BlackRock CEO Larry Fink: The investment climate is better than it seems

BlackRock CEO Larry Fink: The investment climate is better than it seems48 Mins AgoBlackRock CEO and Chairman Larry Fink joins “Squawk Box” to explain why he says the investment landscape around the world is better than it seems.


BlackRock CEO Larry Fink: The investment climate is better than it seems48 Mins AgoBlackRock CEO and Chairman Larry Fink joins “Squawk Box” to explain why he says the investment landscape around the world is better than it seems.
BlackRock CEO Larry Fink: The investment climate is better than it seems Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: david orrell
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, larry, mins, climate, landscape, blackrock, squawk, seems48, world, investment, fink, better, ceo


BlackRock CEO Larry Fink: The investment climate is better than it seems

BlackRock CEO Larry Fink: The investment climate is better than it seems

48 Mins Ago

BlackRock CEO and Chairman Larry Fink joins “Squawk Box” to explain why he says the investment landscape around the world is better than it seems.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: david orrell
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, larry, mins, climate, landscape, blackrock, squawk, seems48, world, investment, fink, better, ceo


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Facebook’s new Portal is great for video calls, but it’s not as useful as Google and Amazon’s competitors

Todd Haselton | CNBCThe new Facebook Portal is Facebook’s second attempt to deliver an in-home smart display that competes with the Amazon Echo Show and Google Nest Hub. It serves as a digital photo frame and lets you place video calls over Facebook Messenger or WhatsApp to phones and other Facebook Portal devices. The Portal is great for video calls, so long as the people you’re calling use Facebook Messenger or WhatsApp. Todd Haselton | CNBCThe camera can also follow people around the room, so


Todd Haselton | CNBCThe new Facebook Portal is Facebook’s second attempt to deliver an in-home smart display that competes with the Amazon Echo Show and Google Nest Hub. It serves as a digital photo frame and lets you place video calls over Facebook Messenger or WhatsApp to phones and other Facebook Portal devices. The Portal is great for video calls, so long as the people you’re calling use Facebook Messenger or WhatsApp. Todd Haselton | CNBCThe camera can also follow people around the room, so
Facebook’s new Portal is great for video calls, but it’s not as useful as Google and Amazon’s competitors Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, portal, amazon, todd, facebooks, calls, video, great, useful, competitors, whatsapp, better, amazons, facebook, echo, google, haselton


Facebook's new Portal is great for video calls, but it's not as useful as Google and Amazon's competitors

A picture of me skydiving on the Facebook Portal. Todd Haselton | CNBC

The new Facebook Portal is Facebook’s second attempt to deliver an in-home smart display that competes with the Amazon Echo Show and Google Nest Hub. It serves as a digital photo frame and lets you place video calls over Facebook Messenger or WhatsApp to phones and other Facebook Portal devices. Facebook isn’t well known for building great hardware yet, but it’s getting more aggressive with a new round of these Portal devices and its Oculus virtual reality business. But these devices make sense for a company that prides itself on connecting people, and the Portal does a good job at that. While the Portal I tested is a marked improvement over the model I tested last year, and the best video chat device of its kind, Google and Amazon’s devices are still better for most people since they can do more. Here’s what you need to know about the latest Facebook Portals, which launch Tuesday.

What’s good

Todd Haselton | CNBC

Last year I tested the massive Portal+, which was huge and a bit goofy looking, even though it worked as advertised. This year, Facebook’s $129 8-inch Portal Mini and $179 10-inch Portal (the one I tested) look like digital picture frames, which I’m more willing to let sit out on my kitchen counter or living room table. The Portal is great for video calls, so long as the people you’re calling use Facebook Messenger or WhatsApp. Most of my family is on WhatsApp, but the Portal only lets you call up to 4 in a video chat, far from the 32 people that you can call with Apple’s FaceTime. Most of my family doesn’t actively use Facebook anymore, but folks with Facebook Messenger can call up to 8 people at once.

Todd Haselton | CNBC

I liked it for simple video calls with my brother and his wife in Santa Monica, who had an identical loaner unit from Facebook. The video was really clear and has a nice wide angle lens so I was able to see my brother, his wife and my niece. Facebook also did a good job with the microphones, so I could hear people even if they walked to the other side of the room during a call. There are some fun options, too, like silly augmented reality masks — I liked one that gave me a mustache — or an option to listen to the same Spotify song together. Parents might appreciate a storybook function, which lets you read a book to your kids over video chat with animated characters. It worked well in a test, though I don’t have any kids of my own to read to.

The Portal has an AR feature that lets you read books over video chat to your children. Todd Haselton | CNBC

The camera can also follow people around the room, so they don’t need to be sitting still. If you want an in-home video calling system, the Portal is better than an Amazon Echo Show or Google Nest Hub Max, since the cameras are better. While the best feature is the video calling function, the Portal spends most of its time as a digital picture frame, showing pictures that you can upload from your phone, or that you’ve selected from Facebook and Instagram. I like that I was always able to look up and see pictures of my niece or recent vacations, but it doesn’t support Google Photos or Apple Photos, where I keep all of my pictures.

