China media says Hong Kong protesters are ‘asking for self-destruction’ as military assembles nearby

Anti-government protesters attend a demonstration at Hong Kong Airport, China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | ReutersChinese propaganda outlets warned on Tuesday that protesters in Hong Kong are “asking for self-destruction,” as they released a video showing military vehicles amassing near the border of the city. Hong Kong’s airport reopened Tuesday early morning after airport authorities canceled all flights on Monday, blaming demonstrators’ disruption to regular operations. Despite that reopen


Anti-government protesters attend a demonstration at Hong Kong Airport, China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | ReutersChinese propaganda outlets warned on Tuesday that protesters in Hong Kong are “asking for self-destruction,” as they released a video showing military vehicles amassing near the border of the city. Hong Kong’s airport reopened Tuesday early morning after airport authorities canceled all flights on Monday, blaming demonstrators’ disruption to regular operations. Despite that reopen
China media says Hong Kong protesters are ‘asking for self-destruction’ as military assembles nearby Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, media, assembles, protesters, peoples, asking, hong, china, airport, beijing, selfdestruction, military, kong, nearby, city


China media says Hong Kong protesters are 'asking for self-destruction' as military assembles nearby

Anti-government protesters attend a demonstration at Hong Kong Airport, China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | Reuters

Chinese propaganda outlets warned on Tuesday that protesters in Hong Kong are “asking for self-destruction,” as they released a video showing military vehicles amassing near the border of the city. Meanwhile, the city’s embattled leader, Carrie Lam, told the news media on Tuesday that “lawbreaking activities in the name of freedom” were damaging the rule of law and that the Asian financial hub’s recovery from anti-government protests could take a long time. Her comments came after Beijing said widespread anti-government protests in the semi-autonomous city showed “sprouts of terrorism,” and such violence must be severely punished, “without leniency, without mercy.” Hong Kong’s airport reopened Tuesday early morning after airport authorities canceled all flights on Monday, blaming demonstrators’ disruption to regular operations. Another sit-in is expected to take place at the airport, a major global hub, on Tuesday. Despite that reopening, Hong Kong flag carrier Cathay Pacific said it had cancelled over 200 flights to and out of the airport for the day, according to its website. The protest at the airport, while disruptive, was largely peaceful. That’s in contrast to Sunday night, where protesters appeared to have thrown Molotov cocktails at police stations around the city and dozens of protesters were arrested.

Beijing’s clear message

On Monday, Chinese officials focused on what they described as “deranged acts” by the protesters, including throwing gasoline bombs, saying they marked the emergence of terrorism in the Chinese city. “Radical Hong Kong protesters have repeatedly used extremely dangerous tools to attack police officers,” Yang Guang, a spokesman for the Chinese government’s Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, said in a news briefing on Monday, according to Chinese state broadcaster CCTV. China’s media is sending a clear signal to the protesters. On Monday afternoon, Chinese state-owned English tabloid the Global Times tweeted a video showing the People’s Armed Police assembling in Shenzhen, a city bordering Hong Kong, about a 1.5 hour- drive away. The People’s Daily, the official newspaper of China’s Communist Party, posted on Chinese social media a statement saying the People’s Armed Police are in Shenzhen prepared to handle “riots, disturbance, major violence and crime and terrorism-related social security issues.” In a Tuesday social media post from the Global Times‘ Chinese edition, the outlet said “if Hong Kong rioters cannot read the signal of having armed police gathering in Shenzhen, then they are asking for self-destruction,” according to a CNBC translation. China is “implying they might send in the People’s Liberation Army or issue direct intervention but they don’t want to,” according to Ben Bland, a director at Sydney-based policy think tank Lowy Institute. “(Beijing) hopes that the signals will scare protesters to back down,” but if and when Beijing decides to deploy troops they will not “advertise it,” he told CNBC. This is all part of a “delicate dance between China and Hong Kong” that’s reached a critical point because there is almost no common ground or overlapping interests between the protesters and Beijing, Bland added. Although China’s leaders do not want to deploy the PLA, they are “willing to do it if they have to,” the Asia politics expert said. Hong Kong’s former governor, Chris Patten, said on Tuesday that if China intervened in the city, it would be a “catastrophe” and that Chinese President Xi Jinping should see the wisdom of trying to bring people together. Patten called on British Prime Minister Boris Johnson to garner support from its allies to ensure Beijing does not intervene.

