British police issue a city-wide ban on climate change protests in London

British police have ordered Extinction Rebellion activists to stop their demonstrations immediately or face arrest, issuing a London-wide ban on the group’s climate change protests. Extinction Rebellion’s London branch described the move as an “outrage,” before calling on the police to “respect the law.” The decision comes after more than a week of civil disobedience in London, with activists targeting government buildings and major financial institutions. The protests, which began last Monday a


British police have ordered Extinction Rebellion activists to stop their demonstrations immediately or face arrest, issuing a London-wide ban on the group’s climate change protests. Extinction Rebellion’s London branch described the move as an “outrage,” before calling on the police to “respect the law.” The decision comes after more than a week of civil disobedience in London, with activists targeting government buildings and major financial institutions. The protests, which began last Monday a
British police issue a city-wide ban on climate change protests in London Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ban, london, rebellion, climate, stop, issue, change, british, extinction, activists, square, protests, uprising, trafalgar, citywide


British police issue a city-wide ban on climate change protests in London

Police arrest Eleanor Elizabeth “Ellie” Chowns, Green Party Member of the European Parliament for the West Midlands while clearing an Extinction Rebellion environmental activists campsite at Trafalgar square on October 14, 2019 in London, England.

British police have ordered Extinction Rebellion activists to stop their demonstrations immediately or face arrest, issuing a London-wide ban on the group’s climate change protests.

In a statement issued on Monday evening, the Metropolitan Police said that anyone who ignores the ban would be detained and face prosecution.

“Any assembly linked to the Extinction Rebellion ‘Autumn Uprising’… must now cease their protest(s) within London,” the police said, marking 21:00 London time on Monday evening as the cut-off for protesters to stop what it called “ongoing serious disruption to the community.”

Activists based in Trafalgar Square, which until Monday had been specified by the Metropolitan Police as the only legitimate protest site in the city, were ordered to remove their tents and clear the area almost without warning.

Extinction Rebellion’s London branch described the move as an “outrage,” before calling on the police to “respect the law.”

The decision comes after more than a week of civil disobedience in London, with activists targeting government buildings and major financial institutions.

The protests, which began last Monday and were due to last two weeks, have resulted in more than 1,400 arrests.

Extinction Rebellion says it has held the so-called “Autumn Uprising” across major cities across the globe to rebel against the world’s governments for their “criminal inaction” when it comes to the intensifying climate crisis.

The group uses non-violent civil disobedience in an attempt to highlight the risks posed by climate change and the accelerating loss of plant and animal species.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ban, london, rebellion, climate, stop, issue, change, british, extinction, activists, square, protests, uprising, trafalgar, citywide


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Airlines slam proposals to ban air mile programs and tax frequent flyers

The CCC is an independent body that advises the U.K. government on how to build a low carbon economy. Among recommendations was a call for the U.K. government to “introduce a ban on air miles and frequent flyer loyalty schemes that incentivise excessive flying.” The report also urged lawmakers to introduce a levy targeting frequent flyers, noting that an estimated 15% of the British population took 70% of the country’s flights. The level of tax would correspond to air miles traveled over a three


The CCC is an independent body that advises the U.K. government on how to build a low carbon economy. Among recommendations was a call for the U.K. government to “introduce a ban on air miles and frequent flyer loyalty schemes that incentivise excessive flying.” The report also urged lawmakers to introduce a levy targeting frequent flyers, noting that an estimated 15% of the British population took 70% of the country’s flights. The level of tax would correspond to air miles traveled over a three
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, air, report, frequent, emissions, slam, flyers, airlines, levy, carbon, ban, aviation, programs, miles, proposals, mile


Airlines slam proposals to ban air mile programs and tax frequent flyers

A Boeing Co. 747 passenger aircraft, operated by British Airways, takes at Heathrow airport in London, U.K. Chris Ratcliffe | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Airlines operating in the U.K. have dismissed a report that called for air miles programs to be banned and additional taxes applied to frequent flyers. In a report published Thursday by Imperial College London for the Committee on Climate Change (CCC), academics proposed several measures that governments should implement to reduce the impact aviation was having on the environment. The CCC is an independent body that advises the U.K. government on how to build a low carbon economy. “Flying is a uniquely high-impact activity and is the quickest and cheapest way for a consumer to increase their carbon footprint,” the report’s authors said before adding, “Low-carbon aviation technology is expected to remain technically unfeasible and so it is vital to restrain rising demand.” Among recommendations was a call for the U.K. government to “introduce a ban on air miles and frequent flyer loyalty schemes that incentivise excessive flying.” The report also urged lawmakers to introduce a levy targeting frequent flyers, noting that an estimated 15% of the British population took 70% of the country’s flights. The level of tax would correspond to air miles traveled over a three-year period, as opposed to the number of flights taken. According to the report, the proposed frequent flyer levy would discourage leisure travelers from booking “much more damaging long-haul flights.” Travel for work would not count towards the frequent flyer tax, researchers said.

