do, and I thanked him again for his time and left.”

Neither the White House nor the State Department immediately responded to CNBC’s requests for comment on NPR’s report.

Reached for comment, Kelly referred CNBC to NPR’s story about the incident.

Pompeo on Friday tweeted his plans to travel to Ukraine.

Yovanovitch’s ouster has at times taken center stage in Trump’s impeachment proceedings.

The House voted to impeach Trump on Dec. 18 on articles of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, both related to his efforts to have Ukraine announce probes into former Vice President Joe Biden and his son, and a debunked conspiracy theory about the 2016 presidential election.

Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani, with help from associates including Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman, had allegedly sought for Yovanovitch’s removal in order to clear the way for Ukraine to announce the probes that involved Trump’s political rivals.

Yovanovitch was removed from her post in Kyiv in the spring of 2019. She testified before the House in November as part of its impeachment inquiry that she felt threatened by Trump and his allies, who had disparaged her even after she was removed from her post.

Yovanovitch said that corrupt Ukrainian officials and Trump associates, including Giuliani, had orchestrated a “smear campaign” against her.

Earlier Friday, ABC News reported that a newly surfaced recording contains audio of Trump, at an April 2018 gathering with Fruman and Parnas, demanding that Yovanovitch be fired.

A transcript of the recorded portion of NPR’s interview with Pompeo shows Kelly first asking questions about the tense relations between the U.S. and Iran. Pompeo defended Trump’s decision to pull the U.S. out of the 2015 Iran nuclear agreement struck during the Obama administration.

Then Kelly changed the subject to Ukraine, asking if Pompeo owed Yovanovitch an apology.

Pompeo said, “I agreed to come on your show today to talk about Iran. That’s what I intend to do.”

Kelly responded: “I confirmed with your staff … last night that I would talk about Iran and Ukraine.”

The back-and-forth continued as Kelly pressed Pompeo on whether or not he should apologize to the former U.S. ambassador.

“I’ll say only this. I have defended every State Department official,” Pompeo said. But when asked where he has defended Yovanovitch in particular, Pompeo said, “I’ve said all I’m going to say today.”

Read NPR’s full report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-24  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pompeo, cursed, mike, state, reported, removal, trumps, reporter, ambassador, trump, npr, iran, yovanovitch, questions, kelly, asking, ukraine


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Andrew Yang’s staff become latest campaign workers to unionize

Staffers for Andrew Yang announced Thursday that they have joined the Campaign Workers Guild, the most recent campaign unionization effort among the 2020 Democratic candidates for president. Yang is the latest Democratic candidate who has recognized a decision to unionize from campaign staffers. Former Housing Secretary Julian Castro and California Rep. Eric Swalwell, who both dropped their bids for president, had also recognized their campaign workers’ unions. In the latest round of campaign fi


Staffers for Andrew Yang announced Thursday that they have joined the Campaign Workers Guild, the most recent campaign unionization effort among the 2020 Democratic candidates for president.
Yang is the latest Democratic candidate who has recognized a decision to unionize from campaign staffers.
Former Housing Secretary Julian Castro and California Rep. Eric Swalwell, who both dropped their bids for president, had also recognized their campaign workers’ unions.
In the latest round of campaign fi
Andrew Yang’s staff become latest campaign workers to unionize Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: yelena dzhanova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, stafferssen, campaign, democratic, recognized, unionize, latest, staff, yang, support, yangs, asking, andrew


Andrew Yang's staff become latest campaign workers to unionize

Staffers for Andrew Yang announced Thursday that they have joined the Campaign Workers Guild, the most recent campaign unionization effort among the 2020 Democratic candidates for president.

“Today marks a victory not only for our workers, but for campaign staff across the country asking for improved labor provisions, asking for appreciation as a collective whole and asking for a chance to be recognized as more than simply an employee,” Chad Young, a Yang campaign worker said in an email announcing the move.

Yang is the latest Democratic candidate who has recognized a decision to unionize from campaign staffers.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, one of the leading Democratic candidates, said in May 2019 that his campaign was the first to approve a union contract with staffers.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, another presidential candidate, said in June that she supported her staffers’ decision to unionize. Former Housing Secretary Julian Castro and California Rep. Eric Swalwell, who both dropped their bids for president, had also recognized their campaign workers’ unions.

“Andrew Yang is a strong believer in the rights of employees to come together and have a voice in their workplaces,” campaign chief Nick Ryan said in a statement to CNBC. “He believes that those rights are the cornerstone of an economy that puts humanity first, and that we need to rewrite the rules of the 21st century to ensure that those rules are strengthened and protected. Our campaign is excited to be able to live our values and ensure that our employee’s voices are heard.”

Yang, an entrepreneur, started his bid for president as a long-shot contender with no political experience. But he’s since amassed a loyal base of internet-savvy supporters known as the “Yang Gang” and has received endorsements from celebrities, including actor and rapper Donald Glover.

In the latest round of campaign finance disclosures, Yang’s campaign predicted that for the fourth quarter he would raise $12.5 million but he ended up reporting $16.5 million.

