Huawei faces a ‘life or death crisis,’ CEO says as he lays out ‘battle’ strategy amid US pressure

Ren Zhengfei, founder and chief executive officer of Huawei Technologies Co., speaks during an interview at the company’s headquarters in Shenzhen, China, on Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019. Huawei is facing a “life or death crisis” amid continued pressure from the U.S. government, its founder and CEO told employees, as he laid out a strategy for the Chinese telecommunications giant going forward. In a memo to employees of Huawei’s networking division seen by CNBC, Ren Zhengfei described the company’s cu


Ren Zhengfei, founder and chief executive officer of Huawei Technologies Co., speaks during an interview at the company’s headquarters in Shenzhen, China, on Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019. Huawei is facing a “life or death crisis” amid continued pressure from the U.S. government, its founder and CEO told employees, as he laid out a strategy for the Chinese telecommunications giant going forward. In a memo to employees of Huawei’s networking division seen by CNBC, Ren Zhengfei described the company’s cu
Huawei faces a ‘life or death crisis,’ CEO says as he lays out ‘battle’ strategy amid US pressure Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-21  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zhengfei, battle, employees, ceo, strategy, company, crisis, memo, pressure, huawei, death, founder, life, lays, ren, telecommunications, faces


Huawei faces a 'life or death crisis,' CEO says as he lays out 'battle' strategy amid US pressure

Ren Zhengfei, founder and chief executive officer of Huawei Technologies Co., speaks during an interview at the company’s headquarters in Shenzhen, China, on Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019.

Huawei is facing a “life or death crisis” amid continued pressure from the U.S. government, its founder and CEO told employees, as he laid out a strategy for the Chinese telecommunications giant going forward.

In a memo to employees of Huawei’s networking division seen by CNBC, Ren Zhengfei described the company’s current situation as a “battle.” Ren is well-known for using military language in his communications with employees.

In May, the company was put on a U.S. blacklist — or the so-called Entity List — which restricts American businesses from selling to the Chinese firm. Huawei relies on a lot of American technology from software to hardware.

But on Monday, the U.S. administration extended a reprieve for the telecommunications company for 90 days. U.S. businesses can sell specific products to Huawei during the 90-day period.

“Now that the company is at a life or death crisis, our first priority is to encourage all crew to make contributions, and the second is to choose and promote talents, to add ‘new blood’ to our system,” Ren said, according to a CNBC translation of the memo. He said there will be “new blood” in the company in three to five years.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-21  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zhengfei, battle, employees, ceo, strategy, company, crisis, memo, pressure, huawei, death, founder, life, lays, ren, telecommunications, faces


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One California police officer killed, two injured in Riverside gun battle

China fixes its yuan midpoint at 7.0326 per dollar, stronger than…Analysts were predicting the midpoint to be set at 7.0421 per dollar after the yuan last traded at 7.0578 in Monday’s session, according to Reuters estimates. China Economyread more


China fixes its yuan midpoint at 7.0326 per dollar, stronger than…Analysts were predicting the midpoint to be set at 7.0421 per dollar after the yuan last traded at 7.0578 in Monday’s session, according to Reuters estimates. China Economyread more
One California police officer killed, two injured in Riverside gun battle Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: joanna tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mondays, riverside, yuan, midpoint, dollar, set, officer, injured, gun, killed, traded, thananalysts, stronger, session, predicting, battle, california


One California police officer killed, two injured in Riverside gun battle

China fixes its yuan midpoint at 7.0326 per dollar, stronger than…

Analysts were predicting the midpoint to be set at 7.0421 per dollar after the yuan last traded at 7.0578 in Monday’s session, according to Reuters estimates.

