Air China reportedly asks Boeing for compensation over aircraft grounding

‘Very dangerous’: Putin, Trump want to weaken the EU, top… There is at least one thing in common between the U.S. and Russia – their willingness to weaken the European Union, a top EU official said. Politicsread more


‘Very dangerous’: Putin, Trump want to weaken the EU, top… There is at least one thing in common between the U.S. and Russia – their willingness to weaken the European Union, a top EU official said. Politicsread more
Air China reportedly asks Boeing for compensation over aircraft grounding Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-22
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, aircraft, saidpoliticsread, willingness, russia, putin, union, reportedly, asks, thing, china, grounding, air, trump, compensation, eu, boeing, topthere, weaken


Air China reportedly asks Boeing for compensation over aircraft grounding

‘Very dangerous’: Putin, Trump want to weaken the EU, top…

There is at least one thing in common between the U.S. and Russia – their willingness to weaken the European Union, a top EU official said.

Politics

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-22
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, aircraft, saidpoliticsread, willingness, russia, putin, union, reportedly, asks, thing, china, grounding, air, trump, compensation, eu, boeing, topthere, weaken


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

US aviation officials think a bird strike was factor in 737 Max crash

Rescuers work at the scene of an Ethiopian Airlines flight crash near Bishoftu, or Debre Zeit, south of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Monday, March 11, 2019. U.S. aviation officials believe a bird strike may have led to the deadly crash of an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max in March, according to a person familiar with the matter. The fast-selling Boeing 737 Max airplanes have been grounded since shortly after that accident, which came less than five months after a similar crash in Indonesia. Crash i


Rescuers work at the scene of an Ethiopian Airlines flight crash near Bishoftu, or Debre Zeit, south of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Monday, March 11, 2019. U.S. aviation officials believe a bird strike may have led to the deadly crash of an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max in March, according to a person familiar with the matter. The fast-selling Boeing 737 Max airplanes have been grounded since shortly after that accident, which came less than five months after a similar crash in Indonesia. Crash i
US aviation officials think a bird strike was factor in 737 Max crash Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-21  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 737, ethiopian, factor, aviation, boeing, plane, similar, think, strike, max, system, crash, bird, officials, stall, airlines


US aviation officials think a bird strike was factor in 737 Max crash

Rescuers work at the scene of an Ethiopian Airlines flight crash near Bishoftu, or Debre Zeit, south of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Monday, March 11, 2019.

U.S. aviation officials believe a bird strike may have led to the deadly crash of an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max in March, according to a person familiar with the matter.

Boeing shares rose after the report Tuesday, gaining 1.2% by midday.

The fast-selling Boeing 737 Max airplanes have been grounded since shortly after that accident, which came less than five months after a similar crash in Indonesia. Together, the two crashes killed 346 people.

Crash investigators have indicated that bad sensor data triggered an anti-stall system aboard the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max that went down shortly after takeoff, a similar scenario to a crash of the same type of plane in Indonesia in October. The system automatically pushes the nose of the plane down if it perceives the aircraft is in a stall, the normal way to recover from such a position. That can be catastrophic if the plane is not in a stall, however.

Pilots in the two crashes were battling the system, known as MCAS, that repeatedly pushed the nose of their planes downward.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-21  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 737, ethiopian, factor, aviation, boeing, plane, similar, think, strike, max, system, crash, bird, officials, stall, airlines


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Boeing says it has completed a software update for 737 Max anti-stall system linked to fatal crashes

Crash investigators have implicated the system in the Ethiopia crash and another 737 Max crash in October, saying it was triggered by bad data from the sensors. On Thursday, Boeing said it has flown the 737 Max with the updated software for 360 hours on 207 flights. It also, as planned, has provided updating training materials for 737 Max pilots. How the Boeing 737 Max won approval from the FAA is the subject of several federal investigations and others by lawmakers. To date, Boeing has flown th


Crash investigators have implicated the system in the Ethiopia crash and another 737 Max crash in October, saying it was triggered by bad data from the sensors. On Thursday, Boeing said it has flown the 737 Max with the updated software for 360 hours on 207 flights. It also, as planned, has provided updating training materials for 737 Max pilots. How the Boeing 737 Max won approval from the FAA is the subject of several federal investigations and others by lawmakers. To date, Boeing has flown th
Boeing says it has completed a software update for 737 Max anti-stall system linked to fatal crashes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, completed, flight, updated, crashes, fatal, linked, max, antistall, crash, pilots, update, mcas, software, boeing, system, 737


Boeing says it has completed a software update for 737 Max anti-stall system linked to fatal crashes

Boeing said Thursday that it has completed a software update for its 737 Max planes, a key step in getting the aircraft flying again after aviation authorities grounded the jets around the world following two fatal crashes.

