AT&T will soon automatically block annoying robocalls

AT&T said this week that it will soon block spam calls or alert customers of suspected spammers. The FCC mandated in February that U.S. carriers need to help stop spam calls. T-Mobile already offers customers two free tools, Scam Block and Scam ID, but Scam Block needs to be turned on first. The Google Pixel 3 and Pixel 3a can automatically screen calls for you, while iOS 13, which will roll out this fall, uses Siri to automatically silence calls from unknown numbers. Correction: A previous vers


AT&T said this week that it will soon block spam calls or alert customers of suspected spammers. The FCC mandated in February that U.S. carriers need to help stop spam calls. T-Mobile already offers customers two free tools, Scam Block and Scam ID, but Scam Block needs to be turned on first. The Google Pixel 3 and Pixel 3a can automatically screen calls for you, while iOS 13, which will roll out this fall, uses Siri to automatically silence calls from unknown numbers. Correction: A previous vers
AT&T will soon automatically block annoying robocalls Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, att, customers, calls, soon, annoying, scam, users, automatically, suspected, spam, robocalls, turned, unwanted, block


AT&T will soon automatically block annoying robocalls

AT&T said this week that it will soon block spam calls or alert customers of suspected spammers. The blocking will first activate for new lines and will then be applied to all existing accounts, the carrier said on Tuesday.

The feature will be on by default but can be turned off by users who don’t want it, per rules set by the Federal Communications Commission that require carriers to let customers opt out.

The FCC mandated in February that U.S. carriers need to help stop spam calls. Hiya, a spam-blocking app, estimates that 25.3 billion unwanted robocalls were received by U.S. wireless customers in the first half of this year alone, even to people who are registered on the Do Not Call list.

AT&T’s service is the first that will be on by default, instead of requiring users to opt in or download a separate app.

T-Mobile already offers customers two free tools, Scam Block and Scam ID, but Scam Block needs to be turned on first. Sprint charges a $2.99 fee for Premium Caller ID, and Verizon alerts customers if a call is from a suspected spammer. Google and Apple have worked to add spam blocking into Android and iOS too.

The Google Pixel 3 and Pixel 3a can automatically screen calls for you, while iOS 13, which will roll out this fall, uses Siri to automatically silence calls from unknown numbers.

Correction: A previous version of this story included an incorrect number of unwanted robocalls.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, att, customers, calls, soon, annoying, scam, users, automatically, suspected, spam, robocalls, turned, unwanted, block


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Supreme Court decides federal judges cannot block gerrymandering

Demonstrators protest against gerrymandering at a rally at the Supreme Court during the gerrymandering cases Lamone v. Benisek and Rucho v. Common Cause. The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that federal courts may not block gerrymandering in a 5-4 decision that fell along partisan lines. On the final day of decisions before the court’s summer recess, Chief Justice John Roberts delivered the majority opinions of the court in both cases. “We conclude that partisan gerrymandering claims present politi


Demonstrators protest against gerrymandering at a rally at the Supreme Court during the gerrymandering cases Lamone v. Benisek and Rucho v. Common Cause. The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that federal courts may not block gerrymandering in a 5-4 decision that fell along partisan lines. On the final day of decisions before the court’s summer recess, Chief Justice John Roberts delivered the majority opinions of the court in both cases. “We conclude that partisan gerrymandering claims present politi
Supreme Court decides federal judges cannot block gerrymandering Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: tucker higgins dan mangan, tucker higgins, dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, political, voters, judges, courts, gerrymandering, federal, president, cases, wrote, court, roberts, supreme, decides, block, justices


Supreme Court decides federal judges cannot block gerrymandering

Demonstrators protest against gerrymandering at a rally at the Supreme Court during the gerrymandering cases Lamone v. Benisek and Rucho v. Common Cause.

The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that federal courts may not block gerrymandering in a 5-4 decision that fell along partisan lines.

The court also ruled, in a separate high-profile case decided Thursday, that the Trump administration’s reasoning for adding a citizenship question to the 2020 census was insufficient, effectively blocking the question for now.