China Economy

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: joanna tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mondays, riverside, yuan, midpoint, dollar, set, officer, injured, gun, killed, traded, thananalysts, stronger, session, predicting, battle, california


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Surescripts ups its battle with Amazon PillPack: ‘We are turning the matter over to the FBI’

Surescripts is upping its battle with Amazon-owned PillPack, accusing a third company of providing PillPack with patient prescription information “fraudulently,” and threatening to turn the matter over to the FBI. It’s the latest in a series of moves that could make it harder for Amazon to enter the prescription drug market. Amazon made its first steps into the space in 2018, when it acquired online pharmacy start-up called PillPack. A year later, Amazon is engaged in a tense battle with one of


Surescripts is upping its battle with Amazon-owned PillPack, accusing a third company of providing PillPack with patient prescription information “fraudulently,” and threatening to turn the matter over to the FBI. It’s the latest in a series of moves that could make it harder for Amazon to enter the prescription drug market. Amazon made its first steps into the space in 2018, when it acquired online pharmacy start-up called PillPack. A year later, Amazon is engaged in a tense battle with one of
Surescripts ups its battle with Amazon PillPack: ‘We are turning the matter over to the FBI’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, turning, ups, prescription, company, space, employee, latest, pharmacy, matter, battle, pillpack, amazon, fbi, surescripts


Surescripts ups its battle with Amazon PillPack: 'We are turning the matter over to the FBI'

Surescripts is upping its battle with Amazon-owned PillPack, accusing a third company of providing PillPack with patient prescription information “fraudulently,” and threatening to turn the matter over to the FBI. It’s the latest in a series of moves that could make it harder for Amazon to enter the prescription drug market.

Americans are spending an excessive amount on prescription drugs, the cost of which likely topped $330 billion in 2018. Amazon made its first steps into the space in 2018, when it acquired online pharmacy start-up called PillPack.

A year later, Amazon is engaged in a tense battle with one of the largest incumbents in the space. Surescripts is owned by a coalition of potential PillPack competitors, including CVS and ExpressScripts, and manages about 80% of all U.S. prescriptions. It is such a dominant force that in April, the Federal Trade Commission sued the company, alleging “illegal monopolization of e-prescription markets.”

The battle is the latest in a string of disputes between Amazon and the established pharmacy companies since the PillPack deal — a deal that sent shares of pharmacy owners and pharmacy benefit managers tumbling. Earlier this year, CVS filed a lawsuit against a former employee after he told the company he would be taking a job at PillPack. A judge blocked the employee from working for PillPack for 18 months.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, turning, ups, prescription, company, space, employee, latest, pharmacy, matter, battle, pillpack, amazon, fbi, surescripts


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Apple lost the 5G battle, but it paid Intel $1 billion to win the war

Apple may have lost the 5G battle to Qualcomm, but it’s now in a position to win the war. Apple said Thursday it will buy Intel’s smartphone modem business, which includes several patents and about 2,000 Intel employees, for $1 billion. Option two: Wait for Intel to catch up with its 5G modems, which were said to be running behind schedule. Option three: Choose Huawei’s 5G modems, which would be a tough sell in today’s environment thanks to trade tensions and cybersecurity concerns. Option four:


Apple may have lost the 5G battle to Qualcomm, but it’s now in a position to win the war. Apple said Thursday it will buy Intel’s smartphone modem business, which includes several patents and about 2,000 Intel employees, for $1 billion. Option two: Wait for Intel to catch up with its 5G modems, which were said to be running behind schedule. Option three: Choose Huawei’s 5G modems, which would be a tough sell in today’s environment thanks to trade tensions and cybersecurity concerns. Option four:
Apple lost the 5G battle, but it paid Intel $1 billion to win the war Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: steve kovach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, qualcomm, battle, apple, paid, settled, intel, win, 5g, lost, chips, war, billion, modems, plans, valley, position


Apple lost the 5G battle, but it paid Intel $1 billion to win the war

Tim Cook, chief executive officer of Apple, and Eddy Cue, senior vice president of Internet Software and Services at Apple, attend the annual Allen & Company Sun Valley Conference, July 10, 2019 in Sun Valley, Idaho.

Apple may have lost the 5G battle to Qualcomm, but it’s now in a position to win the war.

Apple said Thursday it will buy Intel’s smartphone modem business, which includes several patents and about 2,000 Intel employees, for $1 billion. It’s no secret Apple has been interested in developing its own modems for the iPhone, and buying up all that Intel IP puts it in a position to have one ready by the time its deal with Qualcomm runs out.

