‘This is Battle of the Bulge. This is 9/11’: Al Gore compares climate crisis to historic events

Former US Vice-President Al Gore, speaks at the Securing a Sustainable Future for the Amazon, during the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, on January 22, 2020. Former U.S. Vice President Al Gore believes the climate crisis is getting worse “way faster” than most people realize, describing it as a “challenge to our moral imagination.” Delivering closing remarks at a World Economic Forum panel session on Wednesday, Gore spoke passionately about the climate emergency. At one stage, the co


Former US Vice-President Al Gore, speaks at the Securing a Sustainable Future for the Amazon, during the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, on January 22, 2020.
Former U.S. Vice President Al Gore believes the climate crisis is getting worse “way faster” than most people realize, describing it as a “challenge to our moral imagination.”
Delivering closing remarks at a World Economic Forum panel session on Wednesday, Gore spoke passionately about the climate emergency.
At one stage, the co
‘This is Battle of the Bulge. This is 9/11’: Al Gore compares climate crisis to historic events Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, bulge, faster, compares, gore, crisis, 911, realize, historic, events, worse, forum, way, economic, battle, world


'This is Battle of the Bulge. This is 9/11': Al Gore compares climate crisis to historic events

Former US Vice-President Al Gore, speaks at the Securing a Sustainable Future for the Amazon, during the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, on January 22, 2020.

Former U.S. Vice President Al Gore believes the climate crisis is getting worse “way faster” than most people realize, describing it as a “challenge to our moral imagination.”

Delivering closing remarks at a World Economic Forum panel session on Wednesday, Gore spoke passionately about the climate emergency.

At one stage, the co-founder of Generation Investment Management compared the scale of the crisis to a number of infamous historic events.

It is “way worse” than many realize and intensifying “way faster” than people appreciate, Gore said.

“This is Thermopylae. This is Agincourt. This is Dunkirk. This is the Battle of the Bulge. This is 9/11,” he added.

Gore’s comments follow the the hottest year on record for the world’s oceans, the second-hottest year for global average temperatures, and wildfires from the U.S. to the Amazon to Australia.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, bulge, faster, compares, gore, crisis, 911, realize, historic, events, worse, forum, way, economic, battle, world


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Controversial judicial reform still ‘needed,’ Polish prime minister says after EU battle

From August 1, 2019, Polish citizens under the age of 26 who earn less than 85,528 zloty ($22,207) a year will no longer have to pay income tax. Poland continues to have a strained relationship with Brussels after several years of legal disputes over changes to the country’s judiciary, and fears over increasing authoritarianism in the Eastern European nation. Brussels objected to the fact that judges in Poland could be subjected to investigations and sanctions based on their rulings and that the


From August 1, 2019, Polish citizens under the age of 26 who earn less than 85,528 zloty ($22,207) a year will no longer have to pay income tax.
Poland continues to have a strained relationship with Brussels after several years of legal disputes over changes to the country’s judiciary, and fears over increasing authoritarianism in the Eastern European nation.
Brussels objected to the fact that judges in Poland could be subjected to investigations and sanctions based on their rulings and that the
Controversial judicial reform still ‘needed,’ Polish prime minister says after EU battle Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, judicial, judiciary, independence, judges, justice, needed, controversial, changes, support, law, minister, polish, reform, public, prime, european, battle, poland


Controversial judicial reform still 'needed,' Polish prime minister says after EU battle

From August 1, 2019, Polish citizens under the age of 26 who earn less than 85,528 zloty ($22,207) a year will no longer have to pay income tax.

Poland continues to have a strained relationship with Brussels after several years of legal disputes over changes to the country’s judiciary, and fears over increasing authoritarianism in the Eastern European nation.

The dispute came to a head last October when the European Commission referred Poland to the EU’s Court of Justice in order to, it said, “protect judges from political control” that had been introduced by Poland’s conservative ruling Law and Justice Party (PiS).

Brussels objected to the fact that judges in Poland could be subjected to investigations and sanctions based on their rulings and that their judicial independence could be affected. In November, the court ruled that the changes were against EU law and could undermine the independence of courts and discriminated between genders.

Poland’s Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki told CNBC Wednesday that he hoped a solution would be found “very quickly” and seemed unrepentant, saying there was public support for the reforms and that changes were needed.

