Trump: Mexican soldiers used confrontation with US troops as diversion

President Donald Trump on Wednesday said that Mexican soldiers “recently pulled guns” on American troops near the southern border, and accused the soldiers of “probably” doing so as a diversionary tactic for drug smugglers. We are now sending ARMED SOLDIERS to the Border,” Trump wrote in a post on Twitter. The confrontation between Mexican soldiers and U.S. troops happened April 13 on American territory. It was first made public by Newsweek, which reported that Mexican soldiers detained and sear


President Donald Trump on Wednesday said that Mexican soldiers “recently pulled guns” on American troops near the southern border, and accused the soldiers of “probably” doing so as a diversionary tactic for drug smugglers. We are now sending ARMED SOLDIERS to the Border,” Trump wrote in a post on Twitter. The confrontation between Mexican soldiers and U.S. troops happened April 13 on American territory. It was first made public by Newsweek, which reported that Mexican soldiers detained and sear
Trump: Mexican soldiers used confrontation with US troops as diversion Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: tucker higgins, hannah mckay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, american, doing, mexican, troops, wrote, border, used, diversion, mexico, soldiers, incident, confrontation


Trump: Mexican soldiers used confrontation with US troops as diversion

President Donald Trump on Wednesday said that Mexican soldiers “recently pulled guns” on American troops near the southern border, and accused the soldiers of “probably” doing so as a diversionary tactic for drug smugglers.

“Better not happen again! We are now sending ARMED SOLDIERS to the Border,” Trump wrote in a post on Twitter. “Mexico is not doing nearly enough in apprehending & returning!”

The confrontation between Mexican soldiers and U.S. troops happened April 13 on American territory. It was first made public by Newsweek, which reported that Mexican soldiers detained and searched the Americans briefly at gunpoint, thinking they were still in Mexico after mistakenly crossing into the United States.

In a press release issued Wednesday, Mexico’s foreign affairs ministry wrote that the incident was not out of the ordinary. Both governments, it said, were in contact throughout the situation.

“After a brief discussion between the soldiers from the two nations, the Mexican military members departed the area,” a spokesperson for the Pentagon told the outlet. “The U.S. soldiers immediately contacted CBP, who responded quickly. Throughout the incident, the U.S. soldiers followed all established procedures and protocols.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: tucker higgins, hannah mckay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, american, doing, mexican, troops, wrote, border, used, diversion, mexico, soldiers, incident, confrontation


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Cartels may not be the primary culprits of Central American human smuggling to US, a new study says

“At best, we could provide a broad range for the revenues to all types of human smugglers.” The study looked at revenues earned by human smugglers, as well as taxes levied on migrants by drug-trafficking organizations on routes they control. “Transnational criminal organizations and other human smugglers are driven solely by illicit profit and do not care about human life.” The study also estimated the flow of unlawful migrants from the Northern Triangle countries to the U.S., relying in part on


“At best, we could provide a broad range for the revenues to all types of human smugglers.” The study looked at revenues earned by human smugglers, as well as taxes levied on migrants by drug-trafficking organizations on routes they control. “Transnational criminal organizations and other human smugglers are driven solely by illicit profit and do not care about human life.” The study also estimated the flow of unlawful migrants from the Northern Triangle countries to the U.S., relying in part on
Cartels may not be the primary culprits of Central American human smuggling to US, a new study says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: jeff daniels, adrees latif
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, migrants, smuggling, organizations, rand, primary, border, culprits, human, smugglers, northern, cartels, american, central, triangle, study, report


Cartels may not be the primary culprits of Central American human smuggling to US, a new study says

Human smuggling from Central American countries to the U.S. reaped revenue of between $200 million and $2.3 billion for smugglers in 2017, but transnational criminal organizations may not be the primary culprits, according to a Rand Corp. report released Monday.

President Donald Trump recently moved to cut foreign aid to the Northern Triangle countries of Central America — Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador — and in January claimed “ruthless coyotes and vicious cartels” are taking advantage of thousands of children who make the journey up to the U.S. border. Trump also cited human trafficking in February when he declared a national emergency at the U.S.-Mexico border, freeing up billions of dollars for his border wall.