Apple had four bad options when it came to its 5G plans after it settled the royalty spat with Qualcomm in April:

Option one: Settle with Qualcomm and get its 5G chips into iPhones by 2020.

Option two: Wait for Intel to catch up with its 5G modems, which were said to be running behind schedule.

Option three: Choose Huawei’s 5G modems, which would be a tough sell in today’s environment thanks to trade tensions and cybersecurity concerns.

Option four: Make its own 5G chips, which would take several years and put Apple far behind other handset competitors that are already releasing 5G phones this year.

So Apple went with the least of all evils. It settled with Qualcomm and laid the groundwork for a long-term plan to develop its own modems. Meanwhile, Intel was forced to back out of its 5G modem plans once Apple and Qualcomm signed their deal, and its assets were relatively cheap and attractive for Apple to scoop up and get a head start on its own chips.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: steve kovach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, qualcomm, battle, apple, paid, settled, intel, win, 5g, lost, chips, war, billion, modems, plans, valley, position


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Delta says the next big battle between airlines will take place on the ground

PhotoAlto/Thierry Foulon | Brand X Pictures | Getty ImagesThere are some aspects of the airport experience that airlines can’t do anything about. For the airlines like Delta, it does not matter that some of the terminal experience is beyond their control. Delta is collecting as much data as it can from passengers to improve the travel experience. Wall Street is watchingWall Street is focusing more on the airport experience in its analysis of airline stocks. Delta is among the airlines that have


PhotoAlto/Thierry Foulon | Brand X Pictures | Getty ImagesThere are some aspects of the airport experience that airlines can’t do anything about. For the airlines like Delta, it does not matter that some of the terminal experience is beyond their control. Delta is collecting as much data as it can from passengers to improve the travel experience. Wall Street is watchingWall Street is focusing more on the airport experience in its analysis of airline stocks. Delta is among the airlines that have
Delta says the next big battle between airlines will take place on the ground Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-21  Authors: eric rosenbaum, leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, battle, ground, place, airport, experience, travel, jacobson, airports, making, delta, mayerowitz, big, airlines, airline


Delta says the next big battle between airlines will take place on the ground

The airline industry is experiencing strong financial performance — Delta Air Lines recently hit a record stock price, and United Airline Holdings grew profits in its latest earnings as the U.S. economy continues its decade-long run. In fact, airline industry conditions are so good, longtime airline-stock hater Warren Buffett of Berkshire Hathaway became one of the sector’s biggest investors in recent years after a wave of consolidation brought the fleets closer to the almost monopoly conditions he looks for in businesses. But other recent highs in air travel are not so positive: Airports all over the country are setting new records in monthly passenger levels, making the airport experience one of the worst “legs” in a traveler’s journey. As a result, major airlines flush with money for reinvestment are making the on-the-ground experience a greater focus of their efforts to out-compete rival carriers. “I think the next area of competition in air travel is in the airport,” Paul Jacobson, executive vice president and CFO of Delta said at the CNBC @Work Human Capital + Finance conference in Chicago last Tuesday. “How do you continue to streamline the on-the-ground experience. It is a big part of how passengers rate the experience.” In major metro areas the two biggest issues in airport satisfaction are access to the airport (with so many major airports far from city centers) and the terminal itself, at No. 1, according to J.D. Power. “The most common PR headline from any airport any month is ‘X airport sets new monthly passenger record,'” said Mike Taylor, J.D. Power’s travel practice leader. But that does not necessarily mean it is good PR with so many airports so dated.

