Trump’s attacks on Fed could backfire with higher rates, former vice chairman says

Stanley Fischer to Powell: Don’t listen to the politicians or let them move you 6 Hours Ago | 01:39President Donald Trump’s lambasting of Federal Reserve officials for raising interest rates could backfire if the views of the central bank’s former vice chairman are correct. “They could probably raise rates faster, which is not what he is exactly looking for.” Fed officials have said they are seeking to normalize rates to head off inflationary pressures and to ensure financial stability. Earlier


Stanley Fischer to Powell: Don’t listen to the politicians or let them move you 6 Hours Ago | 01:39President Donald Trump’s lambasting of Federal Reserve officials for raising interest rates could backfire if the views of the central bank’s former vice chairman are correct. “They could probably raise rates faster, which is not what he is exactly looking for.” Fed officials have said they are seeking to normalize rates to head off inflationary pressures and to ensure financial stability. Earlier
Trump’s attacks on Fed could backfire with higher rates, former vice chairman says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-18  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chairman, higher, bank, interest, fischer, told, raise, totally, rates, officials, trumps, backfire, try, attacks, fed, vice


Trump's attacks on Fed could backfire with higher rates, former vice chairman says

Stanley Fischer to Powell: Don’t listen to the politicians or let them move you 6 Hours Ago | 01:39

President Donald Trump’s lambasting of Federal Reserve officials for raising interest rates could backfire if the views of the central bank’s former vice chairman are correct.

Stanley Fischer, who also was a governor of the Bank of Israel, said Thursday that the Fed might be tempted to raise rates even more aggressively to show that it can’t be influenced by the White House.

“I don’t think it helps at all, even if he thinks that. The Fed is going to try to demonstrate it’s totally independent politically and it’s not going to react to that,” Fischer told CNBC’s Sara Eisen during a “Squawk on the Street” interview.

“Then the question is, ‘What do they do to show they’re not reacting?’ They could go either way,” he added. “They could probably raise rates faster, which is not what he is exactly looking for.”

Ultimately, the Fed likely will proceed with what it thinks is the best course of action regardless and not try to make any philosophical statements, said Fischer, who served on the bank from 2014-17.

“I believe this is a highly professional board. The Fed’s board was chosen very well by the administration, and it’s a good group of people and they will do what they know they have to do,” he said. “They have to make a professional judgment and that should be what the interest rate should be and it should be totally independent of political pressure.”

The policymaking Federal Open Market Committee has been raising rates in a gradual but steady manner since late 2015, with the most recent increase coming in September. Fed officials have said they are seeking to normalize rates to head off inflationary pressures and to ensure financial stability.

Trump has lashed out at the central bank on multiple occasions, most recently saying that rising rates are the “biggest threat” to the economic boom during his administration.

Earlier in the day, former Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan told CNBC that current Fed officials should “put earmuffs on” and ignore the political pressure. He added that he heard from presidents “all the time” about what monetary policy should be.

Fischer agreed with Greenspan’s advice and said the Fed should not back down from the current policy path.

“The big problem is there are lags in this process. You raise interest rates now because of inflation you fear down the road. So it’s very easy to say always, ‘Yeah, they’re premature,'” he said. “Well, they better be premature.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-18  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chairman, higher, bank, interest, fischer, told, raise, totally, rates, officials, trumps, backfire, try, attacks, fed, vice


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Trump doubles down on Fed attacks, saying it’s ‘going loco’

Saying he’s “not happy” with the Fed, Trump told Fox News he could’t understand why it was continuing to tighten U.S. monetary policy. The Fed is going loco and there’s no reason for them to do it. Even as he expressed concerns about the Fed’s interest rate policy, Trump told reporters at the White House Tuesday that he had not spoken to Fed Chairman Jerome Powell about them. I think the Fed has gone crazy,” the president told reporters. The Fed has raised interest rates three times this year an


