New China virus claims sixth victim as holiday travel stokes risk

Chinese travellers wear protective masks as they arrive to board trains at Beijing Railway station before the annual Spring Festival on January 21, 2020 in Beijing, China. Many in China scrambled to buy face masks to protect themselves from the previously unknown, flu-like coronavirus infection and airports around the world tightened screening. The SARS coronavirus outbreak killed nearly 800 people then. The disease was spreading further around other parts of China, however, including five cases


Chinese travellers wear protective masks as they arrive to board trains at Beijing Railway station before the annual Spring Festival on January 21, 2020 in Beijing, China.
Many in China scrambled to buy face masks to protect themselves from the previously unknown, flu-like coronavirus infection and airports around the world tightened screening.
The SARS coronavirus outbreak killed nearly 800 people then.
The disease was spreading further around other parts of China, however, including five cases
New China virus claims sixth victim as holiday travel stokes risk Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sars, beijing, china, health, stokes, coronavirus, risk, holiday, victim, chinese, claims, confirmed, virus, wuhan, travel, outbreak, cases, sixth


New China virus claims sixth victim as holiday travel stokes risk

Chinese travellers wear protective masks as they arrive to board trains at Beijing Railway station before the annual Spring Festival on January 21, 2020 in Beijing, China. The number of cases of a deadly new coronavirus rose to nearly 300 in mainland China Tuesday as health officials stepped up efforts to contain the spread of the pneumonia-like disease which medicals experts confirmed can be passed from human to human.

The toll from a new virus in China rose to six deaths and more than 300 cases on Tuesday as millions of Chinese prepared to travel for the Lunar New Year, heightening contagion risks.

Many in China scrambled to buy face masks to protect themselves from the previously unknown, flu-like coronavirus infection and airports around the world tightened screening.

The outbreak, which began in the central Chinese city of Wuhan, also worried financial markets as investors recalled the economic damage from China’s Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2002/2003 that it initially covered up.

The SARS coronavirus outbreak killed nearly 800 people then.

“We’ll stay at home during the holiday. I’m scared as I remember SARS very well,” said Zhang Xinyuan, who had been bound from Beijing for the Thai resort of Phuket before she and her husband decided to cancel their air tickets.

Authorities have confirmed more than 300 cases of the new coronavirus in China, mostly in Wuhan, a provincial capital and transportation hub, where it may have come from a seafood market.

Symptoms include fever, coughing and difficulty in breathing, and the viral infection can cause pneumonia.

Wuhan mayor Zhou Xianwang told Chinese state television on Tuesday six people had died in his city. The disease was spreading further around other parts of China, however, including five cases in the national capital Beijing.

Fifteen medical personnel are among those infected.

Abroad, Thailand has reported two cases and South Korea one, all involving Chinese from Wuhan. Japan and Taiwan also confirmed one case each, both nationals who had been to Wuhan.

The World Health Organization (WHO) will hold a meeting on Wednesday to consider whether the outbreak is an international public health emergency.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sars, beijing, china, health, stokes, coronavirus, risk, holiday, victim, chinese, claims, confirmed, virus, wuhan, travel, outbreak, cases, sixth


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Beijing will leave Hong Kong to resolve protests, HKEX chair says

The Chinese government should and will let authorities in Hong Kong resolve the continued public protests that have beset the financial center, according to the chair of the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (HKEX). Hong Kong has witnessed more than nine months of protests over a now suspended extradition bill that would have allowed people in the city to be sent to the mainland for trial. Speaking to CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore at the World Economic Forum in Davos on Monday, the chair of the Hong Kong Stock Ex


The Chinese government should and will let authorities in Hong Kong resolve the continued public protests that have beset the financial center, according to the chair of the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (HKEX).
Hong Kong has witnessed more than nine months of protests over a now suspended extradition bill that would have allowed people in the city to be sent to the mainland for trial.
Speaking to CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore at the World Economic Forum in Davos on Monday, the chair of the Hong Kong Stock Ex
Beijing will leave Hong Kong to resolve protests, HKEX chair says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-20  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hkex, world, chair, protests, leave, cha, resolve, issues, exchange, hong, kong, stock, public, beijing


Beijing will leave Hong Kong to resolve protests, HKEX chair says

The Chinese government should and will let authorities in Hong Kong resolve the continued public protests that have beset the financial center, according to the chair of the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (HKEX).

