Capital One Venture vs. Capital One VentureOne: Which is the best for your needs?

The Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card and Capital One® VentureOne® Rewards Credit Card, for example, are both travel rewards cards, but that’s where the similarities end. If you fall within this description, you have the best chances of qualifying for one of the Venture cards. Welcome bonusThe Venture card offers a larger bonus than the VentureOne card, but the effective rewards return is lower. Winner: The VentureOne® Rewards Credit Card offers a better return on your spending and has a


The Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card and Capital One® VentureOne® Rewards Credit Card, for example, are both travel rewards cards, but that’s where the similarities end.
If you fall within this description, you have the best chances of qualifying for one of the Venture cards.
Welcome bonusThe Venture card offers a larger bonus than the VentureOne card, but the effective rewards return is lower.
Winner: The VentureOne® Rewards Credit Card offers a better return on your spending and has a
Capital One Venture vs. Capital One VentureOne: Which is the best for your needs? Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-19  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, needs, venture, best, rewards, credit, annual, miles, cards, card, ventureone, capital, fee


Capital One Venture vs. Capital One VentureOne: Which is the best for your needs?

Signage is displayed on the exterior of a Capital One Financial Corp. cafe branch in Walnut Creek, California, U.S., on Tuesday, July 18, 2017.

Capital One offers several pairs of cards with similar names but slightly different rewards, perks and annual fees. The Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card and Capital One® VentureOne® Rewards Credit Card, for example, are both travel rewards cards, but that’s where the similarities end. Frequent travelers looking to receive some of the benefits found with luxury travel cards, will find more value with the Venture card. VentureOne is a better choice for consumers who want to avoid an annual fee while taking advantage of special financing. Capital One states on its website that both cards are for people with excellent credit, which is defined as someone who has never declared bankruptcy or defaulted on a loan; hasn’t been more than 60 days late on any credit card, medical bill or loan in the last year; and has had a loan or credit card for three years or more with a credit limit above $5,000. If you fall within this description, you have the best chances of qualifying for one of the Venture cards. Below, CNBC Select reviews both cards, so you can choose the one that provides the most benefit for your spending habits.

Capital One Venture vs. Capital One VentureOne Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card Capital One® VentureOne® Rewards Credit Card Annual fee $0 for the first year, $95 after that $0 Variable APR 17.49% to 24.74% 13.74% to 23.74% Intro APR None 0% for the first 12 months on purchases only Rewards Earn unlimited 2X miles per dollar on every purchase, every day — plus 10X miles on thousands of hotels at hotels.com/venture, through January 2020 Earn unlimited 1.25X miles per dollar on every purchase, every day — plus 10X miles on thousands of hotels at hotels.com/venture, through January 2020 Welcome bonus Earn 50,000 bonus miles once you spend $3,000 on purchases within the first 3 months from account opening Earn 20,000 bonus miles once you spend $1,000 on purchases within the first 3 months from account opening Credits Receive up to $100 credit for Global Entry or TSA PreCheck fee every four years None

Annual fee

The Venture card has a $95 annual fee that’s waived the first year, while the VentureOne card has no annual fee. Before you choose a card, it’s important to do the math to see which card makes the most financial sense for your lifestyle. While $95 pales in comparison to other travel rewards cards that can have annual fees up to $550, it’s still something to consider. Venture cardholders receive a statement credit worth up to $100 for a Global Entry or TSA Precheck application, valid every four years. This perk can help effectively cancel out the annual fee, but only once every four years. Otherwise, you would need to spend approximately $4,750 a year (after the first year) to break even on the fee by earning enough rewards. This should be manageable considering the average American spends approximately $21,852 annually, according to consumer spending data from location intelligence firm Esri. But if you have other credit cards that charge an annual fee, you might not want to add another to your wallet. Winner: It’s a toss-up. The Capital One® VentureOne® Rewards Credit Card has no annual fee, but if you take advantage of the higher rewards rate and Global Entry/TSA Precheck credit on the Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card, you can help offset the $95 annual fee (which is waived the first year).

Rewards

Both cards offer a flat-rate rewards program, which means all purchases earn the same amount of rewards. The VentureOne card earns unlimited 1.25X miles per dollar on every purchase, while the Venture card earns a higher 2X miles per dollar on all spending. And through January 2020, both cards offer 10 miles per dollar on thousands of hotels at hotels.com/venture. CNBC Select used the $21,852 sample budget to break down how much money you could earn (less than annual fee) if you optimized using each card over the course of five years. We found you could earn an estimated $2,451 after five years with the Venture card, which is $835 more than the VentureOne card’s $1,616. While the five-year estimates we’ve included are derived from a budget similar to the average American’s spending, you may earn a higher or lower return depending on your consumer habits. Winner: The Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card earns you more rewards over the course of five years, even with the $95 annual fee (waived the first year).

Redemption

Both cards allow you to redeem rewards in a variety of ways, from travel to statement credit to gift cards. Cardholders can redeem rewards for travel in two ways: as a statement credit for past travel purchases using the Purchase Eraser or to book future travel through Capital One’s rewards center. Keep in mind statement credit redemptions must be made within 90 days from the date your travel purchase posts to your account. Miles can also be transferred to over 10 travel partners including JetBlue, Qatar Airways, Aeromexico and Air France KLM. Winner: Tie. Both cards offer the same redemption options.

Welcome bonus

The Venture card offers a larger bonus than the VentureOne card, but the effective rewards return is lower. Venture cardholders earn 50,000 bonus miles once you spend $3,000 on purchases within the first three months from account opening, which is like earning about 17% back. The VentureOne card offers 20,000 bonus miles once you spend $1,000 on purchases within the first three months from account opening, which is about 20% back. Winner: The VentureOne® Rewards Credit Card offers a better return on your spending and has a lower spending requirement than the Venture® Rewards Credit Card, making it the winner.

Added perks

Both cards offer many of the same perks with a few differences. Here’s a breakdown of the perks offered by both cards: Consumers with either card can benefit from: No foreign transaction fees

24-hour travel assistance services

Roadside assistance

Auto rental collision damage waiver

Travel accident insurance

Extended warranty

Exclusive access to premier culinary, music and sports events

Purchase protection

Extended warranty protection

Trip cancellation/interruption insurance Venture Rewards cardholders enjoy this added perk: Up to $100 credit for Global Entry or TSA PreCheck application fee every four years Winner: Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card since it offers the added benefit of Global Entry/TSA PreCheck application fee credit.