PhotoAlto/Thierry Foulon | Brand X Pictures | Getty Images

There are some aspects of the airport experience that airlines can’t do anything about. Only 6% more airports have been built in the U.S. since 1980, despite 181% more domestic passengers. “They can’t build another four-lane highway to the airport,” Taylor said. “Most of the airports are shoehorned into areas never meant to handle this much traffic.” Those problems don’t end once at the airport, either: Many parking lots closest to terminals at some of the busiest U.S. airports are now completely full and closed on multiple days per week. This is the type of on-the-ground frustration that leads to missed flights, and missed flights lead to the blame being placed all around. “People are more stressed on the airport and airlines side of things, and they blame both,” Taylor said. For the airlines like Delta, it does not matter that some of the terminal experience is beyond their control. Taylor said that when an aircraft closes and sits on the ground because the FAA is holding them there, passengers do not complain about the FAA. “They paid the airline, and they pick up the cocktail napkin and swear at it.” For more on tech, transformation and the future of work, join CNBC at the @ Work: People + Machines Summit in San Francisco on Nov. 4. Leaders from Dropbox, Sas, McKinsey and more will teach us how to balance the needs of today with the possibilities of tomorrow, and the winning strategies to compete. Scott Mayerowitz, executive editorial director of travel information site The Points Guy, said the airport experience is unique in the travel journey as being so bad, and it is an important part of the journey that is underexamined. “Until my head hits the pillow in a hotel room, I am on the go, and it all matters,” Mayerowitz said. Delta is collecting as much data as it can from passengers to improve the travel experience. “We survey everything,” Jacobson told those attending the CNBC event in Chicago. “A lot of that comes down to the psychology of the customer and understanding what each leg in the journey makes the customer feel like.”

Wall Street is watching

Wall Street is focusing more on the airport experience in its analysis of airline stocks. Hunter Keay, a Wolfe Research analyst who covers Delta, wrote that the Delta CFO is correct in his focus on the airport as a competitive key. Keay wrote in a late 2018 research note that Delta’s major investment in “investment-starved airports” like New York City’s LaGuardia “are not so much an act of generosity but a strategic decision that we believe will further widen DAL’s competitive advantage to peers by driving up costs for marginal competitors there that lack scale, pricing power, or both. … This is literally a 20-year competitive advantage DAL is building today, arguably the hardest one yet for competitors to copy.” Delta is investing $12 billion over a five-year period investing in its airport infrastructure, primarily at New York City’s LaGuardia, Los Angeles International, Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, Salt Lake City International Airport and Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. “Airports have always been a challenge for airlines who haven’t been able to crack that code due to more pressing capital needs internally, fear of committing to longer-term, big dollar projects due to business cycle risk with questionable balance sheets, or the challenges of driving buy-in or consensus with the government agencies that run these airports. But it seems to us that DAL is figuring this thing out,” Keay wrote. One of the terminal chokepoints where Delta made an investment is through a stake it owns in biometric screening company Clear. Jacobson pointed to the Clear investment as part of its efforts to streamline the passenger experience through investments in technology. “We’ve made big bets in technology in the past few years thinking we can turn it around into revenue generation,” the Delta CFO said at the CNBC event. Jacobson said technology like Clear should ultimately improve the experience beyond the security checkpoint. “I think ultimately the technology around identification, whether facial recognition or fingerprints, is coming to all transactions,” Jacobson said. “Delta has recognized that security is a horrible headache for people,” Mayerowitz said. “Clear is at many more airports than before because of the Delta investment, and they’ve done saturation at their key hubs. ” Mayerowitz, who is a Clear member, added, “In two to three minutes at LGA or JFK, I can make it from the curb to the other side of security. Clear gets me to the front of the precheck line, and I just put my bag in and walk through and I’m done.”

The timing is right for airlines

A focus on future revenue is one of the reasons why Delta is making the investments now, before a recession hits and operating conditions weaken. Yael Taqqu, a senior partner at management consultant McKinsey, who spoke on a panel with Jacobson at CNBC’s @Work Human Capital + Finance conference, said investments like the ones Delta is making now are designed to be “revenue enhancements” out ahead of the next downturn. “In a downturn, the wedge between digital haves and have nots, which is already wide, will get wider,” said Taqqu. Taylor said the timing is right from an airline industry perspective too. “You have to have three things happen to really expand airports. The economy has to be good, the airline has to be making money, and policies have to be right. These days, we have all three of them working in the airlines favor. … When they are not making money, those things get put on hold. They would like to have everything set up for the passenger to be happy before getting on the craft.” Airlines also are running out of ways to improve and “disaggregate” — price-tier — the in-cabin experience. “Right now airlines have healthy profits and are reinvesting,” Mayerowitz said. “Delta likes to brag that they have the most inflight seatback TVs of any airline, and they’ve built a business around what they say is a superior product in the sky, and it commands a revenue premium, people willing to spend $10-$15 extra. But at the end of the day, there is only so much you can do to increase costs in the sky.” He added of Delta’s focus on the terminal, “They are right, especially as airlines cram more seats into planes and come up with hideous slim-line bathrooms just so they can get an extra row of seats in.” Delta is among the airlines that have cut down bathroom size in some cabins to add an extra back row.