Hong Kong has witnessed more than nine months of protests over a now suspended extradition bill that would have allowed people in the city to be sent to the mainland for trial. The public disorder has spread to consider other issues such as rampant property prices. The most recent rally on Sunday once again turned violent.

Speaking to CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore at the World Economic Forum in Davos on Monday, the chair of the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, Laura Cha, said she felt Beijing would resist from interfering.

“I believe that it will, and it should. It is a local issue under one country, two systems,” said Cha.

For 10 years until 2018, Cha was a member of China’s National People’s Congress, acting as the Hong Kong deputy. The businesswoman added she believed that Hong Kong would soon be able to tackle the issues that have led to the unrest.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-20  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hkex, world, chair, protests, leave, cha, resolve, issues, exchange, hong, kong, stock, public, beijing


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Tenuous US-China trade deal comes as Beijing and Washington remain on a permanent collision course

Chinese President Xi Jinping (R) and US President Donald Trump at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. By sharply accelerating in recent months its trade adjustment with the U.S., China has finally done what it should have initiated more than two years ago. Beijing is on the way to seriously dismantling Washington’s economic and political leverage over China’s economy. During 11 months of last year, China stepped up the rate of decline of its trade surplus with the U.S. t


Chinese President Xi Jinping (R) and US President Donald Trump at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017.
By sharply accelerating in recent months its trade adjustment with the U.S., China has finally done what it should have initiated more than two years ago.
Beijing is on the way to seriously dismantling Washington’s economic and political leverage over China’s economy.
During 11 months of last year, China stepped up the rate of decline of its trade surplus with the U.S. t
Tenuous US-China trade deal comes as Beijing and Washington remain on a permanent collision course Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-20  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rate, western, trade, permanent, collision, chinese, uschina, beijing, strategic, washington, tenuous, surplus, course, china, american, deal, comes, remain, chinas


Tenuous US-China trade deal comes as Beijing and Washington remain on a permanent collision course

Chinese President Xi Jinping (R) and US President Donald Trump at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017.

By sharply accelerating in recent months its trade adjustment with the U.S., China has finally done what it should have initiated more than two years ago.

Beijing is on the way to seriously dismantling Washington’s economic and political leverage over China’s economy. During 11 months of last year, China stepped up the rate of decline of its trade surplus with the U.S. to 16.2%.

Feverish sinologists would call that “decoupling” — a misnomer for China’s belated exit from a position of an excessive and unsustainable trade surplus with the U.S.

Those sinologists don’t seem to notice that China is getting out of that self-imposed structural trap by aggressively slashing its U.S. purchases at an annual rate of 12% between January and November of last year.

Instead of worrying about “decoupling,” advocates of friendly U.S.-China ties should remind Beijing that it should be doing exactly the opposite — by drastically stepping up imports of American goods and services. If the Chinese did that, they would not have to abandon their U.S. markets by cutting exports at an annual rate of 15.2%, as they did for nearly all of last year.

So, the question is: Who is in a hurry to “decouple?”

Looking at trade flows and China’s declining holdings of U.S. debt, the Chinese have apparently concluded that a rapid narrowing of U.S. exposure was a matter of their national interest.

That conclusion has come after years of pleading for a “win-win cooperation,” while Washington kept trying to contain China’s growing global economic and political influence. Instead of cooperation, the U.S. defined its relationship with China as a strategic competition with a country seeking to destroy the Western (i.e., American) world order.

Cooperation made sense for China because it meant an open access to U.S. markets and technology transfers. The U.S., however, finally began to see things differently as it woke up from its evanescing dream that an increasingly prosperous China would shake off its communist rule and join the U.S.-led Western community.