Bottom line

The Venture Rewards credit cards offer similar rewards programs and nearly identical card benefits, but differ in the amount of miles you earn per dollar spent and annual fee. If you’re looking to earn the most rewards, the Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card is the better option with 2X miles on all spending versus the Capital One® VentureOne® Rewards Credit Card’s 1.25X miles. Plus if you fly often, you can benefit from a credit up to $100 for a Global Entry or TSA PreCheck application fee once every four years. However, if you don’t want to pay an annual fee, the VentureOne card is a better fit since the Venture card has a $95 annual fee after the first year. Despite the Venture card’s annual fee, it’s worth pointing out that the average American would still net approximately $835 more in rewards than the VentureOne card. While both of these cards are good options for travelers, there are alternative options that may be a better fit for your needs. Check out CNBC Select’s round up of the best travel credit cards. If travel isn’t one of your major expenses, you might want to consider our lists of the best cash-back credit cards and best rewards credit cards.

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the CNBC Select editorial staff’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any third party.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-19  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, needs, venture, best, rewards, credit, annual, miles, cards, card, ventureone, capital, fee


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

The best no annual fee credit cards of October 2019

And 70% of consumers are very satisfied with their no annual fee cards, while only 35% of consumers are equally satisfied with their cards that charge an annual fee. The best no annual fee cards still offer a lot of perks: competitive rewards programs, intro 0% APR periods and low interest rates. Below, CNBC Select reviewed the best no annual fee credit cards in a range of categories for consumers who are looking to get the most bang for their buck. Our methodologyTo determine which credit cards


And 70% of consumers are very satisfied with their no annual fee cards, while only 35% of consumers are equally satisfied with their cards that charge an annual fee.
The best no annual fee cards still offer a lot of perks: competitive rewards programs, intro 0% APR periods and low interest rates.
Below, CNBC Select reviewed the best no annual fee credit cards in a range of categories for consumers who are looking to get the most bang for their buck.
Our methodologyTo determine which credit cards
The best no annual fee credit cards of October 2019 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, points, 2019, cards, credit, best, card, balance, rewards, purchases, cash, annual, fee


The best no annual fee credit cards of October 2019

If you’re looking for a credit card but unwilling to fork over money for an annual fee, you’re not alone. A May 2019 survey from Discover found that 60% of consumers say that having no annual fee is a very important factor when they choose a card. And 70% of consumers are very satisfied with their no annual fee cards, while only 35% of consumers are equally satisfied with their cards that charge an annual fee. The best no annual fee cards still offer a lot of perks: competitive rewards programs, intro 0% APR periods and low interest rates. And depending on your spending habits, they could offer more value than a card that comes with a steep annual fee (some upwards of $500). Below, CNBC Select reviewed the best no annual fee credit cards in a range of categories for consumers who are looking to get the most bang for their buck. Here are the best no annual fee credit cards: Best for cash back: Citi® Double Cash Card

Citi® Double Cash Card Best for balance transfers: Amex EveryDay® Credit Card

Amex EveryDay® Credit Card Best for low interest: Visa® Titanium Signature Rewards Card from Andrews Federal Credit Union

Visa® Titanium Signature Rewards Card from Andrews Federal Credit Union Best for building credit: Discover it® Secured

Discover it® Secured Best for travel: PenFed Pathfinder Rewards American Express® Card

Best for cash back: Citi® Double Cash Card Apply Now On Citi’s Secured Site Annual fee $0

Rewards 2% cash back: 1% on all purchases and an additional 1% after you pay your credit card bill

Welcome bonus None

Intro APR 0% APR for the first 18 months on balance transfers

Balance transfer fee Either $5 or 3% of the amount of each transfer, whichever is greater

Variable APR 15.74% to 25.74%

Foreign transaction fee 3%

Estimated rewards earned after 1 year $437

Estimated rewards earned after 5 years $2,185

See our methodology, terms apply. Pros 2% cash back on all purchases

Simple cash-back program that doesn’t require activation or spending caps

One of the longest intro periods for balance transfers at 18 months Cons No welcome bonus, so you can’t maximize rewards during the first few months of card opening

Minimum cash-back redemption of $25

3% fee charged on purchases made outside the U.S. Who’s this for? The Citi® Double Cash Card is a straightforward rewards card that continues to offer one of the best flat-rate cash-back programs since it launched in 2014. Cardholders earn 2% cash back on all purchases — 1% when you make a purchase and an additional 1% when you pay your credit card bill. There is no limit to the amount of cash back you can earn and you don’t have to worry about activating bonus categories. Cash back can be redeemed for a statement credit or direct deposit. Who’s this for? The Citi® Double Cash Card is a straightforward rewards card that continues to offer one of the best flat-rate cash-back programs since it launched in 2014. Cardholders earn 2% cash back on all purchases — 1% when you make a purchase and an additional 1% when you pay your credit card bill. There is no limit to the amount of cash back you can earn and you don’t have to worry about activating bonus categories. Cash back can be redeemed for a statement credit or direct deposit. This card is also a good choice for debt consolidation. There’s a 0% APR for the first 18 months on balance transfers (then 15.74% to 25.74% variable APR). Just make sure you transfer balances within four months from account opening. There is a 3% balance transfer fee (minimum $5), which can be outweighed by the amount you save on interest. (See more on how to make the most of a balance transfer.) read more Apply Now On Citi’s Secured Site

Best for balance transfers: Amex EveryDay® Credit Card Learn More Information about the Amex EveryDay® Credit Card has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the cards prior to publication. Annual fee $0

Rewards 2X Membership Rewards® points at U.S. supermarkets on up to $6,000 per year in purchases (then 1%), 1X Membership Rewards® points per dollar spent on all other purchases

Welcome bonus Earn 10,000 Membership Rewards® points after you make $1,000 in purchases in your first 3 months

Intro APR 0% for the first 15 months on purchases and balance transfers

Balance transfer fee $0

Variable APR 14.74% to 25.74%

Foreign transaction fee 2.7%

Estimated rewards earned after 1 year $369*

Estimated rewards return after 5 years $1,444

See our methodology, terms apply. Pros One of the longest intro periods for a no-fee balance transfer card

Rewards program and welcome bonus, which is rare among no-fee balance transfer cards

20% extra point bonus when you make 20 or more purchases in a billing period Cons 2.7% foreign transaction fee