“After four years of discussions with the European Commission (public support) is still at 80%,” he said, speaking to CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, and brushing off questions over protests by members of the judiciary against the changes.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, judicial, judiciary, independence, judges, justice, needed, controversial, changes, support, law, minister, polish, reform, public, prime, european, battle, poland


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French finance minister says the battle over digital tax is not over yet

DAVOS, Switzerland – The United States has agreed to suspend tariffs on French goods over a digital taxation dispute, but there is still work to be done between the two, France’s finance minister said Wednesday. Paris argued that digital firms were paying little to no tax; but the United States said the levy was particularly “burdensome” for American firms and Washington threatened to impose tariffs on French products. Speaking to reporters at the World Economic Forum, Bruno Le Maire, the French


DAVOS, Switzerland – The United States has agreed to suspend tariffs on French goods over a digital taxation dispute, but there is still work to be done between the two, France’s finance minister said Wednesday.
Paris argued that digital firms were paying little to no tax; but the United States said the levy was particularly “burdensome” for American firms and Washington threatened to impose tariffs on French products.
Speaking to reporters at the World Economic Forum, Bruno Le Maire, the French
French finance minister says the battle over digital tax is not over yet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, france, basis, states, french, tax, battle, digital, minister, finance, united, maire, work, taxation


French finance minister says the battle over digital tax is not over yet

DAVOS, Switzerland – The United States has agreed to suspend tariffs on French goods over a digital taxation dispute, but there is still work to be done between the two, France’s finance minister said Wednesday.

The two countries have been at odds over taxation of tech companies since France announced a levy of 3% on sales generated by digital giants, such as Google and Facebook. Paris argued that digital firms were paying little to no tax; but the United States said the levy was particularly “burdensome” for American firms and Washington threatened to impose tariffs on French products.

Speaking to reporters at the World Economic Forum, Bruno Le Maire, the French finance minister, said his country had accepted a postponement of the payments to the end of 2020.

“In exchange of this postponement … the U.S. accepts to suspend the sanctions against France,” Le Maire said.

However, this is not the end of their dispute. Both agreed to develop an international framework for digital taxation at the OECD level, but they disagree on how to shape it. The United States believes companies should be able to decide whether to reallocate a portion of their corporate profits, whereas France believes the system should be compulsory.

“We still need to have a clear understanding of what will be the working basis at the OECD. And we want this basis to be solid, credible and fair. An optional basis would not be credible,” Le Maire said.

“So, there’s still some work to be done,” the French politician said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, france, basis, states, french, tax, battle, digital, minister, finance, united, maire, work, taxation


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This retailer ordered 35,000 cases of French wine to brace for possible tariffs

Bottles of French wine are displayed for sale in a liquor store on December 3, 2019 in Arlington, Virginia. Though it’s not clear yet whether massive tariffs against French wine will take effect next month, Moore Brothers Wine Co. isn’t taking any chances. “It’s just really terrible,” said David Moore, a co-owner of the sprawling business. “But what we hope to do is make sure that we aren’t doubling prices overnight.” Though the U.S. and China have worked out a “phase one” deal of their respecti


Bottles of French wine are displayed for sale in a liquor store on December 3, 2019 in Arlington, Virginia.
Though it’s not clear yet whether massive tariffs against French wine will take effect next month, Moore Brothers Wine Co. isn’t taking any chances.
“It’s just really terrible,” said David Moore, a co-owner of the sprawling business.
“But what we hope to do is make sure that we aren’t doubling prices overnight.”
Though the U.S. and China have worked out a “phase one” deal of their respecti
This retailer ordered 35,000 cases of French wine to brace for possible tariffs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, world, tariffs, 35000, wine, battle, cases, moore, trade, 100, worked, retailer, possible, brace, french, ordered


This retailer ordered 35,000 cases of French wine to brace for possible tariffs

Bottles of French wine are displayed for sale in a liquor store on December 3, 2019 in Arlington, Virginia.

Though it’s not clear yet whether massive tariffs against French wine will take effect next month, Moore Brothers Wine Co. isn’t taking any chances.

The retailer, which operates in New York, New Jersey and Delaware, ordered more than 35,000 cases of imported wine to be delivered by Feb. 1, just in case the White House follows through on its threat for tariffs that could be around 100% and levied on a host of other goods.

“It’s just really terrible,” said David Moore, a co-owner of the sprawling business. “But what we hope to do is make sure that we aren’t doubling prices overnight.”

Wine imports from the European Union already face 25% duties, but the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative has floated the idea of hiking them to 100% as part of an ongoing battle over tariffs on Airbus airliners. The USTR did not respond to a request for comment.