On the final day of decisions before the court’s summer recess, Chief Justice John Roberts delivered the majority opinions of the court in both cases.

The closely watched case on a charged political matter comes in the midst of the 2020 presidential election. The decision was met with scorn by some Democrats running for president, including former vice president Joe Biden, and a sharp dissent from the liberal justices.

“We conclude that partisan gerrymandering claims present political questions beyond the reach of the federal courts,” Roberts wrote in the redistricting case. He said those asking the top court to block gerrymandered districts effectively sought “an unprecedented expansion of judicial power.”

“Federal judges have no license to reallocate political power between the two major political parties, with no plausible grant of authority in the Constitution, and no legal standards to limit and direct their decisions,” he wrote.

The court’s decision prompted a fierce reply from its liberal wing. Justice Elena Kagan wrote a dissent joined by Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor.

“Of all times to abandon the Court’s duty to declare the law, this was not the one,” Kagan wrote. “The practices challenged in these cases imperil our system of government. Part of the Court’s role in that system is to defend its foundations. None is more important than free and fair elections.”

Kagan wrote that she disagreed with the majority with “respect but deep sadness.”

The justices considered two cases, out of North Carolina and Maryland, in which voters alleged that their congressional districts were unfairly drawn to benefit one political party. The top court had never declared a district map as too partisan.

During arguments in March, the conservatives seemed reluctant to weigh in on the matter. At the time, Justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump’s two nominees, suggested that it may be better to leave the issue to the states.

That argument was taken up by Roberts in his opinion. Roberts wrote that the court’s conclusion did not “condemn complaints about districting to echo into a void,” noting that states “are actively addressing the issue on a number of fronts.”

Roberts cited state constitutional amendments passed by Colorado and Michigan that created commissions to approve district maps, and a new position created by Missouri voters — “state demographer” — that will draw legislative district lines.

In a post on Twitter shortly after the opinion was released, Biden, who is leading the crowded field of Democrats seeking their party’s nomination for president, wrote that the court “refused to stop politicians rigging our democracy by writing election rules for their own benefit.”

“It couldn’t have happened without Justices put there by Donald Trump and Republicans — another reason why Democrats must take back the White House in 2020,” he wrote.

Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont wrote in a Twitter post that the “Supreme Court gave Republican politicians across the country the approval to rig our democracy and suppress voters” and said “We can take back power by registering and mobilizing new voters.”

Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts called the decision an “abomination” and vowed to “push to require states to use independent redistricting commissions to draw fair districts.”

The two cases came from North Carolina and Maryland. In North Carolina, Democratic voters alleged that a map drawn by the GOP legislature in 2016 unfairly benefited Republicans.

In Maryland, it was Republicans who challenged the map, saying that one congressional district drawn in 2011 was unfairly tilted in favor of the Democrats.

In both cases, those behind the maps admitted that they were drawn to benefit their party.

The cases are known as Lamone v. Benisek, No. 18-726, and Rucho v. Common Cause, No. 18-422.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: tucker higgins dan mangan, tucker higgins, dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, political, voters, judges, courts, gerrymandering, federal, president, cases, wrote, court, roberts, supreme, decides, block, justices


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Don’t expect the US and China to make any trade progress at G-20, short seller Carson Block says

Investors shouldn’t get their hopes up for the U.S. and China to make any progress on the trade front at the G-20 summit next week, short seller Carson Block said Friday. The Chinese media seems to be digging in and not softening its tone,” Block, founder of Muddy Waters Research, told CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street. ” Block lived in China for six years and gained recognition by shorting several Chinese stocks, including Sino-Forest. China and the U.S. have been engaged in a trade war for more tha


Investors shouldn’t get their hopes up for the U.S. and China to make any progress on the trade front at the G-20 summit next week, short seller Carson Block said Friday. The Chinese media seems to be digging in and not softening its tone,” Block, founder of Muddy Waters Research, told CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street. ” Block lived in China for six years and gained recognition by shorting several Chinese stocks, including Sino-Forest. China and the U.S. have been engaged in a trade war for more tha
Don’t expect the US and China to make any trade progress at G-20, short seller Carson Block says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, huawei, progress, think, block, trade, china, summit, chinese, countries, g20, short, expect, carson, commercial, seller, dont


Don't expect the US and China to make any trade progress at G-20, short seller Carson Block says

Investors shouldn’t get their hopes up for the U.S. and China to make any progress on the trade front at the G-20 summit next week, short seller Carson Block said Friday.

