With trade agreement in doubt, five experts share what to watch now

Chinese officials are reportedly seeking further discussions with the U.S. on trade before they sign “phase one” of a deal announced last week. Simeon Hyman, global investment strategist at ProShares Advisors, says trade progress could be the last bit of good news for a while. “I think the trade deal is probably the only real source of upside in the near term because I don’t think we’re going to have a great earnings season. “If you look at this trade deal, it’s probably a political win for both


Chinese officials are reportedly seeking further discussions with the U.S. on trade before they sign “phase one” of a deal announced last week. Simeon Hyman, global investment strategist at ProShares Advisors, says trade progress could be the last bit of good news for a while. “I think the trade deal is probably the only real source of upside in the near term because I don’t think we’re going to have a great earnings season. “If you look at this trade deal, it’s probably a political win for both
With trade agreement in doubt, five experts share what to watch now Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doubt, earnings, trade, think, experts, deal, global, agreement, know, going, share, bit, probably, china, watch


With trade agreement in doubt, five experts share what to watch now

Stocks are in a holding pattern to begin the week as doubts are raised over how much progress was made between the U.S. and China on Friday.

Chinese officials are reportedly seeking further discussions with the U.S. on trade before they sign “phase one” of a deal announced last week.

Five experts weigh in on what they’re watching right now.

Simeon Hyman, global investment strategist at ProShares Advisors, says trade progress could be the last bit of good news for a while.

“I think the trade deal is probably the only real source of upside in the near term because I don’t think we’re going to have a great earnings season. We have banks reporting this week. You know, it’s been a tough environment for banks — deal volume is slowing a little bit, and the yield curve was inverted up until just a week or so ago — so I don’t think you’re going to get a big impetus from the earnings side. But we certainly know politically, a win on that front sometime as we approach more of the height of the election season is not a terrible thing to bank on.”

William Foster of Moody’s Investors Service says this gave the U.S. and China some breathing room before they move forward.

“It’s a step forward, but it’s, you know, we can’t expect too much, and obviously you’re seeing that right now from China. This basically buys more time for the two sides to try to come to some kind of agreement on some of the core issues, and that will just give the market more time to kind of digest.”

Sameer Samana, senior global market strategist at Wells Fargo Investment Institute, is playing it cautiously for the rest of the year.

“If you look at this trade deal, it’s probably a political win for both sides, which were in need of such a win. Unfortunately, it just doesn’t mean a whole lot for S&P earnings. It probably doesn’t mean a lot for economic data, at least not over the coming months. So from our standpoint, you know, you’ve got good gains in calendar year 2019 even though if you stretch back to Q4 last year they’re not spectacular. We’re still playing it pretty cautiously, so we are underweight small caps, they tend to be lower quality and tend to have fewer levers to pull. We’re also underweight high yield. We think credits are probably a little bit overdone, spreads are very tight. You’re just not getting paid to take that risk. We would take some of those dollars and put them in large caps, because again those are the companies that have probably the most, you know, flexibility in terms of navigating this global environment.”

Art Cashin, director of floor operations at UBS Financial Services, is skeptical much progress was made at all.

“It’s all blue smoke and mirrors. There’s nothing substantive there. I mean, I admire Treasury Secretary [Steven] Mnuchin, and he’s talking about intellectual properties and whatnot. I’m getting different signals from China. They don’t look like they want that to be part of a plan, and they indicate they’re going to take care of it locally. Secondarily, so tomorrow the tariffs were supposed to be raised. If I’m a business, I’ve already traded against that. I knew they were coming up. I bought whatever I wanted back before they were going to get raised, so the impacts are not very strong here.”

Gabriela Santos, global market strategist at J.P. Morgan Asset Management, says it makes sense to keep expectations in check.