What followed was a radical U.S. policy change Beijing apparently did not expect. China’s huge, and growing, American trade surpluses became an imminent strategic danger that had to be fought by tariffs, sanctions and strict limits to Chinese investments in the U.S. economy.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-20  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rate, western, trade, permanent, collision, chinese, uschina, beijing, strategic, washington, tenuous, surplus, course, china, american, deal, comes, remain, chinas


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Beijing cracking down on IP theft could boost investment in China, former US negotiator says

He explained that the trade agreement’s provisions to protect intellectual property would make a difference for many of the companies doing business in China. They’re going to have due process for the judicial proceedings. It calls for China to submit an “Action Plan to strengthen intellectual property protection” within 30 days of the agreement taking effect. I’ll also make the point, this is going for China,” Willems said. Ultimately, “better intellectual property protection means more investm


He explained that the trade agreement’s provisions to protect intellectual property would make a difference for many of the companies doing business in China.
They’re going to have due process for the judicial proceedings.
It calls for China to submit an “Action Plan to strengthen intellectual property protection” within 30 days of the agreement taking effect.
I’ll also make the point, this is going for China,” Willems said.
Ultimately, “better intellectual property protection means more investm
Beijing cracking down on IP theft could boost investment in China, former US negotiator says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investment, property, trade, willems, boost, theyre, theft, white, negotiator, intellectual, going, beijing, china, cracking, agreement


Beijing cracking down on IP theft could boost investment in China, former US negotiator says

President Donald Trump, with (L-R) Vice President Mike Pence, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, speaks during a press conference with Chinas Vice Premier Liu He(not shown), the countrys top trade negotiator, before they sign a trade agreement between the US and China during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC on January 15, 2020.

If Beijing cracks down hard on intellectual property thefts, it would not only boost the U.S. economy but it would also be good for China, according to a former top White House trade official.

Taking steps to protect trade secrets of foreign businesses operating in the world’s second-largest economy was part of the “phase one” trade deal that U.S. President Donald Trump signed with China on Wednesday.

“To me, the most significant part of this (deal) was what the U.S. was able to achieve on intellectual property,” Clete Willems, a partner at law firm Akin Gump, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Thursday. “Trade secrets theft has been a long-time concern for U.S. businesses, and businesses around the world.”

Willems was previously the deputy director of the National Economic Council and served as the lead trade negotiator for the United States at multilateral summits like the G-7 and G-20.

He explained that the trade agreement’s provisions to protect intellectual property would make a difference for many of the companies doing business in China. “They’re going to have criminal penalties. They’re going to have due process for the judicial proceedings. They’re going to apply those penalties broader than they did in the past,” Willems said, adding there are provisions about pharmaceutical patents and counterfeit goods in the trade pact.

Wednesday’s agreement takes steps to root out several practices by Beijing that has irked the White House and members of Congress from both parties, including intellectual property theft and forced technology transfers from U.S. firms in exchange for Chinese market access.

It calls for China to submit an “Action Plan to strengthen intellectual property protection” within 30 days of the agreement taking effect. The proposal would include “measures that China will take to implement its obligations” and “the date by which each measure will go into effect.” (Read the full agreement here)

Part of the deal also details a $200 billion increase in Beijing’s purchases of U.S. goods over two years as well as commitment from Beijing to allow companies to operate without “any force or pressure” to hand over their technology — that, along with the trade secrets protection provisions, are likely to have ramifications for the U.S. tech sector, where firms want market access in China but are also suspicious over how government officials can access private data stored there.

“If you put it all together, it is going to be a big boost for the U.S. economy. I’ll also make the point, this is going for China,” Willems said. “This really empowers those in China that want to reform their system, want to make it more market-oriented and help them move down that path.”

Ultimately, “better intellectual property protection means more investment in China,” he added.

Still, some experts have expressed concerns about how the U.S. would ensure China keeps up with its commitments. Willems said the promise of further reduction in U.S. tariffs in the second phase of the trade agreement would likely be an incentive for Beijing to “faithfully implement this agreement.”

