Markets are at new highs, but the euphoria is missing

The markets are at new highs, but it doesn’t feel that way. This is all good news, but if you think Wall Street is celebrating, try calling around on a trading desk: You won’t hear any champagne corks popping. Consider:The S&P may be sitting at an historic high, but there are only 13 stocks in the index at new highs. The lack of euphoria or its opposite — the lack of worry — is one reason many traders are enthusiastic about the near-term. It means many are still sitting on the sidelines and they


The markets are at new highs, but it doesn’t feel that way. This is all good news, but if you think Wall Street is celebrating, try calling around on a trading desk: You won’t hear any champagne corks popping. Consider:The S&P may be sitting at an historic high, but there are only 13 stocks in the index at new highs. The lack of euphoria or its opposite — the lack of worry — is one reason many traders are enthusiastic about the near-term. It means many are still sitting on the sidelines and they
Markets are at new highs, but the euphoria is missing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: bob pisani, drew angerer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, better, sitting, serious, volatility, euphoria, wall, markets, high, missing, highs, traders, earnings, volume, street


Markets are at new highs, but the euphoria is missing

The markets are at new highs, but it doesn’t feel that way.

Large earnings beats from companies as diverse at Lockheed Martin, United Technologies, PulteGroup and Whirlpool are propelling the S&P 500 to a new high. In addition to earnings well above expectations, we see China bottoming, Europe showing at least some signs of stability and an accommodating Fed.

Doesn’t get much better than that! So what’s next?

We have earnings reports from banks (fair) and industrials (better than expected) and a smattering of consumer names like Kimberly Clark and Procter & Gamble (also better than expected). To keep the momentum going, we need to hear from technology, energy and especially health care, which has suddenly become the problem child for the markets.

Good news after the close: Texas Instruments, one of the world’s largest semiconductor companies, reported earnings above expectations and provided second-quarter guidance that was roughly in-line with expectations.

This is all good news, but if you think Wall Street is celebrating, try calling around on a trading desk: You won’t hear any champagne corks popping.

“It’s not just today, it’s been dead for weeks,” one sell-side trader told me. “It’s the opposite of euphoria.”

This is an age-old Wall Street complaint: Stock traders do not view a new high as truly valid unless there is some serious action — some serious volume, some serious volatility, some kind of, well, serious hoopla.

And that is what is missing from the rally.

Consider:

The S&P may be sitting at an historic high, but there are only 13 stocks in the index at new highs. The market is being pushed up by a small group of super-performers. So, traders believe the rally needs to broaden out. No one is scrambling to buy stocks. Volume has been abysmal since the end of March. No one is panicking either: The CBOE Volatility Index is sitting near the lowest levels of the year. No one seems particularly worried that the market may drop suddenly.

The lack of euphoria or its opposite — the lack of worry — is one reason many traders are enthusiastic about the near-term. It means many are still sitting on the sidelines and they may now be dragged into the markets after seeing the new high headlines.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: bob pisani, drew angerer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, better, sitting, serious, volatility, euphoria, wall, markets, high, missing, highs, traders, earnings, volume, street


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New college graduates enjoy the best job market in years with more offers and better salaries

Those armed with a newly minted diploma will enter a job market with unemployment near the lowest level in 50 years and job prospects up significantly from just last year. In addition, many job offers come with pay better than they did last year in nearly every degree category ranging from business to social sciences. Recent college graduates must also weigh massive student loan balances as they make their way in the real world. Over the last decade, college loan balances in the U.S. have jumped


Those armed with a newly minted diploma will enter a job market with unemployment near the lowest level in 50 years and job prospects up significantly from just last year. In addition, many job offers come with pay better than they did last year in nearly every degree category ranging from business to social sciences. Recent college graduates must also weigh massive student loan balances as they make their way in the real world. Over the last decade, college loan balances in the U.S. have jumped
New college graduates enjoy the best job market in years with more offers and better salaries Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: jessica dickler, andrew sacks, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, science, nace, market, enjoy, best, average, college, social, job, graduates, salaries, recent, better, students, grads, according, offers


New college graduates enjoy the best job market in years with more offers and better salaries

It’s a good time to be a graduate.

Those armed with a newly minted diploma will enter a job market with unemployment near the lowest level in 50 years and job prospects up significantly from just last year.

Employers plan to hire nearly 11% more graduates from the class of 2019 than they did from the class of 2018, according to a recent survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers. This also marks the first time since 2011 that hiring projections are in the double digits, NACE said.