Industry backlash

Speaking to CNBC on the phone on Tuesday, a spokesperson for the U.K.’s Board of Airline Representatives — an industry body representing most of the airlines operating in Britain — said there was “not really any rationale” for the report’s recommendations to be implemented. “This is a drop in the ocean as to what can be done by the government,” they said. Meanwhile, in an emailed statement, a spokesperson for trade body Airlines U.K., whose members include British Airways, Ryanair and Virgin Atlantic, said the proposals would cause economic and reputational harm. “U.K. aviation has a robust plan to cut aviation carbon emissions and get to net zero by 2050 without the need to price people out of air travel or put the U.K. at a competitive disadvantage,” they told CNBC on Tuesday. “We should be focusing on the huge potential for the U.K. to become a world leader in new innovation and the many exciting developments around aircraft and engine technology, sustainable aviation fuels and the new emerging carbon markets. Working with government we can achieve this together without resorting to the kind of unilateral, demand side measures that will damage the U.K.’s reputation internationally and potentially lead to carbon leakage.” The CCC report claimed that the proposed tax would not impact ticket prices for most flyers. “An Air Miles Levy which escalates with the air miles travelled by an individual within a three year accounting period could provide strong price signals to curb some demand by less price-sensitive frequent flyers, encourage shifting from long-haul to short-haul destinations and fund research into low-carbon aviation technology, while sparing the large majority of travellers any extra cost,” it said. The authors also suggested that the levy should take into account the higher emissions attached to business and first class tickets, alleging that more spacious cabins and unfilled seats meant emissions for first class tickets can have seven times the emissions of an economy ticket.

Advertising overhaul


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, air, report, frequent, emissions, slam, flyers, airlines, levy, carbon, ban, aviation, programs, miles, proposals, mile


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Superstar German DJ ‘permanently banned’ from China for liking a ‘South Park’ tweet

Zedd, a high-profile DJ and music producer, has been permanently banned from China for liking a tweet from “South Park’s” official account. On Friday, Zedd tweeted about the ban, and CNBC verified the claim with his publicist on Saturday. It’s unclear at the moment whether this means that Zedd has a travel ban to China. As of Saturday, his music was still available on Chinese music streaming site QQ Music. Beijing responded by heavily censoring content related to “South Park” on search engines l


Zedd, a high-profile DJ and music producer, has been permanently banned from China for liking a tweet from “South Park’s” official account. On Friday, Zedd tweeted about the ban, and CNBC verified the claim with his publicist on Saturday. It’s unclear at the moment whether this means that Zedd has a travel ban to China. As of Saturday, his music was still available on Chinese music streaming site QQ Music. Beijing responded by heavily censoring content related to “South Park” on search engines l
Superstar German DJ ‘permanently banned’ from China for liking a ‘South Park’ tweet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, liking, chinese, music, zedd, tweeted, banned, china, german, superstar, permanently, park, american, app, ban, south


Superstar German DJ 'permanently banned' from China for liking a 'South Park' tweet

Zedd performs onstage during the 2019 iHeartRadio Wango Tango at Dignity Health Sports Park on June 01, 2019 in Carson, California.

Zedd, a high-profile DJ and music producer, has been permanently banned from China for liking a tweet from “South Park’s” official account.

On Friday, Zedd tweeted about the ban, and CNBC verified the claim with his publicist on Saturday.

“This is true, yes, but we don’t have anymore info to give you at this time,” Adam Guest, senior entertainment publicist at U.K.-based SATELLITE414 agency, told CNBC. It’s unclear at the moment whether this means that Zedd has a travel ban to China. As of Saturday, his music was still available on Chinese music streaming site QQ Music.

“South Park” stirred up controversy in the world’s second-largest economy with an episode called “Band in China” which pokes fun at the country’s strict censorship regime and ridicules American firms doing business there.

Beijing responded by heavily censoring content related to “South Park” on search engines like Baidu and other online services.

The tweet that Zedd liked on Twitter was one celebrating “South Park’s” 300th episode.

The 300th episode is called “Shots!!!” and looks to ridicule anti-vaccination supporters, or anti-vaxxers, as well as continuing its satirical take on China.

Zedd was born in Russia but grew up in Germany. The German embassy in Beijing is yet to respond to a request for comment when contacted by CNBC.

His ban comes at a time when American organizations’ dealings with China are under heavy scrutiny with several being accused of bending over backwards to meet Beijing’s demands around censorship.