Balances must be transferred within 60 days from account opening Who’s this for? If you’re struggling to pay down a balance on a credit card that has a high APR, you might want to consider a balance transfer card like the Amex EveryDay® Credit Card. This card provides the chance to get out of debt, finance new purchases and earn rewards — all for no annual fee. (The Amex EveryDay® Credit Card is CNBC Select’s pick for the best balance transfer card, but all the cards on that list have no annual fee. Check it out, if this isn’t quite the right card for you.) Cardholders can take advantage of 0% APR for the first 15 months on both balance transfers and purchases (after, 14.74% to 25.74% variable APR). This card has no balance transfer fee, so you won’t incur the typical 3% to 5% fee many other cards charge, which adds to your savings. Balance transfers must be made within 60 days from account opening to qualify for the no interest period. Who’s this for? If you’re struggling to pay down a balance on a credit card that has a high APR, you might want to consider a balance transfer card like the Amex EveryDay® Credit Card. This card provides the chance to get out of debt, finance new purchases and earn rewards — all for no annual fee. (The Amex EveryDay® Credit Card is CNBC Select’s pick for the best balance transfer card, but all the cards on that list have no annual fee. Check it out, if this isn’t quite the right card for you.) Cardholders can take advantage of 0% APR for the first 15 months on both balance transfers and purchases (after, 14.74% to 25.74% variable APR). This card has no balance transfer fee, so you won’t incur the typical 3% to 5% fee many other cards charge, which adds to your savings. Balance transfers must be made within 60 days from account opening to qualify for the no interest period. Beyond special financing, the card comes with a strong rewards program. You can earn 10,000 Membership Rewards® points after you make $1,000 in purchases in the first three months after card opening. Cardholders get 2X Membership Rewards® points at U.S. supermarkets on up to $6,000 per year in purchases (then 1%) and 1 point per dollar spent on all other purchases. Plus, when you make 20 or more purchases in a billing period, you receive 20% extra points. The value of Membership Rewards® points varies depending on how cardholders redeem them. You can use them in a variety of ways, from paying with points at checkout at stores like Amazon to redeeming for gift cards or a statement credit to booking travel. See more on how points are calculated. The Amex EveryDay® Credit Card also comes with a slew of other perks including car rental loss and damage insurance, travel accident insurance, free two-day shipping at select online retailers with ShopRunner and cell phone protection. *First year rewards total incorporates the points earned from the welcome bonus read more Learn More Information about the Amex EveryDay® Credit Card has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the cards prior to publication.

Best for low interest: Visa® Titanium Signature Rewards Card from Andrews Federal Credit Union Learn More Information about the Visa® Titanium Signature Rewards Card from Andrews Federal Credit Union has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the card prior to publication. Annual fee $0

Rewards 3X points on gas and grocery purchases and 1.5X points on all other purchases

Welcome bonus Earn 7,500 points when you spend $500 within the first 90 days

Intro APR 0% for the first 12 months on purchases and balance transfers processed within the first 90 days of account opening

Balance transfer fee 1.50%, $50 minimum

Variable APR 7.99% to 18.00%

Foreign transaction fee None

Estimated return after 1 year $514*

Estimated return after 5 years $2,270

See our methodology, terms apply. Pros Low 7.99% to 18.00% variable APR

0% APR for the first 12 months on purchases and balance transfers processed within 90 days of account opening date

No fee charged on purchases made outside the U.S. Cons Credit union membership required, though it’s free

1.5% balance transfer fee, with a $50 minimum fee Who’s this for? The Visa® Titanium Signature Rewards Card from Andrews Federal Credit Union is a great choice for people who carry a balance month-to-month (though CNBC Select recommends you pay your credit card balance on time and in full every month). The variable interest rate starts at a low 7.99% and caps at 18.00%. If you qualify for one of the lowest rates, you can save on interest charges. In addition to low interest, this card offers a strong rewards program. Earn 3X points on gas and grocery purchases and 1.5X points on all other purchases. Plus, there’s a welcome bonus of 7,500 points after you spend $500 within the first 90 days. Who’s this for? The Visa® Titanium Signature Rewards Card from Andrews Federal Credit Union is a great choice for people who carry a balance month-to-month (though CNBC Select recommends you pay your credit card balance on time and in full every month). The variable interest rate starts at a low 7.99% and caps at 18.00%. If you qualify for one of the lowest rates, you can save on interest charges. In addition to low interest, this card offers a strong rewards program. Earn 3X points on gas and grocery purchases and 1.5X points on all other purchases. Plus, there’s a welcome bonus of 7,500 points after you spend $500 within the first 90 days. When you open this card, you can also benefit from a 0% APR for the first 12 months on purchases and balance transfers processed within 90 days of account opening date. The balance transfer fee is 1.5% and has a $50 minimum. Credit union membership is required for this card, but anyone can join Andrews Federal Credit Union. If you don’t meet the qualification requirements, you can opt to join the American Consumer Council (ACC). Simply enter promo code “Andrews” to join the ACC at no charge. *First year rewards total incorporates the points earned from the welcome bonus read more Learn More Information about the Visa® Titanium Signature Rewards Card from Andrews Federal Credit Union has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the card prior to publication.

Best for building credit: Discover it® Secured Apply Now On Discover’s Secured Site Annual fee $0

Minimum security deposit $200

Rewards 2% cash back at gas stations and restaurants on up to $1,000 in combined purchases each quarter (then 1%); unlimited 1% cash back on all other purchases

Welcome bonus At the end of your first year, Discover automatically matches all the cash back you earned

Variable APR 24.74%

Intro APR None

Foreign transaction fee None

For secured credit cards, CNBC Select did not analyze how much cash back you can earn.

See rates and fees and our methodology, terms apply. Pros Discover automatically reviews your credit card account monthly, starting at eight months, to see if your security deposit can be returned while you continue to enjoy your card benefits

Strong cash-back rewards program

Simple welcome bonus with no minimum spending requirements

No fee charged on purchases made outside the U.S. Cons Low credit limit prevents cardholders from charging high-cost items or many expenses

You have to have a Social Security number and U.S. bank account to apply for this card

Relatively high 24.74% APR

Discover isn’t as widely accepted as Visa and Mastercard Who’s this for: The Discover it® Secured Card is a well-rounded secured card that offers many benefits that are typically found with unsecured cards. Cardholders can earn cash back, receive a generous welcome bonus, use the card overseas without incurring added fees and more — all for no annual fee. Cardholders earn a competitive 2% cash back at gas stations and restaurants on up to $1,000 in combined purchases each quarter (then 1%). Plus, you can earn unlimited 1% cash back on all other purchases. The welcome bonus is also unique: Discover will match any cash back you’ve earned during the first 12 billing cycles. So, if you earn $50 cash back at the end of the first year, Discover will give you an additional $50. Who’s this for: The Discover it® Secured Card is a well-rounded secured card that offers many benefits that are typically found with unsecured cards. Cardholders can earn cash back, receive a generous welcome bonus, use the card overseas without incurring added fees and more — all for no annual fee. Cardholders earn a competitive 2% cash back at gas stations and restaurants on up to $1,000 in combined purchases each quarter (then 1%). Plus, you can earn unlimited 1% cash back on all other purchases. The welcome bonus is also unique: Discover will match any cash back you’ve earned during the first 12 billing cycles. So, if you earn $50 cash back at the end of the first year, Discover will give you an additional $50. This card requires a $200 security deposit, which is fairly standard for secured credit cards. It stands out from the crowd because it gives users a clear path to upgrading to an unsecured card (and getting their deposit back). Starting at eight months from account opening, Discover will review your account to see if you can get your security deposit back, which takes the guesswork out of wondering when you’ll qualify for an unsecured card. read more Apply Now On Discover’s Secured Site