“We learned that human smuggling involves many different types of actors and that we could not credibly distinguish most criminal organizations’ activities and revenues from those of other actors, including ad hoc groups and independent operators, that engage in human smuggling,” said Victoria Greenfield, lead author on the report and a senior economist at the nonprofit think tank. “At best, we could provide a broad range for the revenues to all types of human smugglers.”

“Although our findings are subject to a high degree of uncertainty, they represent a contribution to the evidence base informing ongoing U.S. government efforts to address threats to homeland security posed by TCOs and other actors that participate in human smuggling,” Rand said.

Also, Rand said because human smuggling operations are often independent and without “formality and strict hierarchical structures,” it might be difficult for the U.S. government to target them with sanctions or other measures effectively.

“Loose networks are difficult to disrupt, ad hoc groups are even less susceptible, and independent operators are easily replaceable,” the report concluded. It added that even if the U.S. government “can apply sanctions to some individuals in a given network or group or to individuals who operate independently, its ability to disrupt their organizations or affect the market may be limited.”

Rand’s 78-page report follows a study it conducted that was sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security. The study looked at revenues earned by human smugglers, as well as taxes levied on migrants by drug-trafficking organizations on routes they control.

“DHS has long warned of the dangers of trafficking and its horrendous impacts on the victims,” DHS press secretary Tyler Houlton said in an emailed statement. “Transnational criminal organizations and other human smugglers are driven solely by illicit profit and do not care about human life.”

According to Rand, the smuggling of unlawful migrants from the Northern Triangle region to the U.S. generated between $200 million and $2.3 billion for smugglers in 2017. It said the wide range reflects uncertainty about the number of migrants that journey northward, their use of smugglers and the fees they ultimately pay.

Rand estimated that migrants or their handlers paid drug-trafficking organizations taxes, or pisos, of $30 million to $180 million for crossing through their territories in 2017.

The report said cartels or TCOs sometimes “coordinate migrants’ border crossings to divert attention from other illicit activities, and they recruit or coerce some migrants to carry drugs.”

Rand estimated that the human smugglers charge migrants between $6,000 and $10,000 for their services. It said fees vary greatly and depend on whether migrants want to be smuggled into the interior of the U.S. or turn themselves in to border officials and seek asylum.

The study also estimated the flow of unlawful migrants from the Northern Triangle countries to the U.S., relying in part on government data. It estimated the unlawful migration from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador was at least 218,000 in 2017 but could have been as high as about 345,000 between ports of entry.

A caravan of Central American migrants became an issue in last year’s midterm elections after Trump deployed more than 5,000 troops to the U.S.-Mexico border. Reports have suggested the migrants are fleeing violence and, in some cases, economic hardship in their home countries.

Last month, the U.S. signed a “regional compact” with the three Northern Triangle countries aimed at addressing what the agency called “the migration crisis.” It said the agreement included collaboration to combat human trafficking and migrant smuggling, as well as countering gangs and organized crime activities.

About one-quarter to two-thirds of unlawful migrants from the Northern Triangle region might have hired smugglers in recent years, according to Rand.

The Rand study found that human smuggling can involve taxis, charter buses and tractor-trailers that ferry migrants from the Northern Triangle to locations further north on the journey to the U.S.-Mexico border.

The report also said human smugglers “rely on corruption to protect their activities in the form of bribes to officials.” Also, it said “more organized [smuggler] networks can feature transnational organizational structures, but relatively few appear to meet the bar of being ‘self-perpetuating associations.'”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: jeff daniels, adrees latif
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, migrants, smuggling, organizations, rand, primary, border, culprits, human, smugglers, northern, cartels, american, central, triangle, study, report


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Trump says he will have to send more troops to the US-Mexico border

President Donald Trump said Wednesday that he will have to direct more American troops to the U.S.-Mexico border, after his supporters shared graphic stories about illegal immigration during a meeting in San Antonio. Trump has sent thousands of troops to the border before. Trump told the reporters, “You’re dishonest people, many of you.” Trump did not elaborate on when he would send more military personnel to the border, or how many he planned to deploy. Coming across the border,'” Trump said.