Boeing said it is planning to work with the Federal Aviation Administration to schedule a certification flight.

Shares of the airplane manufacturer rose after it released its statement, trading up 2.8 percent late in the session.

The nearly 400 Boeing 737 Max planes in airline fleets were grounded by aviation authorities in mid-March after a second deadly crash of the fast-selling plane in less than five months. Investigators in the latest crash, in Ethiopia, have pointed to an automated anti-stall system the that pilots battled in the last minutes of both crashes.

The system, known as MCAS, pushes the plane’s nose down repeatedly if the aircraft’s software senses it is going into a stall. That is a normal position to avoid a stall, but it can be catastrophic if the plane is not actually in a stall. Crash investigators have implicated the system in the Ethiopia crash and another 737 Max crash in October, saying it was triggered by bad data from the sensors.

On Thursday, Boeing said it has flown the 737 Max with the updated software for 360 hours on 207 flights. It also, as planned, has provided updating training materials for 737 Max pilots.

Some pilots complained that they were not told that the MCAS system was even on the planes, until after the October crash of Lion Air Flight 610, which killed all 189 on board. In order to transition from an older model of the Boeing 737 to the 737 Max, pilots said they were given training on a computer or tablet, with some courses that were less than an hour long. MCAS was not mentioned.

Boeing’s lack of disclosure has drawn scrutiny from lawmakers as well as the pilots. FAA’s acting chief, Daniel Elwell, at a House aviation panel’s hearing on Wednesday said the new MCAS system should have been included in pilot manuals.

How the Boeing 737 Max won approval from the FAA is the subject of several federal investigations and others by lawmakers.

Read Boeing’s full statement here:

Boeing has completed development of the updated software for the 737 MAX, along with associated simulator testing and the company’s engineering test flight. To date, Boeing has flown the 737 MAX with updated MCAS software for more than 360 hours on 207 flights. Boeing is now providing additional information to address Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requests that include detail on how pilots interact with the airplane controls and displays in different flight scenarios. Once the requests are addressed, Boeing will work with the FAA to schedule its certification test flight and submit final certification documentation. “With safety as our clear priority, we have completed all of the engineering test flights for the software update and are preparing for the final certification flight,” said Boeing Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer Dennis Muilenburg. “We’re committed to providing the FAA and global regulators all the information they need, and to getting it right. We’re making clear and steady progress and are confident that the 737 MAX with updated MCAS software will be one of the safest airplanes ever to fly. The accidents have only intensified our commitment to our values, including safety, quality and integrity, because we know lives depend on what we do.” In addition, Boeing has developed enhanced training and education materials that are now being reviewed with the FAA, global regulators, and airline customers to support return-to-service and longer-term operations. This includes a series of regional customer conferences being conducted around the world.

Correction: This story has been updated to note that Boeing conducted 207 test flights, not 270.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, completed, flight, updated, crashes, fatal, linked, max, antistall, crash, pilots, update, mcas, software, boeing, system, 737


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

What you need to know about Boeing’s 737 Max crisis

Here is a look at what is happening and what to expect with the 737 Max grounded as the busy summer travel season approaches. In March, the FBI joined an investigation of the certification process for the company’s 737 Max jets. Boeing said Thursday it has developed a software update for the 737 Max, a key step in getting the aircraft flying again. “We’re making clear and steady progress and are confident that the 737 MAX with updated MCAS software will be one of the safest airplanes ever to fly


Here is a look at what is happening and what to expect with the 737 Max grounded as the busy summer travel season approaches. In March, the FBI joined an investigation of the certification process for the company’s 737 Max jets. Boeing said Thursday it has developed a software update for the 737 Max, a key step in getting the aircraft flying again. “We’re making clear and steady progress and are confident that the 737 MAX with updated MCAS software will be one of the safest airplanes ever to fly
What you need to know about Boeing’s 737 Max crisis Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: emma newburger leslie josephs, emma newburger, leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airlines, crisis, 737, crash, know, system, max, jets, need, boeing, pilots, planes, boeings


What you need to know about Boeing's 737 Max crisis

People walk past a part of the wreckage at the scene of the Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302 plane crash, near the town of Bishoftu, southeast of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia March 10, 2019. Tiksa Negeri | Reuters

Boeing 737 Max planes around the world remain grounded more than two months after the second of two fatal crashes of the jets that killed a total of 346 people. Multiple investigations have since been opened, both into the crashes themselves and the regulatory process to approve the planes. Lawmakers and federal investigators are specifically examining how the Federal Aviation Administration in 2017 came to give a green light to the jet — a more fuel-efficient version of Boeing’s workhorse aircraft that’s been flying since the late 1960s — without disclosures to pilots about a new anti-stall system, which has since been implicated in the two air disasters. The Chicago-based manufacturer’s stock has lost more than 16%, closing at $353.81 Thursday, since the most recent crash, on March 10, as the number of probes and lawsuits grew and Boeing suspended deliveries of its best-selling jets. Here is a look at what is happening and what to expect with the 737 Max grounded as the busy summer travel season approaches.