Another option for Washington would be to convince allies to work with the U.S. to enforce the agreement in a multilateral system to make it more sustainable and prevent Beijing from backsliding from its commitments, according to Willems.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investment, property, trade, willems, boost, theyre, theft, white, negotiator, intellectual, going, beijing, china, cracking, agreement


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Chuck Schumer, in a letter to Trump, says a weak trade deal could hurt the US for years to come

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks during a press conference after the Senate Policy luncheons in the Capitol on Tuesday Dec. 10, 2019. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, in a Tuesday letter to President Donald Trump, expressed concern that a weak trade deal that fails to address “structural inequities” in the U.S.-China relationship could harm American workers and businesses for years to come. Trump and Chinese officials are due to sign a partial trade deal on Wednesday aft


Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks during a press conference after the Senate Policy luncheons in the Capitol on Tuesday Dec. 10, 2019.
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, in a Tuesday letter to President Donald Trump, expressed concern that a weak trade deal that fails to address “structural inequities” in the U.S.-China relationship could harm American workers and businesses for years to come.
Trump and Chinese officials are due to sign a partial trade deal on Wednesday aft
Chuck Schumer, in a letter to Trump, says a weak trade deal could hurt the US for years to come Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, american, address, goods, trade, china, deal, weak, commitments, trump, schumer, hurt, come, chinese, beijing, phase, letter, chuck


Chuck Schumer, in a letter to Trump, says a weak trade deal could hurt the US for years to come

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks during a press conference after the Senate Policy luncheons in the Capitol on Tuesday Dec. 10, 2019.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, in a Tuesday letter to President Donald Trump, expressed concern that a weak trade deal that fails to address “structural inequities” in the U.S.-China relationship could harm American workers and businesses for years to come.

Trump and Chinese officials are due to sign a partial trade deal on Wednesday after years of intense bilateral negotiations. Both sides reached an agreement last month, in which Washington agreed to cancel some new tariffs and reduce rates of other duties in exchange for China purchasing more American agricultural products and addressing U.S. concerns on areas of technology and financial services.

Schumer, one of the Democrats most supportive of Trump’s crackdown on China, previously accused the president of caving to Beijing with the phase one trade deal.

In his Tuesday letter, Schumer wrote that without firm commitments from Beijing that it will curtail its questionable practices, including forced technology transfers from foreign companies to local players, U.S. innovators will “continue to lose billions of dollars.” American firms will struggle to gain fair access to the Chinese market and millions of U.S. jobs will be at risk, he said.

“By giving away leverage with a temporary deal of some reduced tariff in exchange for American goods and vague promises of reform, as China has made time and time again, these structural issues will only become more challenging to address in future negotiations,” Schumer wrote.

“China pledging to make short-term purchases of American goods will not address the fundamental problems that undermine long-term U.S. economic opportunity, prosperity, and security,” he added.

On paper, the phase one deal includes “commitments from China to import various U.S. goods and services over the next two years” worth at least $200 billion, according to a U.S. Trade Representative document. Beijing is said to have also agreed to end its “long-standing practice” of forced technology transfer.

Schumer asked Trump to elucidate on six specific questions about the kind of commitments he had received from Beijing as part of the phase one deal:

What commitments, if any, address the Chinese government’s subsidy programs that continue to harm U.S. industry and workers? What commitments, if any, has China made on substantive state-owned enterprise reform as part of the “phase one” agreement? What commitments, if any, will curtail the dumping of Chinese products which puts American firms out of business and threatens U.S. jobs? What commitments, if any, will hold China accountable for unauthorized intrusions into U.S. commercial computer networks and cyber-enabled theft of intellectual property and sensitive commercial information? To what extent will this “phase one” agreement regain lost market share for U.S. farmers? Should farmers expect that additional rounds of program funding will address these inequities?

While experts have said the agreement is a step in the right direction, many are still unsure of exactly what the two countries are agreeing to and how they will enforce their deal.

During the trade war, the U.S. slapped tariffs on more than $500 billion in Chinese goods during the trade war, while Beijing retaliated by putting duties on more than $100 billion in American imports.