Improved job opportunities were spread across most industries, including accounting and professional services, NACE said, with wholesale trade as the only exception.

In addition, many job offers come with pay better than they did last year in nearly every degree category ranging from business to social sciences.

Once again, STEM degree holders are projected to earn the most overall as the demand for workers in science, technology, engineering and math occupations continues to increase, NACE said.

Engineering was the top paid major this year with an average starting salary of $69,188, followed by computer science and math. In 2018, grads earned an overall average of $51,022, NACE found.

However, the tighter labor market is giving recent grads more confidence to pursue a career that is not based on salary alone, according to a separate report by job site Indeed, allowing them to prioritize other interests rather than following a more conventional track.

That is steering some students away from traditional high-paying positions in business or finance in favor of careers in the arts and social service, said Nick Bunker, an economist with Indeed.

In fact, the occupation that garnered the most interest among grads this year was graphic designer, where the typical worker makes $48,700 per year, Bunker said.

But students leaving school are not free from financial burdens. Recent college graduates must also weigh massive student loan balances as they make their way in the real world.

Over the last decade, college loan balances in the U.S. have jumped to a record $1.5 trillion, according to the Federal Reserve. The average outstanding balance is about $30,000, according to the most recent data from the Institute for College Access & Success.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: jessica dickler, andrew sacks, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, science, nace, market, enjoy, best, average, college, social, job, graduates, salaries, recent, better, students, grads, according, offers


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Amazon workers go on strike in Germany, demand better pay and working conditions

Workers at four Amazon logistic centers in Germany went on strike on Monday, the latest action in a long-running campaign for better pay and conditions. An Amazon spokeswoman said the company saw very limited participation in the strike across Germany, adding there was no operational impact so customer deliveries would not be delayed. Verdi has organized frequent strikes at Amazon in Germany since 2013 to press demands for the retailer to raise pay for warehouse workers in accordance with collec


Workers at four Amazon logistic centers in Germany went on strike on Monday, the latest action in a long-running campaign for better pay and conditions. An Amazon spokeswoman said the company saw very limited participation in the strike across Germany, adding there was no operational impact so customer deliveries would not be delayed. Verdi has organized frequent strikes at Amazon in Germany since 2013 to press demands for the retailer to raise pay for warehouse workers in accordance with collec
Amazon workers go on strike in Germany, demand better pay and working conditions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: uwe zucchi, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, germany, demand, conditions, company, verdi, strike, work, workers, amazon, spokeswoman, centers, pay, working, better


Amazon workers go on strike in Germany, demand better pay and working conditions

Workers at four Amazon logistic centers in Germany went on strike on Monday, the latest action in a long-running campaign for better pay and conditions.

Trade union Verdi said workers at warehouses in Rheinberg, Werne, Bad Hersfeld and Koblenz had stopped work, with the strike set to last until Thursday in some centers, and others potentially joining over the Easter holiday period.

An Amazon spokeswoman said the company saw very limited participation in the strike across Germany, adding there was no operational impact so customer deliveries would not be delayed.

Verdi has organized frequent strikes at Amazon in Germany since 2013 to press demands for the retailer to raise pay for warehouse workers in accordance with collective bargaining agreements in Germany’s mail order and retail industry.

Amazon has repeatedly rejected Verdi’s demands and the spokeswoman said the company is a fair and responsible employer without a collective agreement, with wages at the upper end of what is paid in comparable jobs.

Amazon runs 12 fulfillment centers in Germany, its second-biggest market after the United States.

“The employees are not giving up,” Verdi board member Stefanie Nutzenberger said in a statement. “They want to put an end to the arbitrariness of a company that puts pressure on its employees with stressful work and controls.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: uwe zucchi, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, germany, demand, conditions, company, verdi, strike, work, workers, amazon, spokeswoman, centers, pay, working, better


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Amazon workers go on strike in Germany, demand better pay and working conditions

Workers at four Amazon logistic centers in Germany went on strike on Monday, the latest action in a long-running campaign for better pay and conditions. An Amazon spokeswoman said the company saw very limited participation in the strike across Germany, adding there was no operational impact so customer deliveries would not be delayed. Verdi has organized frequent strikes at Amazon in Germany since 2013 to press demands for the retailer to raise pay for warehouse workers in accordance with collec


Workers at four Amazon logistic centers in Germany went on strike on Monday, the latest action in a long-running campaign for better pay and conditions. An Amazon spokeswoman said the company saw very limited participation in the strike across Germany, adding there was no operational impact so customer deliveries would not be delayed. Verdi has organized frequent strikes at Amazon in Germany since 2013 to press demands for the retailer to raise pay for warehouse workers in accordance with collec
Amazon workers go on strike in Germany, demand better pay and working conditions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: uwe zucchi, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, germany, demand, conditions, company, verdi, strike, work, workers, amazon, spokeswoman, centers, pay, working, better


Amazon workers go on strike in Germany, demand better pay and working conditions

Workers at four Amazon logistic centers in Germany went on strike on Monday, the latest action in a long-running campaign for better pay and conditions.