Ongoing investigations

Multiple federal investigations are examining the Max and how it was approved by regulators, along with the planes’ new anti-stall system, known as MCAS. Boeing is also facing lawsuits from the families of crash victims. In March, the FBI joined an investigation of the certification process for the company’s 737 Max jets. House and Senate panels have each launched investigations. Boeing said Thursday it has developed a software update for the 737 Max, a key step in getting the aircraft flying again. The company said it completed more than 360 hours of testing on 207 flights with the updated software. It’s also developed new training materials that the FAA is reviewing. The FAA requested more information, including how the pilots would operate the controls and displays in different circumstances, Boeing said. “We’re committed to providing the FAA and global regulators all the information they need, and to getting it right,” said CEO Dennis Muilenburg in a statement on Thursday. “We’re making clear and steady progress and are confident that the 737 MAX with updated MCAS software will be one of the safest airplanes ever to fly.” Boeing aims to make the MCAS anti-stall system less powerful and give pilots greater control. Investigators have pointed to the system as a factor in the crashes, since the jets’ noses were repeatedly pushed down after the system was fed erroneous information from a sensor. The updated system will also use data from multiple sensors instead of one. It’s unclear how long the FAA will take to approve the fix and deem the planes safe to take to the skies again. In April, the FAA said Boeing’s update was “operationally suitable” in an initial review, and recommended that pilots take additional computer-based training for MCAS. Boeing has also taken a lot of heat following reports that it knew of problems with one of the safety features well before the two crashes, but did not disclose the issues to airlines or regulators until after the Lion Air crash in October.

A group of men and boys examine electronics taken from a pile of twisted metal gathered by workers during the continuing recovery efforts at the crash site of Ethiopian Airlines flight ET302 on March 11, 2019 in Bishoftu, Ethiopia. Jemal Countess | Getty Images

The economic toll

Airlines have already missed out on hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue after aviation authorities ordered them to ground the planes. Southwest Airlines, which has 34 Boeing 737 Max jets in its fleet of about 750 planes, said the grounded jets contributed to $200 million in lost revenue during the first three months of the year. American Airlines, which has 24 of the jets, has canceled at least 15,000 flights through August so far. The cancellations due to the grounded Max each day equal about 2% of American’s daily summer flying and will reduce the airline’s pretax earnings this year by $350 million, the carrier said on April 26. Boeing said its costs in the first quarter rose by $1 billion from the groundings, though it can’t predict its financial performance for the rest of the year as deliveries of Max jets are on hold. It currently has a backlog of more than 4,000 orders for the 737 Max and recently cut monthly production of the jet from 52 to 42 planes in April. Analysts have speculated that the company faces billions of dollars in payments to airlines and families of crash victims. Several banks expect Boeing’s production cuts to hit U.S. GDP. Wells Fargo said in April that Boeing’s production cuts will reduce second-quarter GDP growth by 0.2%. Earlier in March, JP Morgan’s CEO said GDP could fall by 0.6% if production of the plane is halted temporarily. “Boeing’s production cuts are large enough to negatively impact incoming reads on the economy,” said Wells Fargo senior economist Sarah House.

Scrambling to restore trust

Boeing has scrambled to persuade airlines and passengers to rally behind the Max jet following the company’s clumsy response to the two fatal crashes. In an effort to win back public trust, Boeing is reportedly hiring some major public relations firms to help reintroduce the jet. On an earnings call in April, Boeing CEO Muilenburg said that pilots would act as key messengers. “We think a key voice in all of this will be the pilots for our airlines, and their voice is very important,” he said. “That bond between the passenger and the pilot is one that’s critical, and so we’re working with our airline customers and those pilot voices to ensure that we can build on that going forward.”

Muilenburg hasn’t said there’s anything wrong with the 737 Max design. Pilots and airlines have complained to Boeing for failing to provide information about new software after the first crash in Indonesia, as well as incomplete information about safety features in the cockpit. Even assurances from Boeing and airlines that the planes are safe may not necessarily resonate with travelers. A Barclays’ survey of airline passengers that was published earlier this month showed that many people will avoid the 737 Max “for an extended period” once it’s allowed to fly again, with over half of respondents saying they’d choose a different aircraft if given the choice. However, some aviation experts have said the stigma associated with the Max, and damage to Boeing’s reputation, will likely dissipate over time. “If Boeing does what it needs to do to fix the problem, if the airline is certified by safety regulators and goes on to fly reliably, then the stigma that exists now will fade away,” Henry Harteveldt, president of Atmosphere Research Group, told CNBC in April.