Saying he’s “not happy” with the Fed, Trump told Fox News he could’t understand why it was continuing to tighten U.S. monetary policy. The Fed is going loco and there’s no reason for them to do it. Even as he expressed concerns about the Fed’s interest rate policy, Trump told reporters at the White House Tuesday that he had not spoken to Fed Chairman Jerome Powell about them. I think the Fed has gone crazy,” the president told reporters. The Fed has raised interest rates three times this year an
Trump doubles down on Fed attacks, saying it’s ‘going loco’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: christina wilkie, everett rosenfeld, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, saying, white, going, trump, president, fed, problem, central, told, rates, loco, policy, doubles, attacks, interest


Trump doubles down on Fed attacks, saying it's 'going loco'

U.S. President Donald Trump continued his tirade against the Federal Reserve in a late Wednesday television appearance, laying into the central bank’s policy decisions and suggesting it is to blame for Wednesday’s sharp market decline.

Saying he’s “not happy” with the Fed, Trump told Fox News he could’t understand why it was continuing to tighten U.S. monetary policy. The president has previously expressed displeasure with the central bank, and that’s led some to fear the institution’s independence is at risk.

“The problem I have is with the Fed. The Fed is going wild. I mean, I don’t know what their problem is that they are raising interest rates and it’s ridiculous,” Trump said during a telephone interview with Fox host Shannon Bream. “The problem [causing the market drop] in my opinion is Treasury and the Fed. The Fed is going loco and there’s no reason for them to do it. I’m not happy about it.”

“Loco” means “crazy” in Spanish.

In recent months, U.S. officials have sought to emphasize that Trump would honor the Fed’s historic ability to make decisions independent of political interference. “We as an administration absolutely support the independence of the Fed,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin reportedly said in July.

As recently as Tuesday, Trump had signaled that he understood the importance of maintaining a firewall between the White House and the Fed. Even as he expressed concerns about the Fed’s interest rate policy, Trump told reporters at the White House Tuesday that he had not spoken to Fed Chairman Jerome Powell about them.

“I like to stay uninvolved with them. I have not spoken” to Powell all year, Trump said.

Trump’s attitude towards the Fed seemed to change Wednesday, however, as fears about rapidly rising rates helped cause the Dow Jones Industrial Average to drop more than 800 points by day’s end. The S&P 500 posted its worst day since February and clinched its first five-day losing streak since 2016.

Early on Wednesday afternoon, Trump knocked his central bank as he deplaned from Air Force One in Erie, Pennsylvania for a campaign rally. “I think the Fed is making a mistake. They are so tight. I think the Fed has gone crazy,” the president told reporters.

The Fed has raised interest rates three times this year and is largely expected to hike once more before year-end.

The most recent September rate hike drew criticism from Trump at the time, who said he was “worried about the fact that they seem to like raising interest rates, we can do other things with the money,” he said.

—CNBC’s Thomas Franck contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: christina wilkie, everett rosenfeld, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, saying, white, going, trump, president, fed, problem, central, told, rates, loco, policy, doubles, attacks, interest


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Top officials praise the Fed and its independence, after new attacks from President Trump

Prominent officials have praised the U.S. Federal Reserve, its chairman and its independence, amid new attacks from President Donald Trump. “That’s an incredible advantage for the system at a time that the system is changing, to have someone in his position who has that level of technocratic expertise,” Carney told CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore. Powell has been criticized several times for his work at the U.S central bank by the president. On Wednesday, Trump told reporters that “the Fed is going loco (c


Prominent officials have praised the U.S. Federal Reserve, its chairman and its independence, amid new attacks from President Donald Trump. “That’s an incredible advantage for the system at a time that the system is changing, to have someone in his position who has that level of technocratic expertise,” Carney told CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore. Powell has been criticized several times for his work at the U.S central bank by the president. On Wednesday, Trump told reporters that “the Fed is going loco (c
Top officials praise the Fed and its independence, after new attacks from President Trump Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: silvia amaro, alex wong, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bank, work, chairman, president, independence, system, praise, attacks, rates, officials, fed, trump, told, carney


Top officials praise the Fed and its independence, after new attacks from President Trump

Prominent officials have praised the U.S. Federal Reserve, its chairman and its independence, amid new attacks from President Donald Trump.