It began when Daryl Morey, the general manager of the Houston Rockets NBA team, tweeted a message in support of the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong. The post was quickly deleted. The NBA first appeared to apologize for Morey’s remarks which was criticized by American lawmakers. But later, the league’s commissioner Adam Silver came out in support of Morey’s right to express his opinion. Silver’s remarks drew strong criticism from Chinese state media.

Meanwhile, Apple was in hot water with Beijing for allowing an app, which let Hong Kong protesters see the location of police, onto its App Store. Following criticism from Chinese state media, Apple took the app down.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, liking, chinese, music, zedd, tweeted, banned, china, german, superstar, permanently, park, american, app, ban, south


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Violent protests continue in Hong Kong after anti-mask law comes into effect

Hong Kong’s anti-mask law incited another weekend of mass protests. Despite the face mask ban, which took effect on Saturday, anti-government protesters came out in force on the weekend, many donning masks. Still, some have questioned the validity of the anti-mask ban. The turmoil was sparked by a now withdrawn bill that would have enabled suspects in Hong Kong to be extradited to mainland China for trial. Hong Kong is not the first to introduce a ban on masks during mass protests.


Hong Kong’s anti-mask law incited another weekend of mass protests. Despite the face mask ban, which took effect on Saturday, anti-government protesters came out in force on the weekend, many donning masks. Still, some have questioned the validity of the anti-mask ban. The turmoil was sparked by a now withdrawn bill that would have enabled suspects in Hong Kong to be extradited to mainland China for trial. Hong Kong is not the first to introduce a ban on masks during mass protests.
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, antimask, protests, weekend, ban, effect, face, violent, kong, continue, law, comes, violence, protesters, masks, hong


Violent protests continue in Hong Kong after anti-mask law comes into effect

Hong Kong’s anti-mask law incited another weekend of mass protests.

The city’s chief executive Carrie Lam invoked emergency powers on Friday that “aimed to deter people from joining these unlawful assembly and put an end to the violence,” a pro-establishment Hong Kong legislator, who approved of the new law, told CNBC on Monday.

“Apart (from) the anti-mask law, we also urge … the public to cut ties with the violence and of course, we urge this time everyone to calm down and step back and say ‘no’ to the violence,” said Holden Chow, vice chairman of the Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong (DAB).

Despite the face mask ban, which took effect on Saturday, anti-government protesters came out in force on the weekend, many donning masks. Protesters often wear gas masks and other face coverings to protect themselves from tear gas fired by police, as well as from being identified.

“Almost all protesters who carry out vandalism and violence covered their face,” Lam said when she announced the face mask ban. “The purpose was to hide their identity and evade the law and they have become more and more daring.”

Still, some have questioned the validity of the anti-mask ban.

Pro-democracy lawmaker Claudia Mo took to social media on Sunday to rebut Lam’s decision to ban masks, saying that “the Chief Executive has no power to enact regulations in the manner she has.”

Mo said it is “in the immediate public interest for Legco to publicly scrutinize, vet and/or debate the matter.” The Legislative Council, or the local assembly, is informally referred to as Legco.

The city has been roiled by increasingly violent protests for over four months. The turmoil was sparked by a now withdrawn bill that would have enabled suspects in Hong Kong to be extradited to mainland China for trial.

Hong Kong is not the first to introduce a ban on masks during mass protests. Earlier this year, France introduced a similar ban in response to the country’s “yellow vest” movement that swept the European country starting last November.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, antimask, protests, weekend, ban, effect, face, violent, kong, continue, law, comes, violence, protesters, masks, hong


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Hong Kong protests: Carrie Lam invokes emergency law, bans face masks

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam speaking at a press conference in Hong Kong on October 4, 2019 where she announced that an emergency law will be invoked and face masks by protesters will be banned. Mohd Rasfan | AFP | Getty ImagesHong Kong leader Carrie Lam on Friday invoked emergency powers and banned face masks, saying the order goes into effect on Saturday, Oct. 5. Consequences for breaking the ban include up to one year in jail and a fine of $25,000 Hong Kong dollars ($3,187). Face mask


Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam speaking at a press conference in Hong Kong on October 4, 2019 where she announced that an emergency law will be invoked and face masks by protesters will be banned. Mohd Rasfan | AFP | Getty ImagesHong Kong leader Carrie Lam on Friday invoked emergency powers and banned face masks, saying the order goes into effect on Saturday, Oct. 5. Consequences for breaking the ban include up to one year in jail and a fine of $25,000 Hong Kong dollars ($3,187). Face mask
Hong Kong protests: Carrie Lam invokes emergency law, bans face masks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: christine wang, grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, face, kong, masks, carrie, ban, executive, invokes, protests, emergency, lam, protesters, hong, law, regulations