What’s next


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: emma newburger leslie josephs, emma newburger, leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airlines, crisis, 737, crash, know, system, max, jets, need, boeing, pilots, planes, boeings


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Audio recording reveals Boeing resisted angry calls from pilots for 737 Max fix in November

Pilots asked Boeing at a private meeting in November to take emergency action that would have likely grounded the Max, but Boeing officials resisted, according to an audio recording of the meeting reviewed by the Dallas Morning News and New York Times. The meeting attendees included Mike Sinnett, a Boeing vice president; Craig Bomben, a top Boeing test pilot; and senior lobbyist John Moloney, the Times reported. The pilots said they were not aware of the Max’s anti-stall software system, known a


Pilots asked Boeing at a private meeting in November to take emergency action that would have likely grounded the Max, but Boeing officials resisted, according to an audio recording of the meeting reviewed by the Dallas Morning News and New York Times. The meeting attendees included Mike Sinnett, a Boeing vice president; Craig Bomben, a top Boeing test pilot; and senior lobbyist John Moloney, the Times reported. The pilots said they were not aware of the Max’s anti-stall software system, known a
Audio recording reveals Boeing resisted angry calls from pilots for 737 Max fix in November Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, going, software, morning, crash, recording, audio, max, reveals, calls, know, resisted, pilots, meeting, fix, system, boeing, angry


Audio recording reveals Boeing resisted angry calls from pilots for 737 Max fix in November

Weeks after the first fatal crash of Boeing’s popular 737 Max aircraft in October, American Airlines pilots angrily pushed company officials to fix the anti-stall software that has now been implicated in two deadly Max crashes, the Dallas Morning News reported.

Pilots asked Boeing at a private meeting in November to take emergency action that would have likely grounded the Max, but Boeing officials resisted, according to an audio recording of the meeting reviewed by the Dallas Morning News and New York Times.

The meeting attendees included Mike Sinnett, a Boeing vice president; Craig Bomben, a top Boeing test pilot; and senior lobbyist John Moloney, the Times reported.

Sinnett reportedly told the pilots at the meeting that the company was working on a software fix that would be ready in as little as six weeks, and it would not rush the process, according to the Times. He also said it was unclear whether the new system was to blame in the Lion Air crash, which killed 189 people.

“No one has yet to conclude that the sole cause of this was this function on the airplane,” Sinnett said at the meeting, which took place at the Allied Pilots Association headquarters in Fort Worth, Texas. The group represents American Airlines pilots.

The Dallas Morning News said the union recorded the meeting without Boeing’s knowledge and shared the audio with reporters because it was concerned Boeing wasn’t treating the situation as an emergency at the time.

The pilots said they were not aware of the Max’s anti-stall software system, known as MCAS. And they were angry that the system was not disclosed to them until after the October crash in Indonesia.

“These guys didn’t even know the damn system was on the airplane — nor did anybody else,” American pilot Michael Michaelis said at the meeting.

Michaelis, the union’s head of safety, also said Boeing should push the Federal Aviation Administration to issue an additional emergency airworthiness directive in order to update the software.

“My question to you, as Boeing, is why wouldn’t you say this is the smartest thing to do?” Michaelis asked. “Say we’re going to do everything we can to protect that traveling public in accordance with what our pilots unions are telling us.”

Todd Wissing, another American pilot, was angry the MCAS system was not included in the Max training manual.

“I would think that there would be a priority of putting explanations of things that could kill you,” Wissing told Boeing executives.

Sinnett said the company did not believe that pilots needed to know about the software, since they were already trained on how to behave in emergency scenarios.

“I don’t know that understanding this system would’ve changed the outcome on this. In a million miles, you’re going to maybe fly this airplane, maybe once you’re going to see this, ever,” Sinnett said. “So we try not to overload the crews with information that’s unnecessary so they actually know the information we believe is important.”

Sinnett did acknowledge that Boeing was investigating potential errors in the jet’s design.

“One of the questions will be, is our design assumption wrong?” he said. “We’re going through that whole thought process of, were our assumptions really even valid when we did this?”

Boeing is still working on a software upgrade as the Max remains grounded through the summer. The company has revealed that it knew about the problem linked to sensors in the Max jet the year before the Lion Air crash, but did not issue a fix.

Weeks after a second Max crash in Ethiopia, which killed 157 people, Boeing acknowledged for the first time that bad data feeding into the MCAS system played a role in the crashes.