During a CNBC-moderated panel at the IMF-World Bank meetings in Bali Thursday, Bank of England Governor Mark Carney said that Fed Chairman Jay Powell “is an individual that really understands the plumbing of the U.S. and global financial systems.”

“That’s an incredible advantage for the system at a time that the system is changing, to have someone in his position who has that level of technocratic expertise,” Carney told CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore.

Powell has been criticized several times for his work at the U.S central bank by the president. On Wednesday, Trump told reporters that “the Fed is going loco (crazy)” by increasing interest rates. Trump also said that he is “not happy” with the decisions to hike rates.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: silvia amaro, alex wong, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bank, work, chairman, president, independence, system, praise, attacks, rates, officials, fed, trump, told, carney


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Apple says it found no signs of hacking attacks

Apple says it found no signs of hacking attacks6:09 AM ET Mon, 8 Oct 2018CNBC’s ‘Squawk Box’ team discusses Apple’s top security officer announcing in a letter to government officials that the company had no signs of an attack.


Apple says it found no signs of hacking attacks6:09 AM ET Mon, 8 Oct 2018CNBC’s ‘Squawk Box’ team discusses Apple’s top security officer announcing in a letter to government officials that the company had no signs of an attack.
Apple says it found no signs of hacking attacks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-08
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, officer, hacking, apple, letter, signs, security, oct, attacks, team, officials, squawk, et


Apple says it found no signs of hacking attacks

Apple says it found no signs of hacking attacks

6:09 AM ET Mon, 8 Oct 2018

CNBC’s ‘Squawk Box’ team discusses Apple’s top security officer announcing in a letter to government officials that the company had no signs of an attack.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-08
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Britain says Russian military intelligence behind host of global cyber attacks

Britain accused Russian military intelligence on Thursday of directing a host of cyber attacks aimed at undermining Western democracies by sowing confusion in everything from sport to transport and the 2016 U.S. presidential election. In a British assessment based on work by its National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), Russian military intelligence (GRU) was cast as a pernicious cyber aggressor which used a network of hackers to spread discord across the world. “Our message is clear – together wit


Britain accused Russian military intelligence on Thursday of directing a host of cyber attacks aimed at undermining Western democracies by sowing confusion in everything from sport to transport and the 2016 U.S. presidential election. In a British assessment based on work by its National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), Russian military intelligence (GRU) was cast as a pernicious cyber aggressor which used a network of hackers to spread discord across the world. “Our message is clear – together wit
Britain says Russian military intelligence behind host of global cyber attacks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-04
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cyber, grus, british, britain, russian, intelligence, military, attacks, national, host, global, undermine


Britain says Russian military intelligence behind host of global cyber attacks

Britain accused Russian military intelligence on Thursday of directing a host of cyber attacks aimed at undermining Western democracies by sowing confusion in everything from sport to transport and the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

In a British assessment based on work by its National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), Russian military intelligence (GRU) was cast as a pernicious cyber aggressor which used a network of hackers to spread discord across the world.

GRU, Britain said, was almost certainly behind the BadRabbit and World Anti-Doping Agency attacks of 2017, the hack of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) in 2016 and the theft of emails from a UK-based TV station in 2015.

“The GRU’s actions are reckless and indiscriminate: they try to undermine and interfere in elections in other countries,” said British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt.

“Our message is clear – together with our allies, we will expose and respond to the GRU’s attempts to undermine international stability,” Hunt said. Britain believes the Russian government is responsible for the attacks.

Though less well known than the Soviet Union’s once mighty KGB, Russia’s military intelligence service played a major role in some of the biggest events of the past century, from the Cuban missile crisis to the annexation of Crimea.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-04
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cyber, grus, british, britain, russian, intelligence, military, attacks, national, host, global, undermine


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Supply chain attacks most coveted and hardest for nation states to affect, says cybersecurity expert

Supply chain attacks most coveted and hardest for nation states to affect, says cybersecurity expert1:57 PM ET Thu, 4 Oct 2018Dave Weinstein, former New Jersey chief technology officer, and Suzanne Spaulding, Homeland Security former undersecretary for the national protection and programs directorate, join ‘Power Lunch’ to discuss the cyber threat from China after Bloomberg Businessweek reported it had hacked Amazon and Apple motherboard servers by installing chips early on in the supply chain.