Airports are just pretty bus terminals. There is only so much you can do. Scott Mayerowitz The Points Guy executive editorial director


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-21  Authors: eric rosenbaum, leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, battle, ground, place, airport, experience, travel, jacobson, airports, making, delta, mayerowitz, big, airlines, airline


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Koch network throws its weight behind Silicon Valley in the regulatory battle with Washington

The libertarian Koch network has long been a powerful advocate for conservative causes and a major funder for Republican politicians. During the midterms, for example, the network spent $2.1 million on ads supporting then-Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley’s challenge to incumbent Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill. The Koch network quickly issued a statement slamming Hawley’s bill as “toxic” and argued it would “punish success in the next generation of innovative startups.” That’s why we’re ta


The libertarian Koch network has long been a powerful advocate for conservative causes and a major funder for Republican politicians. During the midterms, for example, the network spent $2.1 million on ads supporting then-Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley’s challenge to incumbent Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill. The Koch network quickly issued a statement slamming Hawley’s bill as “toxic” and argued it would “punish success in the next generation of innovative startups.” That’s why we’re ta
Koch network throws its weight behind Silicon Valley in the regulatory battle with Washington Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-30  Authors: ylan mui
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, summit, network, regulatory, battle, sen, washington, silicon, political, technology, supporting, tech, speech, valley, koch, spent, weight, throws


Koch network throws its weight behind Silicon Valley in the regulatory battle with Washington

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — Billionaire industrialist Charles Koch has waded into the battle over Big Tech.

Koch’s sprawling network of advocacy and philanthropy organizations has quietly spent at least $10 million over the past four years to combat the backlash against new technologies and encourage digital free speech, according to a person familiar with the group’s funding. The effort has encompassed grants to academics and think tanks, support for state and local legal battles, and political ad campaigns.

“In this time of disruption, people are wondering if they can adapt and succeed,” Koch said in a video message to wealthy donors invited to the network’s summer summit. “Our answer is yes.”

The libertarian Koch network has long been a powerful advocate for conservative causes and a major funder for Republican politicians. But since the election of President Donald Trump, the group has distanced itself somewhat from the GOP and focused on building coalitions from across the political spectrum on specific issues instead.

Tech is one of the latest examples of that new strategy. The industry has come under fire from both sides of the aisle, and the network said it would not hesitate to cross party lines to defend innovation.

During the midterms, for example, the network spent $2.1 million on ads supporting then-Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley’s challenge to incumbent Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill. Hawley won the election and has since emerged as one of the leading critics of the tech industry on Capitol Hill. Last month, he introduced a bill that would eliminate liability immunity for online platforms unless they get clearance from federal regulators — a potential death blow to internet companies.

The Koch network quickly issued a statement slamming Hawley’s bill as “toxic” and argued it would “punish success in the next generation of innovative startups.”

This spring, after presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., called for breaking up companies such as Facebook and Google, the group released an ad campaign warning members of the Senate Judiciary Committee not to use antitrust law as a “political weapon.” The targets included Sen. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., whom the network has otherwise staunchly supported.

“We believe technology greatly improves people’s lives,” said Jesse Blumenthal, director of technology and innovation for Stand Together, the Koch network’s umbrella organization. “In order to facilitate that, we need cultural attitudes and policies that allow for experimentation. That’s why we’re taking a more active role in supporting positive tech work and holding government accountable on tech issues.”