Much of Yang’s campaign focuses on his freedom dividend policy, which promises $1,000 a month to every American over 18. The RealClearPolitics polling average currently shows Yang with about 3.5% support, putting him just behind Democratic heavyweight Mike Bloomberg who has 5.8% support.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: yelena dzhanova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, stafferssen, campaign, democratic, recognized, unionize, latest, staff, yang, support, yangs, asking, andrew


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Ukraine inquired about aid the same day Trump asked Zelenskiy about Biden probe, impeachment witness says

The first email “said that the Ukrainian embassy and House Foreign Affairs Committee are asking about security assistance,” Cooper testified. That same morning, Trump asked Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskiy in a phone call to “look into” unsubstantiated allegations against former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter. Trump and his allies, as well as Zelenskiy himself, have argued there was “no pressure” on Ukraine by the White House. As evidence, some have claimed that Ukraine was not


The first email “said that the Ukrainian embassy and House Foreign Affairs Committee are asking about security assistance,” Cooper testified.
That same morning, Trump asked Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskiy in a phone call to “look into” unsubstantiated allegations against former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter.
Trump and his allies, as well as Zelenskiy himself, have argued there was “no pressure” on Ukraine by the White House.
As evidence, some have claimed that Ukraine was not
Ukraine inquired about aid the same day Trump asked Zelenskiy about Biden probe, impeachment witness says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: kevin breuninger christina wilkie, kevin breuninger, christina wilkie
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, probe, day, ukrainian, witness, impeachment, biden, asked, house, inquired, asking, committee, cooper, zelenskiy, emails, trump, ukraine


Ukraine inquired about aid the same day Trump asked Zelenskiy about Biden probe, impeachment witness says

Laura Cooper, deputy assistant secretary of defense for Russia, Ukraine, and Eurasia, arrives for testimony before the House Intelligence Committee in the Longworth House Office Building on Capitol Hill November 20, 2019 in Washington, DC.

Defense Department official Laura Cooper said Wednesday that she has seen emails showing Ukraine officials were asking about the delay of a U.S. military aid package to their country as early as July 25 — the same day as President Donald Trump’s call with Ukraine’s leader at the center of the House impeachment inquiry.

Cooper testified in a public hearing that members of her staff recently showed her emails from the State Department, both of which were received the afternoon of July 25.

The first email “said that the Ukrainian embassy and House Foreign Affairs Committee are asking about security assistance,” Cooper testified. The second email said that “the Hill knows about the [Foreign Military Financing] situation to an extent, and so does the Ukrainian embassy,” according to Cooper’s opening statement.

That same morning, Trump asked Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskiy in a phone call to “look into” unsubstantiated allegations against former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter. After Zelenskiy mentioned that his country planned to purchase Javelin missiles, Trump also asked him to “do us a favor though” and investigate a debunked conspiracy theory alleging Ukrainian interference in the 2016 U.S. election aimed at helping Trump’s challenger, Democrat Hillary Clinton.

Trump and his allies, as well as Zelenskiy himself, have argued there was “no pressure” on Ukraine by the White House. As evidence, some have claimed that Ukraine was not aware of the hold on aid at the time Trump himself asked Zelenskiy to launch the probes. The aid was eventually received in September.

A whistleblower’s complaint about the Trump-Zelenskiy call spurred Democrats to launch an impeachment inquiry into whether Trump abused his power by asking Ukraine to announce the probes into his personal political rivals.

Cooper, the deputy assistant secretary of Defense for Russian, Ukrainian and Eurasian affairs, says she was informed by her staff about the emails and other information in mid-November, after a transcript of her closed-door testimony before the House Intelligence Committee was made public.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: kevin breuninger christina wilkie, kevin breuninger, christina wilkie
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, probe, day, ukrainian, witness, impeachment, biden, asked, house, inquired, asking, committee, cooper, zelenskiy, emails, trump, ukraine


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The Justice Department is asking for details about ‘Anonymous,’ the author of forthcoming book on Trump administration

The Department of Justice is asking for information that could help it identify the anonymous author behind a forthcoming book that has been billed as an “unprecedented behind-the-scenes portrait” of President Donald Trump’s time in office. Hachette and Javelin responded defiantly later in the day, declining to comply with the Justice Department’s request. The op-ed went viral and spurred speculation about which Trump administration official could be behind it. The Trump administration has aggre


The Department of Justice is asking for information that could help it identify the anonymous author behind a forthcoming book that has been billed as an “unprecedented behind-the-scenes portrait” of President Donald Trump’s time in office.
Hachette and Javelin responded defiantly later in the day, declining to comply with the Justice Department’s request.
The op-ed went viral and spurred speculation about which Trump administration official could be behind it.
The Trump administration has aggre
The Justice Department is asking for details about ‘Anonymous,’ the author of forthcoming book on Trump administration Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-04  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, administration, justice, department, publisher, book, javelin, forthcoming, official, provide, author, trump, asking, details, anonymous, information


The Justice Department is asking for details about 'Anonymous,' the author of forthcoming book on Trump administration

The Department of Justice is asking for information that could help it identify the anonymous author behind a forthcoming book that has been billed as an “unprecedented behind-the-scenes portrait” of President Donald Trump’s time in office.