There are some apps, but not a lot. Todd Haselton | CNBC

It has a touchscreen that’s easy to use. There are apps and a few games (though not many), like Spotify, which you can tap into to play your favorite music or chess if you want to play a quick game against a random person on Facebook. A Food Network app has a few recipes if you want to scroll through them in the kitchen, but there aren’t enough for the app to be very useful. There’s a web browser, which was useful for checking in on CNBC.com, and helps if you want to find and follow a recipe in the kitchen. Still, you can do a lot more with an Amazon Echo Show or Google Home Hub, which have apps like Prime Video, Netflix, YouTube TV and Hulu, better cooking apps and more.

The Facebook Portal has a web browser. Todd Haselton | CNBC

So, while the video quality may be better on the portal, almost everything else is better on an Echo Show or the Google Nest Hub Max.

What’s bad

There are some (but not many) apps for the Facebook Portal. Todd Haselton | CNBC

There’s a switch that lets you cover the camera and turn off the microphone, which is good, but it seems like Facebook still has a long way to go before it earns people’s trust again. When I told family and friends about the Portal, a lot were skeptical about putting Facebook hardware in their homes, more so than an Amazon Echo or Google speaker. If your friends don’t use WhatsApp or Facebook, then you can’t place a video call. Plenty of people use WhatsApp, like my siblings, so that’s a nice added option that wasn’t available last year. But my inlaws and my parents haven’t fully adopted it yet.

Spotify on the Facebook Portal. Todd Haselton | CNBC

The speakers on the Portal are better than last year’s model but it still didn’t really blow me away. I prefer using either Google, Amazon or Sonos speakers, since I have more of them around the house and can music across all of them at once, too.

The Facebook Portal has a speaker on the back and its charger doubles as a kickstand. Todd Haselton | CNBC

It’s also not very smart. The Portal has Amazon Alexa on it, but that can’t be used to do everything Alexa on an Echo Show can do, like play videos. But you can still do things like ask the weather or control your smart home. I also like that the Google Nest Hub Max recognizes my face and shows me news, my commute time with Google Maps and other information that’s specific to me. My wife thinks that’s creepy, though, so maybe it’s too early for Facebook to add that kind of support.

Should you buy it?

A photo of me skydiving displayed on the Facebook Portal. Todd Haselton | CNBC

If you want a photo frame that can show you your Facebook and Instagram albums and place really good video calls to your friends and family members, and they’re all on Facebook or WhatsApp, then the Portal is great. It’s a fun way to connect with friends and family, especially since the camera works well.

You can call WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger contacts. Todd Haselton | CNBC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, portal, amazon, todd, facebooks, calls, video, great, useful, competitors, whatsapp, better, amazons, facebook, echo, google, haselton


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Author Ryan Holiday: How ‘stillness’ can help you become a better investor

But developing a sense of “stillness” may help you do it, says author Ryan Holiday. Being disciplined, even-keeled, and less emotional about your money can help with investing, too. One role model in investing stillness: Legendary investor Warren Buffett, who has called the stock market “a device for transferring money from the impatient to the patient.” Buffett “has to be really patient, which requires stillness,” Holiday says. Ryan Holiday Author, ‘Stillness Is the Key’Putting your finances on


But developing a sense of “stillness” may help you do it, says author Ryan Holiday. Being disciplined, even-keeled, and less emotional about your money can help with investing, too. One role model in investing stillness: Legendary investor Warren Buffett, who has called the stock market “a device for transferring money from the impatient to the patient.” Buffett “has to be really patient, which requires stillness,” Holiday says. Ryan Holiday Author, ‘Stillness Is the Key’Putting your finances on
Author Ryan Holiday: How ‘stillness’ can help you become a better investor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: sam becker, ramit sethi, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sense, market, author, holiday, better, things, requires, investor, help, stillness, ryan, investing, emotional, investment


Author Ryan Holiday: How 'stillness' can help you become a better investor

Staying focused on your investment goals while ignoring the ups and downs of the market isn’t easy. But developing a sense of “stillness” may help you do it, says author Ryan Holiday. Holiday’s new book, “Stillness Is the Key,” highlights how numerous historical figures — including JFK, Johnny Cash, and Leonardo da Vinci — used a strategic sense of patience, among other things, to achieve their goals. Being disciplined, even-keeled, and less emotional about your money can help with investing, too. “We know that the best investment strategy is long term. It’s indifferent to the day-to-day fluctuations of the market. It’s not emotional. It’s logical. It’s value-based,” Holiday tells Grow. The most dangerous aspect of investing, he says, is that investors “get way too excited when things are good. This is where bubbles and irrational exuberance comes from.”