“I don’t think we’re going to have any rapprochement here. The Chinese media seems to be digging in and not softening its tone,” Block, founder of Muddy Waters Research, told CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street. ” “They’re preparing, I think, for a long geopolitical battle with the West.”

Block lived in China for six years and gained recognition by shorting several Chinese stocks, including Sino-Forest. More recently, he compared Chinese after-school operator Tal Education to Enron.

China and the U.S. have been engaged in a trade war for more than a year. In that time, the two countries have slapped tariffs on billions of dollars worth of each other’s goods, tightening trade conditions and dampening the U.S. economic outlook.

President Donald Trump and his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, are scheduled to meet at next week’s G-20 summit in Japan. The two leaders are expected to discuss trade, with the possibility of reaching an accord.

Still, Block does not expect a deal to be reached. He also said China has figured out how to use the open markets and economies of the West against Western countries through its influence on Chinese companies.

“At the end of the day, there can be no business that is based in mainland China that can be assured of acting independently of the government and just for commercial reasons,” Block said. “Huawei and ZTE built themselves because they were strategic priorities of the Chinese government. When Ericsson and Nokia were laying off employees, Huawei was hiring them in Sweden and Norway not because it was a good commercial decision, but because of the long-term vision” of the Chinese government.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, huawei, progress, think, block, trade, china, summit, chinese, countries, g20, short, expect, carson, commercial, seller, dont


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What it’s really like to be an Amazon Flex delivery driver as Prime one-day shipping expands

Amazon Flex uses on-demand contract drivers to help with this especially labor-intensive and expensive hand-delivery. Amazon would not disclose how many drivers have signed up, or what percentage of its last-mile deliveries are made by Flex drivers compared with its shipping partners. Flex drivers are responsible for their own vehicle costs like gas, tolls and maintenance. “Amazon provides delivery partners with 24/7 on road support,” the company said. “If delivery partners come across issues wh


Amazon Flex uses on-demand contract drivers to help with this especially labor-intensive and expensive hand-delivery. Amazon would not disclose how many drivers have signed up, or what percentage of its last-mile deliveries are made by Flex drivers compared with its shipping partners. Flex drivers are responsible for their own vehicle costs like gas, tolls and maintenance. “Amazon provides delivery partners with 24/7 on road support,” the company said. “If delivery partners come across issues wh
What it’s really like to be an Amazon Flex delivery driver as Prime one-day shipping expands Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: katie schoolov
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deliver, really, shipping, expands, driver, amazon, prime, block, delivery, oneday, drivers, partners, told, thats, flex


What it's really like to be an Amazon Flex delivery driver as Prime one-day shipping expands

“These are like the good days that make you want to continue doing Amazon. But, you know, there’s obviously bad days too,” Montes said.

CNBC spent a day delivering with Flex driver Omar Montes in the San Francisco Bay Area, where he helped a friend deliver around 46 packages in 3½ hours, for $105.

Flex was launched in 2015, and now operates in about 50 U.S. cities. Anyone over 21 with a driver’s license, auto insurance and at least a midsize sedan can sign up. After clearing a basic background check, drivers in areas with open spots can start picking up and delivering packages.

A big part of this fast shipping process is getting the package that last mile to each address. Amazon Flex uses on-demand contract drivers to help with this especially labor-intensive and expensive hand-delivery.

One-day shipping used to be a luxury. Now, Amazon is making it the norm for its 100 million Prime members. The faster speed is now available on more than 10 million products across the country with no minimum purchase required.