Supply chain attacks most coveted and hardest for nation states to affect, says cybersecurity expert1:57 PM ET Thu, 4 Oct 2018Dave Weinstein, former New Jersey chief technology officer, and Suzanne Spaulding, Homeland Security former undersecretary for the national protection and programs directorate, join ‘Power Lunch’ to discuss the cyber threat from China after Bloomberg Businessweek reported it had hacked Amazon and Apple motherboard servers by installing chips early on in the supply chain.
Supply chain attacks most coveted and hardest for nation states to affect, says cybersecurity expert Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-04
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weinstein, suzanne, threat, technology, states, nation, affect, spaulding, attacks, expert, cybersecurity, undersecretary, hardest, coveted, supply, chain, servers


Supply chain attacks most coveted and hardest for nation states to affect, says cybersecurity expert

Supply chain attacks most coveted and hardest for nation states to affect, says cybersecurity expert

1:57 PM ET Thu, 4 Oct 2018

Dave Weinstein, former New Jersey chief technology officer, and Suzanne Spaulding, Homeland Security former undersecretary for the national protection and programs directorate, join ‘Power Lunch’ to discuss the cyber threat from China after Bloomberg Businessweek reported it had hacked Amazon and Apple motherboard servers by installing chips early on in the supply chain.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-04
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weinstein, suzanne, threat, technology, states, nation, affect, spaulding, attacks, expert, cybersecurity, undersecretary, hardest, coveted, supply, chain, servers


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FireEye CEO: ‘Every cyberattack is related to geopolitical conditions’

In his more than 20 years responding to cyberbreaches, Kevin Mandia, the CEO of enterprise-facing cybersecurity company FireEye, has learned one key, overarching thing about cyberattacks. “It took me too long, but here’s the dead reality: every cyberattack’s related to geopolitical conditions,” he told CNBC on Tuesday in an interview with “Mad Money” host Jim Cramer. “If you’re in the United States and you hack a company, you’re going to get caught, so you have to live in a safe harbor,” Mandia


In his more than 20 years responding to cyberbreaches, Kevin Mandia, the CEO of enterprise-facing cybersecurity company FireEye, has learned one key, overarching thing about cyberattacks. “It took me too long, but here’s the dead reality: every cyberattack’s related to geopolitical conditions,” he told CNBC on Tuesday in an interview with “Mad Money” host Jim Cramer. “If you’re in the United States and you hack a company, you’re going to get caught, so you have to live in a safe harbor,” Mandia
FireEye CEO: ‘Every cyberattack is related to geopolitical conditions’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-25  Authors: elizabeth gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, state, cyberattack, fact, fireeye, ceo, company, related, conditions, attacks, geopolitical, mandia, youre, cyberattacks, united, going


FireEye CEO: 'Every cyberattack is related to geopolitical conditions'

In his more than 20 years responding to cyberbreaches, Kevin Mandia, the CEO of enterprise-facing cybersecurity company FireEye, has learned one key, overarching thing about cyberattacks.

“It took me too long, but here’s the dead reality: every cyberattack’s related to geopolitical conditions,” he told CNBC on Tuesday in an interview with “Mad Money” host Jim Cramer.

“If you’re in the United States and you hack a company, you’re going to get caught, so you have to live in a safe harbor,” Mandia said. “You almost have to be condoned, you have to be supported, and many of the attacks we respond to, there are, in fact, people in uniform conducting the attacks against our companies.”

Mandia, whose company was hired by both Facebook and Google to help identify disinformation campaigns, said that while hackers still frequently target individuals, most hacks surveyed by FireEye in the last year had ties to foreign government entities.

“We responded to over 600 breaches last year,” Mandia said. “I would say over 80 percent of them were state-sponsored or state-condoned, meaning the heads of the state or the heads of certain agencies of that state knew the attacks were ongoing, but there’s no risk or repercussions to the attackers.”

