Amazon is trying to soften its image as regulatory scrutiny of Big Tech grows

But rather than fiercely fighting every battle, Amazon looks like its ready to play nice. In March, Amazon dropped a policy that prevented merchants from offering lower prices on other websites following an investigation request by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.). Last month, the company scaled back some of its most aggressive promotion tactics after Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) And late last year Amazon raised its minimum wage to $15 following criticism of the company’s working conditions


But rather than fiercely fighting every battle, Amazon looks like its ready to play nice. In March, Amazon dropped a policy that prevented merchants from offering lower prices on other websites following an investigation request by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.). Last month, the company scaled back some of its most aggressive promotion tactics after Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) And late last year Amazon raised its minimum wage to $15 following criticism of the company’s working conditions
Amazon is trying to soften its image as regulatory scrutiny of Big Tech grows Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: eugene kim, brent lewis, denver post, getty images, david ryder
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, growing, tech, soften, sen, stores, scrutiny, amazon, trying, business, winatallcost, regulatory, image, following, working, looks, grows, company


Amazon is trying to soften its image as regulatory scrutiny of Big Tech grows

Amazon’s relentless pursuit of growth in retail, cloud computing, advertising and consumer devices has put the company squarely in the sights of Washington lawmakers who are concerned about Big Tech’s growing influence over consumers. But rather than fiercely fighting every battle, Amazon looks like its ready to play nice.

In March, Amazon dropped a policy that prevented merchants from offering lower prices on other websites following an investigation request by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.). Last month, the company scaled back some of its most aggressive promotion tactics after Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) called out abusive business practices. And late last year Amazon raised its minimum wage to $15 following criticism of the company’s working conditions by Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-VT).

Amazon also confirmed to CNBC that it would soon start accepting cash at the Amazon Go cashierless stores as a growing number of cities and states push for laws that require all stores to serve the unbanked. It’s all part of a strategy to be more likable at a time when tech companies are drawing heat for behavior that looks increasingly anti-competitive.

“I believe Amazon has made the connection between likability and immunity from regulation,” said NYU business professor Scott Galloway, author of “The Four: The Hidden DNA of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google.”

This is a different company from the vigorously defensive, win-at-all-cost Amazon we’re used to seeing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: eugene kim, brent lewis, denver post, getty images, david ryder
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, growing, tech, soften, sen, stores, scrutiny, amazon, trying, business, winatallcost, regulatory, image, following, working, looks, grows, company


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Bezos story is warning to Amazon on succession plan: Jeff Sonnenfeld

But that doesn’t mean Sonnenfeld thinks Bezos should go. “This is not a situation [of] a guy who is abusing company resources or pilfering or harassing employees.” Bezos also handled the controversy “effectively,” added Sonnenfeld. We think a little bit less of Jeff, but we are impressed, I think, with his resilience.” After that announcement, on Jan. 31, the online retailer reported mixed fourth-quarter earnings and issued weak guidance.


But that doesn’t mean Sonnenfeld thinks Bezos should go. “This is not a situation [of] a guy who is abusing company resources or pilfering or harassing employees.” Bezos also handled the controversy “effectively,” added Sonnenfeld. We think a little bit less of Jeff, but we are impressed, I think, with his resilience.” After that announcement, on Jan. 31, the online retailer reported mixed fourth-quarter earnings and issued weak guidance.
Bezos story is warning to Amazon on succession plan: Jeff Sonnenfeld Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-08  Authors: michelle fox, brent lewis, the denver post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, jeff, told, world, plan, amazon, little, hes, jan, think, ceo, sonnenfeld, succession, warning, bezos


Bezos story is warning to Amazon on succession plan: Jeff Sonnenfeld

But that doesn’t mean Sonnenfeld thinks Bezos should go. He said the CEO may have been “indiscreet and foolish,” but added, “How we judge somebody in a leadership role is — how do they respond and, of course, what’s the magnitude of what they did.”

In this case, Bezos was a “victim,” he said. “This is not a situation [of] a guy who is abusing company resources or pilfering or harassing employees.”

Bezos also handled the controversy “effectively,” added Sonnenfeld. “He’s taken the weapon away. Instead of being held hostage by these people, he’s pretty much obliterated the issue. We think a little bit less of Jeff, but we are impressed, I think, with his resilience.”