— CNBC’s Jacob Pramuk contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, american, address, goods, trade, china, deal, weak, commitments, trump, schumer, hurt, come, chinese, beijing, phase, letter, chuck


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US will remove China from currency manipulator list ahead of trade deal signing

The decision to strike China from the currency manipulator list comes more than five months after the Treasury Department formally made the designation. President Donald Trump and China Vice Premier Liu He are scheduled to sign a preliminary trade agreement in Washington on Wednesday. The president’s decision to remove China from the list drew criticism from the Senate’s top Democrat, New York’s Chuck Schumer. The S&P 500 rose to a record high following reports that the Treasury Department will


The decision to strike China from the currency manipulator list comes more than five months after the Treasury Department formally made the designation.
President Donald Trump and China Vice Premier Liu He are scheduled to sign a preliminary trade agreement in Washington on Wednesday.
The president’s decision to remove China from the list drew criticism from the Senate’s top Democrat, New York’s Chuck Schumer.
The S&P 500 rose to a record high following reports that the Treasury Department will
US will remove China from currency manipulator list ahead of trade deal signing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, manipulator, currency, china, ahead, remove, decision, trade, deal, beijing, treasury, president, yuan, list, signing


US will remove China from currency manipulator list ahead of trade deal signing

Chinese Vice Premier Liu He (2nd L) says goodbye to U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin as they break from meetings at the USTR offices May 10, 2019 in Washington, DC.

The United States will remove China from a list of countries considered currency manipulators just two days before top trade negotiators for Washington and Beijing sign a key “Phase One” trade deal, a person familiar with the matter told CNBC.

The decision to strike China from the currency manipulator list comes more than five months after the Treasury Department formally made the designation. President Donald Trump and China Vice Premier Liu He are scheduled to sign a preliminary trade agreement in Washington on Wednesday.

The world’s two largest economies for nearly two years have been levying tariffs back in forth while trying to work out the terms of a permanent trade resolution. Trump, in particular, has been critical of the U.S.-China trade deficit as well as Beijing’s previous moves to devalue its currency, which tends to boost its exports.

Treasury’s move in August to call China a manipulator raised tensions in the trade war and was the first such formal designation since President Bill Clinton’s administration. It came as the Chinese yuan weakened beyond 7 yuan to the dollar for the first time since 2008.

China’s central bank governor Yi Gang maintained at the time that Beijing doesn’t use its currency as a tool to cope with external disturbances such as trade disputes. The yuan has since returned to a pegged range considered normal — in line with China’s economic fundamentals and market demand and supply and not weak enough to anger its trading partners.

And while largely symbolic, the Treasury Department’s summertime decision to label China as a manipulator could have left Beijing open to additional scrutiny through the IMF.

The president’s decision to remove China from the list drew criticism from the Senate’s top Democrat, New York’s Chuck Schumer.

“China is a currency manipulator—that is a fact,” Schumer said in a statement. “Unfortunately, President Trump would rather cave to President Xi than stay tough on China. When it comes to the president’s stance on China, Americans are getting a lot of show and very little results.”

The White House and the Treasury Department declined to comment on this story. The S&P 500 rose to a record high following reports that the Treasury Department will no longer list China as a manipulator.

Washington’s move to striking China as a currency manipulator comes two days ahead of a hotly anticipated Phase One trade deal signing between the two nations.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin in an interview with Fox News on Sunday reiterated the importance of the pending deal and said that Beijing has agreed to purchase some $200 billion in U.S. goods over the next two years.

Bloomberg News first reported on the Treasury Department’s decision to delist China as a manipulator.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, manipulator, currency, china, ahead, remove, decision, trade, deal, beijing, treasury, president, yuan, list, signing


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Taiwan’s president re-elected as voters back tough China stance

Tsai Ing-wen, Taiwan’s president, looks on during a news conference at the Presidential Palace in Taipei, Taiwan, on Saturday, Jan. 5, 2019. Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen has won a second term, signaling strong voter support for her tough stance against China. Taiwan’s independence-leaning President Tsai Ing-wen appeared headed for a landslide victory and a second term on Saturday with more than 70% of precincts reporting election tallies. The self-governing island was expected to know later


Tsai Ing-wen, Taiwan’s president, looks on during a news conference at the Presidential Palace in Taipei, Taiwan, on Saturday, Jan. 5, 2019.
Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen has won a second term, signaling strong voter support for her tough stance against China.
Taiwan’s independence-leaning President Tsai Ing-wen appeared headed for a landslide victory and a second term on Saturday with more than 70% of precincts reporting election tallies.
The self-governing island was expected to know later
Taiwan’s president re-elected as voters back tough China stance Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tough, island, kaohsiung, president, taiwan, beijing, party, stance, taiwans, tsai, vote, voters, china, reelected


Taiwan's president re-elected as voters back tough China stance

Tsai Ing-wen, Taiwan’s president, looks on during a news conference at the Presidential Palace in Taipei, Taiwan, on Saturday, Jan. 5, 2019.

Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen has won a second term, signaling strong voter support for her tough stance against China.

Tsai defeated two challengers in Saturday’s election — Han Kuo-yu of the rival Nationalist Party and James Soong of the smaller People First Party.

Han told supporters in the southern port city of Kaohsiung that he had called to congratulate Tsai on her victory.

Voters chose Tsai’s tough stance against China over Han’s arguments for friendlier ties with Beijing, which considers self-governing Taiwan a renegade province to be brought under its control, by force if necessary.

China’s communist leaders have taken an especially hard line against Tsai since her 2016 inauguration, infuriated by her refusal to endorse its claim that Taiwan and the mainland belong to a single China. Her victory will likely deepen that deadlock and ratchet up pressure from Beijing.

Taiwan’s independence-leaning President Tsai Ing-wen appeared headed for a landslide victory and a second term on Saturday with more than 70% of precincts reporting election tallies.

Results from the Central Election Commission showed Tsai, with 58% of the vote, holding a healthy lead over her closest challenger, Han Kuo-yu of the Nationalist Party, who had 38%. A third candidate, James Soong, had 4%.

The mood was jubilant at the headquarters of Tsai’s Democratic Progressive Party in Taipei, the capital, with supporters cheering as her tally climbed. At a gathering in Kaohsiung, where Han is mayor, it was much grimmer, with some wiping away tears.

The self-governing island was expected to know later Saturday whether Tsai had triumphed with her tough stance toward China.

Taiwan has developed its own identity since separating from China during civil war in 1949 but has never declared formal independence. Beijing still claims sovereignty over the island of 23 million people and threatens to use force to seize control if necessary.

“I hope every citizen can come out and vote,” Tsai said after casting her vote in Taipei. “You should exercise your rights to make democracy stronger in Taiwan.”

Han voted in Kaohsiung, where he is mayor.

For many in Taiwan, months of anti-government protests in Hong Kong, a semi-autonomous Chinese territory, have driven home the contrast between their democratically governed island and authoritarian, communist-ruled mainland China.

Tsai portrayed the election as a chance to protect Taiwan’s democracy.

“Let us tell the world with our own votes that Taiwanese are determined to defend sovereignty, determined to guard democracy and determined to persist in reforms,” she said at a rally late Friday.

The Nationalist Party’s Han has said Taiwan should be more open to negotiations with China, in contrast to Tsai, who has dismissed Beijing’s overtures. At his last rally, attended by hundreds of thousands of people in the southern port city of Kaohsiung, he focused on practical issues such as improving education and the economy.

“I want to attract massive investments. I want products to be exported nonstop,” he said.

The Hong Kong protests have undermined support in Taiwan for the “one country, two systems” approach Beijing has championed for governing both that former British colony and Taiwan.

Fears of Chinese interference in Taiwan’s politics and an uptick in the economy helped Tsai regain an edge after a dire electoral setback for her Democratic Progressive Party, or DPP, 14 months ago.

“The reason why I vote for her is for upholding the value of Taiwan’s freedom and democracy and that should not be affected by the other side of the strait (China),” Lucy Ting, a college student, said at Tsai’s rally on Friday.

The Nationalists have struggled to find candidates who can fire up their pro-China supporters and win over young Taiwanese who increasingly favor the DPP.

A second term for Tsai is expected to draw more diplomatic, economic and military pressure from Beijing on the island, in a continuation of Chinese President Xi Jinping’s campaign to compel her administration to endorse its insistence that Taiwan is a part of China.

Tsai has refused to do so, maintaining that Beijing has no claim over Taiwan, although her government has repeatedly called for the reopening of talks between the sides without preconditions.

Since its transition to full democracy beginning in the 1980s, Taiwan has increasingly asserted its independent identity from China even though it is not recognized by the United Nations or any major nation.