Mandia’s statements come at a time when cyberattacks on both Wall Street and Main Street, with tech giants warning consumers about the billions of cyberattacks that happen every day and others fretting about how cyber-warfare could affect the 2018 midterm elections.

One of Mandia’s top concerns was the lack of “segregation” between government, enterprise and individuals’ networks, he said, cautioning that as the lines are blurred, hackers will likely go after more vulnerable targets and cause malware to “ripple” out through various systems.

“We’re all blending together into this big mesh network and it could be the strategy of the adversaries to go after the softer targets,” he warned. “If you hack every elementary school in a certain state, that means maybe employees aren’t going to work that day, and then it ripples out from there.”

And state-sponsored hacks from nations like Iran, with which U.S. representatives clashed at the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday, are nowhere near quieting down, the FireEye chief said.

“We first responded to Iran in 2007, 2008, and they just looked like they had just gotten out of the classroom. They weren’t very good in offensive cyber, but they’ve had 10 years now,” he told Cramer.

“You know for a fact they had an agenda to get good at asymmetric warfare. Cyberattacks are, in fact, asymmetric,” Mandia continued. “They’re not going to meet us on a battlefield with a bunch of tanks, … they’re going to meet us in cyberspace. And from the attacks we’re observing, I kind of dub 2017 the year of Iran.”

Shares of FireEye climbed on Tuesday, settling up 4.18 percent at $17.21.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-25  Authors: elizabeth gurdus
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Larry Kudlow’s entitlement reform talk sparks Democratic attacks

Shielding Social Security and Medicare has always been a winning message for political candidates. Jeff Merkley, a Democratic senator from Oregon and potential 2020 presidential candidate, tweeted that “Social Security and Medicare are on the line” in November’s midterms. On Monday, Kudlow downplayed the effect of tax cuts on budget deficits and instead pointed to a longer-term spending problem. “People are quick to blame deficits on tax cuts,” he said. The funds that support Social Security are


Shielding Social Security and Medicare has always been a winning message for political candidates. Jeff Merkley, a Democratic senator from Oregon and potential 2020 presidential candidate, tweeted that “Social Security and Medicare are on the line” in November’s midterms. On Monday, Kudlow downplayed the effect of tax cuts on budget deficits and instead pointed to a longer-term spending problem. “People are quick to blame deficits on tax cuts,” he said. The funds that support Social Security are
Larry Kudlow’s entitlement reform talk sparks Democratic attacks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-18  Authors: jacob pramuk, adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kudlows, order, attacks, tax, talk, social, security, cuts, sparks, entitlement, reform, programs, democratic, larry, candidates, gop, medicare


Larry Kudlow's entitlement reform talk sparks Democratic attacks

Kudlow says the US has to be tougher on spending 1:33 PM ET Mon, 17 Sept 2018 | 08:08

Democrats, who aim to flip 23 GOP-held seats and take a House majority in November, jumped on the comments from the National Economic Council director and former CNBC contributor. As the party tries to win GOP-leaning seats, its candidates have largely focused on calls to protect health-care coverage and social safety-net programs.

Shielding Social Security and Medicare has always been a winning message for political candidates. But now, numerous Democrats have sounded alarms about Republicans trimming spending on those programs in order to make up for the estimated $1 trillion or more last year’s GOP tax cuts are projected to add to budget deficits.

Various Democratic lawmakers and candidates issued warnings after Kudlow’s comments. Jeff Merkley, a Democratic senator from Oregon and potential 2020 presidential candidate, tweeted that “Social Security and Medicare are on the line” in November’s midterms.

Two of his party’s candidates who aim to flip Republican-held seats in swing state Ohio also seized on Kudlow’s remarks. Danny O’Connor, who narrowly lost the Ohio 12th District special election last month and will face off again against GOP Rep. Troy Balderson in November, tweeted that “it is just wrong” to cut taxes for corporations and then trim “earned benefits” such as Social Security and Medicare.

Aftab Pureval, who faces Republican Rep. Steve Chabot in Ohio’s 1st District, also said “this irresponsible tax bill” that Chabot supported “has put Social Security and Medicare at risk.”