President Donald Trump said Wednesday that he will have to direct more American troops to the U.S.-Mexico border, after his supporters shared graphic stories about illegal immigration during a meeting in San Antonio. Trump has sent thousands of troops to the border before. Trump told the reporters, “You’re dishonest people, many of you.” Trump did not elaborate on when he would send more military personnel to the border, or how many he planned to deploy. Coming across the border,'” Trump said.
Trump says he will have to send more troops to the US-Mexico border Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: kevin breuninger, jim watson, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, send, border, trump, start, think, military, cnbcs, told, president, usmexico, troops, wall


Trump says he will have to send more troops to the US-Mexico border

President Donald Trump said Wednesday that he will have to direct more American troops to the U.S.-Mexico border, after his supporters shared graphic stories about illegal immigration during a meeting in San Antonio.

“I’m going to have to call up more military,” said Trump, who was flanked at the roundtable event by a small group of local officials and ranchers.

Trump has sent thousands of troops to the border before. In early February, the Pentagon announced a deployment of about 3,750 active-duty troops less than two weeks before the president declared that the situation at the southern border constituted a national emergency.

Trump also lashed out at media outlets who have refused to count the construction of replacement barrier along the border as “new” sections of his long-promised wall.

“I ripped down a wall” that was “useless, and we built a new one,” Trump said. “Some of them said we didn’t build a wall … what they don’t say is that we ripped it down” because “it was garbage.”

Trump told the reporters, “You’re dishonest people, many of you.”

The roundtable was part of two scheduled fundraising events in Texas — one in San Antonio and the other in Houston. Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel told reporters earlier Wednesday that she expected Trump’s reelection campaign would raise at least $6 million from the two events alone.

Trump did not elaborate on when he would send more military personnel to the border, or how many he planned to deploy. The White House did not immediately respond to CNBC’s questions about the president’s remarks. The Pentagon did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

Trump relayed to the media some of the anecdotes he had been told about the danger on the border.

“We start talking and the first person gets up and says, ‘Sir, we have many people dying. Coming across the border,'” Trump said. “‘They’ll be dropped off and they start walking and they’ll say Houston’s right down the road. But it’s actually 300 miles away. And we find dead people from Guatemala, from Honduras, from El Salvador, From Mexico. All over.'”

The president also said that the troops sent to the border have to use more restraint than they otherwise would.

“Our military, don’t forget, can’t act like a military would act. Because if they got a little rough, everybody would go crazy,” Trump said.

“They have all these horrible laws that the Democrats won’t change, they will not change them. And I think they will pay a very big price in 2020 for all of the things, whether it is the fake witch hunt they start out, or whether it is a situation like this. I think the border is going to be an incredible issue,” Trump said.

— CNBC’s Amanda Macias contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: kevin breuninger, jim watson, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, send, border, trump, start, think, military, cnbcs, told, president, usmexico, troops, wall


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Kirstjen Nielsen is out as Homeland Security chief as Trump pushes for tougher border policy

Kirstjen Nielsen is leaving her role as Homeland Security secretary as President Donald Trump intensifies his focus on the nation’s border with Mexico. Trump said on Sunday that she is leaving her position and thanked Nielsen for her service. Kevin McAleenan, the current Customs and Border Protection commissioner, will serve as acting Homeland Security secretary. A White House aide told CNBC that Nieslen’s departure was unexpected despite months of speculation about whether she would be fired or


Kirstjen Nielsen is leaving her role as Homeland Security secretary as President Donald Trump intensifies his focus on the nation’s border with Mexico. Trump said on Sunday that she is leaving her position and thanked Nielsen for her service. Kevin McAleenan, the current Customs and Border Protection commissioner, will serve as acting Homeland Security secretary. A White House aide told CNBC that Nieslen’s departure was unexpected despite months of speculation about whether she would be fired or
Kirstjen Nielsen is out as Homeland Security chief as Trump pushes for tougher border policy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-07  Authors: spencer kimball, kevin breuninger, leah millis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, border, chief, tougher, policy, kirstjen, homeland, white, secretary, house, security, kelly, energy, pushes, position, nielsen


Kirstjen Nielsen is out as Homeland Security chief as Trump pushes for tougher border policy

Kirstjen Nielsen is leaving her role as Homeland Security secretary as President Donald Trump intensifies his focus on the nation’s border with Mexico.

