Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan orders investigation of ‘inexcusable’ Facebook posts allegedly made by border agents

Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Kevin McAleenan listens to a question during a news conference at the Immigration and Customs Headquarters, on June 28, 2019 in Washington, DC. Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan on Wednesday announced an investigation into “disturbing & inexcusable” social media posts allegedly made by Border Patrol agents. Acting Customs and Border Protection Commissioner John Sanders will resign Friday amid the political turmoil, a CBP official announced l


Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Kevin McAleenan listens to a question during a news conference at the Immigration and Customs Headquarters, on June 28, 2019 in Washington, DC. Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan on Wednesday announced an investigation into “disturbing & inexcusable” social media posts allegedly made by Border Patrol agents. Acting Customs and Border Protection Commissioner John Sanders will resign Friday amid the political turmoil, a CBP official announced l
Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan orders investigation of ‘inexcusable’ Facebook posts allegedly made by border agents Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-03  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facilities, immigration, mcaleenan, facebook, patrol, posts, customs, inexcusable, homeland, drink, secretary, investigation, orders, kevin, migrants, trumps, border, security


Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan orders investigation of 'inexcusable' Facebook posts allegedly made by border agents

Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Kevin McAleenan listens to a question during a news conference at the Immigration and Customs Headquarters, on June 28, 2019 in Washington, DC.

Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan on Wednesday announced an investigation into “disturbing & inexcusable” social media posts allegedly made by Border Patrol agents.

“These statements are completely unacceptable, especially if made by those sworn to uphold” the agency’s standards, McAleenan said in a pair of tweets announcing the “immediate” probe.

“Any employee found to have compromised the public’s trust in our law enforcement mission will be held accountable,” McAleenan added.

McAleenan launched the probe on the heels of a damning expose by investigative news outlet ProPublica revealing graphic and callous posts about migrants and Democratic lawmakers that were allegedly made in a private Facebook group by current and former Border Patrol officers.

Members of the group reportedly cracked jokes about dead migrants and shared sexually explicit memes involving progressive Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., who has been a chief critic of the Trump administration’s immigration policies.

Immigration has been among the most politically divisive and highly scrutinized issues during Donald Trump’s presidency. Democrats have railed against former DHS Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen’s handling of the influx of migrant families coming to the border, as well as Trump’s long-held campaign promise to build a wall across the border and former Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s “zero tolerance” policy that led to an influx of family separations.

That political tension ratcheted up following recent reports about the cramped and derelict conditions for children and adult migrants being held in U.S. facilities. Acting Customs and Border Protection Commissioner John Sanders will resign Friday amid the political turmoil, a CBP official announced last week.

Democratic lawmakers, including many of the two dozen presidential candidates, have flocked to tour the facilities in the wake of the reports.

Ocasio-Cortez visited facilities in Texas this week. She said that one migrant was told by Border Patrol officers to drink out of a toilet. “This is [Customs and Border Protection] on their best behavior, telling people to drink out of the toilet,” Ocasio-Cortez told reporters. Immigration officials have denied that migrants were instructed to drink out of toilets.

On Thursday, the House passed the Republican-majority Senate’s $4.6 billion emergency aid bill even as liberal Democrats had opposed the plan, saying it didn’t go far enough to provide protections for the treatment of migrants at the holding facilities.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-03  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facilities, immigration, mcaleenan, facebook, patrol, posts, customs, inexcusable, homeland, drink, secretary, investigation, orders, kevin, migrants, trumps, border, security


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Trump becomes first sitting US president in history to cross border into North Korea

US President Donald Trump walking with North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un during a break in talks at the second US-North Korea summit at the Sofitel Legend Metropole hotel in Hanoi on February 28, 2019. U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un extended warm invitations to one another on Sunday, exchanging lofty visions for the future as they met at the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two Koreas. The leaders shook hands on the North Korean side of the DMZ, making Trum


US President Donald Trump walking with North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un during a break in talks at the second US-North Korea summit at the Sofitel Legend Metropole hotel in Hanoi on February 28, 2019. U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un extended warm invitations to one another on Sunday, exchanging lofty visions for the future as they met at the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two Koreas. The leaders shook hands on the North Korean side of the DMZ, making Trum
Trump becomes first sitting US president in history to cross border into North Korea Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-30  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, leaders, nuclear, history, weapons, border, sitting, cross, korea, trump, kim, meeting, north, korean, work


Trump becomes first sitting US president in history to cross border into North Korea

US President Donald Trump walking with North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un during a break in talks at the second US-North Korea summit at the Sofitel Legend Metropole hotel in Hanoi on February 28, 2019.