Best for travel: PenFed Pathfinder Rewards American Express® Card Learn More Information about the PenFed Pathfinder Rewards American Express® Card has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the cards prior to publication. Annual fee $0

Rewards 3X points on all travel purchases (4X points on travel for PenFed Honors Advantage members), 1.5X points on all other purchases

Welcome bonus 25,000 points when you spend $2,500 in first 90 days from account opening

Intro APR 0% APR for the first 12 months on balance transfers made from October 1, 2019 to March 31, 2020

Balance transfer fee 5%, $5 minimum

Variable APR 12.74% to 17.99%

Foreign transaction fee None

Estimated rewards earned after 1 year $733*

Estimated rewards earned after 5 years $2,266

See our methodology, terms apply. Pros $100 annual airline travel credit

Up to $100 application fee credit for Global Entry or TSA PreCheck, every five years

No foreign transaction fees

Strong welcome bonus for a no-annual fee card Cons Must be a PenFed Honors Advantage member to earn 4X points on travel

Credit union membership is required

No special financing offers on new purchases Who’s this for? The PenFed Pathfinder Rewards American Express® Card is a unique travel card that provides many travel-centric perks that are typically reserved for annual fee cards. You can earn 3X points on all travel purchases, which rises to 4X points if you’re a PenFed Honors Advantage member. Cardholders can take advantage of an annual $100 airline travel credit, which can be used to cover the cost of baggage fees, lounge access and onboard food and beverages. In addition, every five years, you receive a $100 application fee credit for Global Entry or $85 for TSA PreCheck. Who’s this for? The PenFed Pathfinder Rewards American Express® Card is a unique travel card that provides many travel-centric perks that are typically reserved for annual fee cards. You can earn 3X points on all travel purchases, which rises to 4X points if you’re a PenFed Honors Advantage member. Cardholders can take advantage of an annual $100 airline travel credit, which can be used to cover the cost of baggage fees, lounge access and onboard food and beverages. In addition, every five years, you receive a $100 application fee credit for Global Entry or $85 for TSA PreCheck. Points can be redeemed in a variety of ways, toward travel, gift cards and merchandise. Just keep in mind the value of a point varies depending on how you choose to redeem it. To take full advantage of the card’s rewards program, you’ll have to become an Honors Advantage member. Anyone can join by meeting one of the following qualification requirements: be in an active military service status, a member of the Reserves or National Guard, an honorably discharged U.S. military veteran or retired from such service; be the primary owner on both the credit card and checking accounts of any existing open PenFed product (excluding PenCheck Limited accounts); or open a new Access America checking account (which requires a daily balance or monthly direct deposit of $500 or more to waive the $10 monthly service fee). You’ll also need to be a PenFed member to open this card, but anyone can join can in a few steps: apply, open a savings account with a $5 deposit and maintain a $5 account balance. *First year rewards total incorporates the points earned from the welcome bonus read more Learn More Information about the PenFed Pathfinder Rewards American Express® Card has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the cards prior to publication.

Our methodology

To determine which credit cards offer the best value and no annual fee, CNBC Select analyzed 159 of the most popular credit cards offered by the biggest banks, financial companies, and credit unions that allow anyone to join and have no annual fees whatsoever. Credit cards with no annual fee for the first year of account opening but an annual fee in subsequent years were excluded. We compared each card on a range of features, including: rewards program, introductory and standard APR, balance transfer fee, welcome bonuses and foreign transaction fees, as well as factors such as required credit and customer reviews when available. CNBC Select teamed up with location intelligence firm Esri. The company’s data development team provided the most up-to-date and comprehensive consumer spending data based on the 2018 Consumer Expenditure Surveys from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. You can read more about their methodology here. Esri’s data team created a sample annual budget of approximately $21,852 in retail spending. This budget is comprised of the most common spending categories, including groceries ($5,019), gas ($2,394), dining out ($3,365), travel ($2,154), utilities ($4,959) and general purchases ($3,961). General purchases include items such as housekeeping supplies, clothing, personal care products, prescription drugs and vitamins, and other vehicle expenses. CNBC Select used this budget to estimate how much the average consumer would save over the course of a year, two years and five years, assuming they would attempt to maximize their rewards potential by earning all welcome bonuses offered and using the card for all applicable purchases. All rewards total estimations are net the annual fee. It’s important to note the value of a point or mile varies from card to card and based on how you redeem them. When we calculated the estimated returns, we assumed that cardholders are redeeming points/miles for a typical maximum value of 1 cent per point or mile. (Extreme optimizers might be able to achieve more value.) Our final picks are weighted heavily toward the highest five-year returns, since it’s generally wise to hold onto a credit card for years. This method also avoids giving an unfair advantage to cards with large welcome bonuses. When evaluating best secured credit cards, we did not calculate the estimate rewards consumers could earn because secured cards typically come with much smaller spending limits. While the five-year estimates we’ve included are derived from a budget similar to the average American’s spending, you may earn a higher or lower return depending on your shopping habits.

Best no annual fee credit cards of 2019 Best for… Credit Card Estimated rewards earned after 5 years Cash back Citi® Double Cash Card $2,185 Balance transfers Amex EveryDay® Credit Card $1,494 Low interest Visa® Titanium Signature Rewards Card from Andrews Federal Credit Union $2,270 Building credit Discover it® Secured N/A Travel PenFed Pathfinder Rewards American Express® Card $2,266

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the CNBC Select editorial staff’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any third party.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, points, 2019, cards, credit, best, card, balance, rewards, purchases, cash, annual, fee


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Olivia Wilde’s best career advice—and the game-changer in her wellness routine

Olivia Wilde is a successful actress, perhaps best known for her roles as Alex Kelly on “The O.C.” “I have been an actress since I was a teenager and now I’m 35 and I’m really leaning into a new career of directing full-time,” Wilde tells CNBC Make It. “I think sometimes we all get into the mindset that if you’ve chosen your career at 25 — that’s it. You can’t shift your career focus and it’s just not true,” she says. In addition to acting and directing, Wilde is an entrepreneur.