One role model in investing stillness: Legendary investor Warren Buffett, who has called the stock market “a device for transferring money from the impatient to the patient.” Buffett “has to be really patient, which requires stillness,” Holiday says. “It requires him to see things that other people don’t see. It requires him to be wrong for extended periods of time, until he’s proven right.” Developing a sense of stillness and discipline like Buffett’s takes practice. Here are two ways you can strengthen this attribute as an investor:

Take emotion out of investment decisions

Feelings, both good and bad, can cause investors to make rash decisions. The goal is “not being jerked around by your emotions,” Holiday says, and “having some semblance of self-control.” In practice, this means that you don’t panic if the markets start to fall — and you don’t get giddy if they continue to climb. You try to keep your head down and stick to your plan, no matter what’s going on in the news.

We know that the best investment strategy is long term: It’s indifferent to the day-to-day fluctuations of the market. It’s not emotional. It’s logical. Ryan Holiday Author, ‘Stillness Is the Key’

Putting your finances on autopilot can help you take the emotion out of your investing decisions. Setting up recurring contributions to your investment or retirement accounts can keep you consistent and ensure that you’re benefiting from dollar-cost averaging, too. You can also work on building up your emergency fund and even try writing yourself a motivation letter to help you keep a steady emotional state when the markets get bumpy.

Limit how frequently you monitor your portfolio


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: sam becker, ramit sethi, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sense, market, author, holiday, better, things, requires, investor, help, stillness, ryan, investing, emotional, investment


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Google Maps now gives better voice directions for people with impaired vision

Google on Thursday announced an update for Google Maps on iPhone and Android that improves voice guidance for people with impaired vision. If you turn the feature on, you’ll get more detailed voice guidance. Google also gives frequent updates that you’re on the right route, according to a blog post from the company. I couldn’t find the option on Google Maps on my iPhone yet, but it usually takes a few days for these features to roll out to everyone. You can check by opening Google Maps on your p


Google on Thursday announced an update for Google Maps on iPhone and Android that improves voice guidance for people with impaired vision. If you turn the feature on, you’ll get more detailed voice guidance. Google also gives frequent updates that you’re on the right route, according to a blog post from the company. I couldn’t find the option on Google Maps on my iPhone yet, but it usually takes a few days for these features to roll out to everyone. You can check by opening Google Maps on your p
Google Maps now gives better voice directions for people with impaired vision Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, maps, gives, turn, impaired, tell, vision, iphone, guidance, detailed, voice, better, need, youre, google, directions


Google Maps now gives better voice directions for people with impaired vision

Google on Thursday announced an update for Google Maps on iPhone and Android that improves voice guidance for people with impaired vision.

If you turn the feature on, you’ll get more detailed voice guidance. It might even be useful for folks with perfect vision traveling somewhere they’ve never been before.

For example, instead of just getting alerts for the next turn you need to make, the improved guidance can tell you how much farther you need to walk before you make the turn, and if you’re about to cross a busy intersection. Google also gives frequent updates that you’re on the right route, according to a blog post from the company. And it will tell you if you’ve taken a wrong turn.

It’s available in English in the U.S. and in Japanese in Japan.

I couldn’t find the option on Google Maps on my iPhone yet, but it usually takes a few days for these features to roll out to everyone. You can check by opening Google Maps on your phone, going to navigation, scrolling down to the section under “walking options” and turning on “detailed voice guidance.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, maps, gives, turn, impaired, tell, vision, iphone, guidance, detailed, voice, better, need, youre, google, directions


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CEOs better wake up to the new breed of Elizabeth Warren capitalism, warns GOP pollster

Luntz was referencing comments made Thursday by Salesforce founder and co-CEO Marc Benioff, who argued “capitalism, as we know it, is dead.” Warren’s support has increased as the former Harvard law professor rolled out a series of economic policy proposals that her campaign argues will create “big, structural change.” Her signature proposal is a wealth tax, which would tax wealth over $50 million at 2% and wealth over $1 billion at 3%. Luntz said his polling shows support for Warren’s wealth tax


Luntz was referencing comments made Thursday by Salesforce founder and co-CEO Marc Benioff, who argued “capitalism, as we know it, is dead.” Warren’s support has increased as the former Harvard law professor rolled out a series of economic policy proposals that her campaign argues will create “big, structural change.” Her signature proposal is a wealth tax, which would tax wealth over $50 million at 2% and wealth over $1 billion at 3%. Luntz said his polling shows support for Warren’s wealth tax
CEOs better wake up to the new breed of Elizabeth Warren capitalism, warns GOP pollster Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wealth, support, warrens, democratic, benioff, wake, tax, dont, average, elizabeth, breed, better, luntz, gop, ceos, capitalism, warns, pollster, warren


CEOs better wake up to the new breed of Elizabeth Warren capitalism, warns GOP pollster

Business leaders must reckon with the American electorate’s frustration with capitalism that is driving Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s rise in the Democratic primary, Republican pollster Frank Luntz told CNBC on Friday.