The island of more than 23 million people exercises all the roles of a sovereign nation, issuing its own passports, maintaining its own military and legal system and serving as a crucial hub in the global high-tech supply chain.

If reelected, Tsai will face challenges in trying to reform the government and economy and push through unpopular cuts in generous civil service pensions.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tough, island, kaohsiung, president, taiwan, beijing, party, stance, taiwans, tsai, vote, voters, china, reelected


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US and China agree to hold semiannual talks on reforms, WSJ says

Top negotiators from China and the United States at trade talks in Beijing on March 29, 2019. Washington and Beijing have agreed to hold semiannual talks with the aim of resolving disputes and pushing for reforms, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal which cited people familiar with the matter. The talks will be separate from the ongoing trade deal negotiations and revive an old format that current U.S. trade officials had previously derided, according to the WSJ. Citing an administr


Top negotiators from China and the United States at trade talks in Beijing on March 29, 2019.
Washington and Beijing have agreed to hold semiannual talks with the aim of resolving disputes and pushing for reforms, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal which cited people familiar with the matter.
The talks will be separate from the ongoing trade deal negotiations and revive an old format that current U.S. trade officials had previously derided, according to the WSJ.
Citing an administr
US and China agree to hold semiannual talks on reforms, WSJ says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-11  Authors: matt clinch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hold, treasury, premier, liu, semiannual, trade, wsjciting, talks, according, beijing, report, deal, agree, china, wsj, reforms


US and China agree to hold semiannual talks on reforms, WSJ says

Top negotiators from China and the United States at trade talks in Beijing on March 29, 2019.

Washington and Beijing have agreed to hold semiannual talks with the aim of resolving disputes and pushing for reforms, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal which cited people familiar with the matter.

The talks will be separate from the ongoing trade deal negotiations and revive an old format that current U.S. trade officials had previously derided, according to the WSJ.

Citing an administration official and other anonymous sources briefed on the matter, it said that the effort would be headed by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and possibly Chinese Vice Premier Liu He.

Vice Premier Liu He is due to sign an initial “phase one” trade deal with the U.S. next week and he will visit Washington on Jan. 13-15, Beijing said on Thursday.

A spokesperson for the Treasury Department wasn’t immediately available for comment when contacted by CNBC.

Read the full report on the WSJ website here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-11  Authors: matt clinch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hold, treasury, premier, liu, semiannual, trade, wsjciting, talks, according, beijing, report, deal, agree, china, wsj, reforms


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Don’t expect Soleimani’s killing to derail trade talks despite China’s warmer relations with Iran

The U.S. killing of Tehran’s top military commander on Iraqi soil shouldn’t derail trade talks between Washington and Beijing in spite of warmer diplomatic relations between China and Iran in recent years. “The sovereignty and territorial integrity of Iraq should be respected, and peace and stability in the Middle East Gulf region should be maintained,” China’s Foreign Ministry spokesperson Geng Shuang said Friday. “We urge all parties concerned, especially the United States, to maintain calm an


The U.S. killing of Tehran’s top military commander on Iraqi soil shouldn’t derail trade talks between Washington and Beijing in spite of warmer diplomatic relations between China and Iran in recent years.
“The sovereignty and territorial integrity of Iraq should be respected, and peace and stability in the Middle East Gulf region should be maintained,” China’s Foreign Ministry spokesperson Geng Shuang said Friday.
“We urge all parties concerned, especially the United States, to maintain calm an
Don’t expect Soleimani’s killing to derail trade talks despite China’s warmer relations with Iran Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-03  Authors: tom franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talks, tehran, relations, warmer, dont, recent, killing, expect, trade, iran, despite, soleimanis, international, east, gulf, middle, beijing, decision


Don't expect Soleimani's killing to derail trade talks despite China's warmer relations with Iran

The U.S. killing of Tehran’s top military commander on Iraqi soil shouldn’t derail trade talks between Washington and Beijing in spite of warmer diplomatic relations between China and Iran in recent years.

“The sovereignty and territorial integrity of Iraq should be respected, and peace and stability in the Middle East Gulf region should be maintained,” China’s Foreign Ministry spokesperson Geng Shuang said Friday. “We urge all parties concerned, especially the United States, to maintain calm and restraint and to avoid the further escalation of tension.”