Hong Kong protests: Carrie Lam invokes emergency law, bans face masks

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam speaking at a press conference in Hong Kong on October 4, 2019 where she announced that an emergency law will be invoked and face masks by protesters will be banned. Mohd Rasfan | AFP | Getty Images

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam on Friday invoked emergency powers and banned face masks, saying the order goes into effect on Saturday, Oct. 5. Consequences for breaking the ban include up to one year in jail and a fine of $25,000 Hong Kong dollars ($3,187). In a press conference, Lam explained that the face mask ban was necessary because “almost all protesters who carry out vandalism and violence covered their face.” “The purpose was to hide their identity and evade the law and they have become more and more daring,” Lam said. She noted, however, that the mask ban contains certain exemptions “to cater for legitimate needs.” Face masks have become ubiquitous in the city after the 2003 SARS outbreak. The disease killed 298 people in Hong Kong, according to World Health Organization data. Hong Kong’s parliamentary body, the Legislative Council, will discuss the legislation on Oct. 16 when it resumes session, Lam said.

Pro-democracy demonstrators march from Chater Garden during a protest against a potential government ban on protesters wearing face masks in Hong Kong on October 4, 2019. Nicolas Asfouri | AFP | Getty Images

The Hong Kong leader said the decision was made after she called a special meeting of the Executive Council, which decided to invoke the Emergency Regulations Ordinance. Lam explained that the government believes the regulation will have a “deterrent effect” against violent behavior and help police officers carry out their duties. Under the 1922 law, the chief executive is allowed to “make any regulations whatsoever which he may consider desirable in the public interest.” It also states that any regulations drafted under this ordinance remain in place until repealed by the chief executive. Hong Kong has been swallowed by mass demonstrations since early June. Protest initially began over a now-withdrawn bill that would have enabled extradition to mainland China.

Tensions at new highs

Lam’s comments come after tensions hit a new high on Tuesday, China’s National Day, after an 18-year-old anti-government protester was shot by police, the first person hit by live gunfire in nearly four months of unrest. The protester has been charged with rioting and attacking a police officer. Local authorities have repeatedly said that the officer fired his weapon in self-defense. Multiple videos of the shooting show protesters carrying objects like wrenches and hammers. Of the roughly 1,100 people injured in the protests, Lam said that at least 300 of them were police officers. “There’s a use of lethal weapons, corrosive liquids, snatching of suspects and snatching of police pistols. So, the police have no choice but to use their guns to save their own lives,” Lam said. According to Reuters, police in the Chinese territory were given greater power to use force during protests, ahead of China’s 70th National Day on Tuesday. Reuters reported that officers fired approximately 1,400 rounds of tear gas and nearly 900 rubber bullets.

Protester returns a teargas canister during the demonstration. Ivan Abreu, SOPA Images | LightRocket | Getty Images

The city is a former British colony and returned to Chinese rule in 1997. As a special administrative region of China, Hong Kong operates under a “one country, two systems” structure which grants its citizens legal and economic freedoms that citizens in mainland China do not have.

Colonial-era law


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: christine wang, grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, face, kong, masks, carrie, ban, executive, invokes, protests, emergency, lam, protesters, hong, law, regulations


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Scottish government says no to fracking as it confirms policy position

The Scottish government will not support “unconventional oil and gas development” (UOG) in the country, it said Thursday. Paul Wheelhouse, Scotland’s energy minister, said the government’s final policy position was that it did not “support the development of unconventional oil and gas – often known as ‘fracking’ – in Scotland.” In 2015, the Scottish government announced a moratorium on UOG development. In 2017, authorities said they would not support the development of UOG in the country, descri


The Scottish government will not support “unconventional oil and gas development” (UOG) in the country, it said Thursday. Paul Wheelhouse, Scotland’s energy minister, said the government’s final policy position was that it did not “support the development of unconventional oil and gas – often known as ‘fracking’ – in Scotland.” In 2015, the Scottish government announced a moratorium on UOG development. In 2017, authorities said they would not support the development of UOG in the country, descri
Scottish government says no to fracking as it confirms policy position Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, oil, support, position, ban, uog, scottish, scotland, policy, gas, unconventional, development, fracking, confirms


Scottish government says no to fracking as it confirms policy position

The Scottish government will not support “unconventional oil and gas development” (UOG) in the country, it said Thursday. The decision follows what it described as, “a comprehensive period of evidence-gathering and consultation, including environmental and business assessments.”

Paul Wheelhouse, Scotland’s energy minister, said the government’s final policy position was that it did not “support the development of unconventional oil and gas – often known as ‘fracking’ – in Scotland.”

Wheelhouse added that the development of onshore UOG was “incompatible with our policies on climate change, energy transition and the decarbonization of our economy.”