Last year, Amazon also brought on small-business partners and bought 20,000 Mercedes-Benz Sprinter vans for them to use for delivery. These two programs are part of Amazon’s larger move to grow its own logistics network, relying less on other carriers like UPS, the U.S. Postal Service, and FedEx — which just announced it wouldn’t renew its express U.S. contract with Amazon.

Amazon would not disclose how many drivers have signed up, or what percentage of its last-mile deliveries are made by Flex drivers compared with its shipping partners. But it did tell us the program is expanding.

“We’ve built out these small-businesses delivery service providers and we have Flex which is our on-demand crowdsource delivery. So we need all of that to meet the various types of delivery we do in each of our geographies and I think you’re going to see expansion on all fronts there,” said Dave Clark, senior vice president of worldwide operations at Amazon.

Flex drivers use the Flex app to sign up for a “block” — which ranges from three to six hours — then head to a fulfillment center, where they find out how many boxes they’ve been assigned to deliver in that time frame. Amazon advertises that drivers make $18 to $25 an hour. Flex drivers are responsible for their own vehicle costs like gas, tolls and maintenance.

Depending on how long a block actually takes to deliver, drivers said the jobs are not always worthwhile.

“If I spent three-hours-plus of my time, that’s just doing the block. Then who knows how long it will take me to get back. And all I made was 70 bucks, and half of that might go to expenses like gas and like the bridge,” Montes said.

But drivers in less-congested regions, including Arizona, Kentucky and New Jersey, told CNBC that they often finish deliveries early, making the pace relaxed and the hourly pay much higher, because you’re paid for the full block no matter how long it takes you.

“You just might have just the one package in your three-hour block. That’s done in 20 minutes. So that’s rare but it happens, and it’s just a nice little thing to happen to folks driving,” said Quan Tsang, an Amazon Flex driver in Irvine, California.

Other drivers told CNBC they had safety concerns, from the Flex app encouraging distracted driving, to a lack of Amazon-branded clothing that leads to confrontations with confused customers.

Amazon told CNBC that “Safety is our number one priority. We communicate with delivery partners regarding safety topics, including safe loading practices. The vast majority of drivers complete their routes safely in less than the allotted time.”

“Amazon provides delivery partners with 24/7 on road support,” the company said. “If delivery partners come across issues while making a delivery, we work with them directly on a resolution.

CNBC spoke to a total of 11 Flex drivers around the country to find out what it’s really like to deliver for Amazon, and how it compares to other gig jobs like driving for Uber, Lyft, Postmates or Doordash. Watch the video for more.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: katie schoolov
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deliver, really, shipping, expands, driver, amazon, prime, block, delivery, oneday, drivers, partners, told, thats, flex


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Huawei protests FCC actions to block it in the U.S. on national security grounds

Guests hold umbrellas with Huawei logos at the Songshan Lake New Campus in Dongguan, China, May 31, 2019. China’s Huawei has responded again to actions from the Federal Communications Commission, releasing an ex parte memo further laying out its response to the commission’s efforts to block its equipment on national security grounds. “While Huawei does not agree with the view that Chinese companies pose a threat simply because they are Chinese, Huawei agrees that threats to network security do e


Guests hold umbrellas with Huawei logos at the Songshan Lake New Campus in Dongguan, China, May 31, 2019. China’s Huawei has responded again to actions from the Federal Communications Commission, releasing an ex parte memo further laying out its response to the commission’s efforts to block its equipment on national security grounds. “While Huawei does not agree with the view that Chinese companies pose a threat simply because they are Chinese, Huawei agrees that threats to network security do e
Huawei protests FCC actions to block it in the U.S. on national security grounds Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, national, block, actions, umbrellas, grounds, protests, security, view, fcc, approach, vendortovendor, trough, huawei, equipment, cites


Huawei protests FCC actions to block it in the U.S. on national security grounds

Guests hold umbrellas with Huawei logos at the Songshan Lake New Campus in Dongguan, China, May 31, 2019.