Federal prosecutors are now reviewing the National Enquirer’s handling of the story, a source familiar with the matter told NBC News. They want to determine whether the tabloid violated an immunity agreement its parent company struck last year in the investigation into Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer. That deal required the company to agree to “commit no crimes whatsoever.”

Branding and marketing strategist Dean Crutchfield told CNBC that the CEO has put his company “in a really bad spot” and noted this could “drag on” for some time.

“The richest man in the world could become the biggest joke in the world, and he certainly knows that,” the CEO of Crutchfield and Partners told “Power Lunch.” “So, there is panic running through his life and through his team.”

The controversy isn’t worrying Wall Street analysts. They don’t think it will affect his ability to lead the company.

Shareholders, on the other hand, were a little jittery. The stock closed down 1.62 percent on Friday, adding to losses that began after Bezos announced on Jan. 9 that he and his wife of 25 years, MacKenzie, are divorcing. After that announcement, on Jan. 31, the online retailer reported mixed fourth-quarter earnings and issued weak guidance.

— CNBC’s Tucker Higgins and Yun Li contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-08  Authors: michelle fox, brent lewis, the denver post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, jeff, told, world, plan, amazon, little, hes, jan, think, ceo, sonnenfeld, succession, warning, bezos


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Under ‘Amazon effect’ retailers could be more exposed to supply shocks

Much of the existing conversation devoted to the so-called Amazon effect has revolved around the downward pressure e-commerce has had on the price of consumer goods, but that focus may be short-sighted. Will the Amazon Effects disappear when that limit is reached? The effect was accentuated in sectors where online retailers tend to have high market share, including electronics and household goods. “The transparency of the web imposes a constraint on brick-and-mortar retailers’ ability to price d


Much of the existing conversation devoted to the so-called Amazon effect has revolved around the downward pressure e-commerce has had on the price of consumer goods, but that focus may be short-sighted. Will the Amazon Effects disappear when that limit is reached? The effect was accentuated in sectors where online retailers tend to have high market share, including electronics and household goods. “The transparency of the web imposes a constraint on brick-and-mortar retailers’ ability to price d
Under ‘Amazon effect’ retailers could be more exposed to supply shocks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-28  Authors: thomas franck, brent lewis, the denver post, getty images, bernd von jutrczenka, dpa, picture alliance, tom williams, cq roll call, nbc
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prices, amazon, inflation, exposed, retailers, shocks, effect, price, retail, supply, effects, tariffs, online


Under 'Amazon effect' retailers could be more exposed to supply shocks

Growing online competition is not only forcing retailers to hold prices constant across geographic regions, but it is also pushing companies to adjust their prices more frequently, according to new research.

When combined, those effects can make retail prices more sensitive to countrywide shocks in gasoline prices or import tariffs, according to a paper presented at the Federal Reserve’s annual symposium last weekend.

What that could translate to is a new, more responsive retail sector that quickly passes costs such as oil spikes or tariffs on to consumers.

Much of the existing conversation devoted to the so-called Amazon effect has revolved around the downward pressure e-commerce has had on the price of consumer goods, but that focus may be short-sighted.

Instead, Harvard Business School’s Alberto Cavallo studied how increased competition in the Amazon era affects firm pricing behavior, a result the academic characterized as far more enduring. That’s because prices can only fall so far.

“Changes in the way these pricing decisions are made can have a much more persistent effect on inflation dynamics than a one-time reduction in markups,” Cavallo wrote. “While potentially sizable, there is a limit to how much markups can fall. Will the Amazon Effects disappear when that limit is reached? Or are there longer-lasting effects of online competition on inflation dynamics?”

A number of Fed officials have wondered whether relatively low levels of inflation in recent years may be the result of companies such as Amazon stifling overall prices.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, retrieved from FRED.

The central bank’s preferred inflation gauge — the core personal consumption expenditures (PCE) price index — clinched the Fed’s 2 percent target in March for the first time in six years. Many economists have remained puzzled at the relatively sluggish rate of price increases given the historic low levels of unemployment.

The researcher found the frequency of price changes by retailers that sell both online and in brick-and-mortar locations has increased significantly over the past decade. The average duration for regular price changes — barring temporary sales or one-time discounts — fell to 3.65 months from 2014 to 2017. From 2008 to 2010, it took 6.7 months.