U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un extended warm invitations to one another on Sunday, exchanging lofty visions for the future as they met at the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two Koreas.

The leaders shook hands on the North Korean side of the DMZ, making Trump the first sitting American president to ever set foot in the hermit state, before crossing together to the South Korean side and shaking hands again.

“It’s a great honor to be here,” Trump said, adding, “I feel great.” Upon leaving closed-door talks with Kim, he described the meeting as “very, very good.”

Kim said this was “an expression of his willingness” to work toward a new future.

While the two spoke of reconciliation and diplomatic progress, Trump said that U.S. sanctions on the country over its nuclear weapons and missile development programs would stay for now. The leaders agreed to designate a team to work out the details of future negotiations, Trump said, adding that the U.S. team would be headed by Washington’s nuclear envoy Stephen Biegun and that work would begin “over the next two or three weeks.”

The sticking point between the historical adversaries has long been the issue of denuclearization, a term whose definition the two countries can’t seem to agree on. Washington wants Pyongyang to give up its nuclear weapons, while Kim and his predecessors view the term to mean broader concessions from the U.S., including the removal of its troops from the Korean peninsula.

Trump made the surprise announcement just hours earlier of his intention to meet Kim at the Joint Security Area patrolled by soldiers from both Koreas near the inter-Korean border. Sunday also marks the first meeting between American and North Korean heads of state at the historic border since a cease-fire was signed ending the Korean War in 1953.

The meeting, which comes on the tails of the G-20, is the third between the two leaders in just over a year. The most recent, in Hanoi, Vietnam in February, collapsed due to disagreements over U.S. sanctions on Pyongyang.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-30  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, leaders, nuclear, history, weapons, border, sitting, cross, korea, trump, kim, meeting, north, korean, work


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House passes Senate’s $4.6 billion emergency border aid bill amid Democratic divisions

Cracks in the House Democratic caucus showed Tuesday as the chamber passed the Senate’s version of an emergency border aid bill. The House approved the $4.6 billion Senate legislation Thursday following pressure from centrist members to take up the plan. “The children come first,” Pelosi wrote in a letter to Democratic members Thursday. Earlier, the 46-member caucus asked for “immediate consideration” of the Senate bill “given the humanitarian crisis at the border.” The plan Pelosi will take up


Cracks in the House Democratic caucus showed Tuesday as the chamber passed the Senate’s version of an emergency border aid bill. The House approved the $4.6 billion Senate legislation Thursday following pressure from centrist members to take up the plan. “The children come first,” Pelosi wrote in a letter to Democratic members Thursday. Earlier, the 46-member caucus asked for “immediate consideration” of the Senate bill “given the humanitarian crisis at the border.” The plan Pelosi will take up
House passes Senate’s $4.6 billion emergency border aid bill amid Democratic divisions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, senates, trump, divisions, amid, plan, billion, caucus, members, democratic, border, bill, children, senate, emergency, pelosi, democrats, house, passes


House passes Senate's $4.6 billion emergency border aid bill amid Democratic divisions

Cracks in the House Democratic caucus showed Tuesday as the chamber passed the Senate’s version of an emergency border aid bill.

The House approved the $4.6 billion Senate legislation Thursday following pressure from centrist members to take up the plan. It got through the House by a 305-102 margin and will head to President Donald Trump’s desk. Among Democrats, 129 members voted for the legislation, while 95 opposed it.

The Democratic Party’s liberal House members had insisted on including conditions for how the Trump administration treats children at detention centers as part of a separate bill it passed to fund the U.S. response to an influx of migrants at the southern border.

Congress is rushing to send money to the border before it leaves for its July 4 recess. The congressional spat over funding comes as Democrats criticize Trump for reports of dismal conditions for children detained at a U.S. facility in Texas. Pelosi said earlier that the House would “reluctantly pass” the Senate-approved bill.