The White House did not immediately respond to a request to comment on the Democratic criticism of Kudlow’s comments. On Monday, Kudlow downplayed the effect of tax cuts on budget deficits and instead pointed to a longer-term spending problem.

“People are quick to blame deficits on tax cuts,” he said. “Well, I don’t buy that.”

A House GOP proposal released in June called for cuts to programs including Medicare in order to balance the budget over time. Some Republicans have said the programs, particularly Social Security, are unsustainable over the long run and need to be reformed in order for them to continue. The funds that support Social Security are expected to run out of money in 2034.

Democrats have repeatedly used social safety-net programs as a talking point as they try to win tough races in November. For example, Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia pressed Trump earlier this year about whether the president would seek to cut funds from Social Security and Medicare to try to offset the revenue lost by the tax cuts.

Trump won that state by an enormous margin in 2016. He has supported GOP Senate candidate Patrick Morrisey and repeatedly bashed Manchin, who appears favored to keep his seat as of now.

The GOP is now trying to flip Democrats’ Medicare arguments ahead of November’s key elections. Republican candidates and Trump have contended Democrats will pull money from the health program for seniors in order to pay for Medicare for All, a single-payer system that has gained more traction recently in the Democratic Party.

“They want to raid Medicare to pay for socialism,” Trump recently claimed at a rally in Indiana, where Sen. Joe Donnelly, another vulnerable Democrat, is defending his seat this year.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott, a Republican trying to win a Senate seat in a state with a large population of retirees, also recently contended that “if you want to protect Medicare, vote Republican.”

Medicare for All plans would actually expand Medicare benefits, not cut them.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-18  Authors: jacob pramuk, adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kudlows, order, attacks, tax, talk, social, security, cuts, sparks, entitlement, reform, programs, democratic, larry, candidates, gop, medicare


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Trump: 9/11 memorial is where heroes ‘stopped the forces of terror’

President Donald Trump on Tuesday told the families of the victims of Flight 93 that their loved ones “stopped the forces of terror.” Trump also noted that since 9/11, “five and a half million young Americans have enlisted in the United States armed forces. Nearly 7,000 service members have died facing down the menace of radical Islamic terrorism.” The phrase “radical Islamic terrorism” is controversial, because it invokes the entire Muslim faith, and not just al-Qaeda, the terrorist group that


President Donald Trump on Tuesday told the families of the victims of Flight 93 that their loved ones “stopped the forces of terror.” Trump also noted that since 9/11, “five and a half million young Americans have enlisted in the United States armed forces. Nearly 7,000 service members have died facing down the menace of radical Islamic terrorism.” The phrase “radical Islamic terrorism” is controversial, because it invokes the entire Muslim faith, and not just al-Qaeda, the terrorist group that
Trump: 9/11 memorial is where heroes ‘stopped the forces of terror’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-11  Authors: christina wilkie
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Trump: 9/11 memorial is where heroes 'stopped the forces of terror'

President Donald Trump on Tuesday told the families of the victims of Flight 93 that their loved ones “stopped the forces of terror.”

“A piece of America’s heart is buried on these grounds,” Trump told guests at a memorial service in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, at the site of the crash of United Airlines Flight 93 on Sept. 11, 2001. “This field is now a monument to American defiance. This memorial is a message to the world: America will never, ever, submit to tyranny,” Trump said.

“We will remember that free people are never at the mercy of evil because our destiny is always in our hands. America’s future is not written by our enemies. America’s future is written by our heroes,” the president said.

Trump also noted that since 9/11, “five and a half million young Americans have enlisted in the United States armed forces. Nearly 7,000 service members have died facing down the menace of radical Islamic terrorism.”

The phrase “radical Islamic terrorism” is controversial, because it invokes the entire Muslim faith, and not just al-Qaeda, the terrorist group that committed the 9/11 attacks. Trump did not use the phrase last year in his commemoration of 9/11.

But this year, both the Trump White House and the Trump presidential campaign seemingly made a point of including the phrase.

On Tuesday, Michael Glassner, the Trump campaign’s chief operating officer, said in a statement, “This day reminds us of the need for America’s vigilance against radical Islamic terrorism and its ongoing threat to our freedoms, as President Trump has done so honorably as our Commander-in-Chief.”