“It’s an agreement to postpone the escalation that was planned for tomorrow and to continue talking over the next few weeks. So for us, I think it’s right to temper the enthusiasm a little bit after such a huge rally we had on Friday. It’s not locked down. No. 2, even if we end up having a ‘phase one’ written-down truce, it doesn’t remove the uncertainty cloud going into the election. And No. 3, we have also some late-cycle concerns to think about which should come to the forefront as earnings season picks back up this week.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doubt, earnings, trade, think, experts, deal, global, agreement, know, going, share, bit, probably, china, watch


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Breakthrough in US-China trade talks is ‘a bit optimistic,’ says former commerce secretary

President Donald Trump (L) shakes hand with China’s President Xi Jinping at the end of a press conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. Suggestions that the next round of U.S.-China trade talks could result in some breakthrough is “a bit optimistic,” former American Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez said on Friday. But after both sides agreed to meet in early October in Washington to discuss trade, Hu Xijin — editor-in-chief of Chinese state media Global Times


President Donald Trump (L) shakes hand with China’s President Xi Jinping at the end of a press conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. Suggestions that the next round of U.S.-China trade talks could result in some breakthrough is “a bit optimistic,” former American Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez said on Friday. But after both sides agreed to meet in early October in Washington to discuss trade, Hu Xijin — editor-in-chief of Chinese state media Global Times
Breakthrough in US-China trade talks is ‘a bit optimistic,’ says former commerce secretary Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, uschina, coming, commerce, secretary, twitter, optimistic, china, xijin, widely, washington, trade, bit, talks, breakthrough


Breakthrough in US-China trade talks is 'a bit optimistic,' says former commerce secretary

President Donald Trump (L) shakes hand with China’s President Xi Jinping at the end of a press conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017.

Suggestions that the next round of U.S.-China trade talks could result in some breakthrough is “a bit optimistic,” former American Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez said on Friday.

The tariff fight between the two countries escalated again this month as they slapped additional tariffs on each other’s goods — which led many analysts and economists to lower their expectations that the U.S. and China could reach a trade deal in the coming months.

But after both sides agreed to meet in early October in Washington to discuss trade, Hu Xijin — editor-in-chief of Chinese state media Global Times — said Thursday on Twitter that “there’s more possibility of a breakthrough.” Hu’s Twitter account is widely followed for his insights on the trade war.

Gutierrez, who served under former President George W. Bush, said it’s difficult to see the U.S. and China coming to an agreement in the near term.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, uschina, coming, commerce, secretary, twitter, optimistic, china, xijin, widely, washington, trade, bit, talks, breakthrough


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Dow drops for the first time in 4 days—here’s what experts see ahead for markets

The move leaves investors and experts broadly uncertain about what’s next for global markets, with key Federal Reserve announcements set for this week and U.S.-China trade talks still ahead. Since then, you’ve had another 90% downside day on Aug.14, and you’ve had two almost 90% upside days. The market might be a little bit ahead of itself on a very short-term trading basis, but, again, I think the market’s going substantially higher.” But for right now, rising valuations on low interest rates,


The move leaves investors and experts broadly uncertain about what’s next for global markets, with key Federal Reserve announcements set for this week and U.S.-China trade talks still ahead. Since then, you’ve had another 90% downside day on Aug.14, and you’ve had two almost 90% upside days. The market might be a little bit ahead of itself on a very short-term trading basis, but, again, I think the market’s going substantially higher.” But for right now, rising valuations on low interest rates,
Dow drops for the first time in 4 days—here’s what experts see ahead for markets Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bit, trade, ahead, little, drops, dow, thats, think, market, daysheres, experts, markets, downside, 90, going


Dow drops for the first time in 4 days—here's what experts see ahead for markets

Stocks are in limbo.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell for the first time in four days on Tuesday as the market digested its recent swings, with the S&P 500 and Nasdaq Composite also ticking lower.

The move leaves investors and experts broadly uncertain about what’s next for global markets, with key Federal Reserve announcements set for this week and U.S.-China trade talks still ahead.

Here’s what four market pros are watching:

Jeff Saut, market strategist at Capital Wealth Planning, didn’t let last week’s volatility shake his bullish outlook:

“I think we’re in the sixth inning. I think this market, the secular bull market that we’re in, … has years left to run, and I think that you should be pretty much fully invested here. It was about three weeks ago … that I said, ‘The market bottomed yesterday,’ and that was Aug. 5, with a 90% downside day, meaning 90% of the total volume traded came in on the downside. Since then, you’ve had another 90% downside day on Aug.14, and you’ve had two almost 90% upside days. That … is the way bottoms are made, so we think the lows are in. The market might be a little bit ahead of itself on a very short-term trading basis, but, again, I think the market’s going substantially higher.”