China’s Huawei has responded again to actions from the Federal Communications Commission, releasing an ex parte memo further laying out its response to the commission’s efforts to block its equipment on national security grounds.

“While Huawei does not agree with the view that Chinese companies pose a threat simply because they are Chinese, Huawei agrees that threats to network security do exist, and should be addressed comprehensively trough a holistic approach to supply chain security, not through a vendor-to-vendor approach,” according to the brief.

The company cites comments by government officials that it says appear to indicate the U.S. may have economic motives for the ban, and cites the use of its equipment in other European and North American markets.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, national, block, actions, umbrellas, grounds, protests, security, view, fcc, approach, vendortovendor, trough, huawei, equipment, cites


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Feds block tax breaks for donating to these charitable state funds

designer491 | iStock | Getty ImagesIn turn, those taxpayers could then write off the payment as a charitable deduction on their federal income tax return. For instance, if you received an 85% state tax credit for making your donation, you would only be able to claim 15% of your contribution on your federal tax return. More from Personal Finance:What you should know about new IRS tax withholding form’Jeopardy!’ Slowing donationsFor example, the Alabama Opportunity Scholarship Fund offers a total


designer491 | iStock | Getty ImagesIn turn, those taxpayers could then write off the payment as a charitable deduction on their federal income tax return. For instance, if you received an 85% state tax credit for making your donation, you would only be able to claim 15% of your contribution on your federal tax return. More from Personal Finance:What you should know about new IRS tax withholding form’Jeopardy!’ Slowing donationsFor example, the Alabama Opportunity Scholarship Fund offers a total
Feds block tax breaks for donating to these charitable state funds Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, final, funds, donating, return, feds, block, irs, treasury, tax, state, date, contribution, federal, charitable, breaks


Feds block tax breaks for donating to these charitable state funds

The Internal Revenue Service and the Treasury Department have issued final rules blocking certain states’ attempts to work around the new $10,000 cap for state and local tax deductions. After the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act in 2017 imposed a $10,000 limit on state and local tax deductions that itemizers could claim on their federal return, New York, New Jersey and Connecticut responded with a workaround. Those states passed legislation that would allow municipalities to create charitable funds to pay for local services and offer property tax credits to incentivize homeowners to give.

designer491 | iStock | Getty Images

In turn, those taxpayers could then write off the payment as a charitable deduction on their federal income tax return. The IRS and Treasury barred this move in their final rule, saying that receipt of a state or local tax credit in return for making such a contribution would constitute a “quid pro quo.” The net effect is to reduce the federal deduction a taxpayer can claim for the charitable contribution. For instance, if you received an 85% state tax credit for making your donation, you would only be able to claim 15% of your contribution on your federal tax return. The new rule also has a chilling effect on pre-existing plans in other states, where residents have received tax credits for donating to school voucher programs. More from Personal Finance:

What you should know about new IRS tax withholding form

‘Jeopardy!’ winner likely owes $1.2 million in taxes

This tax strategy for massive IRAs is on its way out There are more than 100 existing state charitable tax-credit plans in 33 states, a research paper authored by a group of tax law professors found. These programs range from conservation easements to private school tuition scholarships. “The private school organizations were asking for full-scale carveouts for themselves; they wanted to be exempt if the program was designed to benefit private entities instead of public ones,” said Carl Davis, research director at the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy. “The IRS stuck to its guns with a broad regulation that treats donations to all these entities the same way,” he said.

Slowing donations

For example, the Alabama Opportunity Scholarship Fund offers a total of $30 million in state tax credits each year. Individuals may donate the equivalent of up to 50% of their state income tax liability, up to $50,000. Alabamans get back a dollar-for-dollar tax credit on their state return. Ambiguity around the federal tax treatment of these donations has led to a slowdown in giving since the 2019 funding cycle started on Jan. 1, according to Lesley Searcy, executive director of the Alabama Opportunity Scholarship Fund.