Trade union Verdi said workers at warehouses in Rheinberg, Werne, Bad Hersfeld and Koblenz had stopped work, with the strike set to last until Thursday in some centers, and others potentially joining over the Easter holiday period.

An Amazon spokeswoman said the company saw very limited participation in the strike across Germany, adding there was no operational impact so customer deliveries would not be delayed.

Verdi has organized frequent strikes at Amazon in Germany since 2013 to press demands for the retailer to raise pay for warehouse workers in accordance with collective bargaining agreements in Germany’s mail order and retail industry.

Amazon has repeatedly rejected Verdi’s demands and the spokeswoman said the company is a fair and responsible employer without a collective agreement, with wages at the upper end of what is paid in comparable jobs.

Amazon runs 12 fulfillment centers in Germany, its second-biggest market after the United States.

“The employees are not giving up,” Verdi board member Stefanie Nutzenberger said in a statement. “They want to put an end to the arbitrariness of a company that puts pressure on its employees with stressful work and controls.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: uwe zucchi, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, germany, demand, conditions, company, verdi, strike, work, workers, amazon, spokeswoman, centers, pay, working, better


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How to delete your voice recordings from Google Assistant

Like Amazon, Google stores and collects the things you say to its assistant on your phone, computer or smart speaker, like the Google Home. Google has a whole host of things I’ve said saved to its servers. It has a recording of my voice — or my wife’s — asking Google Assistant everything — such as playing music, turning off the bedroom lights, getting directions. But I know that Google can get a better picture of my entire life the more data it has, so I’m glad I can delete all of these recordin


Like Amazon, Google stores and collects the things you say to its assistant on your phone, computer or smart speaker, like the Google Home. Google has a whole host of things I’ve said saved to its servers. It has a recording of my voice — or my wife’s — asking Google Assistant everything — such as playing music, turning off the bedroom lights, getting directions. But I know that Google can get a better picture of my entire life the more data it has, so I’m glad I can delete all of these recordin
How to delete your voice recordings from Google Assistant Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-13  Authors: todd haselton, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, does, information, turn, say, ive, recordings, voice, assistant, commands, things, google, better, delete


How to delete your voice recordings from Google Assistant

Like Amazon, Google stores and collects the things you say to its assistant on your phone, computer or smart speaker, like the Google Home.

Google’s privacy page says it does this to “help you get better results using your voice,” and that it only does this after you say “OK Google” to learn the sound of your voice and how you speak certain words and phrases.

Google has a whole host of things I’ve said saved to its servers. It has when I asked the temperature back on Sept. 2, 2014, for example, and everything I’ve asked since then. It has a recording of my voice — or my wife’s — asking Google Assistant everything — such as playing music, turning off the bedroom lights, getting directions.

Normally, this isn’t a big deal. I don’t mind if it saves a few commands for the sake of creating a better product. But I know that Google can get a better picture of my entire life the more data it has, so I’m glad I can delete all of these recordings.

Like me, you might not want Google to save this information, or you might want to review all of the commands you’ve ever spoken. Over the past year, Google has made it a lot easier to see the sorts of information it collects, and gives you better controls over stopping it from gathering some specific data.

You can turn it off completely, but just note that this might affect how well Google responds. You can always turn it back on if you run in to trouble.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-13  Authors: todd haselton, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, does, information, turn, say, ive, recordings, voice, assistant, commands, things, google, better, delete


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How to delete your voice recordings from Google Assistant

Like Amazon, Google stores and collects the things you say to its assistant on your phone, computer or smart speaker, like the Google Home. Google has a whole host of things I’ve said saved to its servers. It has a recording of my voice — or my wife’s — asking Google Assistant everything — such as playing music, turning off the bedroom lights, getting directions. But I know that Google can get a better picture of my entire life the more data it has, so I’m glad I can delete all of these recordin


Like Amazon, Google stores and collects the things you say to its assistant on your phone, computer or smart speaker, like the Google Home. Google has a whole host of things I’ve said saved to its servers. It has a recording of my voice — or my wife’s — asking Google Assistant everything — such as playing music, turning off the bedroom lights, getting directions. But I know that Google can get a better picture of my entire life the more data it has, so I’m glad I can delete all of these recordin
How to delete your voice recordings from Google Assistant Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-13  Authors: todd haselton, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, better, assistant, things, say, information, commands, google, does, recordings, voice, ive, delete, turn


How to delete your voice recordings from Google Assistant

Like Amazon, Google stores and collects the things you say to its assistant on your phone, computer or smart speaker, like the Google Home.