Though the U.S. and China have worked out a “phase one” deal of their respective tariff battle, the wine issue is just one of many unresolved trade issues around the world.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, world, tariffs, 35000, wine, battle, cases, moore, trade, 100, worked, retailer, possible, brace, french, ordered


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The FBI and Apple are poised for another battle over unlocking iPhones

Apple and the FBI are again poised for a disagreement over whether law enforcement should be able to count on tech makers to provide them access to the devices of criminal suspects. The slow-burning dispute has heated up in recent years, with Attorney General William Barr and top FBI officials asking for greater access to consumer technology, even as encryption and privacy controls grow stronger. The FBI sued Apple in California Central District Court. Apple fought the suit, arguing that breakin


Apple and the FBI are again poised for a disagreement over whether law enforcement should be able to count on tech makers to provide them access to the devices of criminal suspects.
The slow-burning dispute has heated up in recent years, with Attorney General William Barr and top FBI officials asking for greater access to consumer technology, even as encryption and privacy controls grow stronger.
The FBI sued Apple in California Central District Court.
Apple fought the suit, arguing that breakin
The FBI and Apple are poised for another battle over unlocking iPhones Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, officials, encryption, phone, users, apple, unlocking, tech, fbi, security, battle, poised, privacy, shooting, iphones


The FBI and Apple are poised for another battle over unlocking iPhones

Apple and the FBI are again poised for a disagreement over whether law enforcement should be able to count on tech makers to provide them access to the devices of criminal suspects. The FBI wants access to the phone of Mohammad Alshamrani, who is suspected of killing three people in a shooting spree on a Navy base in Pensacola, Florida, on Dec. 6. FBI General Counsel Dana Boente said in a letter shared with NBC News that officials have sought help getting information from the encrypted device from other agencies as well as third-party vendors in foreign countries. Apple has responded by saying it is working with officials on the matter.

Attorney General William Barr, December 10, 2019. Al Drago | Reuters

But the issues would appear to set up a privacy and security debate that has pitted tech companies against the U.S. Justice Department for several years. The slow-burning dispute has heated up in recent years, with Attorney General William Barr and top FBI officials asking for greater access to consumer technology, even as encryption and privacy controls grow stronger. Tweet

A long-simmering debate

Although the FBI and tech companies have been at odds over encryption for more than a decade, the dispute came to a head after another mass shooting. The Justice Department asked Apple to create software that would allow law enforcement officials to unlock the phone of the prime suspects in the San Bernardino, California, shooting that killed 14 people in 2015. The FBI sued Apple in California Central District Court. Apple fought the suit, arguing that breaking its encryption would put all users at privacy risk, and won an initial hearing. But the FBI eventually dropped the suit in 2016 after finding a third-party vendor — long rumored to be Israeli security company NSO Group — to help unlock the device. “The government is asking Apple to hack our own users and undermine decades of security advancements that protect our customers — including tens of millions of American citizens — from sophisticated hackers and cybercriminals,” the company said at the time. “The same engineers who built strong encryption into the iPhone to protect our users would, ironically, be ordered to weaken those protections and make our users less safe.” The FBI later said the phone yielded no information relevant to the case, though it had said the passcode was needed to, in part, search for co-conspirators who may be planning further attacks. Later in 2016, Apple also updated security on its devices to prevent government snooping.

The official seal of the Federal Bureau of Investigation is seen on an iPhone’s camera screen outside the J. Edgar Hoover headquarters on Feb. 23, 2016, in Washington, D.C. Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, officials, encryption, phone, users, apple, unlocking, tech, fbi, security, battle, poised, privacy, shooting, iphones


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The battle over abortion rights: Here’s what’s at stake in 2020

Abortionrights activist gathered outside the U.S. Supreme Court to protest against the recent abortion laws passed across the country in recent weeks. Experts, citing these factors, expect the new year to continue to be challenging for abortion rights. Most of the Democratic candidates indicated they support the repeal of the Hyde Amendment, but haven’t specified whether they’d sign a budget that included the Hyde Amendment. Lawmakers since it was passed in 1977 have voted for the Hyde Amendment


Abortionrights activist gathered outside the U.S. Supreme Court to protest against the recent abortion laws passed across the country in recent weeks.
Experts, citing these factors, expect the new year to continue to be challenging for abortion rights.
Most of the Democratic candidates indicated they support the repeal of the Hyde Amendment, but haven’t specified whether they’d sign a budget that included the Hyde Amendment.
Lawmakers since it was passed in 1977 have voted for the Hyde Amendment
The battle over abortion rights: Here’s what’s at stake in 2020 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-06  Authors: yelena dzhanova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, abortion, court, 2020, reproductive, case, stake, hyde, whats, battle, amendment, heres, support, rights, supreme