Assistant attorney general Joseph Hunt sent a letter on Monday to the author’s publisher and literary agency demanding assurances that the author, who claims to be a current or former senior official in the Trump administration, did not sign a nondisclosure agreement and “did not have access to any classified information in connection with government service.”

If the two firms, Hachette Book Group and Javelin, could not provide such a guarantee, Hunt asked them to provide the anonymous author’s dates of government service and the agencies where the author was employed.

The government could likely use those details to determine the author’s identity. The book, titled “A Warning,” is scheduled to go on sale Nov. 19.

Hachette and Javelin responded defiantly later in the day, declining to comply with the Justice Department’s request.

“Our author knows that the President is determined to unmask whistleblowers who may be in his midst. That’s one of the reasons A WARNING was written,” Javelin said in a statement. “But we support the publisher in its resolve that the administration’s effort to intimidate and expose the senior official who has seen misconduct at the highest levels will not prevent this book from moving forward.”

Hachette, for its part, said it had made a commitment of confidentiality to the author “and we intend to honor that commitment.”

“Please be assured that Hachette takes its legal responsibilities seriously and, accordingly, Hachette respectfully declines to provide you with the information your letter seeks,” the New York-based literary giant wrote.

The author of the book gained notoriety under the pen name “Anonymous” after publishing an op-ed in The New York Times last fall in which the person claimed to be part of an internal “resistance” movement within the administration. The op-ed went viral and spurred speculation about which Trump administration official could be behind it.

The Trump administration has aggressively pursued government officials suspected of leaking information to members of the media. In September, the Justice Department filed suit against NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden and his publisher Macmillan for failing to submit his book, “Permanent Record,” to the government for clearance.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-04  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, administration, justice, department, publisher, book, javelin, forthcoming, official, provide, author, trump, asking, details, anonymous, information


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Thousands of companies are asking for tariff exclusions even as US and China push to sign trade deal

As of Saturday, companies have already filed 146 exclusion requests from the fourth round of tariffs. Apple, for example, is asking for tariff exclusions for the Apple Watch, iPhone parts and the HomePod among other items. Amid the uncertainty, trade lawyers are encouraging companies to file exclusions for the $300 billion of products covered by list four. Companies, however, will need to have patience with the exclusion process – or cross their fingers for a trade deal that results in Trump lif


As of Saturday, companies have already filed 146 exclusion requests from the fourth round of tariffs.
Apple, for example, is asking for tariff exclusions for the Apple Watch, iPhone parts and the HomePod among other items.
Amid the uncertainty, trade lawyers are encouraging companies to file exclusions for the $300 billion of products covered by list four.
Companies, however, will need to have patience with the exclusion process – or cross their fingers for a trade deal that results in Trump lif
Thousands of companies are asking for tariff exclusions even as US and China push to sign trade deal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-02  Authors: spencer kimball
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thousands, chinese, asking, push, sign, exclusions, deal, trade, china, requests, billion, tariff, exclusion, tariffs, companies, trump


Thousands of companies are asking for tariff exclusions even as US and China push to sign trade deal

The Office of the United States Trade Representative faces a massive backlog of requests from companies seeking a reprieve from the Trump administration’s tariffs against China, even as Washington and Beijing try to finalize phase one this year of a deal to end the 18-month-long trade war.

More than 3,000 companies have filed about 44,000 requests for exclusions from the first three rounds of President Donald Trump’s tariffs on $250 billion of Chinese imports. The overwhelming majority of these requests, about 28,000, are under review as of Nov. 1. About 4,900 requests have been granted, while about 10,970 have been denied.

And more requests for exclusions are likely to flood the administration in the coming months.

The USTR opened the process this week for companies to file exclusion requests for the president’s fourth round of tariffs on $300 billion of Chinese imports, the largest round of duties yet. Unlike past rounds, which largely targeted components and parts, these tariffs hit a wide array of finished consumer goods. Everything from clothing to electronics to musical instruments and more are subject to this latest round of duties.

As of Saturday, companies have already filed 146 exclusion requests from the fourth round of tariffs. Apple, for example, is asking for tariff exclusions for the Apple Watch, iPhone parts and the HomePod among other items.

The deadline to file exclusion requests for the $300 billion of goods covered by list four is Jan. 31, 2020, despite administration optimism about clinching at least the first phase of a broader trade deal with China sometime this year. The exclusion process closed for lists one through three covering $250 billion. For lists one and two, which cover $50 billion of goods, all requests have already either been granted or denied. The pending cases are from list three, which covers $200 billion of Chinese exports.

The Office of the United States Trade Representative could not be immediately reached for comment.

Optimism rose in October when Trump suspended another tariff hike on the $250 billion of Chinese imports after negotiators agreed on the principles of the first part of a trade deal. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, however, told CNBC days later that tariffs scheduled for Dec. 15, the middle of the holiday shopping season, will likely go into effect if a deal is not reached by then.