The effect was accentuated in sectors where online retailers tend to have high market share, including electronics and household goods.

Cavallo also investigated how prices at Amazon, Walmart, Best Buy and Safeway vary across geographic locations. Since Amazon is entirely internet-based, its prices are the most uniform. More surprising, however, was that the other retailers exhibited almost as much uniformity as Amazon.

“Nearly all of the geographical price dispersion is concentrated in the Food and Beverages category,” he added. “The transparency of the web imposes a constraint on brick-and-mortar retailers’ ability to price discriminate across locations.”

For monetary policymakers, Cavallo concludes that the paper’s most important finding is that retail prices are becoming less “insulated” from common nationwide shocks. That could have important implications, he added, when lawmakers decide to introduce trade tariffs or other taxes.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-28  Authors: thomas franck, brent lewis, the denver post, getty images, bernd von jutrczenka, dpa, picture alliance, tom williams, cq roll call, nbc
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prices, amazon, inflation, exposed, retailers, shocks, effect, price, retail, supply, effects, tariffs, online


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‘Sell in May and go away’ doesn’t apply this year, market bull Tony Dwyer says

According to Canaccord Genuity’s Tony Dwyer, the old adage “sell in May and go away” doesn’t apply this year. “When we looked underneath the surface in a nonrecession environment, we found that you’ve never had a negative market going into May and then had a negative May through September,” the firm’s chief market strategist said Monday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation.” His latest thoughts came as the stock market failed get back to positive territory for 2018. But Dwyer, whose S&P 500 year-end target


According to Canaccord Genuity’s Tony Dwyer, the old adage “sell in May and go away” doesn’t apply this year. “When we looked underneath the surface in a nonrecession environment, we found that you’ve never had a negative market going into May and then had a negative May through September,” the firm’s chief market strategist said Monday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation.” His latest thoughts came as the stock market failed get back to positive territory for 2018. But Dwyer, whose S&P 500 year-end target
‘Sell in May and go away’ doesn’t apply this year, market bull Tony Dwyer says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-01  Authors: stephanie landsman, adam jeffery, jin lee, bloomberg, getty images, ken cedeno, corbis, brent lewis, the denver post, kcna
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, productivity, away, sell, bull, negative, dwyer, market, period, doesnt, companies, sp, going, apply, tony, positive


'Sell in May and go away' doesn't apply this year, market bull Tony Dwyer says

Why you may want to ignore the ‘sell in May’ adage this year 17 Hours Ago | 02:00

One of Wall Street’s biggest bulls suggests unloading stocks this month is a mistake.

According to Canaccord Genuity’s Tony Dwyer, the old adage “sell in May and go away” doesn’t apply this year.

His call is based on historical research that reveals the odds are against seasonal declines right now.

“When we looked underneath the surface in a nonrecession environment, we found that you’ve never had a negative market going into May and then had a negative May through September,” the firm’s chief market strategist said Monday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation.” “It’s more likely you’re going to have an up May through September.”

His latest thoughts came as the stock market failed get back to positive territory for 2018. The Dow is down almost 2 percent this year, while the S&P 500 is off about 1 percent.

“Ultimately, the market moves with the direction of earnings. That is definitely going to be positive for the foreseeable future,” he added.

But Dwyer, whose S&P 500 year-end target of 3,100 is the second highest on the Street, doesn’t see a positive period between May and September blowing the socks off investors.

“May is seasonably a weaker period,” he said. “It may not be the best part of the gain. But again, you should have a gain.”

To capitalize the most during that stretch, Dwyer recommends what he calls “productivity trade” — areas that are positioned to offset higher inflation, particularly in labor. Inflation concerns have been looming over the strong earnings and economic fundamentals.