“The children come first,” Pelosi wrote in a letter to Democratic members Thursday. “Therefore, we will not engage in the same disrespectful behavior that the Senate did in ignoring our priorities. In order to get resources to the children fastest, we will reluctantly pass the Senate bill.”

Democrats have nearly uniformly slammed Trump’s treatment of migrant children. Leaders have tried to stave off his threats to start mass deportations two weeks from Sunday if Congress does not pass changes to asylum laws.

In a tweet Thursday, Trump said Congress did a “great job” in passing the legislation. He wrote that Washington now “must work to get rid of the Loopholes and fix Asylum” laws.

But some fissures have emerged among Democrats over how much to constrict how Trump can spend money sent to border operations.

In a tweet Thursday, Congressional Progressive Caucus co-Chairman Rep. Mark Pocan, D-Wis., eviscerated the Problem Solvers Caucus, the centrist group that pushed for Pelosi to adopt the Senate plan. Earlier, the 46-member caucus asked for “immediate consideration” of the Senate bill “given the humanitarian crisis at the border.”

“Since when did the Problem Solvers Caucus become the Child Abuse Caucus?” Pocan asked. “Wouldn’t they want to at least fight against contractors who run deplorable facilities? Kids are the only ones who could lose today.”

Will Reinert, a spokesman for Problem Solvers Caucus co-chairman Rep. Tom Reed, R-N.Y., responded by saying Congress would have gone into next week without passing humanitarian aid without the group’s effort. He also pointed to reports about the White House making efforts to address Democratic concerns.

In a meeting with Pelosi earlier Thursday, Vice President Mike Pence agreed to notify Congress within 24 hours when a child dies in U.S. custody, according to multiple reports. He also agreed that children would not spend more than 90 days in migrant influx facilities. It is unclear what mechanisms the lawmakers would put in place to enforce the agreements.

The plan Pelosi will take up Thursday caused less tension in the Senate when it passed Wednesday. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., voted for it as the chamber approved it by an 84-8 margin. Six Democrats voted against it.

The plan gives money to the Departments of Homeland Security and Health and Human Services to care for migrants at the southern border.

Furor over Trump administration policy grew after an Associated Press report depicted malnutrition and poor sanitary conditions for children at a detention facility in Texas.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a New York Democrat and one of four Democrats who opposed the House-passed plan, tweeted Thursday that “they will keep hurting kids” if the House passes the Senate bill.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, senates, trump, divisions, amid, plan, billion, caucus, members, democratic, border, bill, children, senate, emergency, pelosi, democrats, house, passes


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Senate approves emergency border aid money as Trump faces anger over US treatment of migrants

The Senate passed an emergency border aid plan Wednesday, setting up a rush to reconcile it with a separate House bill amid anger over the Trump administration’s treatment of migrant children. The GOP-controlled chamber approved a measure to send $4.6 billion to support U.S. efforts to care for migrants by an 84-8 margin. On Tuesday night, the Democratic-held House passed its own plan to appropriate $4.5 billion — including standards for caring for children at U.S. migrant detention facilities.


The Senate passed an emergency border aid plan Wednesday, setting up a rush to reconcile it with a separate House bill amid anger over the Trump administration’s treatment of migrant children. The GOP-controlled chamber approved a measure to send $4.6 billion to support U.S. efforts to care for migrants by an 84-8 margin. On Tuesday night, the Democratic-held House passed its own plan to appropriate $4.5 billion — including standards for caring for children at U.S. migrant detention facilities.
Senate approves emergency border aid money as Trump faces anger over US treatment of migrants Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, border, house, emergency, plan, faces, quickly, anger, try, reconcile, approves, passed, treatment, money, bill, migrants, trump, senate


Senate approves emergency border aid money as Trump faces anger over US treatment of migrants

A man feds his daughter, both originally from Honduras, as they relax at the El Calvario Methodist Church which is housing migrants who are seeking asylum, after they were released by the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement on June 3, 2019 in Las Cruces, New Mexico.

The Senate passed an emergency border aid plan Wednesday, setting up a rush to reconcile it with a separate House bill amid anger over the Trump administration’s treatment of migrant children.