Michael Tyler, Eastern Bank Wealth Management’s chief investment officer, was more inclined to wait for the outcome of U.S.-China trade discussions:

“The interesting thing is that earnings are beginning to come in a little bit soft and we do have some signs that, if the next round of tariffs is implemented, a little in September and perhaps more in December depending on how the politics goes, that could really, meaningfully impact the consumer. Home Depot gave us a tiny touch of that this morning. And, if so, then we’ve got some real vulnerability, because the consumer has been the driving force for so long, and if that weakens, if consumers weaken, then we could have a fundamental problem. But for right now, rising valuations on low interest rates, even if earnings are a bit soft, I’d say Jeff is right: The market’s probably got a little bit more, at least a little bit more, to go this year. ”

Former Minneapolis Fed President Narayana Kocherlakota warned of a debilitating “fear factor” weighing on global markets:

“I think the concern that you see in bond markets about the future is really tied to the lack of policy capacity that we have in central banks, that we’re going to see these downside shocks and central banks and the fiscal authorities are not going to be able to respond effectively. And that’s going to lead to another recession, perhaps of the magnitude we saw in — hopefully not, but could lead to a recession the kind of magnitude we saw in 2007 to 2009, with those same kind of persistent effects on output. And that’s because it’s the fear itself … of low capacity that breeds the conditions where, actually, central banks can’t respond effectively. So, that’s what worries me, and that’s why I think we have these low nominal rates around the world. … You look at German debt, for example, out to 10 years at negative nominal yields — this is all a fear factor, and we need to have better expectations of growth. I’m not sure where that’s going to come from, though.”

Kirk Hartman, president and global chief investment officer at Wells Fargo Asset Management, said playing today’s market was all but a fool’s errand:

“I think if you try to trade this market, it’s an opportunity to lose money. I think you want to look through the next two months. I think you’re going to see a lot more volatility until the trade dispute settles down, and I think what you want to do is you want to say, ‘I want to own stocks towards the end of the year.’ But I wouldn’t be trading this market here.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bit, trade, ahead, little, drops, dow, thats, think, market, daysheres, experts, markets, downside, 90, going


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The market is ‘vulnerable,’ but here are 3 things that could signal the next rally

The market is “vulnerable,” but three things could signal the next rally, according to one strategist. “We’d like to see a little bit of a washout, and some of that just takes a little bit of time for people to digest information and to get a little more cautious,” he told CNBC’s “Futures Now” on Tuesday. Secondly, Clissold monitors how oversold the market gets. Finally, Clissold points out that earnings estimates for the fourth quarter are still pretty high, perhaps a little too high. “We’d lik


The market is “vulnerable,” but three things could signal the next rally, according to one strategist. “We’d like to see a little bit of a washout, and some of that just takes a little bit of time for people to digest information and to get a little more cautious,” he told CNBC’s “Futures Now” on Tuesday. Secondly, Clissold monitors how oversold the market gets. Finally, Clissold points out that earnings estimates for the fourth quarter are still pretty high, perhaps a little too high. “We’d lik
The market is ‘vulnerable,’ but here are 3 things that could signal the next rally Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: annie pei
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, washout, bit, given, rally, signal, points, things, oversold, stocks, market, vulnerable, strategist, clissold, little


The market is 'vulnerable,' but here are 3 things that could signal the next rally

The market is “vulnerable,” but three things could signal the next rally, according to one strategist.

Ed Clissold, Ned Davis Research’s chief U.S. strategist, said investment sentiment, particularly signs of pessimism, is the “number one thing you want to look for.”

“We’d like to see a little bit of a washout, and some of that just takes a little bit of time for people to digest information and to get a little more cautious,” he told CNBC’s “Futures Now” on Tuesday.

Secondly, Clissold monitors how oversold the market gets. While Monday’s sell-off took the Dow down over 750 points, the strategist says even more extreme oversold conditions could put the market back on track, especially given that stocks had looked overbought in the last few months. In other words, stocks aren’t at the “washout level” that Clissold is looking for, but once the market becomes oversold, it could be a sign of an imminent rebound.

Finally, Clissold points out that earnings estimates for the fourth quarter are still pretty high, perhaps a little too high.

“We’d like to see those estimates get lower before we’d feel comfortable that there’s a little bit of a better fundamental underpinning to the market,” he said.

The strategist, however, encourages investors to “partially stay” in the market, especially given that he still expects rate cuts from the Fed despite a nonrecessionary environment. That’s a set of circumstances that Clissold said historically has pointed to more gains for the market.