“I say to corporate leaders who are watching today: If you don’t listen to what Marc [Benioff] said, if you don’t find a way to connect to people you serve, your employees and the communities and the customers themselves, then you will face a backlash at the polls on Election Day,” Luntz said on “Squawk Box.” “And you will rue the day.”

Luntz was referencing comments made Thursday by Salesforce founder and co-CEO Marc Benioff, who argued “capitalism, as we know it, is dead.”

“And if your orientation is just about making money, I don’t think you’re going to hang out very long as a CEO or a founder of a company,” Benioff said at a TechCrunch conference.

Warren, of Massachusetts, has steadily gained traction in her party’s primary contest. She is No. 2 in the national Real Clear Politics polling average, with 24% support. She trails only Joe Biden, who is at 26.2%. But she leads the former vice president in an average of Iowa polls, 23% to 20.3%.

Warren’s support has increased as the former Harvard law professor rolled out a series of economic policy proposals that her campaign argues will create “big, structural change.” Her signature proposal is a wealth tax, which would tax wealth over $50 million at 2% and wealth over $1 billion at 3%.

Warren’s populist economic agenda has alienated some Democratic donors on Wall Street and in big business, who have said they will sit out the general election if she wins the nomination or, possibly, support President Donald Trump.

At the same time, Warren’s message is increasingly appealing to Democratic voters. Luntz said his polling shows support for Warren’s wealth tax at around 75%, including a “bare majority of Republicans.”

“The attitudes and the core principals and priorities of the American people have shifted over the last three years,” Luntz said. “We are no longer pro-capitalist, which is why the language and messaging matters so much.”

In June, Pew Research Center found Americans still hold a more positive few of capitalism than socialism by a margin of 65% to 42%. Democrats were more likely than Republicans to view both terms favorably, though.

Luntz said people who feel the economy is not working for them feel angry toward those who have “figured out how to do well.”

“They are absolutely responding favorably to what Elizabeth Warren is saying, even if the ideas are so extreme,” he argued.

Luntz said he considers Warren the odds-on favorite to win the Democratic nomination.

“She’s a brilliant debater,” Luntz said. “She knows how to begin her statements, how to use facts, how to challenge Donald Trump, how to empathize with the average working-class voter. She’s really good right now.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wealth, support, warrens, democratic, benioff, wake, tax, dont, average, elizabeth, breed, better, luntz, gop, ceos, capitalism, warns, pollster, warren


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Altria launches Iqos tobacco device in US, and the timing couldn’t be better

But Altria is finally launching Iqos in the U.S. this week, and the company’s timing — though coincidental — couldn’t be better. Altria’s Iqos store in Atlanta’s Lenox Square mall CNBCAltria will market Iqos in the U.S. through a licensing agreement with PMI. Altria’s Iqos store in Atlanta’s Lenox Square mall CNBCThe pen-like experience is sleek. That’s why Altria will only sell the Iqos device at its stores and kiosks. Altria’s Iqos store in Atlanta’s Lenox Square mall CNBCAltria will open anot


But Altria is finally launching Iqos in the U.S. this week, and the company’s timing — though coincidental — couldn’t be better. Altria’s Iqos store in Atlanta’s Lenox Square mall CNBCAltria will market Iqos in the U.S. through a licensing agreement with PMI. Altria’s Iqos store in Atlanta’s Lenox Square mall CNBCThe pen-like experience is sleek. That’s why Altria will only sell the Iqos device at its stores and kiosks. Altria’s Iqos store in Atlanta’s Lenox Square mall CNBCAltria will open anot
Altria launches Iqos tobacco device in US, and the timing couldn’t be better Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: angelica lavito, in angelicalavito
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cigarette, lenox, device, mall, iqos, timing, store, altria, square, couldnt, better, launches, tobacco, vaping


Altria launches Iqos tobacco device in US, and the timing couldn't be better

Altria’s Iqos store in Atlanta’s Lenox Square mall CNBC

ATLANTA — Marlboro maker Altria started developing its new tobacco device more than a decade ago — as smoking rates declined but long before vaping took hold in the U.S. It took two more years for regulatory clearance. But Altria is finally launching Iqos in the U.S. this week, and the company’s timing — though coincidental — couldn’t be better. Iqos isn’t a vaping device or a cigarette. It heats tobacco, but doesn’t burn it, and is designed to give users the same rush of nicotine as smoking with fewer toxins. It also comes amid public panic over an outbreak of a deadly lung disease that’s killed at least 18 people. U.S. health officials have traced the illnesses to vaping. “It’s perfect timing,” said Piper Jaffray analyst Michael Lavery. “I don’t think they would have expected some consumer uncertainty around vapor coinciding with the launch of Iqos in the U.S.”