Thursday’s decision follows several years of discussion and debate. In 2015, the Scottish government announced a moratorium on UOG development. In 2017, authorities said they would not support the development of UOG in the country, describing this as “an effective ban on fracking in Scotland.”

This was challenged in the courts by petrochemical firms Ineos and ReachCSG in 2018. They argued that the Scottish government had imposed, unlawfully, an indefinite ban on fracking.

A judge said the case was unfounded, concluding that while there had been “a number of ministerial statements to the effect that there is an effective ban, the Lord Advocate, on behalf of the Scottish Ministers, made it clear to the court that such statements were mistaken and did not accurately reflect the legal position.” Lord Pentland added that there was “indeed no prohibition against fracking in force at the present time.”

This week’s announcement means that, in practice, the Scottish government will not issue licenses for new UOG developments. The country’s planning framework will not support developments that use UOG techniques including hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.

“I am mindful of the fact that there have been calls from stakeholders, and from colleagues in this chamber, for a legislative ban on unconventional oil and gas in Scotland,” Wheelhouse said in a statement to the Scottish Parliament.

“We do not consider that new legislation is necessary at this time to control unconventional oil and gas development in Scotland; a strong policy position enacted through devolved planning powers and licensing is – we believe – robust, evidence-led and sufficient,” he added. “However that option remains open if there is evidence over time that further action is required.”

Commenting on the decision, the director of WWF Scotland, Lang Banks, said in a statement that the Scottish government had “listened to the thousands of people, campaigners and politicians across the country who have been calling for a halt to fracking and other unconventional fossil fuel extraction.”

“Now that fracking won’t be supported in Scotland, we hope politicians can start to rally round new and improved action to more quickly cut climate pollution from existing sources including our buildings, transport, and land,” he went on to add.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, oil, support, position, ban, uog, scottish, scotland, policy, gas, unconventional, development, fracking, confirms


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Two US movie theater chains ban masks at screenings of ‘Joker’

The Landmark Theaters chain will ban costumes and masks for moviegoers during screenings of the film “Joker” it said on Thursday, following concerns expressed by families involved in a 2012 mass shooting during a Batman film in Colorado. “But no masks, painted faces or costumes will be permitted into our theaters,” it said in a statement to Reuters. AMC, which runs more than 650 cinemas, reminded customers this week that while it allowed costumes, it did not allow masks. In response, Warner Bros


The Landmark Theaters chain will ban costumes and masks for moviegoers during screenings of the film “Joker” it said on Thursday, following concerns expressed by families involved in a 2012 mass shooting during a Batman film in Colorado. “But no masks, painted faces or costumes will be permitted into our theaters,” it said in a statement to Reuters. AMC, which runs more than 650 cinemas, reminded customers this week that while it allowed costumes, it did not allow masks. In response, Warner Bros
Two US movie theater chains ban masks at screenings of ‘Joker’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, statement, joker, families, costumes, bros, theater, ban, chains, movie, theaters, screenings, warner, film, masks


Two US movie theater chains ban masks at screenings of 'Joker'

The Landmark Theaters chain will ban costumes and masks for moviegoers during screenings of the film “Joker” it said on Thursday, following concerns expressed by families involved in a 2012 mass shooting during a Batman film in Colorado.

The Los Angeles-based chain, which runs 52 theaters in 27 markets, said it wanted customers to enjoy the film as a “cinematic achievement.”

“But no masks, painted faces or costumes will be permitted into our theaters,” it said in a statement to Reuters.

The film opens in theaters on October 4.

Landmark joins the nation’s largest movie chain, Kansas-based AMC Theatres, which has banned masks in theatres since the Colorado massacre that killed a dozen and wounded scores, and re-affirmed that ban.

AMC, which runs more than 650 cinemas, reminded customers this week that while it allowed costumes, it did not allow masks.

“Guests are welcome to come dressed in costume, but we do not permit masks, face paint or any object that conceals the face,” it said in a statement widely reported in the media, including Variety.

Landmark did not give a reason for its ban.

But it follows a letter from the families of some victims of the shooting at a 2012 showing of the Batman movie, “The Dark Knight Rises” in Aurora, Colorado, to Warner Bros., the studio behind the “Joker,” expressing concern.

Some of those at the midnight screening in the packed Aurora theater had been wearing costumes. The mass shooting at the Century 16 Theater multiplex owned by Cinemark USA Inc killed 12 and wounded 70.

The gunman, James Holmes, is serving multiple life sentences after being convicted of mass murder, despite pleading not guilty by reason of insanity.

The new film depicts the mental breakdown of the Joker character, the nemesis of Batman in various movie, television and comic book adaptations, that leads to violence.

The families’ letter also urged Warner Bros. to end political contributions to candidates who take money from the National Rifle Association and to fund gun violence intervention programs.