Clissold’s price target for the S&P 500 is 2,950 at the end of the year. It was down 1% at 2,843 shortly before Wednesday’s opening bell.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: annie pei
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, washout, bit, given, rally, signal, points, things, oversold, stocks, market, vulnerable, strategist, clissold, little


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Stocks in China mostly tumble; Japan markets closed for 10-day holiday

Shares in the Asia Pacific region were mixed on Monday, while markets in Japan were closed for a holiday. Mainland Chinese shares fell by the close, with the Shanghai composite 0.77% lower at 3,062.50 and the Shenzhen component dropping about 2.88% to 9,622.49. One investor told CNBC valuations in Chinese markets were “a little bit expensive” at the moment. During such scenarios when historical valuations are “getting a little bit stretched,” investors tend to “take a bit of profit,” he added. M


Shares in the Asia Pacific region were mixed on Monday, while markets in Japan were closed for a holiday. Mainland Chinese shares fell by the close, with the Shanghai composite 0.77% lower at 3,062.50 and the Shenzhen component dropping about 2.88% to 9,622.49. One investor told CNBC valuations in Chinese markets were “a little bit expensive” at the moment. During such scenarios when historical valuations are “getting a little bit stretched,” investors tend to “take a bit of profit,” he added. M
Stocks in China mostly tumble; Japan markets closed for 10-day holiday Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, markets, holiday, japan, 10day, profit, tumble, stocks, historical, hand, composite, bit, closed, valuations, shares, china, chinese, index


Stocks in China mostly tumble; Japan markets closed for 10-day holiday

Shares in the Asia Pacific region were mixed on Monday, while markets in Japan were closed for a holiday.

Mainland Chinese shares fell by the close, with the Shanghai composite 0.77% lower at 3,062.50 and the Shenzhen component dropping about 2.88% to 9,622.49. The Shenzhen composite also declined 2.412% to 1,625.62.

The CSI 300, which tracks the largest shares on the mainland, on the other hand, rose 0.28% to finish at 3,900.33. Shenzhen-listed shares of electric vehicle maker BYD gained 0.52% after the company reported a 632% surge in first-quarter net profit. Its Hong Kong-listed counterpart, on the other hand, declined more than 0.8%.

One investor told CNBC valuations in Chinese markets were “a little bit expensive” at the moment.

“When you sort of look at both the valuation levels on a P/E basis as well as on a price-to-book basis for MSCI China, they’re already above its 10 and 15 year historical averages. With the CSI 300, they’re very much approaching their historical averages,” Ken Wong, Asia equity portfolio specialist at Eastspring Investments, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Monday.

During such scenarios when historical valuations are “getting a little bit stretched,” investors tend to “take a bit of profit,” he added. “That’s exactly what we saw last week.”

Mainland Chinese markets stumbled to their worst weekly performance since October last week, with the Shanghai composite dropping more than 5.5%.

Research firm Capital Economics attributed the weakness to comments made by China’s top decision-making body about the country’s economic stimulus plans. While Chinese officials said they would continue to support the economy, better-than-expected first-quarter GDP results sparked worries about potential near-term policy easing.

Meanwhile, Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index advanced 0.88% in its final hour of trading.

The MSCI Asia-ex Japan index also rose 0.53% to 540.53, as of 3:20 p.m. HK/SIN.

In South Korea, the Kospi added 1.70%, with shares of industry heavyweight Samsung Electronics jumping 2.90% ahead of its earnings release on Tuesday.

The ASX 200 in Australia, on the other hand, slipped 0.41% to close at 6,359.50.

Singapore’s Straits Times Index jumped 1.54% in afternoon trade as shares of DBS Group, Southeast Asia’s biggest lender, surged more than 3.4% after it reported a record quarterly profit. The shares of other banks in Singapore also climbed, with Oversea-Chinese Banking Corp rising more than 2%, and United Overseas Bank up more than 2.8%.