The flight was hijacked by four al-Qaeda members, who may have been planning to fly it into the U.S. Capitol. As passengers and crew sought to regain control of the plane, it crashed into a field outside of Shanksville. All 44 people aboard were killed.

A White House statement Monday marking Patriot Day used the phrase “radical Islamic terrorists,” and not al-Qaeda to refer to the hijackers.

By the time Trump took the stage in Shanksville, however, he already had appeared to undermine the solemnity of the day. Trump began Tuesday morning by raging against his Justice Department in a series of tweets. Later, on the way to Pennsylvania, the president gave photographers a thumbs up outside Air Force One, and upon landing, he pumped both fists at his cadre of greeters.

Trump has a complicated history with the 9/11 attacks. On the day of the actual attacks, he was asked by a local TV station about a building he owned at 40 Wall Street. Instead of reflecting upon the loss of life just hours earlier, Trump falsely claimed that with the World Trade Center having collapsed, his own building was now “the tallest” in the city.

In fact, a nearby building on Pine Street was 25 feet taller. Trump described how, according to his staff near the World Trade Center, “Wall Street is littered with two feet of stone and brick and mortar and steel.”

Trump has also used the 9/11 attacks to stoke unfounded fear of Muslims. During Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign, he also falsely claimed to have seen video of Muslims in New Jersey celebrating the collapse of the towers.

“There were people that were cheering on the other side of New Jersey, where you have large Arab populations,” Trump said on ABC’s “This Week” in late 2015. “They were cheering as the World Trade Center came down. I know it might be not politically correct for you to talk about it, but there were people cheering as that building came down — as those buildings came down,” Trump said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-11  Authors: christina wilkie
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Watch: Trump attends 9/11 service at Flight 93 memorial in Pennsylvania

Please refresh the page if you do not see a player above at that time.] President Donald Trump is set to give remarks Tuesday at a ceremony in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, commemorating the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. First lady Melania Trump will also participate in the ceremony, the White House told NBC News. Shanksville became associated with 9/11 after passengers revolted against terrorists who had hijacked United Airlines Flight 93, crashing the plane into the small town. “The nobl


Please refresh the page if you do not see a player above at that time.] President Donald Trump is set to give remarks Tuesday at a ceremony in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, commemorating the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. First lady Melania Trump will also participate in the ceremony, the White House told NBC News. Shanksville became associated with 9/11 after passengers revolted against terrorists who had hijacked United Airlines Flight 93, crashing the plane into the small town. “The nobl
Watch: Trump attends 9/11 service at Flight 93 memorial in Pennsylvania Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-11  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, watch, 93, ceremony, attacks, world, trump, memorial, service, white, york, worked, proclamation, attends, 911, united, flight, pennsylvania, virginia


Watch: Trump attends 9/11 service at Flight 93 memorial in Pennsylvania

[The stream is slated to start at 10:30 a.m. ET. Please refresh the page if you do not see a player above at that time.]

President Donald Trump is set to give remarks Tuesday at a ceremony in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, commemorating the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

First lady Melania Trump will also participate in the ceremony, the White House told NBC News.

Shanksville became associated with 9/11 after passengers revolted against terrorists who had hijacked United Airlines Flight 93, crashing the plane into the small town.

On the morning of the 17th anniversary of the attacks on the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, and the World Trade Center in New York City, Trump sent tweets railing against his own Justice Department and special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation.

The president also praised his personal lawyer, former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani, for his “leadership, bravery and skill” in responding to the attacks.

Trump also shared a message from his social media director, Dan Scavino, which shows Trump signing a proclamation for “Patriot Day 2018” honoring the nearly 3,000 people killed in the attacks, as well as the first responders who worked to save lives.

“The noble sacrifices of these true patriots are forged into the great history of America,” the proclamation says.

The document also calls on government agencies to display flags at half-staff.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-11  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, watch, 93, ceremony, attacks, world, trump, memorial, service, white, york, worked, proclamation, attends, 911, united, flight, pennsylvania, virginia


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