A man smokes with the electronic tobacco heater IQOS (I quit ordinary smoking) of the tobacco company Philip Morris. Sebastian Kahnert | picture alliance | Getty Images

Iqos is formally being launched Friday in Atlanta, where Altria has opened an airy new Iqos store with tall glass windows and light wood in a corner of Lenox Square mall. The Food and Drug Administration authorized its sale in the U.S. in April, setting strict marketing guidelines aimed at ensuring only adult smokers use Iqos, not kids. Regulators are already battling a surge in teen vaping, coupled with the vaping disease that’s sickened more than 1,000 people in recent months. Although most of the cases involve THC found in marijuana, some users have said they exclusively used nicotine. The epidemic has prompted health officials around the world to start pulling e-cigarettes off shelves. Altria and Philip Morris International started developing Iqos when the companies were still combined. PMI led the work once it was spun off from Altria in 2008. It launched Iqos in Nagoya, Japan, and Milan, in 2014 and has since introduced it in 49 markets, with Atlanta being the latest.

Altria’s Iqos store in Atlanta’s Lenox Square mall CNBC

Altria will market Iqos in the U.S. through a licensing agreement with PMI. In some places, like Japan and Russia, Iqos has taken off. Adoption has been slower in other places, like Canada and the United Kingdom. It’s unclear how U.S. consumers will respond to Iqos. Unlike e-cigarettes, Iqos uses actual tobacco. The device heats the tobacco instead of burning it, avoiding the chemical process that occurs when smoking a cigarette that produces many harmful toxins. Altria says the experience mimics smoking a cigarette and is therefore attractive to adult smokers. Of the roughly 34 million adult smokers in the U.S., Altria estimates about 20 million are looking for alternatives, many of whom have tried but did not like vapor products, Altria spokesman David Sutton told CNBC.

Altria’s Iqos store in Atlanta’s Lenox Square mall CNBC

The pen-like experience is sleek. Using it, however, can be confusing. To use Iqos, users insert a Marlboro-branded heatstick, which looks like a stubby cigarette, into the device. They then click a button and the device heats the tobacco, producing an aerosol. Similar to a cigarette, users can puff multiple times until the heatstick runs out. They need to use a scraper tool to clean out the leftover tobacco after about every pack of heatsticks. They have to charge it in a carrying case after each session of using it. That’s why Altria will only sell the Iqos device at its stores and kiosks. It will sell the heatsticks in about 500 stores in the Atlanta area, but even people who order Iqos online must pick it up in stores. At the Atlanta store, an employee stands at the entrance, scanning identification and asking whether people smoke cigarettes. If they are under 21 or do not smoke, they will be turned away, the company says. People can test the Iqos device in the “guided trial room.” The separate area is behind automatic glass and doors decorated with a blue couch and built with its own ventilation system. Altria will sell a bundle containing the holder and 200 heatsticks for $80. The holder costs $100 by itself, Sutton said.

Altria’s Iqos store in Atlanta’s Lenox Square mall CNBC

Altria will open another store in the Mall of Georgia later this month. It will also open mobile stores around the city and pop-up kiosks in its existing retailers, such as convenience stores. The company chose Atlanta as its launch market because it’s a tech-focused city with “several hundred thousands” of adult smokers, Sutton said. Altria will monitor the results before bringing Iqos to other cities, though the company has said it plans to expand rapidly. In clearing Iqos for sale, the FDA stipulated a number of marketing restrictions. Since Iqos meets the legal definition of a cigarette, it is subject to the same marketing restrictions barring it from being advertised on radio or TV.

Altria’s Iqos store in Atlanta’s Lenox Square mall CNBC

Altria must submit advertisements to the FDA 30 days before publication, establish independent age and identification verification for online sales and disclose its affiliation when using influencers to promote Iqos, among other requirements. Altria must also keep detailed records and send the FDA quarterly reports on its sales, including details like demographic data on its customers and how many have switched to Iqos from cigarettes or use both products. The company must also send an annual report with more granular information, including any reports of adverse experiences.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: angelica lavito, in angelicalavito
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cigarette, lenox, device, mall, iqos, timing, store, altria, square, couldnt, better, launches, tobacco, vaping


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Wall Street market strategists see solid fourth quarter despite impeachment inquiry, trade war

Strategists say the stock market should have a better fourth quarter after a range-bound third quarter, even with turbulence that could come from an impeachment inquiry and ongoing trade tensions with China. The fourth quarter is typically the best of the year, and since World War II, it has gained 3.8% on average and was higher 78% of the time, according to CFRA. “I think [the fourth quarter] could actually surprise to the upside. It’s often good,” he said, noting last year’s sharp fourth quart


Strategists say the stock market should have a better fourth quarter after a range-bound third quarter, even with turbulence that could come from an impeachment inquiry and ongoing trade tensions with China. The fourth quarter is typically the best of the year, and since World War II, it has gained 3.8% on average and was higher 78% of the time, according to CFRA. “I think [the fourth quarter] could actually surprise to the upside. It’s often good,” he said, noting last year’s sharp fourth quart
Wall Street market strategists see solid fourth quarter despite impeachment inquiry, trade war Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, inquiry, better, impeachment, street, expected, positive, fed, trade, think, earnings, market, wall, fourth, quarter, war, strategists, solid


Wall Street market strategists see solid fourth quarter despite impeachment inquiry, trade war

Strategists say the stock market should have a better fourth quarter after a range-bound third quarter, even with turbulence that could come from an impeachment inquiry and ongoing trade tensions with China.