At the Koch summit, tech was a recurring theme over the three-day gathering. Donors could take a spin in a self-driving minivan. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai is scheduled to deliver a speech at the summit on Monday. And AOL founder Steve Case addressed the audience on Sunday and implored them to invest in start-ups outside of established bases such as California, New York and Massachusetts.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-30  Authors: ylan mui
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, summit, network, regulatory, battle, sen, washington, silicon, political, technology, supporting, tech, speech, valley, koch, spent, weight, throws


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Tech companies prepare to battle misinformation during debates

Tech companies prepare to battle misinformation during debates15 Hours AgoCNBC’s Julia Boorstin reports on the ways tech companies are gearing up to tackle fake news and misinformation as the first debates of 2020 kick off.


Tech companies prepare to battle misinformation during debates15 Hours AgoCNBC’s Julia Boorstin reports on the ways tech companies are gearing up to tackle fake news and misinformation as the first debates of 2020 kick off.
Tech companies prepare to battle misinformation during debates Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ways, hours, debates, prepare, battle, tech, companies, tackle, julia, kick, misinformation, reports


Tech companies prepare to battle misinformation during debates

Tech companies prepare to battle misinformation during debates

15 Hours Ago

CNBC’s Julia Boorstin reports on the ways tech companies are gearing up to tackle fake news and misinformation as the first debates of 2020 kick off.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ways, hours, debates, prepare, battle, tech, companies, tackle, julia, kick, misinformation, reports


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Adidas loses 3-stripes trade mark battle in Europe

The employee of Adidas Elisabeth Koelemij Peters, poses with a shoe of the German sportswear giant prior the shareholders meeting of the German sportswear giant Adidas. Sportswear giant Adidas lost another battle over its three-stripe branding on clothing, footwear and headgear. The General Court of the European Union confirmed Wednesday that the three parallel stripes applied in any direction is not a valid trade mark. “Adidas is disappointed with the recent ruling by the General Court to uphol


The employee of Adidas Elisabeth Koelemij Peters, poses with a shoe of the German sportswear giant prior the shareholders meeting of the German sportswear giant Adidas. Sportswear giant Adidas lost another battle over its three-stripe branding on clothing, footwear and headgear. The General Court of the European Union confirmed Wednesday that the three parallel stripes applied in any direction is not a valid trade mark. “Adidas is disappointed with the recent ruling by the General Court to uphol
Adidas loses 3-stripes trade mark battle in Europe Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 3stripe, german, giant, applied, battle, court, europe, mark, loses, general, spokesperson, direction, 3stripes, adidas, trade


Adidas loses 3-stripes trade mark battle in Europe

The employee of Adidas Elisabeth Koelemij Peters, poses with a shoe of the German sportswear giant prior the shareholders meeting of the German sportswear giant Adidas.

Sportswear giant Adidas lost another battle over its three-stripe branding on clothing, footwear and headgear.

The General Court of the European Union confirmed Wednesday that the three parallel stripes applied in any direction is not a valid trade mark.

“Adidas does not prove that that mark has acquired, throughout the territory of the EU, distinctive character following the use which had been made of it,” the General Court said in its ruling.

This is not the first time that the German company has had to address challenges with regards to its logo. In 2014, the European Union Intellectual Property Office registered, in favour of Adidas, the three parallel equidistant stripes of identical width, applied on the product in any direction. However, in 2016, the same institution annulled that registration on the basis that it lacked a distinctive character – this came after an application from the Belgian undertaking, Shoe Branding Europe BVBA.

“Adidas is disappointed with the recent ruling by the General Court to uphold the cancellation of the company’s 3-Stripe mark applied to our products in whichever direction in Europe,” a spokesperson for Adidas told CNBC via email on Thursday.

The same spokesperson told CNBC that Adidas is considering its options.