Japan is currently on a 10-day holiday from April 27 to May 6 to celebrate the enthronement of the country’s Crown Prince Naruhito.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, markets, holiday, japan, 10day, profit, tumble, stocks, historical, hand, composite, bit, closed, valuations, shares, china, chinese, index


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Investor: The US and China will reach a deal, then markets will jump 15%

And, by end June, (the) deal would be signed,” Wong told CNBC’s “Street Signs” on Friday. Wong’s prediction follows the market rally that began at the beginning of this year, roughly coinciding with investors’ increasing expectations that a U.S.-China trade deal could be inked. “Now the investors in China or around the world are expecting a deal to be done. From there, Wong said, markets will be set for another leg up once Trump and Xi reach an accord. China wants all tariffs lifted, and the U.S


And, by end June, (the) deal would be signed,” Wong told CNBC’s “Street Signs” on Friday. Wong’s prediction follows the market rally that began at the beginning of this year, roughly coinciding with investors’ increasing expectations that a U.S.-China trade deal could be inked. “Now the investors in China or around the world are expecting a deal to be done. From there, Wong said, markets will be set for another leg up once Trump and Xi reach an accord. China wants all tariffs lifted, and the U.S
Investor: The US and China will reach a deal, then markets will jump 15% Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-22  Authors: tang sue-anne, artyom ivanov, tass, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tariffs, markets, 15, bit, trade, jump, wong, trump, end, china, investor, deal, reach, xi, investors


Investor: The US and China will reach a deal, then markets will jump 15%

Despite all the back and forth between Donald Trump and Xi Jinping’s negotiating teams, the U.S. and China will ultimately come to a trade agreement, according to one investor.

When that happens, markets could soar 15 percent or more for the rest of the year, said Jackson Wong, associate director at Huarong International Securities.

“The rumor is (that by the) end of April, the deal would be 90 percent done. And, by end June, (the) deal would be signed,” Wong told CNBC’s “Street Signs” on Friday.

Wong’s prediction follows the market rally that began at the beginning of this year, roughly coinciding with investors’ increasing expectations that a U.S.-China trade deal could be inked.

“Now the investors in China or around the world are expecting a deal to be done. They have been expecting since the end of last year. So I think the market has been rallying from that point on,” he said.

The ongoing rally, he said, may continue a bit, but there is also a chance it could “consolidate around the current level for about maybe a few weeks.” From there, Wong said, markets will be set for another leg up once Trump and Xi reach an accord.

Such a deal could also have a positive impact on the real economy worldwide, he said.

His analysis comes amid the ongoing trade war between the world’s two largest economies that began about one year ago. That escalating fight has seen rounds of tariffs imposed on items ranging from soybeans to steel, attempts at reconciliation, and Trump declaring the benefits of a trade war on Twitter. Tensions have eased since the presidents of both nations agreed in December to pause any further tariffs while negotiations continued.

The negotiations are focused on both reducing the U.S. trade deficit with China and eliminating some of the systemic impediments to foreign firms succeeding in Asia’s largest economy.

Wong acknowledged that there have been differences of opinion on both sides, but he said he remains positive that both parties will be able to reach a consensus.

“Talks are going not bad,” Wong told CNBC. “The main differences, in my point of view, (are) solvable. China wants all tariffs lifted, and the U.S. wants a say in the new intellectual property theft and transfer policies.”

“If both countries give in a little bit, so maybe, you know, the tariffs will stay a little bit longer, and then China would give (the U.S.) more control over policies, then they can have a final deal,” he said.

Nonetheless, Wong said, the U.S.-China relationship is still rather weak.

“Both countries are standing on very fragile grounds and any sudden move on either side would break the trust on each other,” he said. “Investors are still cautious and nervous about that until they can decide a date that Donald Trump and Xi Jinping can meet. Otherwise, anything can be a wildcard.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-22  Authors: tang sue-anne, artyom ivanov, tass, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tariffs, markets, 15, bit, trade, jump, wong, trump, end, china, investor, deal, reach, xi, investors


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Shale oil drillers gave stock shareholders what they wanted, then investors punished them anyway

That trend came to a head over the last month, when many drillers cut spending and lowered production guidance for 2019. The title of a recent research note by Simmons Energy summed up the the response: “No Good Deed Unpunished.” Though it’s rallying this week, the SPDR S&P Oil & Gas Exploration and Production exchange-traded fund tumbled 8 percent between the start of the drillers’ earnings season in February and the end of last week. But it’s not as simple as saying investors sold the stocks b


That trend came to a head over the last month, when many drillers cut spending and lowered production guidance for 2019. The title of a recent research note by Simmons Energy summed up the the response: “No Good Deed Unpunished.” Though it’s rallying this week, the SPDR S&P Oil & Gas Exploration and Production exchange-traded fund tumbled 8 percent between the start of the drillers’ earnings season in February and the end of last week. But it’s not as simple as saying investors sold the stocks b
Shale oil drillers gave stock shareholders what they wanted, then investors punished them anyway Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: tom dichristopher, ty wright, bloomberg, getty images, david orrell, f carter smith, mary catherine wellons, ali mohammadi, nick oxford, mandel ngan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, oil, shale, shareholders, gave, week, wanted, sp, simmons, think, bit, production, investors, energy, punished, drillers, stock


Shale oil drillers gave stock shareholders what they wanted, then investors punished them anyway

“Today our dilemma is that as a sector, we have destroyed a lot of trust in the investment community over the last decade.”