The S&P 500 ended the third quarter at 2,976 with a 1.2% gain, and it is now about 1.7% below the all-time high it reached during the quarter, on July 26. The fourth quarter is typically the best of the year, and since World War II, it has gained 3.8% on average and was higher 78% of the time, according to CFRA.

“It’s a bull with a lower case ‘b,'” said Sam Stovall, CRFA chief investment strategist. Stovall said about a 4% gain is possible by year end. Stocks have been tossed by trade worries, but supported by easing from the Fed and other global central banks.

“I think [the fourth quarter] could actually surprise to the upside. It’s often good,” he said, noting last year’s sharp fourth quarter decline was an outlier. “October is usually pretty shaky. But November, December, you tend to have investors look to the coming year, not just focus on the rest of the quarter.”

Analysts say the market should be able to weather the impeachment inquiry, and even if the Senate takes it up, there’s little chance the president would be convicted by the GOP controlled body.

“I think it will make for good headlines but not affect the bottom line,” said Stovall. As for the election, it could also cause some bumps, with Sen. Elizabeth Warren closing in on front runner former vice president Joe Biden in the polls. “I think the more left leaning you get, the more likelihood the present administration sticks around,” Stovall said.

On the positive side, the economy is looking better than expected, earnings could therefore pick up, and the recession scare in bonds that drove interest rates sharply lower this summer is fading. Positive earnings surprises are outpacing negative, and when Citigroup’s surprise index picks up, it’s considered positive for stocks.

“I think earnings estimates are going to turn up. I think there’s a number of factors playing out. The fact a number of economic surprises have surged is saying we have a lot more positive economic momentum at the moment than we had earlier this year,” said James Paulsen, chief investment strategist at Leuthold Group. “That might start showing up in third quarter earnings reports.”

Paulsen noted that growth for the third quarter is now expected to be 2% or better, but earnings are still expected to show a decline. Third quarter earnings are expected to fall by 2.2%, according to Refinitiv. The second quarter was expected to be negative as well, but profits were up 3.2%, Refinitiv. For the fourth quarter, profits for S&P companies are expected to be up 4.1%.

Paulsen said he expects earnings to start showing a pick up within six months. “I think if earnings pick up, there’s considerable upside,” he said, noting that will could be the strongest drive for the market.

Analysts also expect a more positive view on the economy to show up in bond yields, which fell precipitously this summer in an extreme period of volatility for bonds. The 10-year touched 1.43% as September began, and it was at 1.66% Monday.

“You’re going to turn that falling yield thing from a real negative to a real positive,” said Paulsen. He said a real positive would be if it moves up above 2% and holds there, but it could spook stocks if it falls back below 1.6%.

Julian Emanuel, head of equity and derivatives strategy at BTIG, said it is likely the global bond bubble which drove rates lower in the summer has burst.

Emanuel said he expects investors will realize that the economy is better than they had believed during the summer, either from the economic surprises or because of the affects of Fed easing. “What could happen is a realization that the global situation is better than these incredibly low interest rates on the long end would lead one to believe,” he said.

Emanuel is less optimistic than some others about how much more the stock market can gain this year. His target puts the S&P 500 at 3,000 by year end and he says it can stay in a range for now that goes up to 3,030.

Many investors expect one more rate cut this year, but Emanuel does not. Disappointment over the Fed could create some volatility. Fed funds futures are pricing in a 42% chance of a quarter point rate cut in October.

“We don’t think the Fed is going to cut again this year because we think the economy is stronger than expected and if you look at inflation, it’s actually breaking out to the upside,” he said.

Emanuel said the better economy should help select stock groups, and when investors embrace cyclicals, the S&P will begin to break above its current range. Cyclicals, including financials, industrials, materials and energy were the top performers in September, with financials leading with a 4.5% gain.

Stock indices have been fairly subdued in September, as the market tried to regain the July high after August’s bond market turbulence.

“The S&P 500 in September 2019 didn’t have a single 1% drop and only two 1% gains. This normally volatile month could be passing some big moves to October this year,” notes Ryan Detrick, senior market strategist for LPL Financial.

“What has us worried this October is the fact that September this year was historically calm. If we know one thing, it is that markets don’t stay calm forever and after a dull market last month, we could be due for some usual October volatility,” according to Detrick.

The trade wars could break the calm, and they remain a wild card, with U.S. and Chinese officials expected to meet Oct. 10. Analysts say there are a variety of scenarios that could play out. For one, Trump could strike a quicker deal to score an economic victory while he’s under pressure from the impeachment process as he faces an election.

There’s also the view that China could drag its feet until the election, if it believes Trump has become more vulnerable. Another scenario is that China could actually seek an earlier deal if Sen. Elizabeth Warren takes the lead in polls, since she would have a different agenda than Trump and potentially be more difficult to strike a deal with.