Read the original report in the Dallas Morning News


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, going, software, morning, crash, recording, audio, max, reveals, calls, know, resisted, pilots, meeting, fix, system, boeing, angry


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Boeing should have disclosed automated system to pilots, FAA head says

The acting head of the Federal Aviation Administration told lawmakers Wednesday that Boeing should have given pilots more information about a new anti-stall system that is suspected in two deadly crashes of the 737 Max since October. Investigators have pointed to erroneous sensor data that fed into the planes’ new, automated anti-stall system in the crashes shortly after takeoff in both deadly flights. Some pilots complained that they weren’t aware the MCAS system existed on the planes until aft


The acting head of the Federal Aviation Administration told lawmakers Wednesday that Boeing should have given pilots more information about a new anti-stall system that is suspected in two deadly crashes of the 737 Max since October. Investigators have pointed to erroneous sensor data that fed into the planes’ new, automated anti-stall system in the crashes shortly after takeoff in both deadly flights. Some pilots complained that they weren’t aware the MCAS system existed on the planes until aft
Boeing should have disclosed automated system to pilots, FAA head says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeing, crashes, automated, fly, faa, planes, head, pilots, crash, aviation, told, system, disclosed


Boeing should have disclosed automated system to pilots, FAA head says

The acting head of the Federal Aviation Administration told lawmakers Wednesday that Boeing should have given pilots more information about a new anti-stall system that is suspected in two deadly crashes of the 737 Max since October.

“I, as a pilot, when I first heard about this, I thought there should have been more text in the manual” about the MCAS anti-stall system Boeing added to the planes before they were delivered to customers, Daniel Elwell, the FAA’s acting administrator, told a House aviation subcommittee.

The fast-selling 737 Max has been grounded worldwide after the second crash, in Ethiopia in March. The first crash, in October, happened in Indonesia. The crashes killed 346 people.

Investigators have pointed to erroneous sensor data that fed into the planes’ new, automated anti-stall system in the crashes shortly after takeoff in both deadly flights. Some pilots complained that they weren’t aware the MCAS system existed on the planes until after the crash of the Lion Air flight in Indonesia.

Audio surfaced this week of a tense meeting in November in which airline pilots confronted a Boeing executive after the Lion Air crash, angry that they weren’t informed about the system. Boeing vice president Mike Sinnett reportedly told the pilots “In a million miles you’re going to maybe fly this airplane, maybe once you’re going to see this ever,” according to a report in The New York Times.

The FAA is facing several investigations about its role in approving the new planes in 2017 as well as heightened scrutiny of its practice of using company employees to help certify the aircraft before the planes are delivered to airlines.

Elwell also said Boeing engineers discovered a problem with displays that show if sensors on the plane were giving bad information, but the FAA didn’t find out about it for more than a year. The sensors in question transmit what is known as the angle of attack — the angle of the aircraft relative to oncoming air.

“I am not happy with 13-month gap” between the discovery by Boeing and when the FAA and customers found out, Elwell said. He added that the displays are not critical to flight safety and that the agency welcomes scrutiny and has room to improve. Boeing did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Some lawmakers criticized the FAA for its oversight and questioned its longtime practice of using manufacturers own employees to help speed aircraft certification.

“The FAA needs to fix its credibility problem,” Rep. Rick Larsen, D-Wash., and chairman of the subcommittee on aviation, said in prepared remarks.

Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., said “Boeing is yet to provide a single document” to the House panel about the plane.

Boeing is working on a fix for the planes that would give pilots more control over the system and use data from two, instead of one sensor, but the grounding has already pinched some airlines’ revenue and is threatening to crimp sales further if the planes remain off limits during the peak summer travel season.

“If the public doesn’t feel safe about flying then they won’t fly,” Larsen said.

Elwell said the FAA will allow the planes to fly again once it’s “absolutely safe to do so. … It’s important we get this right.”

Also Wednesday, the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation is holding a nomination hearing for President Donald Trump’s pick to run the FAA, former Delta Air Lines executive Stephen Dickson.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeing, crashes, automated, fly, faa, planes, head, pilots, crash, aviation, told, system, disclosed


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Boeing, Beyond Meat, Lululemon, Roku & more

Dennis Muilenburg, CEO of Boeing Inc. speaking at the Business Roundtable CEO Innovation Summit in Washington D.C. on Dec. 6th, 2018. Here are the biggest calls on Wall Street on Tuesday:Barclays downgraded Boeing to ‘equal weight’ from ‘overweight’Barclays said it believes that fliers will avoid the Boeing 737 Max when it’s back in service. “We expect the recovery of 737 MAX production to take longer than expected and our 2019-21 EPS & FCF forecasts are below consensus as a result. Our view is


Dennis Muilenburg, CEO of Boeing Inc. speaking at the Business Roundtable CEO Innovation Summit in Washington D.C. on Dec. 6th, 2018. Here are the biggest calls on Wall Street on Tuesday:Barclays downgraded Boeing to ‘equal weight’ from ‘overweight’Barclays said it believes that fliers will avoid the Boeing 737 Max when it’s back in service. “We expect the recovery of 737 MAX production to take longer than expected and our 2019-21 EPS & FCF forecasts are below consensus as a result. Our view is
Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Boeing, Beyond Meat, Lululemon, Roku & more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, roku, boeing, ceo, view, max, 737, washington, fliers, lululemon, biggest, calls, wall, weight, day, meat, avoid, analyst


Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Boeing, Beyond Meat, Lululemon, Roku & more

Dennis Muilenburg, CEO of Boeing Inc. speaking at the Business Roundtable CEO Innovation Summit in Washington D.C. on Dec. 6th, 2018.