Protests continue


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, media, assembles, protesters, peoples, asking, hong, china, airport, beijing, selfdestruction, military, kong, nearby, city


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iPhone prices would rise up to 20% if Apple assembles in US like Trump wants: Bank of America

Mohan said under the “most likely” scenario in which Apple moves 10 percent of its iPhone assembly to the U.S., the average selling price of the iPhone would rise by 8 percent. He also said if Apple shifts 50 percent or 100 percent of iPhone assembly domestically, it would increase iPhone prices by 14 percent and 20 percent, respectively. The analyst downplayed the prospect of Apple bringing more comprehensive iPhone production [nonassembly] factories into the U.S. due to higher labor costs. Moh


Mohan said under the “most likely” scenario in which Apple moves 10 percent of its iPhone assembly to the U.S., the average selling price of the iPhone would rise by 8 percent. He also said if Apple shifts 50 percent or 100 percent of iPhone assembly domestically, it would increase iPhone prices by 14 percent and 20 percent, respectively. The analyst downplayed the prospect of Apple bringing more comprehensive iPhone production [nonassembly] factories into the U.S. due to higher labor costs. Moh
iPhone prices would rise up to 20% if Apple assembles in US like Trump wants: Bank of America Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-10  Authors: tae kim, zhang peng, lightrocket, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, respond, america, assembly, trumps, manufacturing, rise, bank, tariffs, apple, iphone, request, trump, wants, 20, prices, trade, assembles, price


iPhone prices would rise up to 20% if Apple assembles in US like Trump wants: Bank of America

The comment came a day after the company’s letter to U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer was revealed, which said Trump’s proposed tariffs on $200 billion worth of imported Chinese goods would affect the Apple Watch, AirPods, Mac mini and Apple Pencil.

Bank of America Merrill Lynch said Apple may respond to Trump’s pressure by asking its partners to bring some final iPhone assembly operations into the U.S.

“‘Back to US’ manufacturing seems to be back on the agenda for President Trump … We believe Apple could ask Hon Hai and Pegatron to shift a small portion of their iPhone manufacturing to the US in response to President Trump’s request,” analyst Wamsi Mohan said in a note to clients Monday entitled “Handicapping the China trade risk and potential for ramping US manufacturing.” “The conclusion was for the iPhone (not currently impacted by Tariffs) moving production (100% of final assembly) to the U.S. would need 20% price increases to offset the incremental labor costs.”

Mohan said under the “most likely” scenario in which Apple moves 10 percent of its iPhone assembly to the U.S., the average selling price of the iPhone would rise by 8 percent. He also said if Apple shifts 50 percent or 100 percent of iPhone assembly domestically, it would increase iPhone prices by 14 percent and 20 percent, respectively.

The analyst downplayed the prospect of Apple bringing more comprehensive iPhone production [nonassembly] factories into the U.S. due to higher labor costs. He noted wages for a U.S. worker are 2.6 times more than a Chinese worker.

Mohan reiterated his buy rating and $250 price target for Apple shares, representing 13 percent upside to Friday’s close.

Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-10  Authors: tae kim, zhang peng, lightrocket, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, respond, america, assembly, trumps, manufacturing, rise, bank, tariffs, apple, iphone, request, trump, wants, 20, prices, trade, assembles, price


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A robot cooks and assembles burgers in 5 minutes at this new San Francisco restaurant

The entire process takes 5 minutes and costs only $6. Humans are still required to take orders, refill the machine and deliver your burger. Creator’s storefront is located in San Francisco’s SOMA neighborhood. It opens to the public in September 2018.


The entire process takes 5 minutes and costs only $6. Humans are still required to take orders, refill the machine and deliver your burger. Creator’s storefront is located in San Francisco’s SOMA neighborhood. It opens to the public in September 2018.
A robot cooks and assembles burgers in 5 minutes at this new San Francisco restaurant Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-29  Authors: erin black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, takes, minutes, soma, storefront, opens, process, robot, cooks, san, required, refill, restaurant, burgers, public, assembles, orders, francisco


A robot cooks and assembles burgers in 5 minutes at this new San Francisco restaurant

The entire process takes 5 minutes and costs only $6. Humans are still required to take orders, refill the machine and deliver your burger.

Creator’s storefront is located in San Francisco’s SOMA neighborhood. It opens to the public in September 2018.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-29  Authors: erin black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, takes, minutes, soma, storefront, opens, process, robot, cooks, san, required, refill, restaurant, burgers, public, assembles, orders, francisco


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GOP group assembles debt ceiling wish list — for 2018

“Strangely, there was no word at all about the looming debt ceiling deadline,” this attendee said, noting the group’s conversations categorized the ideas as “for next year.” Bipartisan support would be needed to raise the debt ceiling, and Democrats had sought to secure passage of legislation to protect “Dreamers” in exchange. “I can confidently predict there will not be a connection with the debt ceiling and spending decisions in December,” McConnell said in September. “It doesn’t mean we won’t