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Taxpayers who give to the Exceptional SC program in South Carolina, a scholarship fund for children with exceptional needs, have also been hesitant this year, said Chad Connelly, executive director of that program. South Carolinians who give to the program can claim a dollar-for-dollar credit on their state income tax , up to 60 percent of their tax liability for that year. Whether the final rule will ultimately deter people from donating to these funds remains to be seen. “If you’re really passionate about private school vouchers in Georgia, you donate and you still get 100% of your donation back,” said Davis. “You just won’t get a federal tax deduction on top of it.”

A fight with the IRS

The IRS and Treasury proposed this rule last year, giving it an effective date of Aug. 27, 2018. If you made a contribution to a state fund after that date and then claimed it on your 2018 federal tax return as a charitable donation, you’re risking a showdown with the IRS, said Daniel Rosen, partner in the North America Tax Practice Group at Baker & McKenzie. “If the final regulations are issued with the retroactive date of Aug. 27, 2018, you’ll have to report on your return that you’re taking a position that’s inconsistent with the regulation,” he said. “You’ve bought yourself a fight,” Rosen said.

Certainly losing a federal benefit is significant to anyone looking to make a contribution to a state charitable fund. Daniel Rosen partner at Baker & McKenzie

Though some commenters asked Treasury and the IRS to push back the effective date to 2019 or 2020, the agencies stuck with the original Aug. 27, 2018 date. “If the proposed applicability date had not been contemporaneous with the proposed regulations, the Treasury Department and the IRS believe that taxpayers would have engaged in significant tax planning in advance of the regulations being finalized, resulting in a significant loss of revenue,” the agencies said in the final regulation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, final, funds, donating, return, feds, block, irs, treasury, tax, state, date, contribution, federal, charitable, breaks


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Judge rules against Trump in lawsuit to block Democrats’ subpoena for financial records

A federal judge ruled against President Donald Trump on Monday in a lawsuit to block a subpoena from House Democrats for information about his finances. Trump, speaking outside the White House shortly after the ruling came down, called the decision “crazy” and vowed to appeal it. “As far as the financials are concerned,” Trump said, “It’s totally the wrong decision [by an] Obama-appointed judge.” Trump’s lawyers sued in Washington, D.C., federal court to block that subpoena, writing that Democra


A federal judge ruled against President Donald Trump on Monday in a lawsuit to block a subpoena from House Democrats for information about his finances. Trump, speaking outside the White House shortly after the ruling came down, called the decision “crazy” and vowed to appeal it. “As far as the financials are concerned,” Trump said, “It’s totally the wrong decision [by an] Obama-appointed judge.” Trump’s lawyers sued in Washington, D.C., federal court to block that subpoena, writing that Democra
Judge rules against Trump in lawsuit to block Democrats’ subpoena for financial records Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20  Authors: kevin breuninger jacob pramuk, kevin breuninger, jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, congress, legislative, block, house, president, lawyers, democrats, subpoena, lawsuit, trump, judge, financial, trumps, court, rules, records, mehta


Judge rules against Trump in lawsuit to block Democrats' subpoena for financial records

A federal judge ruled against President Donald Trump on Monday in a lawsuit to block a subpoena from House Democrats for information about his finances. U.S. District Court Judge Amit Mehta strongly endorsed Congress’ broad authority to investigate the president, striking a blow to arguments made by Trump’s legal team. Trump, speaking outside the White House shortly after the ruling came down, called the decision “crazy” and vowed to appeal it. “As far as the financials are concerned,” Trump said, “It’s totally the wrong decision [by an] Obama-appointed judge.” Mehta wrote in a 41-page memorandum opinion that while “there are limits on Congress’s investigative authority … those limits do not substantially constrain Congress.” The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee subpoenaed accounting firm Mazars in April, requesting financial documents and related materials from Trump, his trust and a handful of his businesses. Trump’s lawyers sued in Washington, D.C., federal court to block that subpoena, writing that Democrats had “declared all-out political war” against Trump.