“Who funds productivity? That would be the financials and capital markets companies. How do you implement it? That would be the industrial automation companies,” Dwyer said. “And, what’s behind that? That would be the technology companies: software, hardware, services.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-01  Authors: stephanie landsman, adam jeffery, jin lee, bloomberg, getty images, ken cedeno, corbis, brent lewis, the denver post, kcna
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, productivity, away, sell, bull, negative, dwyer, market, period, doesnt, companies, sp, going, apply, tony, positive


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Food, photos and music: These top millennial stocks could see huge moves on earnings this week

Stacey Gilbert, head of derivative strategy at Susquehanna, is focusing in on three technology names reporting this week: Grubhub, Snap and Spotify. • Grubhub, scheduled to report earnings Tuesday before the market opens, is set to see a swing of around 11 percent in either direction. Last quarter, the shares surged a whopping 27 percent on the heels of its earnings report. The stock is expected to move about 8 percent after its first earnings report after going public. Bottom line: Shares of Gr


Stacey Gilbert, head of derivative strategy at Susquehanna, is focusing in on three technology names reporting this week: Grubhub, Snap and Spotify. • Grubhub, scheduled to report earnings Tuesday before the market opens, is set to see a swing of around 11 percent in either direction. Last quarter, the shares surged a whopping 27 percent on the heels of its earnings report. The stock is expected to move about 8 percent after its first earnings report after going public. Bottom line: Shares of Gr
Food, photos and music: These top millennial stocks could see huge moves on earnings this week Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-30  Authors: rebecca ungarino, adam jeffery, jin lee, bloomberg, getty images, ken cedeno, corbis, brent lewis, the denver post, kcna
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spotify, stocks, week, huge, earnings, market, millennial, shares, grubhub, expected, photos, stock, music, snap, moves, report, food


Food, photos and music: These top millennial stocks could see huge moves on earnings this week

Earnings season is in full swing, with a little over half of S&P 500 companies having reported quarterly earnings, and the options market is implying meaningful moves for several stocks this week.

Stacey Gilbert, head of derivative strategy at Susquehanna, is focusing in on three technology names reporting this week: Grubhub, Snap and Spotify. Here’s why she’s watching.

• Grubhub, scheduled to report earnings Tuesday before the market opens, is set to see a swing of around 11 percent in either direction. This is a smaller move than it’s had from past reports, suggesting the market is not pricing in as much risk as in prior quarters. The sentiment, meanwhile, is a bit more cautious this quarter. Last quarter, the shares surged a whopping 27 percent on the heels of its earnings report.

• Snapchat parent Snap is expected to see a move of roughly 15 percent on its report Tuesday after the market closes. This is, too, a smaller move than the stock has seen in reports past. Some investors are buying protective put options ahead of earnings; the stock has fallen nearly 2 percent this year.

• Spotify, shares of which debuted in early April on the New York Stock Exchange, is set to report earnings Wednesday after the market closes. The stock is expected to move about 8 percent after its first earnings report after going public.

Bottom line: Shares of Grubhub, Snap and Spotify are expected to see relatively significant moves on earnings this week.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-30  Authors: rebecca ungarino, adam jeffery, jin lee, bloomberg, getty images, ken cedeno, corbis, brent lewis, the denver post, kcna
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spotify, stocks, week, huge, earnings, market, millennial, shares, grubhub, expected, photos, stock, music, snap, moves, report, food


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Wall Street raises the bar for Amazon after blowout quarter, but some aren’t buying the hype

Wall Street raises the bar for Amazon after blowout quarter, but some aren’t buying the hype 4:44 PM ET Fri, 27 April 2018 | 03:49Analysts rushed to revise their price targets on Amazon following a stunning quarter, and many now see a clear shot to a $1 trillion market cap. “When you look at the relative strength of what you’re seeing with the chart of Amazon you’re seeing this divergence starting to play out,” Johnson said. Larry McDonald, editor of the Bear Traps Report, is also cautious on Am


Wall Street raises the bar for Amazon after blowout quarter, but some aren’t buying the hype 4:44 PM ET Fri, 27 April 2018 | 03:49Analysts rushed to revise their price targets on Amazon following a stunning quarter, and many now see a clear shot to a $1 trillion market cap. “When you look at the relative strength of what you’re seeing with the chart of Amazon you’re seeing this divergence starting to play out,” Johnson said. Larry McDonald, editor of the Bear Traps Report, is also cautious on Am
Wall Street raises the bar for Amazon after blowout quarter, but some aren’t buying the hype Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-30  Authors: keris lahiff, ken cedeno, corbis, getty images, brent lewis, the denver post, adam jeffery, kcna, thomas barwick getty images, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, street, trading, youre, bar, arent, market, mcdonald, quarter, wall, seeing, johnson, little, blowout, hype, amazon, buying, raises, cautious


Wall Street raises the bar for Amazon after blowout quarter, but some aren’t buying the hype

Wall Street raises the bar for Amazon after blowout quarter, but some aren’t buying the hype 4:44 PM ET Fri, 27 April 2018 | 03:49

Analysts rushed to revise their price targets on Amazon following a stunning quarter, and many now see a clear shot to a $1 trillion market cap.