Trump said on Sunday that she is leaving her position and thanked Nielsen for her service. Kevin McAleenan, the current Customs and Border Protection commissioner, will serve as acting Homeland Security secretary.

Although she was originally set to vacate the position immediately, Nielsen later said in a Twitter post that she had agree to stay on through Wednesday, April 10 “to assist with an orderly transition and ensure that key DHS missions are not impacted.”

Trump has sought to toughen his policy on the southern border in recent weeks. The president threatened to shut large portions of the border if Mexico did not stem the flow of migrants and drugs.

He later backed down from that threat, giving Mexico a year to meet his demands or face car tariffs or a border closure.

A White House aide told CNBC that Nieslen’s departure was unexpected despite months of speculation about whether she would be fired or quit.

In her resignation letter, Nielsen said she had “determined that it is the right time for me to step aside” without out citing reasons why.

Nielsen was a protege of former White House chief of staff John Kelly, who stepped down in frustration over his inability to bring discipline to Trump’s chaotic administration. Kelly had led Homeland Security before he took over the chief of staff position in summer 2017.

She had reportedly considered resigning last year after Trump criticized her in front of the Cabinet, accusing her of failing to secure the country’s borders.

Nielsen also faced heated criticism from Democrats for defending the administration’s policy of separating migrant families who arrive at the border. Democrats had called for her resignation last year.

The Washington Post reports that several names have been floated to replace Nielsen, including Energy Secretary Rick Perry, who was also reportedly considered for the role when Kelly left the position.

“Secretary Perry is very happy where is, leading the Department of Energy,” a Department of Energy spokesperson told CNBC.

The White House is also considering former Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli, former Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach and former Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi to head up Homeland Security, according to the Post.

CNBC’s Tom DiChristopher contributed to this article.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-07  Authors: spencer kimball, kevin breuninger, leah millis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, border, chief, tougher, policy, kirstjen, homeland, white, secretary, house, security, kelly, energy, pushes, position, nielsen


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Trump threatens to close ‘large sections’ of US-Mexico border next week over illegal immigration

It would likely be difficult for Mexico to “immediately” stop “all” illegal immigration, as Trump asks. Trump has long hammered Mexico over trade, pledging to crack down on what he calls abuses that sap American jobs. In 2017, the U.S. had a $71 billion goods trade deficit with Mexico and a $63.6 billion deficit for both goods and services, according to the U.S. Trade Representative. Trump sees calls to crack down on Mexico as a strong political argument and often intensifies them when looking t


It would likely be difficult for Mexico to “immediately” stop “all” illegal immigration, as Trump asks. Trump has long hammered Mexico over trade, pledging to crack down on what he calls abuses that sap American jobs. In 2017, the U.S. had a $71 billion goods trade deficit with Mexico and a $63.6 billion deficit for both goods and services, according to the U.S. Trade Representative. Trump sees calls to crack down on Mexico as a strong political argument and often intensifies them when looking t
Trump threatens to close ‘large sections’ of US-Mexico border next week over illegal immigration Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: jacob pramuk, anthony lanzilote, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, close, immediately, week, sections, trump, threatens, large, trade, usmexico, border, trading, goods, likely, deficit, mexico, illegal, immigration


Trump threatens to close 'large sections' of US-Mexico border next week over illegal immigration

It would likely be difficult for Mexico to “immediately” stop “all” illegal immigration, as Trump asks.

Trump has long hammered Mexico over trade, pledging to crack down on what he calls abuses that sap American jobs. His claims about Mexico making money off the United States appear to relate to inaccurate assertions he has repeatedly made about the U.S. trade balance with other countries.

While Trump claims the U.S. having a trade deficit with another country is the same as “losing” money, it simply means America buys more goods from the country than the trading partner purchases from the U.S. In 2017, the U.S. had a $71 billion goods trade deficit with Mexico and a $63.6 billion deficit for both goods and services, according to the U.S. Trade Representative.

In addition, while Mexico admits fewer immigrants than the U.S., it is not clear that Mexico has the strongest or America has the weakest immigration laws in the world, according to PolitiFact.

Trump sees calls to crack down on Mexico as a strong political argument and often intensifies them when looking toward an election. The president faces what will likely be a difficult campaign for re-election next year.