The battle over abortion rights: Here's what's at stake in 2020

Abortionrights activist gathered outside the U.S. Supreme Court to protest against the recent abortion laws passed across the country in recent weeks. Tuesday, May 21, 2019. Washington, D.C. (Photo by Aurora Samperio/NurPhoto via Getty Images) Aurora Samperio | NurPhoto | Getty Images

Changes at the state and federal level made 2019 a volatile year for abortion access. But for activists, the fight is just heating up. Reproductive rights experts anticipate the abortion landscape to change even more dramatically in the year ahead, thanks to an onslaught of expected court rulings and new laws. Many of the battles in the coming year stem from policies implemented and struck down in prior years. Republican-led states, emboldened by the Supreme Court’s new conservative majority and the Trump administration’s anti-abortion policies, passed 59 abortion restrictions in 2019. Among those restrictions was a wave of state-led abortion bans that were temporarily blocked from going into effect last year. The Trump administration in February instituted the “gag rule,” which bars the use of Title X money “to perform, promote, refer for, or support abortion as a method of family planning.” Title X helps fund birth control and reproductive health care for low-income individuals, according to Planned Parenthood. Experts, citing these factors, expect the new year to continue to be challenging for abortion rights. Here are the major events in 2020 that could bring drastic change to abortion policy:

Louisiana abortion case hits the Supreme Court

In March, the Supreme Court will take up its first major case relating to abortion with both of President Donald Trump’s appointees, Justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh, on the bench. The high court will review a controversial Louisiana law from 2014 that requires doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of the facility where the abortions are provided. Opponents said it would effectively limit the state of about 4.5 million to one abortion provider. The court struck down a nearly identical Texas law in the 2016 case Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt. Diana Kasdan, director of judicial strategy at the Center for Reproductive Rights, an activist group that brought the Louisiana case, warned that the court could use the case to “effectively ban abortion” even if it doesn’t overrule its longstanding abortion precedents, known as Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey. “If this law were to be upheld, without overruling Roe v. Wade, without overruling Casey, a state like Louisiana could effectively ban abortion because they’re going to be down to one clinic,” Kasdan said. Opponents are also worried that the ruling could have broader implications for abortion rights, arguing it might undermine the “undue burden” standard applied by the Supreme Court to determine whether laws restricting abortion are constitutional. This case involves a potential regulation that’s “measured against” that standard, said Eric Scheidler, executive director of Pro-Life Action League. “Here in this case, the court has the opportunity to further define that undue burden, maybe even overturn the Hellerstedt case,” he said.

2020 candidates on the Hyde Amendment

Experts on both sides are going to pay attention to 2020 Democratic candidates and their stance on the Hyde Amendment, which bars federal funding for abortions except in cases of rape or incest or when the life of the person giving birth is at risk. Opponents of the Hyde Amendment are reproductive rights groups seeking its repeal, arguing that women of color make up more than half of the population enrolled in Medicaid that’s subject to abortion coverage restrictions. “Restrictions on abortion coverage disproportionately hurt low-income people, especially women of color, immigrant women, and young women, meanwhile anti-choice lawmakers continue to wage unprecedented attacks on reproductive freedom on all fronts,” said Amanda Thayer, deputy national communications director at nonprofit NARAL Pro-Choice America. “The moment we’re in shows how support for reproductive freedom, including repealing the Hyde Amendment, is no longer negotiable, and all the Democratic presidential front-runners understand that — something unthinkable a few years ago,” Thayer said. Most of the Democratic candidates indicated they support the repeal of the Hyde Amendment, but haven’t specified whether they’d sign a budget that included the Hyde Amendment. Lawmakers since it was passed in 1977 have voted for the Hyde Amendment every year as part of a larger spending bill. Former Vice President Joe Biden said he supports its repeal, after having been the subject of criticism for flip-flopping on the matter in June. The Democratic front-runner has shifted his stance multiple times since announcing his candidacy for president. Scheidler from the Pro-Life Action League said he “wouldn’t be surprised to see [Biden] flip again if he wins the nomination, when he realizes that most Americans, even those who support legal abortion, don’t believe in forcing Americans to pay for it.”

Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has scared liberals with a flurry of recent health concerns. The 86-year-old sat out of Supreme Court arguments in November due to a stomach bug. Last year, Ginsburg underwent treatment for what likely was pancreatic cancer, according to a statement from the Supreme Court. In late 2018, she was treated for cancerous growths on her lungs. Ginsburg is the oldest justice and is considered the leader of the Supreme Court’s liberal wing, which is outnumbered by conservatives 5-4. She was appointed by President Bill Clinton in 1993. With the addition of Kavanaugh and Gorsuch, the Trump administration is believed to have shifted the Supreme Court’s balance on the topic of abortion to favor conservative policies. Previously, Justice Anthony Kennedy, a moderate Republican appointee, had been the deciding vote on several issues that were split on an ideological vote. “We suspect Brett Kavanaugh is going to have an anti-choice streak,” said Destiny Lopez, co-director of All* Above All, a coalition that unites organizations to build support for lifting abortion coverage restrictions. “We knew with Gorsuch that this was a problem. So there’s concern that this could be a further erosion of Roe v. Wade.”

More states might adopt abortion bans


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-06  Authors: yelena dzhanova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, abortion, court, 2020, reproductive, case, stake, hyde, whats, battle, amendment, heres, support, rights, supreme


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This $44 million Ferrari is at the center of a legal battle over its $25,000 gearbox—take a look

The Ferrari GTO is considered “the Holy Grail in collectible cars,” according CNBC’s Robert Frank — only 36 were ever made. In June of 2018, a 1963 silver Ferrari GTO reportedly sold privately for $70 million and it’s believed to be the highest price ever paid for a car. In August of 2018, a red 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO was sold at auction for $48.4 million. Fisken sued Carl, for breach of contract, demanding that Carl immediately hand over the original gearbox. This, according to Forbes, is why the


The Ferrari GTO is considered “the Holy Grail in collectible cars,” according CNBC’s Robert Frank — only 36 were ever made.
In June of 2018, a 1963 silver Ferrari GTO reportedly sold privately for $70 million and it’s believed to be the highest price ever paid for a car.
In August of 2018, a red 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO was sold at auction for $48.4 million.
Fisken sued Carl, for breach of contract, demanding that Carl immediately hand over the original gearbox.
This, according to Forbes, is why the
This $44 million Ferrari is at the center of a legal battle over its $25,000 gearbox—take a look Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-20  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 25000, center, according, ferrari, gearbox, battle, million, original, car, gearboxtake, look, carl, gto, collins, race, legal, fisken


This $44 million Ferrari is at the center of a legal battle over its $25,000 gearbox—take a look

The Ferrari GTO is considered “the Holy Grail in collectible cars,” according CNBC’s Robert Frank — only 36 were ever made. In June of 2018, a 1963 silver Ferrari GTO reportedly sold privately for $70 million and it’s believed to be the highest price ever paid for a car. In August of 2018, a red 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO was sold at auction for $48.4 million.

And in October 2017, Washington, D.C.-based lawyer Bernard Carl sold his blue 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO to British classic car trader and former race driver Gregor Fisken for $44 million. Now Carl and Fisken are in the middle of a $500,000 legal battle over the car’s gearbox.

John Collins, Talacrest

Fisken says he bought the Ferrari knowing it didn’t have its original gearbox (which is part of the transmission), but with the understanding that Carl would eventually give it to him, according to The Telegraph. That didn’t happen. Fisken sued Carl, for breach of contract, demanding that Carl immediately hand over the original gearbox. And Carl sued Fisken, saying he didn’t retrieve the part because neither Fisken nor Carl would pay a $25,000 fee to the U.S. auto dealer who Carl says has it. Carl is also asking for $500,000 from Fisken to cover the cost of his search for the original gearbox. The case is ongoing, and in the meantime, neither man actually owns the vehicle anymore. Fisken flipped the Ferrari to a “wealthy anonymous collector,” says The Telegraph, for an undisclosed price in 2017. So what’s so amazing about the car at the center of the controversy?

John Collins, Talacrest

Part of the appeal of Ferrari GTOs is their racing history. The GTO at the center of the law suit was used in many races throughout the 1960s, including two particularly well-known contests.

John Collins, Talacrest

In 1962, legendary drivers Phil Hill and Olivier Gendebien drove this Ferrari during the “12 Hours of Sebring,” a famous endurance race, and placed second.

John Collins, Talacrest

The same year, Hill and Gendebien won perhaps the most famous endurance race, “24 Hours of Le Mans,” in the Ferrari.