“This ruling is limited to this particular execution of the 3-Stripe mark and does not impact on the broad scope of protection that adidas has on its well-known 3-Stripe mark in various forms in Europe. Whilst we are disappointed with the decision, we are further evaluating it and are welcoming the useful guidance that the Court will give us for protecting our 3-Stripe mark applied to our products in whichever direction in the future,” the spokesperson said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 3stripe, german, giant, applied, battle, court, europe, mark, loses, general, spokesperson, direction, 3stripes, adidas, trade


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Joe Biden’s Twitter fight with Amazon perfectly sums up the battle over America’s new tax code

WASHINGTON – Amazon and Joe Biden are in a Twitter spat, and it perfectly captures the controversy over America’s new tax code. “I have nothing against Amazon, but no company pulling in billions of dollars of profits should pay a lower tax rate than firefighters and teachers,” Biden wrote Thursday morning. Congress designed tax laws to encourage companies to reinvest in the American economy,” the company wrote on its Amazon News Twitter account. Assume VP Biden’s complaint is w/ the tax code, no


WASHINGTON – Amazon and Joe Biden are in a Twitter spat, and it perfectly captures the controversy over America’s new tax code. “I have nothing against Amazon, but no company pulling in billions of dollars of profits should pay a lower tax rate than firefighters and teachers,” Biden wrote Thursday morning. Congress designed tax laws to encourage companies to reinvest in the American economy,” the company wrote on its Amazon News Twitter account. Assume VP Biden’s complaint is w/ the tax code, no
Joe Biden’s Twitter fight with Amazon perfectly sums up the battle over America’s new tax code Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-14  Authors: ylan mui
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, twitter, perfectly, amazon, paid, americas, company, sums, pay, wrote, taxes, rate, battle, tax, profits, bidens, code, joe, fight


Joe Biden's Twitter fight with Amazon perfectly sums up the battle over America's new tax code

WASHINGTON – Amazon and Joe Biden are in a Twitter spat, and it perfectly captures the controversy over America’s new tax code.

The beef began when the frontrunner for the Democratic presidential nomination called out the online giant on Twitter.

“I have nothing against Amazon, but no company pulling in billions of dollars of profits should pay a lower tax rate than firefighters and teachers,” Biden wrote Thursday morning. “We need to reward work, not just wealth.”

Amazon fired back at the end of the day, redirecting the candidate’s aim.

“We’ve paid $2.6B in corporate taxes since 2016. We pay every penny we owe. Congress designed tax laws to encourage companies to reinvest in the American economy,” the company wrote on its Amazon News Twitter account. “We have. $200B in investments since 2011 & 300K US jobs. Assume VP Biden’s complaint is w/ the tax code, not Amazon.”

Biden’s tweet linked to a New York Times story that cited data from the left-leaning Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy on companies that earned billions of dollars last year but paid no federal taxes. The analysis showed that Amazon topped the list, with pretax profits of nearly $11 billion. In fact, the group found the company actually enjoyed a negative tax rate of 1.2 percent, thanks to a $129 million income tax rebate.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-14  Authors: ylan mui
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, twitter, perfectly, amazon, paid, americas, company, sums, pay, wrote, taxes, rate, battle, tax, profits, bidens, code, joe, fight


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California gig economy legislation advances, could shape battle in other states

LOS ANGELES — Several states may follow California ‘s lead on proposed gig economy legislation that could add new labor protections for ride-hailing drivers working for Lyft and Uber . Uber drivers protest in New York’s financial district, May 8, 2019. At the same time, Gonzalez said several other states have looked at, and continue to look at, new laws on the gig economy and may see California as leading the way. “We see movements on the gig economy in New York and Washington,” added Gonzalez.


LOS ANGELES — Several states may follow California ‘s lead on proposed gig economy legislation that could add new labor protections for ride-hailing drivers working for Lyft and Uber . Uber drivers protest in New York’s financial district, May 8, 2019. At the same time, Gonzalez said several other states have looked at, and continue to look at, new laws on the gig economy and may see California as leading the way. “We see movements on the gig economy in New York and Washington,” added Gonzalez.
California gig economy legislation advances, could shape battle in other states Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: jeff daniels
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shape, wage, gig, dynamex, california, uber, battle, drivers, lyft, advances, workers, states, legislation, economy, independent


California gig economy legislation advances, could shape battle in other states

Last month, Uber and Lyft drivers in New York, Los Angeles and several other cities conducted a strike to call attention to low wages and other grievances. Uber has more than 3 million drivers worldwide, and Lyft has over 1 million.