But Beijing has too much to lose in economic terms to justify anything more than stern criticism of U.S. action toward Tehran, economists and analysts said.

“China will, despite its closeness with Iran, still recognize that the U.S. is their big trade partner,” said Adnan Mazarei, an Iran specialist at the Peterson Institute for International Economics and a former deputy director of the International Monetary Fund’s Middle East Department.

“And, given the unfavorable sentiments in the U.S. government these days toward China, they would be very, very hesitant to come out and make declarations of any sort,” he added. “None of these three countries can change trade policy overnight.”

President Donald Trump’s decision in 2018 to withdraw from the landmark Iran nuclear deal, in particular, drove a wedge between the U.S. and its Western allies and is widely viewed as the beginning of the recent downward spiral in U.S.-Iranian relations.

The decision also highlighted China’s closer energy and business ties with Iran. Beijing announced that it wouldn’t participate in U.S. oil sanctions against Tehran and last month held joint naval war exercises in the Gulf of Oman.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-03  Authors: tom franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talks, tehran, relations, warmer, dont, recent, killing, expect, trade, iran, despite, soleimanis, international, east, gulf, middle, beijing, decision


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China’s November soybean imports from US rise as tariff-free cargoes arrive

China’s November soybean purchases from the United States surged from a year earlier, data showed on Wednesday, as cargoes booked by importers with tariff-free quotas cleared customs. China brought in 2.56 million tonnes of U.S. soybeans, up from zero a year ago and 1.147 million tonnes in October, after Beijing issued waivers to exempt importers from hefty tariffs for some American cargoes. Crushers have made more rounds of purchases of U.S. beans in recent months after Beijing issued tariff-fr


China’s November soybean purchases from the United States surged from a year earlier, data showed on Wednesday, as cargoes booked by importers with tariff-free quotas cleared customs.
China brought in 2.56 million tonnes of U.S. soybeans, up from zero a year ago and 1.147 million tonnes in October, after Beijing issued waivers to exempt importers from hefty tariffs for some American cargoes.
Crushers have made more rounds of purchases of U.S. beans in recent months after Beijing issued tariff-fr
China’s November soybean imports from US rise as tariff-free cargoes arrive Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-25
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rise, beijing, cargoes, tariffs, tonnes, tarifffree, soybeans, recent, chinas, trade, imports, million, soybean, arrive, months


China's November soybean imports from US rise as tariff-free cargoes arrive

China’s November soybean purchases from the United States surged from a year earlier, data showed on Wednesday, as cargoes booked by importers with tariff-free quotas cleared customs.

China brought in 2.56 million tonnes of U.S. soybeans, up from zero a year ago and 1.147 million tonnes in October, after Beijing issued waivers to exempt importers from hefty tariffs for some American cargoes.

Shipments of U.S. soybeans plunged in the same month last year as buyers stayed clear of the U.S. market after Beijing slapped hefty tariffs on a list of American goods including soybeans in a tit-for-tat trade war.

China resumed buying U.S. cargoes after the countries agreed to a truce in their trade war in December last year.

Crushers have made more rounds of purchases of U.S. beans in recent months after Beijing issued tariff-free quotas in a goodwill gesture to Washington.

Also in November, China brought in 3.86 million tonnes of soybeans from Brazil, down 24% from 5.07 million tonnes in the same month last year.

U.S. soybeans usually dominate the market in the fourth quarter as the autumn harvest kicks in.

Brazilian shipments were slightly up from last month’s 3.793 million tonnes, as buyers stocked up ahead of China’s Spring Festival holiday, a peak season for meat and oils.

China brings in soybeans to crush into cooking oil, and soymeal to feed its massive livestock sector.

Demand for soybeans has been curbed by a severe African swine fever disease that has decimated China’s massive pig herd and left a huge gap in supply of its favorite meat.

However, China’s pig herd has started to recover in recent months, the government said, following a series of measures to boost production.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-25
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rise, beijing, cargoes, tariffs, tonnes, tarifffree, soybeans, recent, chinas, trade, imports, million, soybean, arrive, months


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