In response, Warner Bros. issued a statement of sympathy for the victims and their families, Entertainment Weekly said.

“Our company has a long history of donating to victims of violence, including Aurora, and in recent weeks, our parent company joined other business leaders to call on policymakers to enact bipartisan legislation to address this epidemic,” Warner Bros. said, media reported.

But the movie does not endorse real-world violence and does not hold up the Batman villian as a hero, it added.

Los Angeles police aim to step up visibility during the film’s opening weekend.

“The Los Angeles Police Department is aware of public concerns and the historical significance associated with the premiere of the Joker,” it said in a statement to Reuters.

“While there are no credible threats in the Los Angeles area, the department will maintain high visibility around movie theaters when it opens.”

Aurora police have said Cinemark will not screen “Joker” at the Colorado multiplex, where they continue to provide enhanced security.

“We recognize this release may cause concern for the families, friends, first responders and beyond,” police said in a statement on Wednesday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, statement, joker, families, costumes, bros, theater, ban, chains, movie, theaters, screenings, warner, film, masks


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Washington issues flavored vaping ban, joining other states

Washington on Friday joined several other states in banning the sale of flavored vaping products amid concern over the mysterious lung illness that has sickened hundreds of people and killed at least a dozen across the country. Inslee said the flavored products especially appeal to youth. President Donald Trump has said he plans to ban flavored vaping products nationally. Massachusetts has gone the farthest, issuing a four-month ban on all vaping products — flavored or not. Symptoms of the vapin


Washington on Friday joined several other states in banning the sale of flavored vaping products amid concern over the mysterious lung illness that has sickened hundreds of people and killed at least a dozen across the country. Inslee said the flavored products especially appeal to youth. President Donald Trump has said he plans to ban flavored vaping products nationally. Massachusetts has gone the farthest, issuing a four-month ban on all vaping products — flavored or not. Symptoms of the vapin
Washington issues flavored vaping ban, joining other states Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, officials, washington, joining, states, health, vaping, illness, inslee, ban, order, flavored, issues, products


Washington issues flavored vaping ban, joining other states

Washington on Friday joined several other states in banning the sale of flavored vaping products amid concern over the mysterious lung illness that has sickened hundreds of people and killed at least a dozen across the country.

Gov. Jay Inslee issued an executive order asking the Department of Health to issue the emergency rule at its next meeting, scheduled for Oct. 9. The ban will apply to products containing nicotine as well as the cannabis extract THC. Inslee said the flavored products especially appeal to youth.

“We need to act for the public health of our people,” said Inslee, a Democrat. “I’m confident this executive order will save lives.”

The ban is necessary because even if a vaping ingredient or compound were conclusively linked to the illnesses, the state would have no way to identify which products contain the substance so they could be removed from store shelves, Inslee said.

President Donald Trump has said he plans to ban flavored vaping products nationally. New York, Michigan and Rhode Island are among the states that have announced at least temporary bans, while officials in Oregon and California have urged consumers to stop using them. Massachusetts has gone the farthest, issuing a four-month ban on all vaping products — flavored or not.

Inslee also ordered health officials to work with the state’s Liquor and Cannabis Board to develop legislation to increase oversight of vapor products, including requiring the disclosure of ingredients and increasing spending on anti-vaping campaigns aimed at teens.

More than 500 cases of the illness have been reported across the U.S. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating but has not yet identified a common product or ingredient as the culprit.

This week, Juul Labs, the San Francisco-based company that controls about 70% of the vaping market, announced it is replacing its CEO and will no longer run TV, print or digital advertisements for its e-cigarettes. The company also promised not to lobby against a proposed U.S. ban on flavors.

Symptoms of the vaping illness can include chest pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue, fever and weight loss.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, officials, washington, joining, states, health, vaping, illness, inslee, ban, order, flavored, issues, products


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Elizabeth Warren’s fracking ban would be bad news for the US, IEA chief says

ABU DHABI — Fatih Birol, executive director of the IEA (International Energy Agency), told CNBC that a ban on fracking as proposed by some Democratic presidential contenders would have “major implications” for the U.S. energy industry. “Just banning this would not be good news, not only for Americans but for Europeans,” Birol told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” during the World Energy Conference on Monday. Democratic presidential contenders Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders and Kamala Harris have all


ABU DHABI — Fatih Birol, executive director of the IEA (International Energy Agency), told CNBC that a ban on fracking as proposed by some Democratic presidential contenders would have “major implications” for the U.S. energy industry. “Just banning this would not be good news, not only for Americans but for Europeans,” Birol told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” during the World Energy Conference on Monday. Democratic presidential contenders Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders and Kamala Harris have all
Elizabeth Warren’s fracking ban would be bad news for the US, IEA chief says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, contenders, good, iea, major, chief, presidential, bad, warrens, fracking, energy, birol, ban, implications, security, elizabeth


Elizabeth Warren's fracking ban would be bad news for the US, IEA chief says

ABU DHABI — Fatih Birol, executive director of the IEA (International Energy Agency), told CNBC that a ban on fracking as proposed by some Democratic presidential contenders would have “major implications” for the U.S. energy industry.