That trend came to a head over the last month, when many drillers cut spending and lowered production guidance for 2019.

The title of a recent research note by Simmons Energy summed up the the response: “No Good Deed Unpunished.” Simmons analysts called the reaction from investors “nothing short of punishing.”

Though it’s rallying this week, the SPDR S&P Oil & Gas Exploration and Production exchange-traded fund tumbled 8 percent between the start of the drillers’ earnings season in February and the end of last week. During the same time, the S&P 500 rose 1.4 percent.

But it’s not as simple as saying investors sold the stocks because production growth forecasts fell, said Osmar Abib, chairman of global energy at Credit Suisse. The space is also on shaky ground because investors aren’t yet sure drillers will hold the line on spending.

“I would say it’s a bit of a ‘show me’ situation, and so one quarter isn’t long enough,” he told CNBC on the sidelines of the CERAWeek by IHS Markit energy conference in Houston. “I think investors need to see a little bit more time, a little bit more evidence, and I think there’s still concern that if oil prices go back up, that some of this discipline might erode to a certain degree.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: tom dichristopher, ty wright, bloomberg, getty images, david orrell, f carter smith, mary catherine wellons, ali mohammadi, nick oxford, mandel ngan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, oil, shale, shareholders, gave, week, wanted, sp, simmons, think, bit, production, investors, energy, punished, drillers, stock


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Howard Schultz on building the Starbucks brand: ‘I know a little bit about marketing’

Starbucks’ former chair and CEO Howard Schultz is making news for his possible plans to run for U.S. president in 2020, and he used an interview at the South by Southwest conference in Austin, Texas to pitch himself as a “centrist independent outside of the two-party system.” But he also made a few salient points about how he built Starbucks into a $86 billion company. “You can create shareholder value and you can create value for your people. Asked about how he would market himself as a preside


Starbucks’ former chair and CEO Howard Schultz is making news for his possible plans to run for U.S. president in 2020, and he used an interview at the South by Southwest conference in Austin, Texas to pitch himself as a “centrist independent outside of the two-party system.” But he also made a few salient points about how he built Starbucks into a $86 billion company. “You can create shareholder value and you can create value for your people. Asked about how he would market himself as a preside
Howard Schultz on building the Starbucks brand: ‘I know a little bit about marketing’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-11  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, building, think, brand, bit, starbucks, marketing, create, value, little, schultz, going, howard, know


Howard Schultz on building the Starbucks brand: 'I know a little bit about marketing'

Starbucks’ former chair and CEO Howard Schultz is making news for his possible plans to run for U.S. president in 2020, and he used an interview at the South by Southwest conference in Austin, Texas to pitch himself as a “centrist independent outside of the two-party system.”

But he also made a few salient points about how he built Starbucks into a $86 billion company.

“You can create shareholder value and you can create value for your people. We’ve also learned something at Starbucks that by doing good things to your people, your customers are going to build a large reservoir of trust around the equity of the brand, because they want to support a company whose values are compatible with their own,” he told NBC News’ Dylan Byers at the event Saturday.

Asked about how he would market himself as a presidential candidate after former President Barack Obama’s “Yes We Can,” and President Donald Trump’s “Make America Great Again,” slogans Schultz said: “I have not officially said that I am running for president. I think if you were going to give me a little bit of credit I think you’d have to say that over the course of the last 40 years I know a little bit about building a brand.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-11  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, building, think, brand, bit, starbucks, marketing, create, value, little, schultz, going, howard, know


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New York’s image is ‘a bit tarnished’ after Amazon exit, says business group CEO

” Employers here pay 20, 30 percent premium for employees in New York because of the cost of living, and then there’s the taxes.” Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change, applauded Amazon’s exit. “We’ll now be able to reset what the climate should be for businesses in New York,” he told “Closing Bell.” “If you want to come to New York, you actually have to deal with regular people. “We are going to figure out how to work together to make up for it and to keep our t