There are also geopolitical events that could stir up markets. The U.K. government is trying to resolve Brexit, or its exit from the European Union in October, and the relations between Iran and the U.S. have become more tense after the attack on Saudi Arabia’s oil infrastructure.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, inquiry, better, impeachment, street, expected, positive, fed, trade, think, earnings, market, wall, fourth, quarter, war, strategists, solid


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Next year’s iPads and MacBooks will get improved screens that look a lot better, top Apple analyst says

The move will help Apple cut its reliance on Samsung “given only Samsung is capable of the mid-size OLED display mass production,” Kuo said. Mini LED displays offer some of the benefits of OLED, like higher contrast, that users don’t get in LCD screens. Apple currently uses OLED in its high-end iPhone 11 Pro phones, but uses LCD displays on its iPhone 11, MacBooks and iPads. Kuo said Apple may turn to mini LED to meet thinner form factor requirements, and that Apple will only use them in its “mo


The move will help Apple cut its reliance on Samsung “given only Samsung is capable of the mid-size OLED display mass production,” Kuo said. Mini LED displays offer some of the benefits of OLED, like higher contrast, that users don’t get in LCD screens. Apple currently uses OLED in its high-end iPhone 11 Pro phones, but uses LCD displays on its iPhone 11, MacBooks and iPads. Kuo said Apple may turn to mini LED to meet thinner form factor requirements, and that Apple will only use them in its “mo
Next year’s iPads and MacBooks will get improved screens that look a lot better, top Apple analyst says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, screen, lot, look, macbooks, apple, mini, kuo, oled, midsize, highend, led, ipads, analyst, display, backlight, screens, improved, better


Next year's iPads and MacBooks will get improved screens that look a lot better, top Apple analyst says

Top Apple analyst TF International Securities’ Ming-Chi Kuo said in a note on Sunday that Apple will launch iPads and MacBooks that use new mini LED screen technology during the fourth quarter of 2020 and the first half of 2021 “at the earliest.”

The move will help Apple cut its reliance on Samsung “given only Samsung is capable of the mid-size OLED display mass production,” Kuo said.

Mini LED displays offer some of the benefits of OLED, like higher contrast, that users don’t get in LCD screens. They’re also not as prone to “burn in,” according to Kuo. Burn in happens when one application is left open on a screen and can cause a permanent reflection of that image. This is particularly a concern in “productivity applications,” Kuo said, where someone might leave an application open for a long period of time without any movement on the screen to prevent burn-in.

Apple currently uses OLED in its high-end iPhone 11 Pro phones, but uses LCD displays on its iPhone 11, MacBooks and iPads. Kuo said Apple may turn to mini LED to meet thinner form factor requirements, and that Apple will only use them in its “most high-end products.”

“Many competitors will likely follow Apple’s steps, and it’s expected that the mini LED display will be the general spec for the most high-end mid-size productivity devices in the future,” Kuo said, noting that “some investors worry that Apple may adopt the mid-size OLED display to replace the mini LED display,” but that mini LED screens will be Apple’s “first choice.”

“The main beneficiaries of Apple’s mini LED display include Avary/ZDT (mini LED backlight PCB), Epistar (LED), Nichia (LED), Radiant (mini LED backlight), TSMT (mini LED backlight), and LG Display (mini LED display),” Kuo said in the note.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, screen, lot, look, macbooks, apple, mini, kuo, oled, midsize, highend, led, ipads, analyst, display, backlight, screens, improved, better


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JP Morgan expects Apple shares to rise over 20% on better than expected iPhone sales

J.P. Morgan raised its price target on Apple’s stock Monday, expecting the company’s shares will rise 21% as sales of its new line of iPhone are “stronger than muted expectations.” J.P. Morgan raised its price target on Apple to $265 a share from $243 a share. The firm has an overweight rating on the stock. Apple shares rose 1.2% in trading from their previous close of $218.82. J.P. Morgan forecasts 1 million more iPhone sales than it previously expected during the current quarter, plus 3 millio


J.P. Morgan raised its price target on Apple’s stock Monday, expecting the company’s shares will rise 21% as sales of its new line of iPhone are “stronger than muted expectations.” J.P. Morgan raised its price target on Apple to $265 a share from $243 a share. The firm has an overweight rating on the stock. Apple shares rose 1.2% in trading from their previous close of $218.82. J.P. Morgan forecasts 1 million more iPhone sales than it previously expected during the current quarter, plus 3 millio
JP Morgan expects Apple shares to rise over 20% on better than expected iPhone sales Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expected, apple, shares, quarter, target, morgan, price, raised, volume, share, sales, iphone, rise, expects, better


JP Morgan expects Apple shares to rise over 20% on better than expected iPhone sales

J.P. Morgan raised its price target on Apple’s stock Monday, expecting the company’s shares will rise 21% as sales of its new line of iPhone are “stronger than muted expectations.”