Olivia Wilde is a successful actress, perhaps best known for her roles as Alex Kelly on “The O.C.”
“I have been an actress since I was a teenager and now I’m 35 and I’m really leaning into a new career of directing full-time,” Wilde tells CNBC Make It.
“I think sometimes we all get into the mindset that if you’ve chosen your career at 25 — that’s it.
You can’t shift your career focus and it’s just not true,” she says.
In addition to acting and directing, Wilde is an entrepreneur.
Olivia Wilde’s best career advice—and the game-changer in her wellness routine Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, olivia, walk, think, wellness, skincare, routine, wildes, success, career, adviceand, best, directing, true, gamechanger, wilde


Olivia Wilde's best career advice—and the game-changer in her wellness routine

Olivia Wilde is a successful actress, perhaps best known for her roles as Alex Kelly on “The O.C.” and Dr. Remy ‘Thirteen’ Hadley on “House” on FOX. But according to Wilde, “you’re never too old to pivot.”

“I have been an actress since I was a teenager and now I’m 35 and I’m really leaning into a new career of directing full-time,” Wilde tells CNBC Make It.

In 2011, Wilde started to slowly transition to directing and has already racked up four director credits.

“I think sometimes we all get into the mindset that if you’ve chosen your career at 25 — that’s it. You can’t shift your career focus and it’s just not true,” she says.

Wilde in part blames the college system for forcing people to believe that once you pick a major, you are stuck with it for the next 70 years of your life. (Wilde was accepted to Bard College but went to acting school in Dublin instead.)

“I think we need to continue to evolve and trust [our] own evolution and don’t be afraid to pivot,” she adds.

In addition to acting and directing, Wilde is an entrepreneur. In 2017, the former Revlon ambassador signed on as a spokesperson with organic skincare brand True Botanicals and was given an equity stake in the company instead of a one-time cash deal.

Wilde says switching to organic skincare was a game-changer for not only her skin because she suffered from adult acne into her 30s but it the most consistent “healthy choice” she has made for her overall health.

“Your skin is your largest organ,” she says.

But she admits she’s not always perfect when it comes to sticking to wellness routines, like eating clean.

“I try to,” says Wilde, “but it’s all about balance.”

“I think anyone who’s ever had even a small period of their life where they clean up their act — first begin to eat healthy food and exercise and use natural products — they’ll always say … I feel my best. But sometimes it’s hard to sustain that lifestyle. You know it’s tricky for anybody to stay totally clean.”

Wilde says she tries to eat healthfully and avoid processed foods (it’s always her New Year’s resolution to get better), but can’t resist the occasional Coca-Cola. (“I really love it,” she says, which puts her in good company with Coke fan and investor Warren Buffett.)

She does not have a regimented fitness routine either. As a New Yorker (she lives in New York City with her longtime partner actor Jason Sudeikis and two kids), she relies on walking. “We already walk more than people in a lot of other cities. But when you have an option to walk or take a car, walk if it’s an option. I’ll take the stairs.

“There’s often a way to [be active],” she says. “Rather than sitting at home and taking a call and doing a phone meeting, walk around. You could often incorporate activity into your life.”

Wilde has also dabbled in Transcendental Meditation (billionaire hedge fund guru Ray Dalio is a devotee and says it’s been key to his success). She trained at the David Lynch Foundation but says “I’m not consistent enough…. I want to get better at that.”

Like this story? Like CNBC Make It on Facebook.

Don’t miss: This self-made millionaire says the key to his success is eating only fruit until noon

Inside ‘goddess circles’: The wellness ritual Jennifer Aniston says she’s been doing for 30 years


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, olivia, walk, think, wellness, skincare, routine, wildes, success, career, adviceand, best, directing, true, gamechanger, wilde


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

This is best chance of getting Brexit deal through parliament: analyst

Boris Johnson’s deal best chance we’ve had of getting Brexit deal through parliament, analyst says3 Hours AgoRichard Mylles, political analyst at Absolute Strategy, discusses the likelihood of Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal being passed in the U.K. Parliament.


Boris Johnson’s deal best chance we’ve had of getting Brexit deal through parliament, analyst says3 Hours AgoRichard Mylles, political analyst at Absolute Strategy, discusses the likelihood of Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal being passed in the U.K. Parliament.
This is best chance of getting Brexit deal through parliament: analyst Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boris, analyst, strategy, johnsons, chance, best, parliament, brexit, deal, says3, getting, weve


This is best chance of getting Brexit deal through parliament: analyst

Boris Johnson’s deal best chance we’ve had of getting Brexit deal through parliament, analyst says

3 Hours Ago

Richard Mylles, political analyst at Absolute Strategy, discusses the likelihood of Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal being passed in the U.K. Parliament.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boris, analyst, strategy, johnsons, chance, best, parliament, brexit, deal, says3, getting, weve


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Walter Isaacson on how American CEOs can best navigate China

Walter Isaacson on how American CEOs can best navigate China1 Hour AgoWalter Isaacson, Tulane professor, and Barry Sternlicht, chairman and CEO of Starwood Capital Group, join “Squawk Box” to discuss the relationship between the Chinese government and big American businesses such as Apple and Facebook.


Walter Isaacson on how American CEOs can best navigate China1 Hour AgoWalter Isaacson, Tulane professor, and Barry Sternlicht, chairman and CEO of Starwood Capital Group, join “Squawk Box” to discuss the relationship between the Chinese government and big American businesses such as Apple and Facebook.
Walter Isaacson on how American CEOs can best navigate China Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: michael kovac, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, american, isaacson, tulane, china, best, sternlicht, walter, relationship, ceos, navigate, starwood, professor, squawk


Walter Isaacson on how American CEOs can best navigate China

Walter Isaacson on how American CEOs can best navigate China

1 Hour Ago

Walter Isaacson, Tulane professor, and Barry Sternlicht, chairman and CEO of Starwood Capital Group, join “Squawk Box” to discuss the relationship between the Chinese government and big American businesses such as Apple and Facebook.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: michael kovac, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, american, isaacson, tulane, china, best, sternlicht, walter, relationship, ceos, navigate, starwood, professor, squawk


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Consumer staples stocks are having best year in decades, but valuations may be ‘stretched’

A handful of top consumer staples stocks are having a banner year, with better year-to-date gains in 2019 than they’ve seen for decades. “But we do think some of the consumer stocks are overvalued.” “I think Walmart is showing good strength within [the Consumer Staples Select Sector SPDR Fund, or] XLP.” While Gordon said staples stocks were broadly overvalued, he maintained his bullish take on one high-flying name. “Plus, I think Costco trades more as a discretionary rather than a consumer stapl


A handful of top consumer staples stocks are having a banner year, with better year-to-date gains in 2019 than they’ve seen for decades.
“But we do think some of the consumer stocks are overvalued.”
“I think Walmart is showing good strength within [the Consumer Staples Select Sector SPDR Fund, or] XLP.”
While Gordon said staples stocks were broadly overvalued, he maintained his bullish take on one high-flying name.
“Plus, I think Costco trades more as a discretionary rather than a consumer stapl
Consumer staples stocks are having best year in decades, but valuations may be ‘stretched’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, shares, decades, staples, stock, valuations, tengler, think, stocks, walmart, costco, stretched, having, consumer


Consumer staples stocks are having best year in decades, but valuations may be 'stretched'

It’s a party in the pantry.