He also threatened to close the southern border last year ahead of the midterm elections. At the time, Trump’s rhetoric sparked concerns about economic damage from closing points of entry with a vital trading partner.

States Trump aims to win next year such as Arizona and Texas rely heavily on trade with Mexico.

Neither the White House nor the Department of Homeland Security immediately responded to CNBC’s requests to comment on his tweets.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: jacob pramuk, anthony lanzilote, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, close, immediately, week, sections, trump, threatens, large, trade, usmexico, border, trading, goods, likely, deficit, mexico, illegal, immigration


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Trump’s Facebook ads focus on Schumer, Pelosi and the border wall as Democrats play catch-up

The data provides fresh insight into the themes and strategies that the Trump campaign is employing in the earliest days of the 2020 election cycle. Trump’s ads have primarily focused on his political opponents and his efforts to build a wall along the southern border. Trump’s Facebook ads are also responsive to the news cycle. Three-quarters of Trump’s ads included solicitations for contact information, while the rest asked for donations. Edelson said this suggests the Trump campaign is targeti


The data provides fresh insight into the themes and strategies that the Trump campaign is employing in the earliest days of the 2020 election cycle. Trump’s ads have primarily focused on his political opponents and his efforts to build a wall along the southern border. Trump’s Facebook ads are also responsive to the news cycle. Three-quarters of Trump’s ads included solicitations for contact information, while the rest asked for donations. Edelson said this suggests the Trump campaign is targeti
Trump’s Facebook ads focus on Schumer, Pelosi and the border wall as Democrats play catch-up Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-28  Authors: brandy zadrozny, carlos barria
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, catchup, schumer, facebook, wall, play, spent, democrats, border, trump, ad, ads, million, political, trumps, pelosi, president, focus, campaign


Trump's Facebook ads focus on Schumer, Pelosi and the border wall as Democrats play catch-up

After making Facebook advertisements a key part of its 2016 run, President Donald Trump’s campaign continues to spend heavily on the social network as Democratic presidential candidates begin their own social media efforts.

Trump spent $3.6 million on Facebook ads from Dec. 30 to March 23, according to data compiled by researchers at the Online Advertising Transparency Project, an ongoing study launched last year at New York University that tracks political ad spending through Facebook’s publicly available political ad archive.

Trump’s spending in early 2019 was more than the Democratic campaigns combined, but he has been outspent by some candidates in recent weeks. Former Texas congressman Beto O’Rourke outspent Trump two weeks ago, dropping $157,000 on Facebook compared to Trump’s $109,000. Last week, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., spent $198,000 to the president’s $150,000.

The data provides fresh insight into the themes and strategies that the Trump campaign is employing in the earliest days of the 2020 election cycle. Facebook launched its political ad archive in May 2018 amid mounting concerns about Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, an effort that included the purchase of thousands of divisive Facebook and Instagram ads by Kremlin-backed agents.

Trump’s ads have primarily focused on his political opponents and his efforts to build a wall along the southern border.

More from NBC News:

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Fearful of fake news blitz, U.S. Census enlists help of tech giants

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Among Trump’s biggest targets in the Democratic Party have been Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. Trump’s ads have mentioned those two lawmakers in at least 16,300 targeted Facebook ads since January, almost 40 percent of the total, according to an NBC News analysis of the data.

The wall was the main subject of more than 30 percent of the president’s ads during this time period, while appeals for more general support made up 24 percent of his ads. The State of the Union address (15 percent), contests for meals with the president (14 percent) and attacks on the “mainstream media” (7 percent) followed as the most popular talking points for Trump ads.

In hundreds of ads — featuring captions like “How much more American blood must we shed before Congress does its job?” — Trump urged supporters to contribute to an “Official Secure The Border Fund,” donations which went to the president’s reelection effort.

Trump bucked tradition by announcing his 2020 candidacy on the day of his 2017 inauguration. Since then, he’s raised more than $100 million, a historic rate for a presidential campaign. Trump spent heavily on Facebook in the run-up to the 2016 election, buying more than 5.9 million ads, Trump’s 2020 re-election campaign manager Brad Parscale told PBS.