Here are the biggest calls on Wall Street on Tuesday:

Barclays downgraded Boeing to ‘equal weight’ from ‘overweight’

Barclays said it believes that fliers will avoid the Boeing 737 Max when it’s back in service.

“We expect the recovery of 737 MAX production to take longer than expected and our 2019-21 EPS & FCF forecasts are below consensus as a result. Our view is informed by our survey that indicates a large portion of fliers are likely to avoid 737 MAX for an extended period beyond when the grounding is lifted.”

Read more about this call here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, roku, boeing, ceo, view, max, 737, washington, fliers, lululemon, biggest, calls, wall, weight, day, meat, avoid, analyst


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Stocks making the biggest moves midday: Beyond Meat, Boeing, Mylan & more

Bernstein said the alternative meat company will soon experience rapid sales growth and added it could be worth $40.5 billion in the next decade. Boeing — Boeing shares fell 3% in midday trading after Barclays downgraded the aircraft manufacturing company to equal weight from overweight. The company reported first-quarter earnings per share of $1.27, while analysts polled by StreetAccount expected a profit of $1.34. Mylan reported earnings per share that beat expectations, but its revenue fell s


Bernstein said the alternative meat company will soon experience rapid sales growth and added it could be worth $40.5 billion in the next decade. Boeing — Boeing shares fell 3% in midday trading after Barclays downgraded the aircraft manufacturing company to equal weight from overweight. The company reported first-quarter earnings per share of $1.27, while analysts polled by StreetAccount expected a profit of $1.34. Mylan reported earnings per share that beat expectations, but its revenue fell s
Stocks making the biggest moves midday: Beyond Meat, Boeing, Mylan & more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reported, boeing, meat, biggest, moves, making, revenue, share, company, earnings, polled, sales, stocks, shares, midday, mylan, fell


Stocks making the biggest moves midday: Beyond Meat, Boeing, Mylan & more

NEW YORK, NY – MAY 2: Beyond Meat CEO Ethan Brown (C) celebrates with guests after ringing the opening bell at Nasdaq MarketSite, May 2, 2019 in New York City.

Check out the companies making headlines midday Tuesday:

Beyond Meat — Beyond Meat shares surged 12% after Bernstein initiated them with an overweight rating and a price target of $81 per share, implying an upside of 8.3% from its Monday close. Bernstein said the alternative meat company will soon experience rapid sales growth and added it could be worth $40.5 billion in the next decade.

Boeing — Boeing shares fell 3% in midday trading after Barclays downgraded the aircraft manufacturing company to equal weight from overweight. Barclays said that it believes fliers will most likely avoid the Boeing 737 Max even when it’s back in service, according to a survey of airline passengers that was conducted.

Anheuser-Busch InBev — Shares of the Budweiser beer maker fell 2.1% after reporting weaker-than-forecast earnings. The company reported first-quarter earnings per share of $1.27, while analysts polled by StreetAccount expected a profit of $1.34. The company’s revenue also disappointed investors.

Mylan — The pharmaceutical company’s stock plummeted nearly 18% on the back of mixed quarterly results. Mylan reported earnings per share that beat expectations, but its revenue fell short. Mylan posted revenue of $2.496 billion, while analysts polled by Refnitiv expected sales to come in at $2.691 billion. The drugmaker said it was hurt by restructuring at its West Virginia plant and a stronger dollar.

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals — Shares of Regeneron Pharmaceuticals dropped 5.82% after the biotechnology company reported disappointing first-quarter results. Regeneron reported earnings of $4.45, missing a Refinitiv estimate by $1.01, and revenues of which missed by $49 million. The company cited a surge in expenses for the miss.

Cohu — Shares of Cohu surged 27% after the back-end semiconductor equipment maker reported first-quarter revenue that topped analyst expectations. Cohu reports sales of $147.8 million for the previous quarter, while analysts polled by Refinitiv had forecast sales of $145 million. The company also issued better-than-expected sales guidance for the second quarter.

Allergan — Allergan fell more than 3% despite posting results that topped analyst expectations. The pharmaceutical company posted adjusted earnings per share of $3.79 on revenue of $3.597 billion. Analysts polled by Refinitv expected a profit of $3.55 per share on revenue of $3.54 billion.