Whether or not progress in trade talks continues is an open question. The U.S. and China were reportedly close to a deal in May, but negotiations collapsed after Washington accused Beijing of backtracking on key commitments. The trade war escalated in the ensuing months with Trump slapping tariffs on virtually all Chinese exports to the U.S.

American businesses, many of them small and medium-sized companies, have filed scores of public comments asking the administration to rethink its trade strategy. Other companies have spoken out strongly in favor of more targeted tariffs against China to promote U.S. manufacturing and protect intellectual property.

Wall Street analysts had a lukewarm response to the announcement of the first phase of a deal. Morgan Stanley called the deal “uncertain” and said there’s “meaningful risk” that tariff escalation will continue. Goldman Sachs said the December round of tariffs will likely be postponed, but still sees a 60% chance they will go into effect sometime in 2020. Evercore, on the other hand, expects the tariff hike to be delayed and does not foresee any tariff increases next year.

Uncertainty rose this week after Chile canceled the international summit where Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping where expected to sign phase one of the deal. The South American nation has been gripped by mass protests recently over domestic issues. Trump said Washington and Beijing were looking for a new location for the signing and an announcement would be made soon. Bloomberg reported Thursday that Chinese officials are skeptical a comprehensive deal can be reached with the Trump administration, even as the two sides prepare to sign phase one.

On Friday, China said it reached a consensus in principle with the U.S. after a phone call among trade negotiators this week.

Amid the uncertainty, trade lawyers are encouraging companies to file exclusions for the $300 billion of products covered by list four. Andrew McAllister, an attorney with the international trade group at the firm Holland & Knight, was skeptical when the exclusion process opened for the first two rounds of tariffs, but said companies had a fair amount of success getting their requests granted by the USTR. About 34% of the requests filed for lists one and two, which covered $50 billion of goods, were granted.

Jeremy Page, a trade lawyer with the firm PageFura who has worked with dozens of companies on exclusion requests, said he’s found the USTR process has generally been fair.

“The USTR process has been pretty even handed,” Page said. “I’ve been pleasantly surprised. It seems that they’re not being knee-jerk. Obviously if there’s a national security implication all bets are off.”

To receive an exclusion, a company is required to explain whether the particular product is available only in China; whether they’ve attempted to source the product from the U.S. or a third country; whether the imposition of tariffs will cause “severe economic harm to the requester or U.S. interests; and whether the product is important to Beijing’s “Made in China 2025” industrial program.

McAllister said the main challenge companies face is demonstrating that they can only source their product in China. It’s also important for companies to file applications that resonate with the administration’s “America First” agenda by explaining why their business and their exclusion request is good for the U.S. economy, he said.

“The applications that are well thought out tell a nice story about how it’s good for America – how it’s promoting U.S. jobs, how it’s promoting U.S. economic activity,” McAllister said. “We’ve found the success rate to be higher.”

Beyond filing a strong application, McAllister said Holland & Knight also encourages companies to advocate for their case in Washington, whether that’s through a trade association, lobby group or contacting their congressional delegation. A call by the right person with the right touch can potentially help move an application up in the pile, he said.

Companies, however, will need to have patience with the exclusion process – or cross their fingers for a trade deal that results in Trump lifting the tariffs against China. The USTR has not provided an official time frame for processing claims, but it normally takes months for an exclusion request to reach a final determination. Even if company has a strong case, there’s no guarantee that an exclusion will be approved.

Both McAllister and Page said they’re not optimistic about the Trump administration broadly lifting tariffs this year, despite the push by the U.S. and China to sign the first part of a trade deal.

“We want to make sure people are tempering their enthusiasm,” Page said.

— CNBC’s Nate Rattner and Nick Wells contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-02  Authors: spencer kimball
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thousands, chinese, asking, push, sign, exclusions, deal, trade, china, requests, billion, tariff, exclusion, tariffs, companies, trump


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3 mega-mansions with some of the largest price drops in luxury real estate

Each estate eventually sold at a discount of more than 60% from the initial asking price. Here are three of the largest price drops in residential real estate in America over the last 12 months. There is a point of no return and diminishing returns in super luxury real estate.” That’s a reduction of about 61% and a total price drop of more than $48 million from the original asking price. Back in 2017, that nosebleed asking price made it the most expensive listing in America.


Each estate eventually sold at a discount of more than 60% from the initial asking price.
Here are three of the largest price drops in residential real estate in America over the last 12 months.
There is a point of no return and diminishing returns in super luxury real estate.”
That’s a reduction of about 61% and a total price drop of more than $48 million from the original asking price.
Back in 2017, that nosebleed asking price made it the most expensive listing in America.
3 mega-mansions with some of the largest price drops in luxury real estate Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-01  Authors: ray parisi christopher dilella, ray parisi, christopher dilella
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sold, drops, luxury, largest, plaza, megamansions, price, million, estate, reduction, asking, real, market


3 mega-mansions with some of the largest price drops in luxury real estate

These mega-mansions started out with enormous price-tags, but when they didn’t sell, they got massive price cuts. Each estate eventually sold at a discount of more than 60% from the initial asking price. Here are three of the largest price drops in residential real estate in America over the last 12 months.