“Just banning this would not be good news, not only for Americans but for Europeans,” Birol told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” during the World Energy Conference on Monday.

Democratic presidential contenders Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders and Kamala Harris have all advocated plans to ban the fossil fuel extraction process that has catapulted the U.S. to becoming the world’s largest producer of oil.

“This would have major implications on the market for the U.S. economy, for jobs growth and everything, and not good news for energy security, because for example U.S. natural gas provides a lot of security to the markets,” Birol said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, contenders, good, iea, major, chief, presidential, bad, warrens, fracking, energy, birol, ban, implications, security, elizabeth


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Tech giants want rules on facial recognition, but critics warn that won’t be enough

The privacy regulator has also been investigating the use of facial recognition by police. In Sweden, a local authority was fined under GDPR for trialing facial recognition on high-school students. Tomlinson told CNBC that policymakers should ensure live facial recognition is only used for “purposes where there is a real legitimate interest.” Facial recognition “has a track record of misidentifying people of color, women and kids,” Hare said. Campaigners are already challenging the police use of


The privacy regulator has also been investigating the use of facial recognition by police. In Sweden, a local authority was fined under GDPR for trialing facial recognition on high-school students. Tomlinson told CNBC that policymakers should ensure live facial recognition is only used for “purposes where there is a real legitimate interest.” Facial recognition “has a track record of misidentifying people of color, women and kids,” Hare said. Campaigners are already challenging the police use of
Tech giants want rules on facial recognition, but critics warn that won’t be enough Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-30  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, used, tech, facial, wont, technology, live, ban, giants, warn, critics, recognition, rules, surveillance, regulation, public, data


Tech giants want rules on facial recognition, but critics warn that won't be enough

People walk past a CCTV camera at King’s Cross on August 16, 2019 in London. CCTV cameras using facial recognition are being investigated by the UK’s data protection watchdog.

It almost comes naturally to many smartphone users today. You can just take out your iPhone — or Android equivalent — and hold it up to your face to unlock the device. But the technology behind that has become increasingly controversial of late, with business executives and regulators alike calling for oversight. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella earlier this year said the technology warranted “any regulation that helps the marketplace not be a race to the bottom.” While people are far more open to the idea of registering their portrait with Apple’s Face ID, the idea of being spotted by an artificial intelligence-powered camera on the street has proven much more unnerving. This is the difference, tech executives and experts say, between consensual identity verification and non-consensual surveillance. The use of facial recognition technology in London’s King’s Cross area was met with much backlash earlier this month, drawing the attention of the U.K. data protection watchdog. It emerged that Argent, a property developer, had deployed the software in the space without people’s knowledge. Argent was not immediately available for comment when contacted by CNBC. Some are calling for a ban of so-called live facial recognition, where surveillance cameras equipped with the technology scan people in public places. One of the biggest problems with face identification systems, independent researcher Stephanie Hare said, is that it involves biometric data — in other words, information about people’s bodies. She thinks an outright ban on the technology should be one option on the table. “It needs to be treated in the same way that your DNA would be,” Hare told CNBC. “They’re in the same category of powerful data. What you could do with face recognition in terms of identifying someone in real time makes it a surveillance technology.” And it’s that issue of surveillance that has become a key concern for regulators. Britain’s Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham said she would launch a probe into how the software was used in London, adding she was “deeply concerned about the growing use of facial recognition technology in public spaces” by both law enforcement and the private sector. The privacy regulator has also been investigating the use of facial recognition by police.

UK police trials

Some police forces in the U.K. have conducted trials of the technology, which is being promoted by the Home Office. London’s Metropolitan Police ended its pilot program, which was aimed at identifying criminals, last month. Researchers from the University of Essex found “significant flaws ” with the Met’s trial, adding that police deployment of live facial recognition technology “may be held unlawful if challenged before the courts.” South Wales Police, on the other hand, has gone ahead with an app that lets officers run a snapshot of a person through a database of suspects to find potential matches. That’s despite a court case against the force brought by the campaign group Liberty. Privacy campaigners at Big Brother Watch want the British parliament to step in. They think that lawmakers in the country should look to ban the technology from being used for monitoring people, rather than introduce regulation that sees it permitted under certain guidelines. Laws can take years to implement and even then policies would vary across different regions. “We’re not asking parliament to regulate, we’re asking parliament to immediately put a stop to it,” Silkie Carlo, director of Big Brother Watch, told CNBC. “If anyone thinks it’s feasible that live facial recognition for public surveillance is possible in a rights-respecting democracy, they’d have to make a pretty convincing argument.”