A handful of top consumer staples stocks are having a banner year, with better year-to-date gains in 2019 than they’ve seen for decades. They include:

PepsiCo, up 24%, its best year since 2000;

Costco, up 48%, its best year since 1998;

Procter & Gamble, up 28%, its best year since 1997;

Campbell Soup, up 45%, its best year since 1997;

General Mills, up 35%, its best year since 1991;

Hershey, up 43%, its best year since 1986.

That doesn’t mean they’re necessarily buys, warns Nancy Tengler, chief equity strategist at Tengler Wealth Management.

“I do think there are better places to be in the market,” she told CNBC’s “Trading Nation” on Thursday. “These valuations are pretty stretched.”

Tengler said that while she doesn’t believe September’s unexpected drop in retail sales “is indicative of a weakening consumer,” a number of the stocks behind consumer-facing companies appear to have lofty valuations.

“One month of retail sales numbers doesn’t have me concerned. We think the consumer is in great shape for all the obvious reasons: interest rates, employment, gas prices are tame,” the strategist said. “But we do think some of the consumer stocks are overvalued.”

Having pounded the table on stocks such as Costco when the stock market rolled over at the end of 2018, Tengler said her firm has decided it’s time to reposition.

“We’ve been selling a lot of those names. We exited Costco last week on a valuation basis. It’s just too overdone for us,” she said. “We do still hold PepsiCo, but we’ve trimmed Apple, which I think is kind of consumer-y. We’ve also trimmed Starbucks, Home Depot, Procter & Gamble, and we’re still holding onto things like Walmart.”

Walmart also caught the eye of Todd Gordon, longtime trader and founder of TradingAnalysis.com, who flagged the stock’s “beautiful” uptrend in the same “Trading Nation” interview.

“Ninety-five to 100 is your support level,” he said, noting that he’d recommend adding to a position in Walmart as the stock heads higher. “I think Walmart is showing good strength within [the Consumer Staples Select Sector SPDR Fund, or] XLP.”

While Gordon said staples stocks were broadly overvalued, he maintained his bullish take on one high-flying name.

“One stock that I do like is Costco. I continue to hold it in my portfolio simply because it’s working,” he said, pointing to the stock’s neat uptrend since the end of last year.

“You really can’t dump it until it gets below about 250,” he said, adding that he’d also boost his Costco position if the stock were to break out to the upside.

“But … once it gets overvalued into resistance, I’m going to look to scale back,” he said. “Plus, I think Costco trades more as a discretionary rather than a consumer staple just because of the growth rate.”

Costco shares were down less than 1% by midday Friday at $302.26 a share. Walmart was near $119.66, a less than 1% decline. The XLP gained less than 1%.

Disclosure: Todd Gordon owns shares of Costco. Nancy Tengler and Tengler Wealth Management both own shares of PepsiCo, Apple, Starbucks, Home Depot, Procter & Gamble and Walmart.

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, shares, decades, staples, stock, valuations, tengler, think, stocks, walmart, costco, stretched, having, consumer


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Andrew Yang: You should get a check in the mail from Facebook, Amazon, Google for your data

Andrew Yang, the Democratic presidential candidate best known for his $1,000-per-month universal basic income platform, says tech giants should pay people for use of their data. “Right now, our data is worth more than oil,” Yang said during Tuesday’s Democratic debate in Ohio. “How many of you remember getting your data check in the mail? According to Yang, companies should first be required to have customers opt-in to data collection, with a “clear and easy-to-understand statement about what is


Andrew Yang, the Democratic presidential candidate best known for his $1,000-per-month universal basic income platform, says tech giants should pay people for use of their data.
“Right now, our data is worth more than oil,” Yang said during Tuesday’s Democratic debate in Ohio.
“How many of you remember getting your data check in the mail?
According to Yang, companies should first be required to have customers opt-in to data collection, with a “clear and easy-to-understand statement about what is
Andrew Yang: You should get a check in the mail from Facebook, Amazon, Google for your data Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, best, tuesdays, andrew, google, optin, amazon, mail, facebook, tech, yang, democratic, share, check, companies, data


Andrew Yang: You should get a check in the mail from Facebook, Amazon, Google for your data

Andrew Yang, the Democratic presidential candidate best known for his $1,000-per-month universal basic income platform, says tech giants should pay people for use of their data.

“Right now, our data is worth more than oil,” Yang said during Tuesday’s Democratic debate in Ohio. “How many of you remember getting your data check in the mail? It got lost. It went to Facebook, Amazon, Google.”

Yang offered the idea as a way to handle such tech megaliths instead of just breaking them up (which some, like Democratic candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, have advocated).

Though there are “absolutely excesses in technology and in some cases having them divest parts of their business is the right move,” according to Yang, “we also have to be realistic that competition doesn’t solve all the problems.

“It’s not like any of us wants to use the fourth-best navigation app. That would be like cruel and unusual punishment. There is a reason why no one is using Bing today. Sorry, Microsoft. It’s true,” Yang said during Tuesday’s debate.

Yang said that if “we say this [data] is our property and we share in the gains, that’s the best way we can balance the scales against the big tech companies,” calling it “the best way we can fight back.”

According to Yang, companies should first be required to have customers opt-in to data collection, with a “clear and easy-to-understand statement about what is being collected and how it is going to be used.” Those who do opt-in and share personal data with companies should then “receive a share of the economic value generated from your data.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, best, tuesdays, andrew, google, optin, amazon, mail, facebook, tech, yang, democratic, share, check, companies, data


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Wall Street’s top hedge fund managers reveal their best ideas

A slew of Wall Street’s top hedge fund managers shared their best ideas on Wednesday at the annual Sohn San Francisco Investment Conference. The conference is best known for hedge fund managers making market-moving presentations. The Sohn conference held in San Francisco is the West Coast version of the investment conferences that began in New York. Here are some of picks from the fund managers this year. Kevin Oram, Praesidium Investment Management CompanyLong: Instructure (INST)Praesidium is f


A slew of Wall Street’s top hedge fund managers shared their best ideas on Wednesday at the annual Sohn San Francisco Investment Conference.
The conference is best known for hedge fund managers making market-moving presentations.
The Sohn conference held in San Francisco is the West Coast version of the investment conferences that began in New York.
Here are some of picks from the fund managers this year.
Kevin Oram, Praesidium Investment Management CompanyLong: Instructure (INST)Praesidium is f
Wall Street’s top hedge fund managers reveal their best ideas Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ideas, reveal, kacher, investment, hedge, million, streets, fisher, market, rates, fund, best, company, oram, wall, saidthe, managers


Wall Street's top hedge fund managers reveal their best ideas

A slew of Wall Street’s top hedge fund managers shared their best ideas on Wednesday at the annual Sohn San Francisco Investment Conference.