Florida beachfront mansion

Original Asking Price: $159 million (2015)

Sold For: $42.5 million (2018)

Price Reduction: 73%

Playa Vista Isle, Hillsboro Beach, Florida Source: Concierge Auctions

This oceanfront mansion in Hillsboro Beach, Florida (about an hour north of Miami), was on the market for $159 million in 2015. At the time, it made headlines as the most expensive listing in America. But for three years the 60,000-square-foot compound had no takers. The owner eventually decided to put the estate on the auction block, and in November of 2018, it sold for a fraction of the original asking price at $42.5 million. That’s a $116.5 million or 73% price cut.

Concierge Auctions

What went wrong? South Florida based luxury real estate broker Senada Adzem — who was not involved in the transaction — believes that “when it hit the market, the price was mandated by the sellers based on what they had invested in the property, not based on the current market value.” Adzem adds, “The money spent on custom homes is not in direct proportion with the final sales price. There is a point of no return and diminishing returns in super luxury real estate.”

Tommy Hilfiger’s NYC Plaza hotel home

Original Asking Price: $80 million (2013)

Sold For: $31.25 million (2019)

Price Reduction: 61%

The Plaza Hotel in New York City. Larry McManus | Getty Images

When fashion mogul Tommy Hilfiger listed his Manhattan penthouse at The Plaza hotel in 2013, he was asking $80 million for it. The 6,000-square-foot duplex sat on the market for six years. And over that time, it was incrementally reduced. In 2017, the asking price was lowered to $50 million. The duplex finally sold in September for $31.25 million. That’s a reduction of about 61% and a total price drop of more than $48 million from the original asking price.

Tommy Hilfiger and his wife, Dee Ocleppo, just sold their NYC penthouse for under $34 million. Source: Tommy and Dee Hilfiger

Hilfiger had such a hard time selling the penthouse for three reasons, according to NYC-based luxury real estate broker Noble Black, who was not involved in the sale: “pricing, layout, and competition.” “Although it was a penthouse at The Plaza, the layout and views … were not what most buyers [at that level] would want or expect,” says the Douglas Elliman broker.

Master bedroom Source: Sotheby’s International Realty | Travis Mark

LA behemoth

Original Asking Price: $250 million (2017)

Sold For: $94 million (2019)

Price Reduction: 62%

Photo: Bruce Makowsky / BAM Luxury Development

This Los Angeles mansion originally hit the market for $250 million. Back in 2017, that nosebleed asking price made it the most expensive listing in America. But the 38,000-square-foot home sat on the market for over two years.

The interior dining area has a good view of a giant $1 million art installation of a Leica camera. Photo: Bruce Makowsky / BAM Luxury Development


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-01  Authors: ray parisi christopher dilella, ray parisi, christopher dilella
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sold, drops, luxury, largest, plaza, megamansions, price, million, estate, reduction, asking, real, market


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Adam Schiff says Trump asking China to investigate Biden is ‘a fundamental breach’ of his oath of office

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said Thursday that President Donald Trump’s request for China to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden constitutes “a fundamental breach of the president’s oath of office.” Trump’s request for a foreign government to investigate Biden, his possible challenger in the 2020 election, spurred Democrats to launch an impeachment inquiry. Trump’s allies have raised suspicions about Hunter Biden’s employment on the board of Ukrainian nat


House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said Thursday that President Donald Trump’s request for China to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden constitutes “a fundamental breach of the president’s oath of office.” Trump’s request for a foreign government to investigate Biden, his possible challenger in the 2020 election, spurred Democrats to launch an impeachment inquiry. Trump’s allies have raised suspicions about Hunter Biden’s employment on the board of Ukrainian nat
Adam Schiff says Trump asking China to investigate Biden is ‘a fundamental breach’ of his oath of office Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, biden, fundamental, china, asking, president, ukraine, breach, vice, oath, hunter, office, trump, schiff, bidens, investigate


Adam Schiff says Trump asking China to investigate Biden is 'a fundamental breach' of his oath of office

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-CA) speaks during a news conference about impeachment proceedings at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, September 25, 2019.

On Thursday morning, Trump told reporters at the White House that ” China should start an investigation into the Bidens, because what happened in China is just about as bad as what happened with Ukraine .” It was not immediately clear what Trump believes “happened in China” related to the Bidens.

“To have a president of the United States suggesting, urging a foreign country to interfere in our presidential elections is an illustration that if this president has learned anything from the two years of [former special counsel Robert Mueller’s] investigation, it’s that he feels he can do anything with impunity,” Schiff told reporters on Capitol Hill.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said Thursday that President Donald Trump’s request for China to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden constitutes “a fundamental breach of the president’s oath of office.”

Trump also publicly doubled down on his call for Ukraine to investigate the Bidens — a request he made in a July 25 call to Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky. Trump’s request for a foreign government to investigate Biden, his possible challenger in the 2020 election, spurred Democrats to launch an impeachment inquiry.

Schiff made the comments after emerging from a closed-door hearing with Kurt Volker, former special envoy to Ukraine, who appeared for a deposition as part of House Democrats’ impeachment probe into Trump.