“Strangely, there was no word at all about the looming debt ceiling deadline,” this attendee said, noting the group’s conversations categorized the ideas as “for next year.” Bipartisan support would be needed to raise the debt ceiling, and Democrats had sought to secure passage of legislation to protect “Dreamers” in exchange. “I can confidently predict there will not be a connection with the debt ceiling and spending decisions in December,” McConnell said in September. “It doesn’t mean we won’t
GOP group assembles debt ceiling wish list — for 2018 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-11-29  Authors: kayla tausche, carlos barria, joshua roberts
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, members, president, group, gop, list, ceiling, 2018, wish, house, meeting, told, assembles, spending, debt


GOP group assembles debt ceiling wish list — for 2018

Congress is barreling toward a Dec. 8 deadline to avoid a government shutdown, but there’s one tug-of-war they don’t expect to start until the new year: Raising the debt ceiling.

A House Republican working group gathered Tuesday evening to discuss a list of debt ceiling priorities to consider when the urgency of keeping government open is a non-issue, according to multiple meeting attendees and a copy of the list obtained by CNBC.

The proposals mostly concern traditional Republican efforts to enforce the budget and instill spending discipline: By requiring a signature from the president; subjecting all spending, even mandatory spending, to the appropriations process; instituting “difficult to bypass” spending guardrails; making the process for short-term deals more onerous; or reforming Social Security and Medicare.

One particular proposal — tying spending caps and the debt ceiling to economic growth — led to a heated discussion in which attendees questioned whether such pegs would be arbitrary or even feasible.

“Most people admitted that going from ‘big idea’ to ‘legislative text’ would be immensely challenging,” said one attendee who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the group’s deliberations are private. “Strangely, there was no word at all about the looming debt ceiling deadline,” this attendee said, noting the group’s conversations categorized the ideas as “for next year.”

A senior White House official told CNBC that deliberations will likely come to a head in January after one or two continuing resolutions, since Congress remains in the thick of tax reform. Treasury will know by Dec. 15 how much longer it can creatively finance debt payments based on the tax receipts it tabulates, this official said. Congressional aides said members have been told the debt limit could be reached in February or March.

Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., whom House Speaker Paul Ryan tapped to lead the debt ceiling group, said in an interview that the group would prefer to make lasting changes than small tweaks in this cycle.

“I would not tie current events to a working group that is looking for long-term solutions,” Collins told CNBC. “The benefit, up or down, of this group is not what happens in the next three weeks.”

Even so, members of the group that spoke to CNBC anonymously had hoped to provide a list of concrete proposals to Ryan by Dec. 1, or a week before the Dec. 8 funding deadline and described the Tuesday meeting as a “Come to Jesus” moment and “crunch time.”

Collins said he speaks regularly with Ryan about the group’s discussions, including Wednesday following the meeting. An email circulated Wednesday evening to the group said a meeting with members and Ryan is in the works to chart “a path forward.”

Ryan assembled the working group in early October after President Donald Trump sided with Democratic leaders to suspend the debt limit for three months. More than half of the group’s members voted against the September deal. The group represents widely varying ideologies within the party — from fiscal hawks demanding caps on spending to moderates who wouldn’t mind a “clean” debt limit increase if it spares the full faith and credit of the United States.

Bipartisan support would be needed to raise the debt ceiling, and Democrats had sought to secure passage of legislation to protect “Dreamers” in exchange. In September, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the Treasury’s ability to prioritize certain payments, an exercise termed “extraordinary measures,” meant Republicans could decouple the two issues by dealing with government spending first and the debt ceiling later.

“I can confidently predict there will not be a connection with the debt ceiling and spending decisions in December,” McConnell said in September. “It doesn’t mean we won’t have to address the debt ceiling at some point, but it will not be in December.”

Immediately following Trump’s debt deal with “Chuck and Nancy,” discussions followed on how to “de-politicize” the debt ceiling so it doesn’t require horse trading so often. The White House then pivoted to tax reform, and it’s unclear how President Trump’s views have evolved since then.

This week, the president tweeted “I don’t see a deal!” with Democrats on government funding, leading Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi, the top-ranking Democrat in the House, to skip a White House meeting on that topic.

A senior administration official told CNBC that the president would in theory support a move to re-link the debt ceiling with the annual budgeting process — a move that would automatically raise the debt ceiling when Congress approved a budget resolution and scrap the need for a separate vote.

Collins said, based on what he knows about his members’ positions, the White House would be met with resistance.

“Fiscal conservatives like myself would say, ‘We’re just hiding an issue here,'” Collins told CNBC. “We need to make some long-term restraints.”

—By CNBC’s Kayla Tausche. Follow her on Twitter: @KaylaTausche


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-11-29  Authors: kayla tausche, carlos barria, joshua roberts
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, members, president, group, gop, list, ceiling, 2018, wish, house, meeting, told, assembles, spending, debt


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