Roku — Roku shares rose as much as 4.1% before giving up those gains amid a broader selloff. An analyst at Stephens initiated them with an overweight rating and an $84 price target. “We like ROKU’s LT industry position as an independent, branded, embedded and capital-light player at the nexus between smart TVs and an increasingly fragmented streaming video landscape,” the analyst said. The stock later gave back those gains, however, trading 1.6% lower.

—CNBC’s Jessica Bursztynsky, Nadine El-Bawab and Isabel Soisson contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reported, boeing, meat, biggest, moves, making, revenue, share, company, earnings, polled, sales, stocks, shares, midday, mylan, fell


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Stocks making the biggest moves premarket: Ferrari, Boeing, PepsiCo, Mosaic, Hertz, AIG & more

Check out the companies making headlines before the bell:Allergan — Allergan beat estimates by 24 cents a share, with adjusted quarterly profit of $3.79 per share. Mallinckrodt — The European drugmaker earned an adjusted $1.94 per share for its first quarter, 24 cents a share above consensus forecasts. Regeneron Pharmaceuticals — Regeneron reported adjusted quarterly profit of $4.45 per share, short of the $5.46 a share consensus estimates. Aramark — The food services company missed estimates by


Check out the companies making headlines before the bell:Allergan — Allergan beat estimates by 24 cents a share, with adjusted quarterly profit of $3.79 per share. Mallinckrodt — The European drugmaker earned an adjusted $1.94 per share for its first quarter, 24 cents a share above consensus forecasts. Regeneron Pharmaceuticals — Regeneron reported adjusted quarterly profit of $4.45 per share, short of the $5.46 a share consensus estimates. Aramark — The food services company missed estimates by
Stocks making the biggest moves premarket: Ferrari, Boeing, PepsiCo, Mosaic, Hertz, AIG & more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07  Authors: peter schacknow, fred imbert, yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hertz, adjusted, quarter, reported, boeing, ferrari, forecasts, quarterly, biggest, moves, making, revenue, pepsico, premarket, share, profit, stocks, mosaic, estimates, cents


Stocks making the biggest moves premarket: Ferrari, Boeing, PepsiCo, Mosaic, Hertz, AIG & more

Check out the companies making headlines before the bell:

Allergan — Allergan beat estimates by 24 cents a share, with adjusted quarterly profit of $3.79 per share. Revenue also exceeded Wall Street forecasts, helped by sales growth for existing products like Botox and Juviderm. The company also raised its full-year forecast amid what it calls a rapidly progressing product pipeline.

Mallinckrodt — The European drugmaker earned an adjusted $1.94 per share for its first quarter, 24 cents a share above consensus forecasts. Revenue also topped estimates, helped by a return to growth for its specialty generics business. The company also raised its full-year forecast.

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals — Regeneron reported adjusted quarterly profit of $4.45 per share, short of the $5.46 a share consensus estimates. The drugmaker’s revenue also missed forecasts, hurt by a surge in expenses.

Ferrari — Ferrari reported a 22% jump in net profit during the first quarter from a year earlier, helped by sales growth for its Portofino sports car line.

Aramark — The food services company missed estimates by 4 cents a share, with adjusted quarterly profit of 45 cents per share. Revenue was essentially in line with expectations. Its full-year forecast was also slightly short of analysts’ forecasts.

Anadarko Petroleum — Anadarko said Occidental Petroleum’s $38 billion takeover bid is superior to the deal it had in place to be bought by Chevron. Anadarko has notified Chevron that it is determining the deal, with Chevron now having four days to respond with another offer should it decide to do so.

Boeing — Boeing was downgraded to “equal weight” from “overweight” at Barclays, which thinks passengers will try to avoid flying 737 Max jets for longer than anticipated.

Hertz Global — Hertz reported a quarterly loss of 99 cents per share, smaller than the $1.33 per share loss that analysts had been predicting. The car rental company’s revenue was essentially in line with estimates.

AIG — AIG earned an adjusted $1.58 per share for the first quarter, well above the $1.06 a share consensus estimate. The insurance company’s revenue also came in above Street forecasts, and its general insurance operation saw an underwriting profit for the first time in a decade.

PepsiCo — The beverage and snack maker will invest about $4 billion in Mexico over the next year in conjunction with Mexican partner Grupo Gepp, with part of that investment going to a new $109 million plant.

Pioneer Natural — Pioneer reported adjusted quarterly profit of $1.83 per share, beating consensus estimates by 22 cents a share, though revenue was below forecasts. The energy producer also announced it sold various assets to focus solely on its operations in the Permian basin.