John Collins, Talacrest

As a race car, its parts were often removed and replaced to maximize the likelihood of success on the track. This, according to Forbes, is why the vehicle’s original gearbox was removed and not put back. The 250 GTO was built with a 3-liter V12 engine, according to Ferrari, that features 300 horsepower at 7,400 rpm. It has a cable-operated handbrake to the rear wheels, and was available as both left- and right-hand drive.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-20  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 25000, center, according, ferrari, gearbox, battle, million, original, car, gearboxtake, look, carl, gto, collins, race, legal, fisken


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Facebook secures a symbolic victory in EU court battle against privacy activist Max Schrems

Facebook’s sharing of data on its European users with the U.S. is legal and provides sufficient protections, the legal advisor to the EU’s top court said Thursday. “Standard contractual clauses for the transfer of personal data to processors established in third countries is valid,” he said in written opinion Thursday. His non-binding opinion is not a ruling as such, but legal experts say opinions from the advocate general are typically followed by the court in a majority of cases. Privacy activ


Facebook’s sharing of data on its European users with the U.S. is legal and provides sufficient protections, the legal advisor to the EU’s top court said Thursday.
“Standard contractual clauses for the transfer of personal data to processors established in third countries is valid,” he said in written opinion Thursday.
His non-binding opinion is not a ruling as such, but legal experts say opinions from the advocate general are typically followed by the court in a majority of cases.
Privacy activ
Facebook secures a symbolic victory in EU court battle against privacy activist Max Schrems Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-19  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, battle, court, privacy, general, facebook, written, data, legal, victory, cjeu, shield, schrems, secures, symbolic, transfer, opinion, max, advocate


Facebook secures a symbolic victory in EU court battle against privacy activist Max Schrems

Facebook’s sharing of data on its European users with the U.S. is legal and provides sufficient protections, the legal advisor to the EU’s top court said Thursday.

In a symbolic win for the social network, Henrik Saugmandsgaard Oe, advocate general to the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU), said the use of so-called standard contractual clauses by Facebook and other firms to transfer information abroad is “valid.”

“Standard contractual clauses for the transfer of personal data to processors established in third countries is valid,” he said in written opinion Thursday.

His non-binding opinion is not a ruling as such, but legal experts say opinions from the advocate general are typically followed by the court in a majority of cases. The CJEU will rule on the case in the coming months.

Privacy activist Max Schrems has been battling Facebook and other internet platforms in the courts for several years. His main contention is with the exporting of data from Europe for processing in the U.S., claiming it aids Washington’s surveillance of citizens and governments in the bloc.

He successfully brought down the EU’s “Safe Habor” data regime in 2015, but argues the bloc’s new “Privacy Shield” arrangement on EU-U.S. data transfers is merely an update to the previous system and remains unlawful.

The CJEU advocate general in his written opinion appeared to sympathize with Schrems’ concerns about the Privacy Shield, “in the light of the right to respect for private life and the right to an effective remedy.”

He said that there was ultimately an “obligation” on data controllers and regulatory authorities to suspend the transfer of data where it conflicts with the laws of the country that information is being sent to.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-19  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, battle, court, privacy, general, facebook, written, data, legal, victory, cjeu, shield, schrems, secures, symbolic, transfer, opinion, max, advocate


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George Conway and other conservative Trump critics form super PAC to battle president in 2020

The mission, as outlined in a website that launched Tuesday coinciding with a New York Times opinion piece, is simple: “Defeat President Trump and Trumpism at the ballot box.” In an interview, George Conway said that he encouraged the new super PAC to involve Anonymous, an unnamed Trump administration official who authored a recent book warning the public against Trump’s reelection. “I think the more the merrier,” George Conway told The Associated Press. The inception of the Lincoln Project is s


The mission, as outlined in a website that launched Tuesday coinciding with a New York Times opinion piece, is simple: “Defeat President Trump and Trumpism at the ballot box.”
In an interview, George Conway said that he encouraged the new super PAC to involve Anonymous, an unnamed Trump administration official who authored a recent book warning the public against Trump’s reelection.
“I think the more the merrier,” George Conway told The Associated Press.
The inception of the Lincoln Project is s
George Conway and other conservative Trump critics form super PAC to battle president in 2020 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, republican, pac, voters, trumps, president, conway, group, super, trump, presidents, battle, reelection, conservative, form, critics, george


George Conway and other conservative Trump critics form super PAC to battle president in 2020

President Donald Trump talks to reporters as he meets with Paraguay’s President Mario Abdo Benitez in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, December 13, 2019.