The conference is best known for hedge fund managers making market-moving presentations. The Sohn conference held in San Francisco is the West Coast version of the investment conferences that began in New York. The conferences, presented in partnership with CNBC, benefit education and other children’s causes.

Here are some of picks from the fund managers this year.

Kevin Oram, Praesidium Investment Management Company

Long: Instructure (INST)

Praesidium is finding value in educational technology company Instructure. The company develops education learning software Canvas, which is used by more than 1,000 institutions and six million students.

Canvas has taken “tremendous” market share from its competitor BlackBoard, portfolio manager Kevin Oram said. Canvas generated about $235 million in revenue in 2018, more than 90% of the company’s total revenue, Oram said.

The hedge fund believes Canvas can grow its earnings by 40% by 2022.

Instructure’s other software start-up Bridge is losing money, however, as it requires “vast up-front” R&D investments and a large dedicated sales team, Oram said.

The company needs to eliminate Bridge’s losses by selling it, Oram said, adding that the company’s board will announce new strategic plans on Dec. 3.

Gil Simon, SoMa Equity Partners

SailPoint Technologies (SAIL)

SoMa Equity Partners made a pitch for security software company SailPoint Technologies, which specializes in identity governance.

SailPoint ensures employees access only what they need to access, which is crucial in an environment when many corporations are threatened by insider threats, internal data breaches and hacks, CEO Gil Simon said.

The company, which currently has a $2 billion market cap, is likely to double in three years with its stock surging to $35 to $40 a share from Wednesday’s close of $18.32, Simon said. The manager sees strong tailwinds including massive enterprise replacement opportunities.

Adam Fisher, Commonwealth Asset Management

Short: interest rates in China

Adam Fisher, CEO at Commonwealth Asset Management, believes the global trend of zero interest rates will spread to China.

“Interest rates in China are going to zero,” Fisher said. “We believe rates much more likely to fall to other countries in East Asia than to rise for idiosyncratic domestic reason.”

Fisher said China’s four megacities with a population of 10 million or more — Beijing, Shanghai Shenzhen and Guangzhou — are already as rich as the rest of East Asia, meaning it’s unlikely for them to have explosive growth going forward.

Furthermore, China’s workforce is about to collapse as its working age population peaked in 2015 and is projected to fall by 125 million in 2019, which will slow down traditional bank lending, Fisher said.

The stage is set for the Chinese government to step in and cut interest rates further, the manager said.

Glen Kacher, Light Street Capital

Long: Talend (TLND)

Light Street Capital is recommending data integration company Talend.

Talend disrupted the ETL (extract, transform and load) data market when it was launched in 2005, chief investment officer and founder Glen Kacher said. The company has been benefiting from the cloud database wave in the past few years and is building a hybrid platform with both on-premises and cloud solutions, Kacher added.

The company is “the growth leader” in the data integration market, which enjoyed a 38.7% growth and 87% in recurring subscription revenue in 2018, Kacher said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ideas, reveal, kacher, investment, hedge, million, streets, fisher, market, rates, fund, best, company, oram, wall, saidthe, managers


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

The best credit card for people who love shopping on Amazon

If you’re one of them, you might have seen promotions for an Amazon credit card. CNBC Select crunched the numbers to determine which of these options provides the biggest benefit to frequent shoppers. 1 pick is the Amazon Prime Rewards Visa Signature Card. Since Amazon Prime has 100 million subscribers and is growing, many people already meet this requirement. Below, CNBC Select breaks down Amazon’s four credit cards to help you choose the best card for your needs.


If you’re one of them, you might have seen promotions for an Amazon credit card.
CNBC Select crunched the numbers to determine which of these options provides the biggest benefit to frequent shoppers.
1 pick is the Amazon Prime Rewards Visa Signature Card.
Since Amazon Prime has 100 million subscribers and is growing, many people already meet this requirement.
Below, CNBC Select breaks down Amazon’s four credit cards to help you choose the best card for your needs.
The best credit card for people who love shopping on Amazon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, offers, rewards, card, select, credit, best, online, love, prime, month, shopping, amazon


The best credit card for people who love shopping on Amazon

More than 40% of online shoppers buy from Amazon at least once a month, according to a recent poll from NPR.

If you’re one of them, you might have seen promotions for an Amazon credit card. The mega online retailer offers four types of credit cards. CNBC Select crunched the numbers to determine which of these options provides the biggest benefit to frequent shoppers.

Our No. 1 pick is the Amazon Prime Rewards Visa Signature Card. Although this card requires users to have an eligible Amazon Prime membership ($119 annually, or $12.99 a month), the company’s branded credit card offers the highest rewards return: 5% cash back at Amazon.com and Whole Foods Market. Since Amazon Prime has 100 million subscribers and is growing, many people already meet this requirement.

Below, CNBC Select breaks down Amazon’s four credit cards to help you choose the best card for your needs.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, offers, rewards, card, select, credit, best, online, love, prime, month, shopping, amazon


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Chase Sapphire Reserve® vs Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card: Which is best for you?

In addition to the Sapphire Reserve, there is a more affordable option: the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card. The Chase Sapphire Preferred has a lower $95 annual fee, but if you use all the benefits from the Sapphire Reserve, you’d wind up with a lower effective annual fee. For the average consumer, you could earn up to $2,567 in rewards using the Chase Sapphire Reserve® over a five-year period. With the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card you could earn up $1,986. Winner: The Sapphire Preferred offers


In addition to the Sapphire Reserve, there is a more affordable option: the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card.
The Chase Sapphire Preferred has a lower $95 annual fee, but if you use all the benefits from the Sapphire Reserve, you’d wind up with a lower effective annual fee.
For the average consumer, you could earn up to $2,567 in rewards using the Chase Sapphire Reserve® over a five-year period.
With the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card you could earn up $1,986.
Winner: The Sapphire Preferred offers
Chase Sapphire Reserve® vs Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card: Which is best for you? Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, preferred, cards, points, card, travel, sapphire, annual, best, credit, chase, reserve


Chase Sapphire Reserve® vs Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card: Which is best for you?