Gluu Mobile — Gluu Mobile earned an adjusted 5 cents per share for the first quarter, matching Wall Street forecasts. The mobile game developer’s revenue came in above estimates. It also said three new games — WEE Universe, Diner DASH Adventures, and Disney Sorcerer’s Arena — are set to launch over the next few months. However, Gluu also gave weaker-than-expected guidance for both the second quarter and the full year.

Mosaic — Mosaic beat estimates by a penny a share, with adjusted quarterly profit of 25 cents per share. The fertilizer producer’s revenue also came in above analysts’ forecasts. The better-than-expected results occurred despite poor weather, which boosted Mosaic’s costs.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07  Authors: peter schacknow, fred imbert, yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hertz, adjusted, quarter, reported, boeing, ferrari, forecasts, quarterly, biggest, moves, making, revenue, pepsico, premarket, share, profit, stocks, mosaic, estimates, cents


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Stocks making the biggest moves premarket: Kraft Heinz, IBM, CBS, Tesla, Boeing & more

IBM — IBM said the Justice Department has concluded its review of its proposed acquisition of Red Hat without imposing any conditions. IBM said it expects to close the deal for Linux software distributor in the second half of the year. CBS — CBS announced that Norah O’Donnell would succeed Jeff Glor as anchor of its flagship CBS Evening News program. Berkshire Hathaway — Berkshire saw operating profit rise to $5.56 billion during the first quarter from $5.29 billion the prior year. Tesla — Tesla


IBM — IBM said the Justice Department has concluded its review of its proposed acquisition of Red Hat without imposing any conditions. IBM said it expects to close the deal for Linux software distributor in the second half of the year. CBS — CBS announced that Norah O’Donnell would succeed Jeff Glor as anchor of its flagship CBS Evening News program. Berkshire Hathaway — Berkshire saw operating profit rise to $5.56 billion during the first quarter from $5.29 billion the prior year. Tesla — Tesla
Stocks making the biggest moves premarket: Kraft Heinz, IBM, CBS, Tesla, Boeing & more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-06  Authors: peter schacknow, fred imbert, eustance huang, thomas franck, silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tesla, billion, profit, kraft, share, boeing, deal, company, settlement, second, software, stocks, premarket, moves, ibm, cbs, widely, heinz, making


Stocks making the biggest moves premarket: Kraft Heinz, IBM, CBS, Tesla, Boeing & more

Check out the companies making headlines before the bell:

Tyson Foods — The poultry and beef producer reported adjusted quarterly profit of $1.20 per share, 6 cents a share above estimates. Revenue also exceeded forecasts. The company said its chicken segment is poised for improvement after hitting what it believes are profit margin lows for the year.

Kraft Heinz — The food company said it would restate its earnings for 2016 and 2017, due to misstatements in its original filings related to procurement operations. However, Kraft Heinz said the restatements would not be material. The misstatements, according to the company, were due to misconduct on the part of some employees although none were members of senior management.

IBM — IBM said the Justice Department has concluded its review of its proposed acquisition of Red Hat without imposing any conditions. IBM said it expects to close the deal for Linux software distributor in the second half of the year.

CBS — CBS announced that Norah O’Donnell would succeed Jeff Glor as anchor of its flagship CBS Evening News program.

Berkshire Hathaway — Berkshire saw operating profit rise to $5.56 billion during the first quarter from $5.29 billion the prior year. The earnings report was released prior to Berkshire’s widely followed weekend annual meeting.

Anadarko Petroleum — Occidental Petroleum increased the cash portion of its $38 billion cash-and-stock bid for Anadarko, as it seeks to convince Anadarko to abandon its deal to be acquired by Chevron.

Tesla — Tesla bid for a tariff exemption was rejected by U.S. trade officials. Tesla had sought the exemption for the Chinese-manufactured technology that controls its Model 3 vehicle.

Sinclair Broadcast Group — Sinclair announced a deal to buy 21 regional sports networks from Walt Disney for $9.6 billion. The deal had been widely reported to be imminent on Friday before the late-day official announcement.

Boeing — Officials say Boeing did not tell the Federal Aviation Administration for 13 months that it had inadvertently made a safety alarm optional on the now-grounded 737 Max jet. Boeing issued a statement saying it only discovered the issue after deliveries had begun, but that it did not represent critical safety data.

Fiat Chrysler — The automaker’s $307.5 million settlement over diesel emissions was approved by a U.S. judge. The settlement involves about 100,000 owners of diesel vehicles that allegedly had illegal software allowing excess emissions.

Dish Network — Dish was upgraded to “neutral” from “underperform” at Credit Suisse, which thinks video subscriber losses for the satellite TV provider will lessen in the second half of the year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-06  Authors: peter schacknow, fred imbert, eustance huang, thomas franck, silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tesla, billion, profit, kraft, share, boeing, deal, company, settlement, second, software, stocks, premarket, moves, ibm, cbs, widely, heinz, making


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post