Google’s privacy page says it does this to “help you get better results using your voice,” and that it only does this after you say “OK Google” to learn the sound of your voice and how you speak certain words and phrases.

Google has a whole host of things I’ve said saved to its servers. It has when I asked the temperature back on Sept. 2, 2014, for example, and everything I’ve asked since then. It has a recording of my voice — or my wife’s — asking Google Assistant everything — such as playing music, turning off the bedroom lights, getting directions.

Normally, this isn’t a big deal. I don’t mind if it saves a few commands for the sake of creating a better product. But I know that Google can get a better picture of my entire life the more data it has, so I’m glad I can delete all of these recordings.

Like me, you might not want Google to save this information, or you might want to review all of the commands you’ve ever spoken. Over the past year, Google has made it a lot easier to see the sorts of information it collects, and gives you better controls over stopping it from gathering some specific data.

You can turn it off completely, but just note that this might affect how well Google responds. You can always turn it back on if you run in to trouble.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-13  Authors: todd haselton, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, better, assistant, things, say, information, commands, google, does, recordings, voice, ive, delete, turn


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2020 candidate Pete Buttigieg on taxing the rich and the future of American capitalism

But as you have more and more corporate agglomerations of power, you’re going to see less and less competition. It’s not the planet as an abstraction that’s going to be harmed. Pete Buttigieg: I think we certainly need to consider a higher marginal tax rate for top income earners. What happens is you’re better off. Pete Buttigieg: I think there is a tectonic change in economic policy.


But as you have more and more corporate agglomerations of power, you’re going to see less and less competition. It’s not the planet as an abstraction that’s going to be harmed. Pete Buttigieg: I think we certainly need to consider a higher marginal tax rate for top income earners. What happens is you’re better off. Pete Buttigieg: I think there is a tectonic change in economic policy.
2020 candidate Pete Buttigieg on taxing the rich and the future of American capitalism Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: john harwood
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, economic, american, tax, future, capitalism, think, taxing, thats, rich, harwood, better, youre, pete, candidate, 2020, going, buttigieg


2020 candidate Pete Buttigieg on taxing the rich and the future of American capitalism

Pete Buttigieg: Yeah. It’s pretty typical human behavior for people to try to make sure the rules work to their benefit. That’s why the U.S. is based on the idea of a robust legal system and constraints on the excesses of anybody, especially concentrated wealth. And yet we’re at this moment where concentrated wealth has begun to turn into concentrated power. More than begun. It’s well underway. The thing that makes capitalism capitalism is competition. But as you have more and more corporate agglomerations of power, you’re going to see less and less competition.

John Harwood: Is that the reason why you think we have expanding income inequality?

Pete Buttigieg: I think it’s a vicious cycle. This didn’t just happen. The economy is not some creature that just lumbers along on its own. It’s an interaction between private sector and public sector. And public sector policies, for basically as long as I’ve been alive, have been skewed in a direction that’s increasing inequality.

And a lot of this is the consequence of what you might call the Reagan consensus. There was a period where even Democrats seemed to operate in this framework that assumes that the only thing you’d ever do with a tax is cut it. That those tax cuts were assumed to pay for themselves. The empirical collapse of that supply side consensus, I think, is one of the defining moments of this period that we’re living through.

John Harwood: Why do you ascribe it to the Reagan consensus as opposed to technological change, globalization, movement of capital?

Pete Buttigieg: Well, all of these forces interact. But none of these forces automatically have to make our society more unequal. If anything, globalization was supposed to create more equality among nations.

John Harwood: Well actually it has created more equality in the world. It’s taken millions of people out of poverty.

Pete Buttigieg: Sure, it’s lifted so many out of poverty. And by the way, there are ways that it can work for us at home, too. But again, we’re seeing a concentration of wealth and power that skews things in the opposite direction.