The GOP-controlled chamber approved a measure to send $4.6 billion to support U.S. efforts to care for migrants by an 84-8 margin. On Tuesday night, the Democratic-held House passed its own plan to appropriate $4.5 billion — including standards for caring for children at U.S. migrant detention facilities.

Now, the two chambers will try to reconcile their plans. Earlier Wednesday, the Senate voted down the House-passed version of the bill by a 55-37 margin. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi also said she would not take up the Senate-approved plan, telling reporters “there are some improvements that we think can be reconciled,” according to NBC News.

Pelosi spoke to Trump on Wednesday about how Democrats and Republicans could craft a joint proposal. The California Democrat suggested four unspecified changes to the Senate measure, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said Wednesday.

“We could quickly have a conference, talk about those four changes, try to get them in the bill, finish this quickly and I hope that’s what will happen,” the New York Democrat said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, border, house, emergency, plan, faces, quickly, anger, try, reconcile, approves, passed, treatment, money, bill, migrants, trump, senate


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House passes emergency border aid bill amid anger over treatment of migrant children

A U.S. Border Patrol agent searches an undocumented migrant who illegally crossed the Rio Grande in Los Ebanos, Texas, April 6, 2019. The House on Tuesday passed a bill to send emergency aid to the southern border, setting up another face off with the White House and Senate Republicans over immigration policy. The GOP-held Senate will likely try to pass its own version of the border aid bill before lawmakers leave town Thursday for their July 4 recess. In a statement shared by the House Appropri


A U.S. Border Patrol agent searches an undocumented migrant who illegally crossed the Rio Grande in Los Ebanos, Texas, April 6, 2019. The House on Tuesday passed a bill to send emergency aid to the southern border, setting up another face off with the White House and Senate Republicans over immigration policy. The GOP-held Senate will likely try to pass its own version of the border aid bill before lawmakers leave town Thursday for their July 4 recess. In a statement shared by the House Appropri
House passes emergency border aid bill amid anger over treatment of migrant children Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amid, children, texas, house, passes, trump, bill, treatment, senate, immigration, border, vote, passed, migrant, anger, emergency


House passes emergency border aid bill amid anger over treatment of migrant children

A U.S. Border Patrol agent searches an undocumented migrant who illegally crossed the Rio Grande in Los Ebanos, Texas, April 6, 2019.

The House on Tuesday passed a bill to send emergency aid to the southern border, setting up another face off with the White House and Senate Republicans over immigration policy.

The Democratic-held chamber approved $4.5 billion to manage an influx of migrants after leaders changed the measure to appease liberals’ concerned about the Trump administration’s treatment of migrant children. The party added health and safety standards for the government to follow as furor grows about living conditions for hundreds of children who were held at a Texas facility.

It passed in a 230-195 vote, mostly on party lines. Four Democrats opposed the measure, while three Republicans backed it.

The GOP-held Senate will likely try to pass its own version of the border aid bill before lawmakers leave town Thursday for their July 4 recess. It is unclear how quickly the two chambers may agree on a bill they can both pass. Democrats have hesitated to give President Donald Trump funds for his immigration policy — or anything he can cast as a political victory on the issue.

The scramble to send money to the border comes at a tumultuous time for U.S. immigration policy. Lawmakers have slammed the treatment of children at a migrant detention facility in Texas, where an Associated Press report depicted malnutrition, poor sanitary standards and older children tasked with looking after a toddler.

Earlier Tuesday, acting Customs and Border Protection Commissioner John Sanders resigned, effective July 5. Meanwhile, Trump has threatened mass deportations starting two weeks from Sunday if Democrats do not agree to changes to asylum laws.

Democratic leaders tied the bill to efforts to oppose Trump’s broader immigration agenda. In a statement shared by the House Appropriations Committee, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Ca., said “a vote for this bill today is a vote against the Trump Administration’s cruel attitude towards children.”

“It creates strong oversight by Congress so we can ensure this crisis never occurs again,” she said.