Count Piper Jaffray’s Craig Johnson out. His charts have made him more cautious than ebullient.

“While you’re seeing the fundamental analysts raising their estimates on Amazon, I look at this and I have a little bit more of a cautious kind of perspective purely looking at the charts,” Johnson, chief market technician, told CNBC’s “Trading Nation” on Friday.

Amazon’s upside momentum appears to be lagging. Its shares hit a record intraday high on Friday, but its relative strength index has weakened: The momentum indicator hit a high of 90 at the end of January but now trades at around 60.

“When you look at the relative strength of what you’re seeing with the chart of Amazon you’re seeing this divergence starting to play out,” Johnson said.

Johnson said Amazon’s inability to hold onto session highs on Friday is another worry. At its peak on Friday, the stock was up nearly 8 percent and trading at more than $1,600. By market close, it had halved those gains and ended with a 3.6 percent increase.

Other tech heavyweights such as Netflix are seeing similar price action after reporting earnings, Johnson noted.

“Big earnings, big beats, you see the stocks moving up but they can’t continue to push ahead, and from my perspective that’s a little bit of a concern,” said Johnson. “You can’t continue to see the stocks move higher on good news so it makes me a little bit more cautious in the short to intermediate term here on some of these names.”

Larry McDonald, editor of the Bear Traps Report, is also cautious on Amazon but for a different reason, one he thinks could catch the Street off guard.

“There’s no better populist pinata than Amazon,” McDonald said on “Trading Nation,” referring to President Donald Trump’s attacks on the Jeff Bezos-led company.

Trump has asserted that Amazon costs the U.S. Postal Service billions of dollars though no evidence has been presented to support his claim. McDonald believes the Trump administration could enact a change to Amazon’s packaging pricing.

“The Street is not prepared for this. It could hit Amazon’s bottom line 15, 20, upwards of 30 percent, and it’ll be a real shocker,” said McDonald. “It will create a 20 to 40 percent downdraft in the stock between now and year-end.”

That type of decline would put Amazon shares in a bear market.

Amazon is up 34 percent this year, far better than the S&P 500’s small decline. It is the third-best performer in the consumer discretionary sector this year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-30  Authors: keris lahiff, ken cedeno, corbis, getty images, brent lewis, the denver post, adam jeffery, kcna, thomas barwick getty images, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, street, trading, youre, bar, arent, market, mcdonald, quarter, wall, seeing, johnson, little, blowout, hype, amazon, buying, raises, cautious


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The last two times this ‘classic late-cycle activity’ emerged, a recession soon followed

The last two times this ‘classic late cycle activity’ emerged, a recession soon followed 4:40 PM ET Fri, 27 April 2018 | 01:36A disconnect between the best- and worst-performing sectors this year is raising a note of caution to some market watchers. Recently, the degree to which the 2018 market-leading consumer discretionary sector is outperforming the biggest laggard, consumer staples, has reached extremes, said Larry McDonald, editor of the Bear Traps Report. • Consumer discretionary stocks ar


The last two times this ‘classic late cycle activity’ emerged, a recession soon followed 4:40 PM ET Fri, 27 April 2018 | 01:36A disconnect between the best- and worst-performing sectors this year is raising a note of caution to some market watchers. Recently, the degree to which the 2018 market-leading consumer discretionary sector is outperforming the biggest laggard, consumer staples, has reached extremes, said Larry McDonald, editor of the Bear Traps Report. • Consumer discretionary stocks ar
The last two times this ‘classic late-cycle activity’ emerged, a recession soon followed Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-30  Authors: rebecca ungarino, ken cedeno, corbis, getty images, brent lewis, the denver post, adam jeffery, kcna, thomas barwick getty images, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, latecycle, watchersrecently, emerged, consumer, discretionary, worstperforming, followed, unsustainable, recession, activity, times, soon, 2018, classic, warning, development, staples


The last two times this 'classic late-cycle activity' emerged, a recession soon followed

The last two times this ‘classic late cycle activity’ emerged, a recession soon followed 4:40 PM ET Fri, 27 April 2018 | 01:36

A disconnect between the best- and worst-performing sectors this year is raising a note of caution to some market watchers.