“A president of the United States encouraging a foreign nation to interfere again to help his campaign by investigating a rival is a fundamental breach of the president’s oath of office. It endangers our elections, it endangers our national security. It ought to be condemned by every member of this body, Democrats and Republicans alike,” Schiff said.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., who formally announced the impeachment inquiry last week, tweeted Thursday afternoon that Trump’s call for another country to probe the Bidens is “just the latest example of him putting his personal political gain ahead of defending the integrity of our elections.”

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, ranking member on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, said after listening to Volker’s testimony that “nothing he said supports the narrative you’ve been hearing from Mr. Schiff.”

Trump called on China to investigate the current Democratic presidential front-runner and his son Hunter, one week before a Chinese delegation is set to arrive in Washington to resume protracted trade negotiations.

“I have a lot of options on China, but if they don’t do what we want, we have tremendous power,” Trump said of the U.S. stance in the talks before he was asked about the Bidens.

Trump’s allies have raised suspicions about Hunter Biden’s employment on the board of Ukrainian natural gas company Burisma Holdings while his father was in office. They suggest that the elder Biden improperly pressured Ukraine to fire a prosecutor there out of concern that he would investigate the company.

But there is no clear evidence that Biden’s actions as vice president were intended to help his son; in fact, many Western leaders had called on Ukraine to fire that prosecutor over allegations of corruption. Hunter Biden has not been accused of illegal wrongdoing related to his work with the company.

The New Yorker delved into some of Hunter Biden’s Chinese connections in a lengthy piece in July. Hunter accompanied his father, then the vice president, on an official trip to that country in 2013.

Still, Vice President Mike Pence said Thursday that Trump is right to want to investigate allegations of wrongdoing against Biden and his son. “The American people have a right to know” whether Biden’s family “profited from his position,” Pence said.

Federal Election Commission Chair Ellen Weintraub, however, took to Twitter on Thursday to once again share a memorandum stating that it is against the law for anyone running for public office to solicit help from a foreign national.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, biden, fundamental, china, asking, president, ukraine, breach, vice, oath, hunter, office, trump, schiff, bidens, investigate


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Here is AG Barr’s full letter to Facebook asking it not to make messages completely secret

Facebook said it has been consulting with experts in child safety as well as governments and other tech companies to ensure its newly encrypted services are secure. You stated that “we have a responsibility to work with law enforcement and to help prevent” the use of Facebook for things like child sexual exploitation, terrorism, and extortion. Not doing so hinders our law enforcement agencies’ ability to stop criminals and abusers in their tracks. To take one example, Facebook sent a priority re


Facebook said it has been consulting with experts in child safety as well as governments and other tech companies to ensure its newly encrypted services are secure. You stated that “we have a responsibility to work with law enforcement and to help prevent” the use of Facebook for things like child sexual exploitation, terrorism, and extortion. Not doing so hinders our law enforcement agencies’ ability to stop criminals and abusers in their tracks. To take one example, Facebook sent a priority re
Here is AG Barr’s full letter to Facebook asking it not to make messages completely secret Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, completely, access, safety, facebook, letter, secret, content, asking, sexual, barrs, enforcement, users, reports, law, child, messages


Here is AG Barr's full letter to Facebook asking it not to make messages completely secret

A Facebook spokesperson said in a statement, “We believe people have the right to have a private conversation online, wherever they are in the world.” Facebook said it has been consulting with experts in child safety as well as governments and other tech companies to ensure its newly encrypted services are secure. Facebook “strongly oppose[s] government attempts to build backdoors because they would undermine the privacy and security of people everywhere,” according to the statement.

Facebook is not the first tech company to butt heads with the government over encryption. Just a few years ago, Apple was in a standoff with the Federal Bureau of Investigation over access to the iPhone of a shooter in the 2015 San Bernardino attack. A federal judge asked Apple to help the FBI unlock the phone, but Apple CEO Tim Cook called the order “dangerous” because it could allow the government to overstep in future cases and demand technology companies to surveil users. The Department of Justice ultimately said it was able to access the phone’s data without Apple and asked the judge to drop the case.

Facebook’s plans to integrate its three platforms also has raised antitrust concerns as investigations into Facebook’s competitive practices will likely scrutinize its past acquisitions of Instagram and WhatsApp. While the letter does not seem to touch on these concerns based on BuzzFeed’s report, postponing the integration would buy investigators more time to understand the antitrust implications of those acquisitions before Facebook scrambles the eggs, preempting a potential breakup.

The U.K. Home Office did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Here is the full letter Barr sent to Zuckerberg:

Mark Zuckerberg

Chief Executive Officer

Facebook

1 Hacker Way

Menlo Park, California 94025

4 October 2019

Dear Mr. Zuckerberg,

OPEN LETTER: FACEBOOK’S “PRIVACY FIRST” PROPOSALS

We are writing to request that Facebook does not proceed with its plan to implement end-to-end encryption across its messaging services without ensuring that there is no reduction to user safety and without including a means for lawful access to the content of communications to protect our citizens.