Chase is a leader in travel rewards cards, and its Sapphire cards have become cult favorites for frequent travelers. In fact, when it launched the Chase Sapphire Reserve® in 2016, there was so much demand, despite the $450 annual fee, that Chase ran out of the metal required to make the card. In addition to the Sapphire Reserve, there is a more affordable option: the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card. These two popular travel cards have very similar names but very different rewards programs. Frequent travelers who are looking for access to luxury perks, such as lounge access and travel credits, will see more value in the Reserve versus the Preferred. However, the Preferred may be a better choice for consumers who don’t want to fork over $450 a year for a credit card. If you’re in the market for a travel card and have good or excellent credit — a 670 or higher FICO Score, according to Experian — you have the best chances of qualifying for one of the Chase Sapphire cards and enjoying the cards’ great travel perks. Below, CNBC Select breaks down what sets these two cards apart, so you can choose the one that provides the most benefit for your spending habits.

Benefits Chase Sapphire Preferred Chase Sapphire Reserve Annual fee $95 $450 APR 17.74% to 24.74% variable 18.74% to 25.74% variable Rewards 2X points on travel and dining at restaurants, 1X points on all other purchases 3X points on travel (after earning your $300 travel credit) and dining at restaurants, 1X points on all other purchases Welcome bonus 60,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening — worth up to $750 in travel 50,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening — worth up to $750 in travel Ultimate Rewards bonus 25% 50% Credits None $300 annual travel credit; up to $100 application fee credit for Global Entry/TSA PreCheck every 4 years Lounge access None Priority Pass™ Select

Annual fee

The two Chase Sapphire cards have very different annual fees, so it’s important to do the math and see which card makes the most financial sense for your lifestyle. While your jaw may drop at the $450 annual fee for the Sapphire Reserve, you can effectively recoup the fee if you utilize all the added card benefits. Just by accounting for the $300 annual travel credit, the fee is already reduced to a more manageable $150. Then there’s the Priority Pass Select membership, which can be valued at $99 to $429, depending on membership level. The membership level you receive with the Sapphire Reserve is closer to the $429 Prestige tier. Sapphire Reserve cardholders can also take advantage of the Global Entry/TSA PreCheck credit of up to $100 every four years, which lowers the cost of the card even more. You don’t get any of these credits with a Sapphire Preferred card, but the $95 annual fee is pretty standard among the best travel rewards cards. Winner: It’s a toss-up. The Chase Sapphire Preferred has a lower $95 annual fee, but if you use all the benefits from the Sapphire Reserve, you’d wind up with a lower effective annual fee.

Rewards

Both cards offer the same bonus categories — worldwide travel and worldwide dining — but the points value varies by card. With the Sapphire Reserve you earn 3X points on dining and travel (immediately after earning your $300 travel credit), while the Sapphire Preferred gives you 2X points in those categories. With both cards you earn 1X points on all other purchases. CNBC Select used a sample spending budget based on the latest data available from the location intelligence firm Esri to break down how much money you would earn using each card over the course of five years, after the cost of the annual fee. For the average consumer, you could earn up to $2,567 in rewards using the Chase Sapphire Reserve® over a five-year period. With the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card you could earn up $1,986. Winner: The Chase Sapphire Reserve® offers 3X points on dining and travel purchases after you earn a $300 travel credit, which gives you more rewards over the course of five years, even with the high annual fee.

Redemption

Both cards allow you to redeem rewards in a variety of ways, from statement credit to gift cards to travel. However, travel redemptions come with a unique perk: If you redeem points for travel through the Chase Ultimate Rewards® portal, they’re worth 25% more for Sapphire Preferred cardholders and 50% more for Sapphire Reserve cardholders. For example, 50,000 bonus points are worth $500. But if you buy your plane ticket with your Sapphire Preferred card through the rewards portal, the value of your points increases 25% to $625. And it jumps to $750 for Sapphire Reserve cardholders, thanks to the 50% bonus. Winner: The Sapphire Reserve is the winner, offering double the value on points redeemed for travel.

Welcome bonus

Currently, the Sapphire Preferred and Sapphire Reserve offer welcome bonuses that require you to spend $4,000 on purchases in the first three months from account opening to earn extra points. While the spending requirements are the same, the earning potential is not. When you meet the spending requirements for the Sapphire Preferred you’ll earn 60,000 bonus points, while you’ll only earn 50,000 bonus points using the Sapphire Reserve. However, both bonuses equal $750 when redeemed for travel through the Chase Ultimate Rewards® portal. Winner: The Sapphire Preferred offers 10,000 more bonus points for the same amount of spending as the Sapphire Reserve, making the Preferred the winner.

Added perks

Both cards come with a bunch of added protections and discounts, but differ in a few significant offerings. Here’s a breakdown of the perks offered by both cards: Consumers with either card can benefit from: No foreign transaction fees

Purchase protection

Extended warranty protection

Trip cancellation/interruption insurance

Auto rental collision damage waiver

Baggage delay insurance

Trip delay reimbursement

Travel and emergency assistance services Sapphire Reserve cardholders enjoy these added perks: $300 annual travel credit

Global Entry/TSA PreCheck fee credit of up to $100 every four years

Priority Pass™ Select lounge access at 1,000+ VIP lounges in over 500 cities worldwide

Special benefits at The Luxury Hotel & Resort Collection, such as complimentary room upgrades, early check-in and late check-out

Lost luggage reimbursement

Return protection

Emergency evacuation and transportation

24/7 direct access to customer service specialists Winner: Sapphire Reserve with over a dozen cardholder perks and annual credits that help lower the cost of owning the card.

Bottom line

At the end of the day, choosing the right Chase Sapphire card depends on individual preferences such as how you spend your money and how you plan to use the card. If you’re traveling often and want access to more high-end perks (and are willing to pay for them), the Sapphire Reserve may be a better option with its premium lounge access, Global Entry or TSA PreCheck credit and $300 annual travel credit — all of which help to effectively reduce the overall cost of the card’s $450 annual fee. However, if you don’t travel enough to get the most bang for your buck with the Sapphire Reserve, the lower-cost Sapphire Preferred is a solid choice. It may not have the premium perks, but it offers a competitive 25% bonus on travel reward redemptions, a suite of travel and purchase protections and a competitive welcome bonus — all for a more reasonable $95 annual fee. While these cards are both good options for frequent travelers, there are alternative options available that may be a better fit. If you’re looking for a card that offers more flexibility for how you can redeem points, check out CNBC Select’s round up of the best cash-back credit cards.

Information about the Chase Sapphire Reserve® card has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the cards prior to publication.

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the CNBC Select editorial staff’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any third party.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, preferred, cards, points, card, travel, sapphire, annual, best, credit, chase, reserve


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post