” Employers here pay 20, 30 percent premium for employees in New York because of the cost of living, and then there’s the taxes.” Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change, applauded Amazon’s exit. “We’ll now be able to reset what the climate should be for businesses in New York,” he told “Closing Bell.” “If you want to come to New York, you actually have to deal with regular people. “We are going to figure out how to work together to make up for it and to keep our t
New York’s image is ‘a bit tarnished’ after Amazon exit, says business group CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: michelle fox, drew angerer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, closing, bit, bell, communities, group, image, ceo, actually, tax, tarnished, city, cost, york, burden, yorks, exit, amazon, business, amazons


New York's image is 'a bit tarnished' after Amazon exit, says business group CEO

Wylde said the government had to put something on the table to lure Amazon.

“New York is the highest-taxed place in the country, and when we are competing with every other state and city, in places like Nashville and Dallas — runners-up to our application — it’s pretty hard to compare our tax burden and cost burden there,” she said on “Closing Bell.” ” Employers here pay 20, 30 percent premium for employees in New York because of the cost of living, and then there’s the taxes.”

Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change, applauded Amazon’s exit. “We shouldn’t be subsidizing companies to provide jobs.”

He called Amazon’s decision a “huge victory” for New Yorkers.

“We’ll now be able to reset what the climate should be for businesses in New York,” he told “Closing Bell.” “If you want to come to New York, you actually have to deal with regular people. You actually have to make sure that people are included in the conversation and not displace working-class communities that have been here forever.”

Wylde said while the expected tax revenue is a “big loss” for the city, she is optimistic that New York can move forward.

“We are going to figure out how to work together to make up for it and to keep our tech economy growing. It is our fastest-growing industry, and we need it,” she said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: michelle fox, drew angerer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, closing, bit, bell, communities, group, image, ceo, actually, tax, tarnished, city, cost, york, burden, yorks, exit, amazon, business, amazons


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New York’s image is ‘a bit tarnished’ after Amazon exit, says business group CEO

” Employers here pay 20, 30 percent premium for employees in New York because of the cost of living, and then there’s the taxes.” Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change, applauded Amazon’s exit. “We’ll now be able to reset what the climate should be for businesses in New York,” he told “Closing Bell.” “If you want to come to New York, you actually have to deal with regular people. “We are going to figure out how to work together to make up for it and to keep our t


” Employers here pay 20, 30 percent premium for employees in New York because of the cost of living, and then there’s the taxes.” Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change, applauded Amazon’s exit. “We’ll now be able to reset what the climate should be for businesses in New York,” he told “Closing Bell.” “If you want to come to New York, you actually have to deal with regular people. “We are going to figure out how to work together to make up for it and to keep our t
New York’s image is ‘a bit tarnished’ after Amazon exit, says business group CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: michelle fox, drew angerer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, closing, bit, bell, communities, group, image, ceo, actually, tax, tarnished, city, cost, york, burden, yorks, exit, amazon, business, amazons


New York's image is 'a bit tarnished' after Amazon exit, says business group CEO

Wylde said the government had to put something on the table to lure Amazon.

“New York is the highest-taxed place in the country, and when we are competing with every other state and city, in places like Nashville and Dallas — runners-up to our application — it’s pretty hard to compare our tax burden and cost burden there,” she said on “Closing Bell.” ” Employers here pay 20, 30 percent premium for employees in New York because of the cost of living, and then there’s the taxes.”

Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change, applauded Amazon’s exit. “We shouldn’t be subsidizing companies to provide jobs.”

He called Amazon’s decision a “huge victory” for New Yorkers.

“We’ll now be able to reset what the climate should be for businesses in New York,” he told “Closing Bell.” “If you want to come to New York, you actually have to deal with regular people. You actually have to make sure that people are included in the conversation and not displace working-class communities that have been here forever.”

Wylde said while the expected tax revenue is a “big loss” for the city, she is optimistic that New York can move forward.

“We are going to figure out how to work together to make up for it and to keep our tech economy growing. It is our fastest-growing industry, and we need it,” she said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: michelle fox, drew angerer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, closing, bit, bell, communities, group, image, ceo, actually, tax, tarnished, city, cost, york, burden, yorks, exit, amazon, business, amazons


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