The group is led by a seven-person advisory council that features some of the GOP’s most vocal Trump critics. Most, but not all, have already left the Republican Party to protest Trump’s rise.

The mission, as outlined in a website that launched Tuesday coinciding with a New York Times opinion piece, is simple: “Defeat President Trump and Trumpism at the ballot box.”

The new organization, known as the Lincoln Project, represents a formal step forward for the so-called Never Trump movement, which has been limited largely to social media commentary and cable news attacks through the first three years of Trump’s presidency. Organizers report fundraising commitments exceeding $1 million to begin, although they hope to raise and spend much more to fund a months-long advertising campaign in a handful of 2020 battleground states to persuade disaffected Republican voters to break from Trump’s GOP.

A small group of President Donald Trump’s fiercest conservative critics, including the husband of the president’s own chief adviser, is launching a super PAC designed to fight Trump’s reelection and punish congressional Republicans deemed his “enablers.”

The principals include former John McCain adviser Steve Schmidt, former Ohio Gov. John Kasich adviser John Weaver, former New Hampshire GOP chair Jennifer Horn, veteran Republican operative Rick Wilson and George Conway, a conservative attorney and husband of Trump’s chief counselor Kellyanne Conway.

In an interview, George Conway said that he encouraged the new super PAC to involve Anonymous, an unnamed Trump administration official who authored a recent book warning the public against Trump’s reelection. The rest of the group ultimately decided not to take Conway’s suggestion.

“I think the more the merrier,” George Conway told The Associated Press. “And I hope maybe he — he or she, I don’t know who Anonymous is — will come out someday and join the effort. Because everyone who believes as we do that Donald Trump is a cancer on the presidency and on the Constitution needs to help and join this effort.”

The inception of the Lincoln Project is significant, but to say it represents a minority of Trump’s Republican Party would be an understatement. Roughly 9 in 10 Republican voters approved of the president’s job performance and have all year, according to Gallup. And with very few exceptions, Trump has the public backing of virtually every Republican member of Congress.

Yet recent elections suggest that Trump’s party is losing ground with educated voters and women, particularly in America’s suburbs, which have traditionally leaned Republican. This new group hopes to push those voters further toward the Democrats.

It is very much a work in progress, despite Tuesday’s official launch. While the core players don’t yet have titles, day-to-day operations will be led by Horn and Reed Galen, a veteran Republican operative who worked for McCain but left the GOP after Trump’s nomination in 2016.

The group begins as a super PAC, which means it can raise and spend unlimited sums of money and must disclose its donors.

“You’re seeing a shift from talk into action,” said Galen, describing the launch as “a big turning point for the political season and for the president’s reelection.”

Specifically, the group plans to focus on blocking Trump’s reelection and defeating Trump-allied Senate candidates in a handful of key 2020 battlegrounds. To do so, it’s targeting a narrow but important slice of the electorate: disaffected Republicans and Republican-leaning independents.

While there is no concrete road map, Weaver said the organizers plan to fight the president’s reelection in Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin along with Arizona and North Carolina. Their Senate efforts likely would focus on Arizona, Colorado, North Carolina, Maine and possibly Kansas and Kentucky.

Weaver said the group is already reviewing scripts for new ads, which are expected to begin running early next year.

“This is organic, and we’re going to be flexible,” he said. “We have to go out and prove ourselves and prove that we can be efficient and effective.”

Meanwhile, George Conway, who formally left the GOP last year, said he likely would serve in a “cheerleader” capacity for the new organization because of his limited political experience.

“I’m not a fundraiser or political consultant, but if I could help in that way and learn how to do that — even to raise a nickel or two — I’ll do it because it’s important,” he said. “For this, I think I can make an exception.”

He suggested the Lincoln Project would pay particular attention to Congress’ impeachment proceedings.

“If he’s not removed by the Senate, he needs to be removed at the ballot box,” he said of Trump. “The people in Congress who are enabling him, either actively or passively, they, too, are violating their oaths of office. … And they need to be removed, too.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, republican, pac, voters, trumps, president, conway, group, super, trump, presidents, battle, reelection, conservative, form, critics, george


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The future of the US wireless industry in limbo as T-Mobile and Sprint begin battle to win merger approval

The future of the U.S. wireless industry is at stake as T-Mobile and Sprint prepare to argue why their $26.5 billion merger should be approved over the arguments of state attorneys general. The states plan to argue the wireless industry is already too consolidated to further squeeze four main competitors — Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint — down to three. Still, cable companies can only offer wireless service because of an agreement the cable companies struck with Verizon in 2011. Comcast, Cha