Trump’s Facebook ad buys come from two groups: Donald J. Trump for President, Inc., the official campaign committee, and the Trump Make America Great Again Committee, a joint fundraising committee composed of the Trump campaign and the Republican National Committee. Those groups spent about $1.3 million in the first two full weeks in January, with spending declining in recent weeks, the data showed.

Between Jan. 6 and mid-March, Trump’s campaign made more than 42,000 distinct ad buys. Most of those were the same ads with different target audiences, according to Laura Edelson, a doctoral candidate and member of NYU’s Online Advertising Transparency Project.

Trump’s Facebook ads are also responsive to the news cycle. On Tuesday, the Trump Make America Great Again Committee launched 14 versions of a new Facebook ad that referred to the end of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation.

“After more than 2 years of an endless Witch Hunt, there is still NO EVIDENCE OF COLLUSION,” one ad reads. “The Democrats raised millions off a lie. Now we FIGHT BACK!”

The data also offers some sense of what has resonated with Trump’s audience. An ad promoting an opportunity to have breakfast with the president in Florida was seen more than 5 million times. One of the smallest ad buys featured former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, philanthropist George Soros and Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, labeling them “liberal mega donors.” That campaign included 40 ads and ran for just a few minutes in February.

Three-quarters of Trump’s ads included solicitations for contact information, while the rest asked for donations. Most ads appear to be targeted at wide regions, according to the data. Edelson said this suggests the Trump campaign is targeting users based on existing lists of personally identifiable data.

Much of Trump’s current spending is “aimed at expanding and engaging databases of potential supporters and donors,” said Greg Dale, the director of campaign relations for Tech for Campaigns, an organization that builds technology and provides talent for centrist and progressive political campaigns.

In addition to Klobuchar and O’Rourke, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., has spent $526,000 on Facebook ads, the most of any Democratic presidential candidate in the time period. She was followed by Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., who spent $521,000 and $420,000, respectively.

Dale said the president is at an advantage with his social media campaign, leaving Democrats to play catch-up.

“Without a hyper-competitive primary, the president can invest long term, while Democrats need to immediately show momentum and build up a base,” Dale said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-28  Authors: brandy zadrozny, carlos barria
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, catchup, schumer, facebook, wall, play, spent, democrats, border, trump, ad, ads, million, political, trumps, pelosi, president, focus, campaign


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In his first veto, Trump rejects bill that would block his border emergency

Those lawsuits in part cited comments Trump made when he declared the emergency last month. Democrats plan to vote to override Trump’s veto on March 26, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a written statement Friday. Trump declared a national emergency at the U.S.-Mexico border last month to divert already appropriated Defense Department money to build his proposed border wall. “There is no emergency; Congress has refused to fund his wall multiple times; Mexico won’t pay for it; and a bipartisan


Those lawsuits in part cited comments Trump made when he declared the emergency last month. Democrats plan to vote to override Trump’s veto on March 26, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a written statement Friday. Trump declared a national emergency at the U.S.-Mexico border last month to divert already appropriated Defense Department money to build his proposed border wall. “There is no emergency; Congress has refused to fund his wall multiple times; Mexico won’t pay for it; and a bipartisan
In his first veto, Trump rejects bill that would block his border emergency Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: jacob pramuk, evan vucci
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, block, border, bill, billion, veto, vote, emergency, president, wall, support, trump, congress, house, rejects


In his first veto, Trump rejects bill that would block his border emergency

Those lawsuits in part cited comments Trump made when he declared the emergency last month. The president said he “didn’t need to” take that step but wanted to expedite the construction of barriers.

Democrats plan to vote to override Trump’s veto on March 26, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a written statement Friday. When the House voted on it previously, 245 members supported it, well short of the 285 needed for two-thirds support. (The House currently only has 432 members due to three vacancies.)

“On March 26, the House will once again act to protect our Constitution and our democracy from the President’s emergency declaration by holding a vote to override his veto,” the California Democrat said. “House Republicans will have to choose between their partisan hypocrisy and their sacred oath to support and defend the Constitution.”

Rep. Joaquin Castro, a Texas Democrat who introduced the measure to block the declaration in the House, said Thursday that he will try to gather support for another vote even though it will be “very tough” to reach a two-thirds majority.