Recently, the degree to which the 2018 market-leading consumer discretionary sector is outperforming the biggest laggard, consumer staples, has reached extremes, said Larry McDonald, editor of the Bear Traps Report.

He recently flagged this development as a warning sign to his clients. Here are his reasons why.

• Consumer discretionary stocks are surging this year, led by names like Netflix and Amazon. The group’s outperformance relative to the staples, down more than 11 percent this year, is currently near two standard deviations outside the average for the past 30 years.

• Typically, this action emerges within one year of a recession; a similar development appeared ahead of the 2000 recession and the financial crisis. Consumer staples has suffered this year as interest rates have risen from historically low levels.

• This kind of behavior is ultimately unsustainable, and one relationship investors should consider monitoring.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-30  Authors: rebecca ungarino, ken cedeno, corbis, getty images, brent lewis, the denver post, adam jeffery, kcna, thomas barwick getty images, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, latecycle, watchersrecently, emerged, consumer, discretionary, worstperforming, followed, unsustainable, recession, activity, times, soon, 2018, classic, warning, development, staples


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Energy stocks are about to have their best month in three years, and the run could continue

Energy stocks haven’t been this hot since 2015. The XLE Energy ETF, banged up after years of low oil prices, has begun to show signs of life. It is up 10 percent in April, looking to close the month with its best gains since October 2015. Larry McDonald, editor of the Bear Traps Report, also sees upside ahead for energy stocks. As stocks and bonds have come under pressure this year, McDonald sees a shift in holdings toward the underowned commodity and energy space.


Energy stocks haven’t been this hot since 2015. The XLE Energy ETF, banged up after years of low oil prices, has begun to show signs of life. It is up 10 percent in April, looking to close the month with its best gains since October 2015. Larry McDonald, editor of the Bear Traps Report, also sees upside ahead for energy stocks. As stocks and bonds have come under pressure this year, McDonald sees a shift in holdings toward the underowned commodity and energy space.
Energy stocks are about to have their best month in three years, and the run could continue Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-30  Authors: keris lahiff, ken cedeno, corbis, getty images, brent lewis, the denver post, adam jeffery, kcna, thomas barwick getty images, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, think, month, johnson, energy, names, higher, going, mcdonald, youre, best, continue, xle, run


Energy stocks are about to have their best month in three years, and the run could continue

Energy stocks haven’t been this hot since 2015. These gains are just the beginning, says one technician.

“Lows have been made. You’re starting to make some higher highs and some higher lows in here,” said Craig Johnson, chief market technician at Piper Jaffray, told CNBC’s “Trading Nation” on Friday. “You’re above your 50-, 200-day moving average.”

The XLE Energy ETF, banged up after years of low oil prices, has begun to show signs of life. It is up 10 percent in April, looking to close the month with its best gains since October 2015. Over the past two weeks, the ETF has risen above its 50-day, 100-day and 200-day moving average.

“I think the next stop for the XLE is going to be $78 which is the old highs we’ve tested twice before so I think we’re going to run up to that,” said Johnson.

The XLE last touched $78 during the broader market rally in late January. It is currently 5 percent from that level.

This month’s surge has dragged the energy sector into the green for the year. Before April, it was one of the worst performers in the S&P 500.

The XLE’s underperformance was largely tied to weakness in Chevron and Exxon Mobil, the ETF’s largest weightings. Excluding those two stocks, the XLE would be up more than 7 percent so far this year, said Johnson, far better than its current 3 percent increase.

“We’re overweight the space,” said Johnson. “We’d continue to be buying the names, not Chevron or Exxon, but we do like things like ConocoPhillips and some of the other names and even the refiners. We think there’s lots of leverage in there.”

Larry McDonald, editor of the Bear Traps Report, also sees upside ahead for energy stocks.

“For most of the year the companies have dramatically underperformed the commodity, but over the last month there’s a real catch-up going on,” McDonald told “Trading Nation” on Friday.