A separate, bipartisan bill passed by the Senate Appropriations Committee would put $4.6 billion toward border funding without the conditions imposed in the House bill. Still, the White House has threatened to veto both measures because they do not include money for more Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention beds.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Ca., has accused Pelosi of “playing politics” and urged her to take up the Senate version of the legislation.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amid, children, texas, house, passes, trump, bill, treatment, senate, immigration, border, vote, passed, migrant, anger, emergency


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Acting Customs and Border Protection Commissioner John Sanders resigns amid furor over treatment of migrant children

Customs and Border Protection acting Commissioner John Sanders listens during a news conference where Lindsey Graham, (R-SC)., is proposing legislation to address the crisis at the southern border at the U.S. Capitol on May 15, 2019 in Washington, DC. Acting Customs and Border Protection Commissioner John Sanders will resign, a CBP official said Tuesday, as the Trump administration faces furor over treatment of migrant children. He is stepping down amid backlash over conditions at a border patro


Customs and Border Protection acting Commissioner John Sanders listens during a news conference where Lindsey Graham, (R-SC)., is proposing legislation to address the crisis at the southern border at the U.S. Capitol on May 15, 2019 in Washington, DC. Acting Customs and Border Protection Commissioner John Sanders will resign, a CBP official said Tuesday, as the Trump administration faces furor over treatment of migrant children. He is stepping down amid backlash over conditions at a border patro
Acting Customs and Border Protection Commissioner John Sanders resigns amid furor over treatment of migrant children Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, immigration, commissioner, resigns, border, children, official, sanders, furor, john, migrant, treatment, trump, protection, customs, texas


Acting Customs and Border Protection Commissioner John Sanders resigns amid furor over treatment of migrant children

Customs and Border Protection acting Commissioner John Sanders listens during a news conference where Lindsey Graham, (R-SC)., is proposing legislation to address the crisis at the southern border at the U.S. Capitol on May 15, 2019 in Washington, DC.

Acting Customs and Border Protection Commissioner John Sanders will resign, a CBP official said Tuesday, as the Trump administration faces furor over treatment of migrant children.

He is stepping down amid backlash over conditions at a border patrol facility in Texas. Sanders’ departure is effective July 5, the official said.

The New York Times first reported his resignation.

Sanders’ decision to step down leaves the White House with yet another vacancy in a key role at a fraught time for U.S. immigration policy. The administration faces bipartisan pressure to improve living conditions for detained children reportedly left with poor nutrition and supervision. President Donald Trump has also threatened mass deportations if he cannot come to an agreement with congressional Democrats on tweaks to immigration laws.

Speaking to reporters Tuesday afternoon, Trump said he did not talk to Sanders about resigning and denied ever speaking to him. But he said he knew “there was going to be a change” at CBP.

Concerns about a facility near El Paso, Texas have also complicated efforts to pass a bill to send emergency aid to address the migrant crisis. After liberal members of the Democratic-held House raised concerns about treatment of migrant children, the party released a revised bill Tuesday that would set health and safety standards for CBP to follow.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, immigration, commissioner, resigns, border, children, official, sanders, furor, john, migrant, treatment, trump, protection, customs, texas


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Government moves more than 300 children out of Texas Border Patrol station after AP report of perilous conditions

New sanctions on Iran may be the end of the diplomatic road:…”What else do you have to do that will actually have to affect the Iranians’ calculus?” said Amos Hochstein, who served as U.S. special envoy for international energy affairs…World Politicsread more


New sanctions on Iran may be the end of the diplomatic road:…”What else do you have to do that will actually have to affect the Iranians’ calculus?” said Amos Hochstein, who served as U.S. special envoy for international energy affairs…World Politicsread more
Government moves more than 300 children out of Texas Border Patrol station after AP report of perilous conditions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: spencer kimball
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, politicsread, children, perilous, texas, envoy, patrol, iranians, station, hochstein, report, moves, conditions, served, sanctions, roadwhat, iran, international, ap, special, border


Government moves more than 300 children out of Texas Border Patrol station after AP report of perilous conditions

New sanctions on Iran may be the end of the diplomatic road:…

“What else do you have to do that will actually have to affect the Iranians’ calculus?” said Amos Hochstein, who served as U.S. special envoy for international energy affairs…

World Politics

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: spencer kimball
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People often don’t believe Trump’s threats — but his track record says they should

President Donald Trump in the Cabinet Room of the White House, December 13, 2018. A New York Times economic correspondent tweeted that “Mexico has every incentive to call Trump’s bluff on this.” He had threatened to close “large sections” of the border, or even the entire border, unless Mexico stopped “ALL illegal immigration.” But as Trump’s best-selling “The Art of the Deal” says, “If you don’t deliver the goods, people will eventually catch on.” The White House denied that request in April.