The fundamental truth is, it turns out a rising tide does not lift all boats. Not on its own. Especially if some of the boats are sort of tethered to the ocean floor. And that’s the kind of pattern that we’ve been on.

John Harwood: So how do you fix what’s wrong without slowing down or harming what’s right?

Pete Buttigieg: Well, first of all, we’ve got to define what success looks like. Is success just the number, the GDP? Or is success that more Americans are prospering? When you have that definition, it tells you that you have to rate these kind of exchanges between distribution and growth a little more evenly.

John Harwood: So there’s an efficiency-equity trade off, and you’re willing to make it?

Pete Buttigieg: There may be, yeah. I mean, look, it’s great to say that it’s all win/wins, and to some extent it is. I actually think an economy that’s more equitable also tends to grow better. But if there’s a win/lose equation, we shouldn’t shy away from that. We shouldn’t pretend that all of this stuff can be done — that you can make everybody better off while making nobody worse off. The reality is there are some people who are not paying their share. There are some corporations that are not contributing the way that they should. Until we recalibrate that, until we invest in things like education and infrastructure and health, investments that do in fact pay for themselves overall, some people may have to pay more than others. Because some people frankly are getting a bit of a free ride on the productive energy of this country and this economy.

John Harwood: Now, one thing that surprised me that you said in an interview the other day was that first of all, political change comes first. That is the set of issues, Supreme Court, filibuster, electoral college, because that is necessary to achieve policy changes that you need. But when you identified the most important policy change, it was climate, not the economy. Explain why that’s the priority.

Pete Buttigieg: Because I think climate is the biggest economic issue of our time, too. What kind of economy are we going to have if cities are becoming less and less inhabitable, if we’re experiencing crop failures and heightening natural disasters? The problem with climate is it wrecks our chance at economic security as well as physical security. So, of course, we want to continue building an equitable and a growing economy. It’s just that we can’t do that if we’re totally ignoring the biggest threat our economy has seen since the Great Depression.

One reason you see traditionally conservative sectors like the military and like the business community way ahead of, for example, conservative politicians in this country on the issue of climate, is that the market, too, is beginning to recognize the stakes of failing to act and simply accepting what will eventually will be trillions of dollars in damage. It’s not the planet as an abstraction that’s going to be harmed. It’s people. It’s us. It’s our economies, it’s our societies, it’s our communities. That’s why this is such an urgent issue.

John Harwood: You think we need to raise a lot more money for the government. What are the things that strike you as the most achievable and desirable?

Pete Buttigieg: I think we certainly need to consider a higher marginal tax rate for top income earners. Maybe it doesn’t have to be as high as it was historically, but we should at least admit that when it was higher, the American economy was growing pretty well. We should consider a wealth tax. I think it makes sense. I think one of the things that’s appealing about it is it’s not very distortionary compared to an income tax, and that’s important.

The least distortionary tax probably is the estate tax, because you’re dead. We should think about turning to a more equitable use of the estate tax, especially for the biggest and wealthiest estates. I’m interested also — if we could find the right way to implement it and the devil’s in the details — in a financial transactions tax. Because you see preposterous levels of wealth sometimes being created around these millisecond differences in financial transactions that nobody can explain to us whether it adds any actual real value to the economy.

John Harwood: Even McKinsey can’t explain whether that adds real value?

Pete Buttigieg: Even McKinsey, as far as I know. Look, the downside of any tax is it can disincentivize economic activity. So let’s start by taxing by the economic activity whose value is hardest to prove.

John Harwood: Warren’s wealth tax would raise something on the order of $2.7 trillion over 10 years. Is that the order of magnitude you’re talking about?

Pete Buttigieg: Probably. I mean, look, we had something on the order of a trillion dollars robbed from the Treasury through the Trump tax cuts on the wealthiest. So even just getting us closer to being able to cover the deficit, with the services Americans count on today, is going to take us filling in a gap of that size. If we want to do more — if we want to have better infrastructure, which we absolutely need; if we want to deal with climate change, which is no longer optional; if we want to actually deliver on health care; if we want to continue to grow as the kind of country that can actually lead the world — then you don’t get something for nothing.

John Harwood: Can you do everything that you think needs to be done while hitting only the wealthy? Or is there no rational plan for dealing with our fiscal challenges, as well as our economic challenges, that doesn’t also hit the middle class?

Pete Buttigieg: If we’re going to collect revenue from the middle class, then we have to be certain that it is going to be reinvested and returned to the middle class in a way that makes us and the middle class better off. So as a middle class taxpayer, I don’t mind paying a certain amount in if it’s going to come back to me in the form of health care, if it’s going to come back to me in the form of education for my kids, if it’s going to come back to me in the form of a better road to get me to my job.