The Democratic lawmaker said that the “misclassification” of some workers as independent contractors also impacts their right to organize.

“A lot of workers in California and throughout the nation have been misclassified for years,” said Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez, D-San Diego, who introduced AB 5 in December. “There’s a whole list of things people are entitled to as employees that they don’t get as independent contractors — minimum wage, overtime, wage and hour rules, sick leave, paid family leave, unemployment insurance, workers’ compensation, and in some instances health care.”

AB 5 passed the California Assembly last week and is now in the state Senate for consideration. California Gov. Gavin Newsom hasn’t indicated whether he supports AB 5.

The measure could result in thousands of independent contractors getting classified as employees, making them eligible for minimum wages, overtime pay and workers’ compensation protections. The bill could impact not only ride-hailing firms but freight trucking companies.

Assembly Bill 5 would essentially write into law standards adopted last year by California’s high court to determine whether workers fall under the classification of an employee or independent contractor. Oregon and Washington also have pending bills proposing criteria similar to the Golden State.

LOS ANGELES — Several states may follow California ‘s lead on proposed gig economy legislation that could add new labor protections for ride-hailing drivers working for Lyft and Uber .

Uber drivers protest in New York’s financial district, May 8, 2019. The protests were just ahead of Uber’s initial public stock offering.

“Our No. 1 issue is fair wages cause most of us make less than minimum wage after expenses,” said Nicole Moore of Rideshare Drivers United in Los Angeles. Moore said others include labor protections and “having a voice on the job.”

According to Moore, AB 5 could help ride-hailing drivers by establishing a wage floor if they were considered employees. “For most of us that would mean a significant raise after expenses,” said Moore, who drives for both Lyft and Uber. “It would also help us if we were injured on the job.”

Uber doesn’t support the legislation and has raised concerns about the need to keep flexibility for business and drivers.

“We support efforts to modernize labor laws in ways that preserve the flexibility drivers tell us they value while improving the quality and security of independent work,” an Uber spokesperson said in an email statement.

After the California bill cleared the Assembly last week, Lyft also issued a statement focusing on the need for flexibility with labor laws.

AB 5 is supported by union groups and currently grants exemptions to insurance agents, real estate agents, hair stylists and physicians. However, some business groups are pushing for additional carve-outs.

The legislation follows the California Supreme Court decision last year involving Dynamex, a courier service that converted its drivers to independent contractors. There have been challenges to the Dynamex ruling, including from a trucking industry group.

The landmark state court case adopted a so-called ABC test to determine whether someone is an independent contractor. The Dynamex case uses three factors: A) whether the worker is free from the control and direction of the business, B) whether they perform work outside the entity’s business, and C) whether they decide to do so independently.

“AB 5 is really codifying the test that the state Supreme Court put into the Dynamex decision last April,” said Gonzalez. She said there’s still “unease” about the independent contractor issue of from both workers and businesses so the bill is designed “to make it clear.”

At the same time, Gonzalez said several other states have looked at, and continue to look at, new laws on the gig economy and may see California as leading the way.

“We see movements on the gig economy in New York and Washington,” added Gonzalez. “We know that there’s concern out there. Might we provide a level of certainty that other states want to follow — I would hope so.”

Washington state and Oregon have bills in legislative committees that would apply a similar test to the one used in California’s Dynamex case for independent contractor determinations. In Oregon, several groups have lined up to fight the proposed legislation and argue it would curb start-ups and be a job killer.

Also, Philadelphia is “watching California closely” as it considers its own new gig worker laws, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported last week.

Last year, New York City passed laws that require ride-hailing operators to pay drivers a $17.22 per hour minimum wage. The regulations went into effect in February and a New York judge recently rejected a challenge from Lyft to the wage rules.

Nationwide, just more than 10% of workers rely on the gig economy for most of their income, according to the Gig Economy Data Hub, a project affiliated with Cornell University and the Aspen Institute. The figure counts those individuals getting income from temp agencies and contract work as well as various freelancers and on-call workers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: jeff daniels
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shape, wage, gig, dynamex, california, uber, battle, drivers, lyft, advances, workers, states, legislation, economy, independent


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