Trump declared a national emergency at the U.S.-Mexico border last month to divert already appropriated Defense Department money to build his proposed border wall. He demanded $5.7 billion for border barriers as part of a spending plan to fund the government through September, but Congress denied him. Lawmakers passed only $1.4 billion for structures on the border.

Democrats said Trump created a sham emergency in order to circumvent Congress’ appropriations power. Republicans also worried the president is setting a dangerous precedent that Democrats could use in the future to declare emergencies related to other topics such as climate change and gun violence.

“It is no surprise that the president holds the rule of law and our Constitution in minimal regard,” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said in a statement following the veto. “There is no emergency; Congress has refused to fund his wall multiple times; Mexico won’t pay for it; and a bipartisan majority in both chambers just voted to terminate his fake emergency.”

Trump hopes to put $8 billion total toward the border wall, including the money allocated by Congress. Using emergency powers, he would divert $3.6 billion from military construction funds. With other executive actions, he hopes to pull the remainder from other Pentagon and Treasury Department funds.

The wall will not go away as a political issue. Trump set up another fight with Democrats when he asked for an additional $8.6 billion for border barriers in his recently released fiscal 2020 budget.

Democrats could also vote on whether to block the national emergency declaration every six months.

The Senate rebuked Trump twice this week. The chamber also voted to end U.S. support for a Saudi-led coalition’s military intervention in Yemen. Once the House passes the resolution, as expected, the president will likely have to issue his second veto.

Trump’s two predecessors, Presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush, both issued 12 vetoes during their two terms in office.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: jacob pramuk, evan vucci
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, block, border, bill, billion, veto, vote, emergency, president, wall, support, trump, congress, house, rejects


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Trump tweets ‘VETO!’ after Senate votes to block his border emergency declaration

The Senate voted Thursday to block President Donald Trump’s national emergency declaration over the southern border, a sharp bipartisan rebuke of the president’s flex of executive power. Trump plans to reject the bill, which the Democratic-held House has already passed. Neither chamber appears to have enough support to overcome Trump’s opposition with a two-thirds majority vote. It is unclear now if House leaders will push for a vote to override the president’s veto. Trump publicly lobbied the G


The Senate voted Thursday to block President Donald Trump’s national emergency declaration over the southern border, a sharp bipartisan rebuke of the president’s flex of executive power. Trump plans to reject the bill, which the Democratic-held House has already passed. Neither chamber appears to have enough support to overcome Trump’s opposition with a two-thirds majority vote. It is unclear now if House leaders will push for a vote to override the president’s veto. Trump publicly lobbied the G
Trump tweets ‘VETO!’ after Senate votes to block his border emergency declaration Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: jacob pramuk, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, votes, block, vote, house, veto, emergency, tweets, passed, resolution, senate, declaration, trump, voted, republicans, presidents, support, border


Trump tweets 'VETO!' after Senate votes to block his border emergency declaration

The Senate voted Thursday to block President Donald Trump’s national emergency declaration over the southern border, a sharp bipartisan rebuke of the president’s flex of executive power.

The chamber comfortably passed the measure in a 59-41 vote. Twelve Republicans who worried about executive overreach supported it in an embarrassing blow to the president.

Trump plans to reject the bill, which the Democratic-held House has already passed. In one tweet after the vote, he simply said, “VETO!” In a subsequent message, he said he looks “forward to VETOING the just passed Democrat inspired Resolution,” thanking Republicans “who voted to support Border Security and our desperately needed WALL!”

The veto would be the first of his presidency. Neither chamber appears to have enough support to overcome Trump’s opposition with a two-thirds majority vote.

It is unclear now if House leaders will push for a vote to override the president’s veto. Rep. Joaquin Castro, a Texas Democrat who introduced the House resolution, told reporters Thursday that he will push for another vote even though it will be “very tough” to reach a veto-proof majority. He called it a “consequential constitutional vote.”