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Various police forces across the country have pushed back against the scheme. “That’s not a positive thing,” said Jason Tooley, chief revenue officer of biometric software maker Veridium. The worry for some is whether legislators take too heavy-handed an approach. “In terms of innovative technology, we want the police forces to be able to innovate to deliver better services,” Tooley told CNBC. “What we’ve got to try to avoid here is that innovation is squashed or stopped.” Biometric data is already covered by the European Union’s GDPR, or General Data Protection Regulation, a data privacy overhaul that was introduced by the bloc last year. The rules call on companies to obtain explicit consent from consumers on the use of their personal information. In Sweden, a local authority was fined under GDPR for trialing facial recognition on high-school students. But recently it was reported that the EU is looking to tighten its laws around the use of facial recognition as part of an overhaul of how AI is regulated. Natasha Bertaud, deputy chief spokesperson for the European Commission, declined to comment on that report last week, but pointed to recommendations from a group of experts advising the EU executive body on its approach to AI. That group had suggested the EU consider the need for new regulation of biometric technologies like emotion tracking and facial recognition.

Tech firms ‘ride the wave of public opinion’

So where do tech firms like Microsoft and Amazon sit in the regulatory debate swirling around facial recognition? Tech giants make “big claims about being on the side of privacy,” but ultimately “ride the wave of where public opinion is,” said Mike Beck, global head of threat analysis at cybersecurity firm Darktrace. Amazon’s computer vision platform Rekognition — that’s the one that can now apparently detect fear — has in the past been used by police in the U.S. That hasn’t always sat well with the company’s own shareholders, who earlier this year lumped pressure on the tech giant to stop selling the facial identification software to law enforcement.

But the company has — like Microsoft — said it wants to at least see guidelines established to ensure the technology is used ethically. “New technology should not be banned or condemned because of its potential misuse,” Michael Punke, vice president of global public policy for Amazon’s cloud business, AWS, said in a blog post earlier this year. Microsoft has repeatedly called on governments to regulate face recognition, with the firm’s president, Brad Smith, having previously said that 2019 should be the year for regulation. Google, meanwhile, has said it will not sell the technology “before working through important technology and policy questions.” Beck said that a ban on live facial recognition was “not the answer,” adding regulation would need to address how biometric data is collected and handled by organizations. “Regulation is only part of the answer,” he said. “Securing data when it is collected is as important as regulating the applications of the technology in the first place.” Meanwhile, Gus Tomlinson, head of strategy at identity verification firm GBG, said a clear regulatory framework could help consumers understand the benefits of the technology — one of the benefits cited by Amazon is that Rekognition has been used to prevent human trafficking and find missing children. Tomlinson told CNBC that policymakers should ensure live facial recognition is only used for “purposes where there is a real legitimate interest.”

‘Perfect tool of oppression’

One big problem with facial recognition is it uses machine-learning algorithms that are fed abundant volumes of data on people’s faces to be able to discriminate between one person and another. But that information can be discriminatory in its own right, as demonstrated by MIT researcher Joy Buolamwini, who published a paper that showed such systems are less likely to accurately identify ethnic minorities and women than white men. The combination of that with laying down the law is problematic, critics say, as it could result in cases of mistaken identity and people being wrongly arrested. Facial recognition “has a track record of misidentifying people of color, women and kids,” Hare said. And even as the technology improves, it could become a “perfect tool of oppression,” Carlo said, adding: “In extremis, you could live in a society where you have no chance of being anonymous.” The technology is used without hesitation in China. The country is littered with millions of surveillance cameras and almost all of its 1.4 billion citizens are included in a facial recognition database. That has become a source of scrutiny amid claims the technology has been used to track Uighur Muslims in China’s Xinjiang territory.

In the U.S., meanwhile, the technology is facing increasing pushback from legislators, at least in terms of how it’s used by the police. The California State Senate is considering legislation that would ban the use of facial recognition software in police body cameras, while San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors already went ahead with moving to ban the use of the technology by law enforcement. Hare said that the issue was so severe that it could result in a “landmark” court case. Campaigners are already challenging the police use of facial recognition in the U.K., but Hare said there could one day be a “class action lawsuit.” She said GDPR — under which firms can be fined up to 4% of their global revenues — would be “legalizing mass surveillance” if it doesn’t protect people from live facial recognition.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-30  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, used, tech, facial, wont, technology, live, ban, giants, warn, critics, recognition, rules, surveillance, regulation, public, data


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