President Donald Trump in the Cabinet Room of the White House, December 13, 2018. A New York Times economic correspondent tweeted that “Mexico has every incentive to call Trump’s bluff on this.” He had threatened to close “large sections” of the border, or even the entire border, unless Mexico stopped “ALL illegal immigration.” But as Trump’s best-selling “The Art of the Deal” says, “If you don’t deliver the goods, people will eventually catch on.” The White House denied that request in April.
People often don’t believe Trump’s threats — but his track record says they should Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, record, mexico, white, border, threats, tariffs, trump, trade, believe, trumps, house, dont, track, times, president


People often don't believe Trump's threats — but his track record says they should

President Donald Trump in the Cabinet Room of the White House, December 13, 2018. Jim Young | Reuters

President Donald Trump’s bombastic rhetoric and surprise policy tweets are often greeted with skepticism. But he has repeatedly shown that even some of his most controversial threats are more than mere bargaining chips or bluster. Trump’s most recent demand is that Mexico “STOP” the flow of illegal migrants into the U.S. — or face a 5% tariff on all goods coming into the country. A White House statement expanded on the president’s announcement, saying that unless Mexico “substantially stops” the number of illegal entrants across the southern border the tariffs will grow steadily more severe, to as high as 25% by October. The reactions from experts and lawmakers broadly ranged from concern to cautious skepticism. Some suggested that Trump was simply using the threat of tariffs as a bargaining chip. But he has a track record of following through on his intentions — including his attempt to repeal Obamacare, which came one Senate vote short, or his decision earlier this month to hike tariffs on Chinese goods.

Although stocks sank Friday morning after the Mexico tariff announcement, J.P. Morgan analyst Nur Cristiani cautioned in a strategist note not to “press the panic button … just yet.” A New York Times economic correspondent tweeted that “Mexico has every incentive to call Trump’s bluff on this.” Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, told Politico earlier this month that Trump merely “believes in tariffs as a tool to get a negotiation as opposed to being an end in themselves.” To be sure, Trump has declined to act on some hard-line positions. He signed an omnibus spending bill in March 2018 that he had threatened to veto, saying it was “a matter of national security” while complaining that it was a “ridiculous situation.” He had threatened to close “large sections” of the border, or even the entire border, unless Mexico stopped “ALL illegal immigration.” That never happened. But as Trump’s best-selling “The Art of the Deal” says, “If you don’t deliver the goods, people will eventually catch on.” And Trump has, indeed, followed through on many threats that were initially deemed extreme or impractical by his critics.

Tariff man

For instance, Trump has long held, and has freely expressed, protectionist views on trade. As president, he has described himself as a “tariff man,” proclaimed that “tariffs are the greatest!” and called trade wars “good, and easy to win. ” His administration has imposed tariffs on neighboring allies Canada and Mexico. It is also locked in an intensifying trade dispute with China, in which both countries have slapped duties on hundreds of billions of dollars’ worth of each other’s goods. Despite the prior insistence from top White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow that Trump wants “free and open trade,” The New York Times reported in May that, “Beyond an update to the United States agreement with South Korea, no other free trade deals have been finalized.” The American Enterprise Institute’s economic policy studies director, Michael Strain, told the Times that the more accurate explanation would be to take the president at his word that he is, indeed, a protectionist. Trump’s threat to Mexico, which could jeopardize the trilateral free-trade deal to replace NAFTA, known as the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement or USMCA, is only the latest example.