Trump publicly lobbied the GOP to support his declaration in recent days. Republican lawmakers who voted to terminate Trump’s action voiced concerns not only about presidents circumventing Congress’ appropriations power, but also the prospect of Democratic administrations declaring emergencies on other topics in the future.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: jacob pramuk, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, votes, block, vote, house, veto, emergency, tweets, passed, resolution, senate, declaration, trump, voted, republicans, presidents, support, border


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OMB acting Director Russell Vought on Trump $8.6 billion wall request

The White House is expected to release Trump’s budget proposal for fiscal year 2020 on Monday. It is expected to seek $8.6 billion from Congress for additional barriers along the U.S.-Mexico border. The states said Trump is “trying to rob funds that were allocated by Congress legally to various states.” According to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection, more than 76,000 migrants crossed the U.S.-Mexico border last month, more than double the number from the same period last year. WATCH: Virtua


The White House is expected to release Trump’s budget proposal for fiscal year 2020 on Monday. It is expected to seek $8.6 billion from Congress for additional barriers along the U.S.-Mexico border. The states said Trump is “trying to rob funds that were allocated by Congress legally to various states.” According to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection, more than 76,000 migrants crossed the U.S.-Mexico border last month, more than double the number from the same period last year. WATCH: Virtua
OMB acting Director Russell Vought on Trump $8.6 billion wall request Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-11  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr, cnbc, kyle walsh
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, russell, billion, usmexico, trumps, request, acting, 86, congress, white, states, trump, budget, wall, omb, director, border, vought


OMB acting Director Russell Vought on Trump $8.6 billion wall request

Russell Vought, acting White House budget director, said Monday security at the southern U.S. border is “deteriorating by the day,” and he’s blaming Democrats for refusing to approve President Donald Trump’s repeated requests for wall funding.

“This is an area of where we’re tired of being right,” Vought said on CNBC’s “Squawk Box,” referring to a government report of a record number of migrant families crossing the U.S.-Mexico border.

The White House is expected to release Trump’s budget proposal for fiscal year 2020 on Monday. It is expected to seek $8.6 billion from Congress for additional barriers along the U.S.-Mexico border.

That amount would be on top of the funds Trump will redirect from other programs as part of his national emergency, said Vought, who’s minding the Office of Management and Budget after previous OMB head Mick Mulvaney left the agency to become the president’s acting chief of staff.

Trump’s declaration last month, aimed at circumventing Congress to pay for his wall, is currently being challenged by more than a dozen states. The states said Trump is “trying to rob funds that were allocated by Congress legally to various states.”

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said they had hoped Trump “learned his lesson” after failing to get his wall funding following the partial government shutdown earlier this year.

“Congress refused to fund his wall and he was forced to admit defeat and reopen the government. The same thing will repeat itself if he tries this again,” they said in a joint statement Sunday.

According to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection, more than 76,000 migrants crossed the U.S.-Mexico border last month, more than double the number from the same period last year. The figures help Trump’s case for his border emergency, albeit one built around a humanitarian crisis and not security.

WATCH: Virtual walls could be the cheaper and more effective answer to Trump’s border wall


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-11  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr, cnbc, kyle walsh
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, russell, billion, usmexico, trumps, request, acting, 86, congress, white, states, trump, budget, wall, omb, director, border, vought


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Rep. Will Hurd on Marriott-Equifax and the border emergency

Rep. Will Hurd on Marriott-Equifax and the border emergency13 Hours AgoCongressman Will Hurd (R-Texas) joins ‘The Exchange’ to discuss the Equifax and Marriott hearing today and what we can learn from the incident. He also weighs in on the border emergency.


Rep. Will Hurd on Marriott-Equifax and the border emergency13 Hours AgoCongressman Will Hurd (R-Texas) joins ‘The Exchange’ to discuss the Equifax and Marriott hearing today and what we can learn from the incident. He also weighs in on the border emergency.
Rep. Will Hurd on Marriott-Equifax and the border emergency Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rep, emergency, rtexas, marriott, hurd, weighs, today, border, joins, learn, marriottequifax


Rep. Will Hurd on Marriott-Equifax and the border emergency

Rep. Will Hurd on Marriott-Equifax and the border emergency

13 Hours Ago

Congressman Will Hurd (R-Texas) joins ‘The Exchange’ to discuss the Equifax and Marriott hearing today and what we can learn from the incident. He also weighs in on the border emergency.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rep, emergency, rtexas, marriott, hurd, weighs, today, border, joins, learn, marriottequifax


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