In your post of 6 March 2019, “A Privacy-Focused Vision for Social Networking,” you acknowledged that “there are real safety concerns to address before we can implement end-to-end encryption across all our messaging services.” You stated that “we have a responsibility to work with law enforcement and to help prevent” the use of Facebook for things like child sexual exploitation, terrorism, and extortion. We welcome this commitment to consultation. As you know, our governments have engaged with Facebook on this issue, and some of us have written to you to express our views. Unfortunately, Facebook has not committed to address our serious concerns about the impact its proposals could have on protecting our most vulnerable citizens.

We support strong encryption, which is used by billions of people every day for services such as banking, commerce, and communications. We also respect promises made by technology companies to protect users’ data. Law abiding citizens have a legitimate expectation that their privacy will be protected. However, as your March blog post recognized, we must ensure that technology companies protect their users and others affected by their users’ online activities. Security enhancements to the virtual world should not make us more vulnerable in the physical world. We must find a way to balance the need to secure data with public safety and the need for law enforcement to access the information they need to safeguard the public, investigate crimes, and prevent future criminal activity. Not doing so hinders our law enforcement agencies’ ability to stop criminals and abusers in their tracks.

Companies should not deliberately design their systems to preclude any form of access to content, even for preventing or investigating the most serious crimes. This puts our citizens and societies at risk by severely eroding a company’s ability to detect and respond to illegal content and activity, such as child sexual exploitation and abuse, terrorism, and foreign adversaries’ attempts to undermine democratic values and institutions, preventing the prosecution of offenders and safeguarding of victims. It also impedes law enforcement’s ability to investigate these and other serious crimes.

Risks to public safety from Facebook’s proposals are exacerbated in the context of a single platform that would combine inaccessible messaging services with open profiles, providing unique routes for prospective offenders to identify and groom our children.

Facebook currently undertakes significant work to identify and tackle the most serious illegal content and activity by enforcing your community standards. In 2018, Facebook made 16.8 million reports to the US National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC) – more than 90% of the 18.4 million total reports that year. As well as child abuse imagery, these referrals include more than 8,000 reports related to attempts by offenders to meet children online and groom or entice them into sharing indecent imagery or meeting in real life. The UK National Crime Agency (NCA) estimates that, last year, NCMEC reporting from Facebook will have resulted in more than 2,500 arrests by UK law enforcement and almost 3,000 children safeguarded in the UK. Your transparency reports show that Facebook also acted against 26 million pieces of terrorist content between October 2017 and March 2019. More than 99% of the content Facebook takes action against – both for child sexual exploitation and terrorism – is identified by your safety systems, rather than by reports from users.

While these statistics are remarkable, mere numbers cannot capture the significance of the harm to children. To take one example, Facebook sent a priority report to NCMEC, having identified a child who had sent self-produced child sexual abuse material to an adult male. Facebook located multiple chats between the two that indicated historical and ongoing sexual abuse. When investigators were able to locate and interview the child, she reported that the adult had sexually abused her hundreds of times over the course of four years, starting when she was 11. He also regularly demanded that she send him sexually explicit imagery of herself. The offender, who had held a position of trust with the child, was sentenced to 18 years in prison. Without the information from Facebook, abuse of this girl might be continuing to this day.

Our understanding is that much of this activity, which is critical to protecting children and fighting terrorism, will no longer be possible if Facebook implements its proposals as planned. NCMEC estimates that 70% of Facebook’s reporting – 12 million reports globally – would be lost. This would significantly increase the risk of child sexual exploitation or other serious harms. You have said yourself that “we face an inherent tradeoff because we will never find all of the potential harm we do today when our security systems can see the messages themselves”. While this tradeoff has not been quantified, we are very concerned that the right balance is not being struck, which would make your platform an unsafe space, including for children.

Equally important to Facebook’s own work to act against illegal activity, law enforcement rely on obtaining the content of communications, under appropriate legal authorisation, to save lives, enable criminals to be brought to justice, and exonerate the innocent.

We therefore call on Facebook and other companies to take the following steps:

• Embed the safety of the public in system designs, thereby enabling you to continue to act against illegal content effectively with no reduction to safety, and facilitating the prosecution of offenders and safeguarding of victims;

• Enable law enforcement to obtain lawful access to content in a readable and usable format;

• Engage in consultation with governments to facilitate this in a way that is substantive and genuinely influences your design decisions; and

• Not implement the proposed changes until you can ensure that the systems you would apply to maintain the safety of your users are fully tested and operational.

We are committed to working with you to focus on reasonable proposals that will allow Facebook and our governments to protect your users and the public, while protecting their privacy. Our technical experts are confident that we can do so while defending cyber security and supporting technological innovation. We will take an open and balanced approach in line with the joint statement of principles signed by the governments of the US, UK, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada in August 2018 and the subsequent communique agreed in July this year.

As you have recognised, it is critical to get this right for the future of the internet. Children’s safety and law enforcement’s ability to bring criminals to justice must not be the ultimate cost of Facebook taking forward these proposals.