AT&T and Time Warner

It goes beyond trade. As a presidential candidate, Trump vowed to block a pending merger deal between AT&T and Time Warner. But it wasn’t clear to experts if Trump would follow through on that promise once he took office. “It’s impossible to know at this point how real his populist rhetoric is going to be in terms of policy,” said Public Knowledge’s Senior Vice President Harold Feld in an Ars Technica interview at the time. But the Trump administration did fight to prevent AT&T’s $85 billion acquisition of Time Warner, kicking off a lengthy court fight that only ended in February after the Justice Department said it would not seek further appeals to block the merger. Democrats have requested documents that could show whether Trump sought to intervene in the government’s review of the merger. The White House denied that request in April.

The wall and the border


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, record, mexico, white, border, threats, tariffs, trump, trade, believe, trumps, house, dont, track, times, president


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Trump: Mexican soldiers used confrontation with US troops as diversion

President Donald Trump on Wednesday said that Mexican soldiers “recently pulled guns” on American troops near the southern border, and accused the soldiers of “probably” doing so as a diversionary tactic for drug smugglers. We are now sending ARMED SOLDIERS to the Border,” Trump wrote in a post on Twitter. The confrontation between Mexican soldiers and U.S. troops happened April 13 on American territory. It was first made public by Newsweek, which reported that Mexican soldiers detained and sear


President Donald Trump on Wednesday said that Mexican soldiers “recently pulled guns” on American troops near the southern border, and accused the soldiers of “probably” doing so as a diversionary tactic for drug smugglers. We are now sending ARMED SOLDIERS to the Border,” Trump wrote in a post on Twitter. The confrontation between Mexican soldiers and U.S. troops happened April 13 on American territory. It was first made public by Newsweek, which reported that Mexican soldiers detained and sear
Trump: Mexican soldiers used confrontation with US troops as diversion Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: tucker higgins, hannah mckay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, american, doing, mexican, troops, wrote, border, used, diversion, mexico, soldiers, incident, confrontation


Trump: Mexican soldiers used confrontation with US troops as diversion

President Donald Trump on Wednesday said that Mexican soldiers “recently pulled guns” on American troops near the southern border, and accused the soldiers of “probably” doing so as a diversionary tactic for drug smugglers.

“Better not happen again! We are now sending ARMED SOLDIERS to the Border,” Trump wrote in a post on Twitter. “Mexico is not doing nearly enough in apprehending & returning!”

The confrontation between Mexican soldiers and U.S. troops happened April 13 on American territory. It was first made public by Newsweek, which reported that Mexican soldiers detained and searched the Americans briefly at gunpoint, thinking they were still in Mexico after mistakenly crossing into the United States.

In a press release issued Wednesday, Mexico’s foreign affairs ministry wrote that the incident was not out of the ordinary. Both governments, it said, were in contact throughout the situation.

“After a brief discussion between the soldiers from the two nations, the Mexican military members departed the area,” a spokesperson for the Pentagon told the outlet. “The U.S. soldiers immediately contacted CBP, who responded quickly. Throughout the incident, the U.S. soldiers followed all established procedures and protocols.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: tucker higgins, hannah mckay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, american, doing, mexican, troops, wrote, border, used, diversion, mexico, soldiers, incident, confrontation


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Cartels may not be the primary culprits of Central American human smuggling to US, a new study says

“At best, we could provide a broad range for the revenues to all types of human smugglers.” The study looked at revenues earned by human smugglers, as well as taxes levied on migrants by drug-trafficking organizations on routes they control. “Transnational criminal organizations and other human smugglers are driven solely by illicit profit and do not care about human life.” The study also estimated the flow of unlawful migrants from the Northern Triangle countries to the U.S., relying in part on


“At best, we could provide a broad range for the revenues to all types of human smugglers.” The study looked at revenues earned by human smugglers, as well as taxes levied on migrants by drug-trafficking organizations on routes they control. “Transnational criminal organizations and other human smugglers are driven solely by illicit profit and do not care about human life.” The study also estimated the flow of unlawful migrants from the Northern Triangle countries to the U.S., relying in part on
Cartels may not be the primary culprits of Central American human smuggling to US, a new study says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: jeff daniels, adrees latif
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, migrants, smuggling, organizations, rand, primary, border, culprits, human, smugglers, northern, cartels, american, central, triangle, study, report


Cartels may not be the primary culprits of Central American human smuggling to US, a new study says

Human smuggling from Central American countries to the U.S. reaped revenue of between $200 million and $2.3 billion for smugglers in 2017, but transnational criminal organizations may not be the primary culprits, according to a Rand Corp. report released Monday.