John Harwood: How powerful is a racial consideration when you think about the scale of things that need to be done for the entire country?

Pete Buttigieg: We know that if we target inequality in this country, much of which arose not by accident but by deliberate racist policies, and they can perhaps be reversed with intentional anti-racist policies, that we’re benefiting the entire society. We all do better when we all do better, as Senator [Paul] Wellstone said. We need to consider, first of all, that it’s the right thing to do. Secondly, that this is not a favor to somebody, this is a restoration of a theft. And third, that if we get it right, you don’t have to be somebody who is on the wrong side of a racial inequity to be better off for living in a country that did something about it.

John Harwood: Jamie Dimon recently put out a letter to J.P. Morgan that said, “The social needs of too many citizens have not been met.” But he also says that tax cut that was enacted late 2017 was the irreducible minimum of what we needed to turn our economy around. What would you say to him?

Pete Buttigieg: The big problem in this country was not that it was too difficult to be wealthy. It just isn’t the big problem in our country right now. It’s not what led to the political instability we’re seeing. It’s not what’s leading to diminished life expectancy, or the prospect of my generation is going to be the first in history to be worse off economically than our parents. What we could’ve done, especially if we were going to create a trillion-dollar deficit, is make the kinds of investments in infrastructure and education and health that would have made this whole country better off.

I also think that, no matter how educated or intelligent some of the people working in these industries are, they can quickly get out of touch with the reality on the ground. If you don’t understand just how much anger there is in, for example, my part of the industrial Midwest — where it can be used in a very cynical political way to direct it against immigrants, or trade writ large, or against your fellow American, or even against Democrats, just because folks are mad and it’s got to go somewhere — you’re going to continue to see these destabilizing political outcomes like what we’re living through right now.

John Harwood: Others say that the kinds of things you’re talking about would be destructive of capitalism, that it’s a war on the wealthy, that it would bring socialism to the United States. How how do you respond to arguments like that?

Pete Buttigieg: The crazy thing about arguments like that is how uncoupled they are from evidence. We don’t have to speculate on what happens in a Western society that delivers health care to everybody, or that has more social mobility or that invests at a higher rate in infrastructure or education. We know exactly what happens. What happens is you’re better off.

The American dream is slipping away. You’re much more likely to experience that if you’re a kid in Denmark right now than if you’re in America. And while people can think up all kinds of excuses why something that worked in other societies hasn’t worked here, the reality is, when we’ve tried it here in our history, it’s also served us pretty well.

John Harwood: When it comes to cultural conservatives, you have said that progressives need to be mindful of the distance they have to travel, be sensitive to that. Do you think progressives also need to be mindful of the distance that some in business have to travel, when they think ‘hey, they’re coming after me?’

Pete Buttigieg: I think a lot of this is tonal. Look, the one thing I learned in the business community, and even more as a mayor engaging the business community, is that while we’d like to think of businesses as the most numbers-driven kind of discipline in America, in my experience it’s one of the most emotional. So what’s really important is that people not feel that they’re being attacked — or at least they understand that if we’re attacking a certain way of doing things, or a certain system, that this is not motivated by just angsty hatred. It’s being motivated by serious and legitimate concerns about where we’re headed.

John Harwood: We have seen in the last 10 to 15 years astonishing change in terms of cultural attitudes on issues like same sex marriage. Do you have any degree of expectation that we’re going to see very fast changes of opinion on economic issues?

Pete Buttigieg: I think there is a tectonic change in economic policy. You can see it by the fact that the Republican Party experienced a hostile takeover on the part of, basically, economic populists. This is not just another four-year cycle. This is not just another election, and I don’t just mean because of the character, or personality of the president.

I believe we’re living through one of those moments just as when the New Deal consensus gave way to the Reagan consensus. We’re living through the end of a 30- or 40-year era that defined American politics and helped to explain how Democrats as well as Republicans behaved in office. We’re at the dawn of a new one.