Oil prices have rocketed nearly 13 percent higher so far this year, while the energy ETF has risen by roughly a quarter of that. Crude is on track to close April with gains of nearly 5 percent, its seventh monthly increase in eight months.

As stocks and bonds have come under pressure this year, McDonald sees a shift in holdings toward the underowned commodity and energy space.

“The flight out of stocks and bonds will move toward commodities, toward energy names and you’re talking potentially a trillion dollars over the next year and a half, two years,” said McDonald. “So back up the truck, the energy space, the XLE, XLP are screaming buys right here.”

The XLE was up 0.7 percent on Monday, while West Texas Intermediate crude gained 0.5 percent to $68.41 a barrel.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-30  Authors: keris lahiff, ken cedeno, corbis, getty images, brent lewis, the denver post, adam jeffery, kcna, thomas barwick getty images, source
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Amazon hits all-time high as Wall Street gushes over Prime price hike, new markets

Goldman Sachs reiterated its buy rating for the company, saying Amazon is still in the “early stages” in many of its key markets. Terry raised his price target for Amazon shares to $2,000 from $1,825, representing 32 percent upside from Thursday’s close. Several analysts expressed optimism over the company’s Amazon Prime price hike. UBS predicted Amazon’s Prime price increase will benefit the company’s subscription services sales growth. Post reiterated his buy rating and increased his price tar


Goldman Sachs reiterated its buy rating for the company, saying Amazon is still in the “early stages” in many of its key markets. Terry raised his price target for Amazon shares to $2,000 from $1,825, representing 32 percent upside from Thursday’s close. Several analysts expressed optimism over the company’s Amazon Prime price hike. UBS predicted Amazon’s Prime price increase will benefit the company’s subscription services sales growth. Post reiterated his buy rating and increased his price tar
Amazon hits all-time high as Wall Street gushes over Prime price hike, new markets Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-27  Authors: tae kim, brent lewis, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, price, hike, analyst, markets, growth, amazon, high, note, wall, street, gushes, prime, clients, amazons, companys, wrote, hits


Amazon hits all-time high as Wall Street gushes over Prime price hike, new markets

Wall Street is buzzing over Amazon’s impressive March quarter results.

Analysts are growing more confident over the prospects for many of Amazon’s new businesses including subscription services, advertising and cloud computing.

The e-commerce juggernaut reported better-than-expected first-quarter earnings results Thursday. It also gave profit guidance for its second quarter significantly above Wall Street expectations.

Amazon shares soared 7.6 percent Friday, hitting a new all-time high.

Goldman Sachs reiterated its buy rating for the company, saying Amazon is still in the “early stages” in many of its key markets.

“We are in the sweet spot between Amazon investment cycles where new fulfillment/data centers are driving accelerating revenue growth while incremental capacity utilization is driving margin expansion,” analyst Heath Terry wrote in a note to clients Friday. “We still remain in the early stages of the shift of compute to the cloud and the transition of traditional retail online and, in our opinion, the market is underestimating the long-term financial benefit of both to Amazon.”

Terry raised his price target for Amazon shares to $2,000 from $1,825, representing 32 percent upside from Thursday’s close.

Several analysts expressed optimism over the company’s Amazon Prime price hike. The company announced on Thursday it plans to increase the price of its Prime membership to $119 from $99 for one year starting on May 11.

“We are raising our topline and operating margin estimates for FY:18 and beyond reflecting the continued momentum in Prime and accelerating growth in its two more profitably businesses, AWS and advertising,” Stifel analyst Scott Devitt wrote in a note to clients Friday.

Devitt raised his price target to $2,020 from $1,800 and reaffirmed his buy rating for the company’s stock.

J.P. Morgan believes consumers will stick with the service even with its higher cost.

“The last time AMZN raised the price of Prime was in March 2014, & we do not expect the company to get much pushback from consumers given the increasing value of the service,” analyst Doug Anmuth wrote in a note to clients Friday.

UBS predicted Amazon’s Prime price increase will benefit the company’s subscription services sales growth.

“We believe that strong Prime member growth, and fast seller FBA [Fulfillment by Amazon] adoption will continue to advance Amazon’s Prime + FBA flywheel effect that is likely to be supportive of a ~20% rev growth CAGR (’17-’22),” analyst Eric Sheridan wrote in a note to clients Thursday. Our “upward revision [of subscription services revenue] also reflects announced Prime membership fee increase.”