President Donald Trump recently moved to cut foreign aid to the Northern Triangle countries of Central America — Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador — and in January claimed “ruthless coyotes and vicious cartels” are taking advantage of thousands of children who make the journey up to the U.S. border. Trump also cited human trafficking in February when he declared a national emergency at the U.S.-Mexico border, freeing up billions of dollars for his border wall.

“We learned that human smuggling involves many different types of actors and that we could not credibly distinguish most criminal organizations’ activities and revenues from those of other actors, including ad hoc groups and independent operators, that engage in human smuggling,” said Victoria Greenfield, lead author on the report and a senior economist at the nonprofit think tank. “At best, we could provide a broad range for the revenues to all types of human smugglers.”

“Although our findings are subject to a high degree of uncertainty, they represent a contribution to the evidence base informing ongoing U.S. government efforts to address threats to homeland security posed by TCOs and other actors that participate in human smuggling,” Rand said.

Also, Rand said because human smuggling operations are often independent and without “formality and strict hierarchical structures,” it might be difficult for the U.S. government to target them with sanctions or other measures effectively.

“Loose networks are difficult to disrupt, ad hoc groups are even less susceptible, and independent operators are easily replaceable,” the report concluded. It added that even if the U.S. government “can apply sanctions to some individuals in a given network or group or to individuals who operate independently, its ability to disrupt their organizations or affect the market may be limited.”

Rand’s 78-page report follows a study it conducted that was sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security. The study looked at revenues earned by human smugglers, as well as taxes levied on migrants by drug-trafficking organizations on routes they control.

“DHS has long warned of the dangers of trafficking and its horrendous impacts on the victims,” DHS press secretary Tyler Houlton said in an emailed statement. “Transnational criminal organizations and other human smugglers are driven solely by illicit profit and do not care about human life.”

According to Rand, the smuggling of unlawful migrants from the Northern Triangle region to the U.S. generated between $200 million and $2.3 billion for smugglers in 2017. It said the wide range reflects uncertainty about the number of migrants that journey northward, their use of smugglers and the fees they ultimately pay.

Rand estimated that migrants or their handlers paid drug-trafficking organizations taxes, or pisos, of $30 million to $180 million for crossing through their territories in 2017.

The report said cartels or TCOs sometimes “coordinate migrants’ border crossings to divert attention from other illicit activities, and they recruit or coerce some migrants to carry drugs.”

Rand estimated that the human smugglers charge migrants between $6,000 and $10,000 for their services. It said fees vary greatly and depend on whether migrants want to be smuggled into the interior of the U.S. or turn themselves in to border officials and seek asylum.

The study also estimated the flow of unlawful migrants from the Northern Triangle countries to the U.S., relying in part on government data. It estimated the unlawful migration from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador was at least 218,000 in 2017 but could have been as high as about 345,000 between ports of entry.

A caravan of Central American migrants became an issue in last year’s midterm elections after Trump deployed more than 5,000 troops to the U.S.-Mexico border. Reports have suggested the migrants are fleeing violence and, in some cases, economic hardship in their home countries.

Last month, the U.S. signed a “regional compact” with the three Northern Triangle countries aimed at addressing what the agency called “the migration crisis.” It said the agreement included collaboration to combat human trafficking and migrant smuggling, as well as countering gangs and organized crime activities.

About one-quarter to two-thirds of unlawful migrants from the Northern Triangle region might have hired smugglers in recent years, according to Rand.

The Rand study found that human smuggling can involve taxis, charter buses and tractor-trailers that ferry migrants from the Northern Triangle to locations further north on the journey to the U.S.-Mexico border.

The report also said human smugglers “rely on corruption to protect their activities in the form of bribes to officials.” Also, it said “more organized [smuggler] networks can feature transnational organizational structures, but relatively few appear to meet the bar of being ‘self-perpetuating associations.'”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: jeff daniels, adrees latif
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, migrants, smuggling, organizations, rand, primary, border, culprits, human, smugglers, northern, cartels, american, central, triangle, study, report


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