We’ve got to make sure we have an account of economic change, as well as social, and political structures to handle that change, especially in the new machine age with automation transforming our relationship to the workforce. We’ve got to have answers that go a lot further than just saying “the current guy’s rotten and we ought to throw him out.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: john harwood
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, economic, american, tax, future, capitalism, think, taxing, thats, rich, harwood, better, youre, pete, candidate, 2020, going, buttigieg


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The earnings picture is about to change, likely for the better, and Jamie Dimon may be a big help

As for JPMorgan, which is reporting tomorrow, the key issue will not be the dry facts, it will be the tone Dimon strikes about the global economy. But Dimon could help change attitudes about the global economy in the second half of the year. The reason: bulls are hopeful Dimon will say the economy is still growing and paint a positive macroeconomic picture for the economy and for banks. Traders are anticipating we are near a bottom, and the markets are anticipating stronger 2020 numbers,” he tol


As for JPMorgan, which is reporting tomorrow, the key issue will not be the dry facts, it will be the tone Dimon strikes about the global economy. But Dimon could help change attitudes about the global economy in the second half of the year. The reason: bulls are hopeful Dimon will say the economy is still growing and paint a positive macroeconomic picture for the economy and for banks. Traders are anticipating we are near a bottom, and the markets are anticipating stronger 2020 numbers,” he tol
The earnings picture is about to change, likely for the better, and Jamie Dimon may be a big help Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: bob pisani, drew angerer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, sp, jamie, dimon, big, likely, global, change, 2020, picture, better, told, help, earnings, numbers, economy, single


The earnings picture is about to change, likely for the better, and Jamie Dimon may be a big help

Why is that happening? “Analysts over-reacted in December on concerns over a global slowdown led by China and Europe and cut numbers too much,” Nick Raich from Earnings Scout told me.

If companies beat estimates by anything close to 7 percentage points, then earnings for the first quarter are likely to be up in the low single digits, not negative.

No earnings recession!

As for JPMorgan, which is reporting tomorrow, the key issue will not be the dry facts, it will be the tone Dimon strikes about the global economy. Banks in general are continuing to see loan growth in the low single digits, flat interest income because rates are not moving up, and good credit quality.

Bottom line: no one is expecting amazing numbers.

But Dimon could help change attitudes about the global economy in the second half of the year.

The reason: bulls are hopeful Dimon will say the economy is still growing and paint a positive macroeconomic picture for the economy and for banks.

“If they put up a decent number, and Jamie says, ‘Hey, the economy is still chugging along,’ it will go a long way toward quieting down the recession worries,” Jeff Harte, bank analyst with Sandler O’Neill, told me.

Of course, the markets could still turn down if economic data from China and Europe continues to decline, but the biggest obstacle the market faces may not be earnings, it is valuation. The forward earnings multiple for the S&P 500 (Q2 2019 to Q1 2020) is currently 16.8, at the high end of the historic norm of about 15.

That’s no surprise to David Aurelio, who tracks earnings at Refinitiv: The market tends to get ahead of itself. Traders are anticipating we are near a bottom, and the markets are anticipating stronger 2020 numbers,” he told me.

Looked at that way, he’s certainly right: based on 2020 numbers, the S&P is trading at a 15.5 multiple, about inline with historic averages.

WATCH: Big bank CEOs survive Capitol Hill grilling


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: bob pisani, drew angerer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, sp, jamie, dimon, big, likely, global, change, 2020, picture, better, told, help, earnings, numbers, economy, single


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Mike Pence says Pete Buttigieg ‘knows better’ after criticism

And they’re all competing with one another for how much more liberal they are,” Pence said. Pence was responding to comments that Buttigieg, who is expected to officially launch his campaign for president Sunday, made over the weekend during an event hosted by the LGBTQ Victory Fund. Buttigieg, an Afghanistan war veteran, has said that his marriage to his husband has brought him closer to God. Pence said that as governor, he “worked very closely with Mayor Pete” and that they “had a great workin


And they’re all competing with one another for how much more liberal they are,” Pence said. Pence was responding to comments that Buttigieg, who is expected to officially launch his campaign for president Sunday, made over the weekend during an event hosted by the LGBTQ Victory Fund. Buttigieg, an Afghanistan war veteran, has said that his marriage to his husband has brought him closer to God. Pence said that as governor, he “worked very closely with Mayor Pete” and that they “had a great workin
Mike Pence says Pete Buttigieg ‘knows better’ after criticism Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: tucker higgins, dan mescon, justin sullivan, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mike, pete, pence, criticism, governor, buttigieg, marriage, knows, gay, view, responding, better, quarrel, president, saidpence


Mike Pence says Pete Buttigieg 'knows better' after criticism

“But I get it. You know, it’s look, again, 19 people running for president on that side in a party that’s sliding off to the left. And they’re all competing with one another for how much more liberal they are,” Pence said.