In similar fashion, Bank of America Merrill Lynch predicted strong earnings growth from the company’s high-profit margin new businesses.

“Amazon’s share in its key markets continues to expand, supported by strong fulfillment infrastructure and Prime lock-in, while the earlier stage higher margins businesses of AWS and advertising are contributing to more meaningful profit growth,” analyst Justin Post wrote in a note to clients Friday.

Post reiterated his buy rating and increased his price target to $1,840 from $1,650 for the company’s shares.

Amazon is one of the best-performing large-cap stocks in the market. Its shares rallied 30 percent this year through Thursday versus the S&P 500’s roughly flat return.

— CNBC’s Michael Bloom contributed to this story.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-27  Authors: tae kim, brent lewis, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, price, hike, analyst, markets, growth, amazon, high, note, wall, street, gushes, prime, clients, amazons, companys, wrote, hits


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Jeff Bezos finds a masterful leadership lesson in a story about doing a handstand

Bezos illustrates the point with an example at Amazon — to prep for meetings, employees there write “structured” six-page memos, explains Bezos. “Here’s what we’ve figured out,” Bezos writes. writes Bezos. Bring a new person onto a high standards team, and they’ll quickly adapt.” You can consider yourself a person of high standards in general and still have debilitating blind spots.


Bezos illustrates the point with an example at Amazon — to prep for meetings, employees there write “structured” six-page memos, explains Bezos. “Here’s what we’ve figured out,” Bezos writes. writes Bezos. Bring a new person onto a high standards team, and they’ll quickly adapt.” You can consider yourself a person of high standards in general and still have debilitating blind spots.
Jeff Bezos finds a masterful leadership lesson in a story about doing a handstand Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-19  Authors: catherine clifford, getty images, brent lewis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, know, doing, great, bezos, lesson, jeff, masterful, memo, standards, point, memos, handstand, finds, writes, leadership, high


Jeff Bezos finds a masterful leadership lesson in a story about doing a handstand

Bezos illustrates the point with an example at Amazon — to prep for meetings, employees there write “structured” six-page memos, explains Bezos.

“Not surprisingly, the quality of these memos varies widely,” he says.

“Here’s what we’ve figured out,” Bezos writes. “Often, when a memo isn’t great, it’s not the writer’s inability to recognize the high standard, but instead a wrong expectation on scope,” he explains.

Some employees “mistakenly believe a high-standards, six-page memo can be written in one or two days or even a few hours, when really it might take a week or more!” writes Bezos. “They’re trying to perfect a handstand in just two weeks, and we’re not coaching them right,” he says.

Instead, “great memos are written and re-written, shared with colleagues who are asked to improve the work, set aside for a couple of days, and then edited again with a fresh mind. They simply can’t be done in a day or two,” he writes.

“The key point here is that you can improve results through the simple act of teaching scope — that a great memo probably should take a week or more,” explains Bezos.

Further, to accomplish something with excellence, an individual has to know what excellence looks like.

That may be easy with a handstand, but not so much with something like the memos, which “is much squishier,” he writes. “It would be extremely hard to write down the detailed requirements that make up a great memo,” it’s more, you know it when you see it. But “The standard is there, and it is real, even if it’s not easily describable,” he says.

Luckily, high standards are teachable, says Bezos.

“[P]eople are pretty good at learning high standards simply through exposure,” says Bezos. “High standards are contagious. Bring a new person onto a high standards team, and they’ll quickly adapt.”

However, it’s important to remember that just because you have high standards in one area does not mean you have them in all domains, Bezos says.

“Understanding this point is important because it keeps you humble. You can consider yourself a person of high standards in general and still have debilitating blind spots. There can be whole arenas of endeavor where you may not even know that your standards are low or non-existent, and certainly not world class. It’s critical to be open to that likelihood,” he writes.

After all, admits Bezos, “I certainly can’t do a handstand myself….”

See also:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-19  Authors: catherine clifford, getty images, brent lewis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, know, doing, great, bezos, lesson, jeff, masterful, memo, standards, point, memos, handstand, finds, writes, leadership, high


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