The future of the U.S. wireless industry is at stake as T-Mobile and Sprint prepare to argue why their $26.5 billion merger should be approved over the arguments of state attorneys general.
The states plan to argue the wireless industry is already too consolidated to further squeeze four main competitors — Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint — down to three.
Still, cable companies can only offer wireless service because of an agreement the cable companies struck with Verizon in 2011.
Comcast, Cha
The future of the US wireless industry in limbo as T-Mobile and Sprint begin battle to win merger approval Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-08  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, begin, win, industry, argue, cable, verizon, states, companies, merger, wireless, network, future, limbo, offer, battle, tmobile, sprint


The future of the US wireless industry in limbo as T-Mobile and Sprint begin battle to win merger approval

T-Mobile CEO John Legere (L) and Sprint Executive Chairman Marcelo Claure (R) arrive to testify at the Senate Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Antitrust, Competition Policy and Consumer Rights hearing on the proposed merger of T-Mobile and Sprint in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on June 27, 2018.

The future of the U.S. wireless industry is at stake as T-Mobile and Sprint prepare to argue why their $26.5 billion merger should be approved over the arguments of state attorneys general.

The federal trial begins Monday in Manhattan. U.S. Judge Victor Marrero will decide if T-Mobile and Sprint’s merger violates anti-competitive law as a group of states, including New York and California, argue the deal will limit competition and ultimately lead to higher prices for consumers.

The states plan to argue the wireless industry is already too consolidated to further squeeze four main competitors — Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint — down to three. While both the Department of Justice and the Federal Communications Commission have already allowed Sprint and T-Mobile to merge, the states will argue those regulatory bodies erred in their decision to OK the deal.

The DOJ and FCC approved the No. 3 and No. 4 U.S. carriers to come together only after reaching a side deal with Dish Network, the satellite TV provider that wants to develop its own new national wireless platform. Dish agreed to buy Sprint’s Boost prepaid business, cell towers and billions of dollars of wireless spectrum to jumpstart a nationwide 5G network that must reach 70% of the U.S. population by 2023.

The states plan to argue that deal won’t be enough to make Dish a compelling fourth player in the nationwide wireless market. The Department of Justice blocked AT&T’s attempt at consolidating the wireless market from four players to three when it tried to acquire T-Mobile in 2011.

Lawyers for T-Mobile and Sprint will argue several important things have changed that make a deal today more competitive and beneficial for consumers than eight years ago.

First, cable companies, such as Comcast and Charter, now offer their own wireless subscription plans, creating more competition and negating the argument that there are only four wireless players in the U.S. Comcast’s Xfinity mobile has more than 1 million customers as the cable company looks to bundle wireless and home broadband service together on one bill for consumers.

Still, cable companies can only offer wireless service because of an agreement the cable companies struck with Verizon in 2011. That agreement allowed cable operators to use Verizon’s wireless network while branding the product as one of their own services, such as Comcast’s Xfinity Mobile. Comcast, Charter and Cox, the third-largest U.S. cable company, share revenue with Verizon from customers that sign up for cable wireless. Because Verizon provides the underlying backbone, state attorneys general may argue that cable companies don’t count as true competitors.

Second, wireless companies are transitioning from 4G LTE to 5G, which should ultimately lead to significantly higher speeds for consumers. T-Mobile and Sprint will argue that if allowed to merge, the companies can offer a 100 megabit per second (Mbps) network that can even substitute as a home broadband product. This could lead to billions of dollars in savings for U.S. consumers who could theoretically cancel their home broadband service in lieu of a wireless replacement. T-Mobile has promised a combined Sprint-T-Mobile 5G network will offer average speeds with lowband and midband wireless spectrum of more than 100 Mbps to 66% of American households by 2021 and 90% of Americans by 2024.

“While we see the odds as close, our current view [is] that the states are more likely than not to win, particularly due to weaknesses we see in the companies’ market definition, reliance on economic arguments with little support in antitrust precedent, a reliance on behavioral remedies to justify the fix, and a reliance on public interest considerations, such as social or industrial policy, that generally are considered irrelevant to competition analysis,” New Street Research analyst Blair Levin wrote in a note to clients. “Having said that, we could see the Judge accepting a number of arguments from the companies and ultimately ruling their way, including by fashioning his own remedies.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-08  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, begin, win, industry, argue, cable, verizon, states, companies, merger, wireless, network, future, limbo, offer, battle, tmobile, sprint


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