While Trump’s lawyers had argued that the committee’s subpoena did not have a legitimate legislative purpose — and was therefore invalid — Mehta took a more liberal view. “So long as Congress investigates on a subject matter on which ‘legislation could be had,'” then Congress is acting within the bounds of the U.S. Constitution, the judge wrote. “President Trump cannot block the subpoena to Mazars.” The Democrat-led committee argued that the requested financial documents will help it strengthen ethics and disclosure laws and their penalties, as well as assisting in making sure that the president does not violate the emoluments clause of the Constitution. “These are facially valid legislative purposes, and it is not for the court to question whether the Committee’s actions are truly motivated by political considerations,” Mehta wrote. In a hearing in May, the president’s lawyers argued that the Democrats’ actions fell far afield of Congress’ legitimate oversight functions as a legislative body. But Mehta questioned that argument, suggesting in the hearing that many historic congressional investigations — including the Watergate probe — might be considered invalid by the standard Trump’s lawyers were asserting. House Oversight Chairman Elijah Cummings, D-Md., praised the decision as a “resounding victory for the rule of law” in a statement Monday evening. “The court recognized the basic, but crucial fact that Congress has authority to conduct investigations as part of our core function under the Constitution,” Cummings said. “The court rejected President Trump’s repeated claim that congressional investigations serve no ‘legislative function’ — a baseless argument made in response to multiple investigations by the House of Representatives.” Democrats in Congress have issued requests to Trump and dozens of other figures in his orbit for records on a variety of subjects, including the president’s finances, his 2016 campaign and his inauguration committee. Some of their areas of inquiry also stem from the findings made public in special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Russian election meddling, possible obstruction of justice and possible conspiracy between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin. Some of those requests have led to subpoenas — all of which Trump has vowed to fight.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20  Authors: kevin breuninger jacob pramuk, kevin breuninger, jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, congress, legislative, block, house, president, lawyers, democrats, subpoena, lawsuit, trump, judge, financial, trumps, court, rules, records, mehta


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Trump sues Deutsche Bank and Capital One to block House subpoenas for his financial information

U.S. President Donald Trump, three of his children and the Trump Organization sued Deutsche Bank and Capital One, in a bid to block the two from responding to congressional subpoenas, according a Monday court filing. The U.S. House issued a subpoena to Deutsche Bank earlier this month and the German lender had said in January that it had received inquiries from Democrat-controlled committees about its links to Trump. In the complaint filed on Monday, the president’s team argued that his politica


U.S. President Donald Trump, three of his children and the Trump Organization sued Deutsche Bank and Capital One, in a bid to block the two from responding to congressional subpoenas, according a Monday court filing. The U.S. House issued a subpoena to Deutsche Bank earlier this month and the German lender had said in January that it had received inquiries from Democrat-controlled committees about its links to Trump. In the complaint filed on Monday, the president’s team argued that his politica
Trump sues Deutsche Bank and Capital One to block House subpoenas for his financial information Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, subpoenas, services, deutsche, bank, capital, personal, trump, political, issued, sues, information, block, financial, purpose, president, house


Trump sues Deutsche Bank and Capital One to block House subpoenas for his financial information

U.S. President Donald Trump, three of his children and the Trump Organization sued Deutsche Bank and Capital One, in a bid to block the two from responding to congressional subpoenas, according a Monday court filing.

The U.S. House issued a subpoena to Deutsche Bank earlier this month and the German lender had said in January that it had received inquiries from Democrat-controlled committees about its links to Trump. In the complaint filed on Monday, the president’s team argued that his political opponents leading the House Intelligence and Financial Services Committees are on a fishing expedition.

“This case involves Congressional subpoenas that have no legitimate or lawful purpose. The subpoenas were issued to harass President Donald J. Trump, to rummage through every aspect of his personal finances, his businesses, and the private information of the President and his family, and to ferret about for any material that might be used to cause him political damage. No grounds exist to establish any purpose other than a political one,” the complaint said.

The filing said the two banks have “long provided business and personal banking services” to the Trumps, and the subpoenas seeking a complete accounting of financial records are an instance of “remarkable overbreadth.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, subpoenas, services, deutsche, bank, capital, personal, trump, political, issued, sues, information, block, financial, purpose, president, house


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