Pence was responding to comments that Buttigieg, who is expected to officially launch his campaign for president Sunday, made over the weekend during an event hosted by the LGBTQ Victory Fund.

“I wish the Mike Pences of the world would understand, that if you have a problem with who I am, your quarrel is not with me,” Buttigieg said. “Your quarrel, sir, is with my creator.”

Buttigieg has skyrocketed to the front of the Democratic pack since announcing the formation of an exploratory committee in late January. Buttigieg, an Afghanistan war veteran, has said that his marriage to his husband has brought him closer to God.

Pence has faced scrutiny from LGBT activist groups over his opposition to gay marriage and his support, while governor, for a “religious freedom” bill that opponents said targeted gays and lesbians. Business groups including the Indiana Chamber of Commerce had opposed the measure. Pence signed the bill shortly before Buttigieg came out.

The former governor, who President Donald Trump once reportedly joked “wants to hang them all,” referring to gay people, said Wednesday that he stood by his view of marriage.

“But that doesn’t mean that we’re we’re critical of anyone else who has a different point of view,” he said.

Pence said that as governor, he “worked very closely with Mayor Pete” and that they “had a great working relationship.” He noted that, as governor of Indiana, he implemented the Supreme Court’s decision that made gay marriage the law of the land.

When reached for comment on Pence’s remarks, a representative for Buttigieg’s campaign referred CNBC to the candidate’s previous statements.

Buttigieg, apparently responding to similar comments that Pence made in 2015, wrote in a post on Twitter this week that people “will often be polite to you in person, while advancing policies that harm you and your family.”

“You will be polite to them in turn, but you need not stand for such harms. Instead, you push back, honestly and emphatically. So it goes, in the public square,” Buttigieg wrote.

Read the full exchange:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: tucker higgins, dan mescon, justin sullivan, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mike, pete, pence, criticism, governor, buttigieg, marriage, knows, gay, view, responding, better, quarrel, president, saidpence


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This is Tony Robbins’ 10-minute morning routine to ‘change your day for the better’

There are countless stories of successful people who swear by a specific morning routine to help them greet each new day with energy and focus. So it’s not surprising that business and life strategist and self-made multimillionaire Tony Robbins (who is a fan of health and wellness biohacks) has his own morning ritual that he uses to mentally prepare himself for the day ahead. All in all, the ritual takes less than 10 minutes, Robbins says. If you don’t have 10 minutes, you don’t have a life,” Ro


There are countless stories of successful people who swear by a specific morning routine to help them greet each new day with energy and focus. So it’s not surprising that business and life strategist and self-made multimillionaire Tony Robbins (who is a fan of health and wellness biohacks) has his own morning ritual that he uses to mentally prepare himself for the day ahead. All in all, the ritual takes less than 10 minutes, Robbins says. If you don’t have 10 minutes, you don’t have a life,” Ro
This is Tony Robbins’ 10-minute morning routine to ‘change your day for the better’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: tom huddleston jr, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, day, tony, change, tim, 10minute, routine, minutes, help, ritual, better, process, morning, website, robbins


This is Tony Robbins' 10-minute morning routine to 'change your day for the better'

There are countless stories of successful people who swear by a specific morning routine to help them greet each new day with energy and focus.

Whether it’s Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey meditating and exercising (including walking five miles to work) every morning to boost his mental and physical health, or Apple CEO Tim Cook spending an hour every morning reading comments from Apple users to help him focus on what his company is doing well and what could be improved.

So it’s not surprising that business and life strategist and self-made multimillionaire Tony Robbins (who is a fan of health and wellness biohacks) has his own morning ritual that he uses to mentally prepare himself for the day ahead.

Robbins’ daily routine involves a process he calls “Priming,” which his website describes as “a ritual that involves powerful and directed breathing and movement to center yourself so that you’re primed for whatever the day brings.” Robbins claims the process “will train and direct your mind” to provide “lasting results.”

All in all, the ritual takes less than 10 minutes, Robbins says. “There’s no excuse … If you don’t have 10 minutes, you don’t have a life,” Robbins says in the book “Tools of Titans,” by Tim Ferriss.

“Taking this time in the morning, along with a healthy breakfast, can help you get into a peak state and change your day for the better,” Robbins writes on his website. “You’ll set a high baseline for the rest of your day, so that you can accomplish great things in every other area of your life.”

Here’s how it works:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: tom huddleston jr, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, day, tony, change, tim, 10minute, routine, minutes, help, ritual, better, process, morning, website, robbins


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