“We are modestly raising our iPhone volume forecasts and expect investor sentiment on AAPL shares to improve materially given the firm’s ability to drive upward revision to volume expectations despite the 2019 product cycle largely considered to be a muted one,” J.P. Morgan analyst Samik Chatterjee said in a note to investors.

J.P. Morgan raised its price target on Apple to $265 a share from $243 a share. The firm has an overweight rating on the stock.

Apple shares rose 1.2% in trading from their previous close of $218.82.

J.P. Morgan forecasts 1 million more iPhone sales than it previously expected during the current quarter, plus 3 million more iPhone sales than expected in the final quarter of the calendar year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expected, apple, shares, quarter, target, morgan, price, raised, volume, share, sales, iphone, rise, expects, better


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I made $70,000 through this side hustle at 27—while working a full-time job. Here’s how I did it

I’ve done just about every side hustle you can imagine, from selling Avon products to my mom’s friends to starting an online retail store for bridal accessories. But Onada Photography, the wedding photography business that I started in my early-20s, was my longest-running one. A natural interestGrowing up, my dad was always taking photos of our family. But the idea to turn my hobby into a business came about during a trip to Jamaica for my friend’s wedding. I was more than happy to do it, and ph


I’ve done just about every side hustle you can imagine, from selling Avon products to my mom’s friends to starting an online retail store for bridal accessories. But Onada Photography, the wedding photography business that I started in my early-20s, was my longest-running one. A natural interestGrowing up, my dad was always taking photos of our family. But the idea to turn my hobby into a business came about during a trip to Jamaica for my friend’s wedding. I was more than happy to do it, and ph
I made $70,000 through this side hustle at 27—while working a full-time job. Here’s how I did it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: bola sokunbi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, working, better, photos, friends, taking, photography, business, heres, money, 27while, job, starting, took, wedding, hustle, fulltime, 70000


I made $70,000 through this side hustle at 27—while working a full-time job. Here's how I did it

Eleven years ago, when I was 27, I reached one of my proudest financial milestones: I had amassed more than $100,000 in savings — and I did it in just three years. One of the biggest things that helped me accelerate my savings was taking on side hustles. I highly recommend everyone consider starting one at some point, even if it’s just for a short period of time. I’ve done just about every side hustle you can imagine, from selling Avon products to my mom’s friends to starting an online retail store for bridal accessories. But Onada Photography, the wedding photography business that I started in my early-20s, was my longest-running one. I did it for seven years, and it earned me the most amount of money of all my side hustles. In one particular year, I made more than $70,000 total. A chunk of that money went toward my savings.

A natural interest

Growing up, my dad was always taking photos of our family. As a result, I developed an interest in photography. But the idea to turn my hobby into a business came about during a trip to Jamaica for my friend’s wedding. I had just purchased an inexpensive entry-level DSLR camera, which I took with me. (From the author’s wedding portfolio | Credit: Bola Sokunbi) As luck would have it, the photographer was running late on the wedding day. My friend then turned to me and asked, “Would it be all right if you took a few photos while we wait for him to arrive?” I was more than happy to do it, and photos I took turned out better than I expected. More importantly, my friend loved them. It was then and there that I decided to make some money out of my photography skills.

A self-taught photographer

Getting started was the biggest hurdle. I was nervous to put myself out there, but I knew that if I didn’t try, I’d never know if it was something I could be successful doing. I created a simple website using the photos I took at my friend’s wedding, set up my first ad on Craigslist and asked everyone I knew to spread the word. I had so much to learn, and I really needed to expand my portfolio, so I decided to shoot the first wedding for free. (Pictured above: The author, Bola Sokunbi) To further build on my skills and knowledge, I read books, watched videos, took workshops and practiced taking photos of my friends and family. Once I had a solid portfolio, I felt confident in charging clients for my services. I charged $300 per wedding. But as I did more events, my client base grew and my services became increasingly in demand. So I finally upped my rates to between $2,000 and $5,000, which was — and still is — pretty standard. Some photographers charge up to $10,000, but it really depends on factors like shoot duration and location.

Slow and steady

If you’re starting a side hustle, it’s important to take things slowly so you don’t operate on a negative balance. It took me about two years to turn a decent profit. My goal was to build a business with zero debt, so I opened a business savings account. Once I paid my business taxes, I invested the rest of the money back into Onada Photography (e.g. purchasing high-quality equipment, better editing software, travel expenses). With better quality equipment and better skills, I had mastered the art of photography. My dedication earned me solid reviews and several awards. (Recognition and awards for Onada Photography) As my business grew more successful, I expanded my services and offered lifestyle photo sessions. (These are less time-consuming and capture day-to-day activities and normal life scenarios, such as family and engagement portraits). I charged between $300 and $450 for those.

Hustling is hard work


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: bola sokunbi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, working, better, photos, friends, taking, photography, business, heres, money, 27while, job, starting, took, wedding, hustle, fulltime, 70000


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