Yours sincerely,

Rt Hon Priti Patel MP

United Kingdom Secretary of State for the Home Department

William P. Barr

United States Attorney General

Kevin K. McAleenan

United States Secretary of Homeland Security (Acting)

Hon Peter Dutton MP

Australian Minister for Home Affairs


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, completely, access, safety, facebook, letter, secret, content, asking, sexual, barrs, enforcement, users, reports, law, child, messages


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Before Warren Buffett made his fortune, he took a job without asking what the salary was—here’s why

Berkshire Hathaway chairman and CEO Warren Buffett believes in working with people you respect. “It won’t necessarily be the job that you’ll have 10 years later, but you’ll have the opportunity to pick up so much as you go along.” It’s advice that served him well: When he was starting his career, well before he made his billions, Buffett took a job with his mentor and hero, Benjamin Graham, without even asking about the salary. “I found that out at the end of the month when I got my paycheck,” h


Berkshire Hathaway chairman and CEO Warren Buffett believes in working with people you respect. “It won’t necessarily be the job that you’ll have 10 years later, but you’ll have the opportunity to pick up so much as you go along.” It’s advice that served him well: When he was starting his career, well before he made his billions, Buffett took a job with his mentor and hero, Benjamin Graham, without even asking about the salary. “I found that out at the end of the month when I got my paycheck,” h
Before Warren Buffett made his fortune, he took a job without asking what the salary was—here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-04  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, asking, wont, work, book, washeres, warren, zoe, took, buffett, told, career, youll, working, job, salary, fortune


Before Warren Buffett made his fortune, he took a job without asking what the salary was—here's why

Berkshire Hathaway chairman and CEO Warren Buffett believes in working with people you respect.

“Try to work for whomever you admire most,” the investing legend told author Gillian Zoe Segal in an interview for her 2015 book, “Getting There: A Book of Mentors.” “It won’t necessarily be the job that you’ll have 10 years later, but you’ll have the opportunity to pick up so much as you go along.”

It’s advice that served him well: When he was starting his career, well before he made his billions, Buffett took a job with his mentor and hero, Benjamin Graham, without even asking about the salary. “I found that out at the end of the month when I got my paycheck,” he told Segal.

The decision paid off, career-wise. Buffett, who was one of Graham’s students at Columbia Business School, says that his former professor largely shaped his career and investment philosophy.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-04  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, asking, wont, work, book, washeres, warren, zoe, took, buffett, told, career, youll, working, job, salary, fortune


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Tesla owners in China are asking for refunds after the company scored a 10% tax break

Tesla customers in China are scrambling to figure out if they can get a refund after the electric car company scored a tax break from the government there last week. China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) said that dozens of battery-electric and plug-in hybrid vehicle makers qualified for the tax break. Customers aren’t sure if they are eligible for the refunds retroactively, or whether the tax break applies only to new buyers. But Zhu Xiaotong, Tesla’s China head, told t


Tesla customers in China are scrambling to figure out if they can get a refund after the electric car company scored a tax break from the government there last week. China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) said that dozens of battery-electric and plug-in hybrid vehicle makers qualified for the tax break. Customers aren’t sure if they are eligible for the refunds retroactively, or whether the tax break applies only to new buyers. But Zhu Xiaotong, Tesla’s China head, told t
Tesla owners in China are asking for refunds after the company scored a 10% tax break Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-03  Authors: lora kolodny
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, break, asking, company, miit, owners, times, customers, teslas, scored, qualified, refunds, tax, exemption, tesla


Tesla owners in China are asking for refunds after the company scored a 10% tax break

Tesla customers in China are scrambling to figure out if they can get a refund after the electric car company scored a tax break from the government there last week.

Authorities in China exempted Tesla’s cars from a 10% purchase tax, making the electric car maker the first foreign manufacturer to attain the benefit without a local joint venture partner. With Tesla stressing the increased importance of expansion in China, the exemption announcement buoyed Tesla’s shares.

China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) said that dozens of battery-electric and plug-in hybrid vehicle makers qualified for the tax break. That list includes Toyota and Daimler, which have local partners, along with domestic companies like Geely, Guangzhou Auto, NIO and SAIC Motor.

While the news was a boon for Tesla, it also caused some confusion. Customers aren’t sure if they are eligible for the refunds retroactively, or whether the tax break applies only to new buyers.

Some customers in China complained that Tesla should have warned them that a tax exemption may be possible, so they could have delayed purchases and qualified for the deal. But Zhu Xiaotong, Tesla’s China head, told the state-sponsored Global Times that Tesla China couldn’t make information about its application for the exemption public.

The Global Times said that frustrated Tesla owners have taken to WeChat to discuss the issue, and customers have sent letters to Tesla offices seeking refunds.

“The MIIT announcement was written with lots of ambiguity as to who benefits from the inclusion of Tesla” on the exempt list, wrote Junheng Li, the CEO of JL Warren Capital, in an email to CNBC. “Consumers want clarity from the government, not from Tesla China.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-03  Authors: lora kolodny
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, break, asking, company, miit, owners, times, customers, teslas, scored, qualified, refunds, tax, exemption, tesla


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