A voter who could be key to Elizabeth Warren’s 2020 hopes? Justice Brett Kavanaugh

Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s political origin story is inextricably tied to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a regulatory agency the presidential contender envisioned while an influential professor at Harvard Law School. But Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who until October was a federal appeals court judge in Washington, made his views clear before his confirmation. Read more: Supreme Court could cripple consumer finance watchdog if agency critic Brett Kavanaugh is confirmedIn his first term on th


Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s political origin story is inextricably tied to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a regulatory agency the presidential contender envisioned while an influential professor at Harvard Law School. But Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who until October was a federal appeals court judge in Washington, made his views clear before his confirmation. Read more: Supreme Court could cripple consumer finance watchdog if agency critic Brett Kavanaugh is confirmedIn his first term on th
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-18  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kavanaugh, key, warren, voter, 2020, agency, warrens, court, sen, brett, presidential, wealth, tax, justice, elizabeth, supreme, hopes


A voter who could be key to Elizabeth Warren's 2020 hopes? Justice Brett Kavanaugh

Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s political origin story is inextricably tied to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a regulatory agency the presidential contender envisioned while an influential professor at Harvard Law School.

In the brief biography included on her campaign’s Twitter account, Warren boasts that she is the “mom” of the agency. In Iowa, a staffer recently got the CFPB’s initials tattooed on her bottom lip.

But the fate of the Obama-era regulatory agency is now in the hands of a skeptical Supreme Court, which is weighing whether to take up a case that would allow it to rule on the constitutionality of the agency’s structure. The court is being asked to declare the CFPB — and all of its actions to date — unlawful.

The top court has not yet considered the matter. But Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who until October was a federal appeals court judge in Washington, made his views clear before his confirmation.

“The CFPB’s departure from historical practice, threat to individual liberty, and diminution of Presidential authority combine to make this an overwhelming case of unconstitutionality,” Kavanaugh wrote in a dissent in 2018. A little more than a year before, Kavanaugh authored an opinion, later overruled, striking down the agency.

Read more: Supreme Court could cripple consumer finance watchdog if agency critic Brett Kavanaugh is confirmed

In his first term on the bench, Kavanaugh has proven to be near the court’s ideological center.

If he and the court’s four other Republican-appointed justices put Warren’s signature accomplishment in the dust bin, the decision could dent the Massachusetts Democrat’s argument that she is the best presidential candidate to accomplish “big, structural change” while in office.

And it could focus attention on questions about the constitutionality of another Warren pledge, a federal wealth tax on the ultra-rich, which Warren says will raise the funds to pay for other key parts of her agenda. Those who advised Warren on the wealth tax plan have said they are uncertain about whether the top court will approve it.

The case is another instance in which the Supreme Court, with a newly reliable conservative majority, could hamper Democratic political goals. In the wake of Kavanaugh’s confirmation last year, liberal activists have pressured Democrats to reform the court, which they have argued has grown politicized.

Warren herself has indicated that she is open to expanding the size of the nine-member panel, drawing a contrast between herself and fellow progressive Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who has ruled out the idea.

Read more: The Supreme Court could stop Elizabeth Warren’s wealth tax dead in its tracks

In a sign of the rising political profile of the top court, a number of Democratic senators, including presidential contender Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, filed an unusual brief with the justices this week telling them to “heal” or face the prospect of getting “restructured.”

The Warren campaign did not respond to multiple requests for comment. Warren has previously defended the constitutionality of the CFPB, and said that other government agencies, such as the Comptroller of the Currency, have similar structures.

The CFPB said in 2017 it had returned $12 billion in financial relief to consumers since it was created seven years earlier in the wake of the financial crisis. The Trump administration has severely curtailed its enforcement actions.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-18  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kavanaugh, key, warren, voter, 2020, agency, warrens, court, sen, brett, presidential, wealth, tax, justice, elizabeth, supreme, hopes


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House Democrats ask National Archives for Brett Kavanaugh’s White House records

US Judge Brett Kavanaugh speaks after being nominated by US President Donald Trump (L) to the Supreme Court in the East Room of the White House on July 9, 2018 in Washington, DC. Two Democratic members of the House Judiciary Committee requested records from the National Archives on Tuesday related to Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s time in the White House under President George W. Bush. House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., and Rep. Hank Johnson, D-Ga., who chairs


US Judge Brett Kavanaugh speaks after being nominated by US President Donald Trump (L) to the Supreme Court in the East Room of the White House on July 9, 2018 in Washington, DC. Two Democratic members of the House Judiciary Committee requested records from the National Archives on Tuesday related to Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s time in the White House under President George W. Bush. House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., and Rep. Hank Johnson, D-Ga., who chairs
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: tucker higgins
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House Democrats ask National Archives for Brett Kavanaugh's White House records

US Judge Brett Kavanaugh speaks after being nominated by US President Donald Trump (L) to the Supreme Court in the East Room of the White House on July 9, 2018 in Washington, DC.

Two Democratic members of the House Judiciary Committee requested records from the National Archives on Tuesday related to Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s time in the White House under President George W. Bush.

The request renews the records fight that dominated Kavanaugh’s nomination hearings before the controversy was subsumed by sexual-misconduct accusations against the then-federal appeals court judge.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., and Rep. Hank Johnson, D-Ga., who chairs the subcommittee on the courts, issued a letter to the National Archives and Records Administration seeking records related to Kavanaugh’s time as staff secretary and in the White House counsel’s office. Kavanaugh served in the White House from 2001 to 2006.

In particular, Nadler and Johnson are asking for all emails Kavanaugh sent or received as well as the “textual records contained in [his] office files.”

“In the coming year, the Supreme Court will again address important matters regarding civil rights, criminal justice, and immigration,” the two lawmakers wrote. “The Court may also review certain high-profile cases related to reproductive rights, the separation of powers, and the limits of executive authority — all topics within the jurisdiction of the House Judiciary Committee.”

Nadler and Johnson wrote that they are seeking the records under the Presidential Records Act. The law provides congressional committees access to records that “contain information that is needed for the conduct of [their] business and that is not otherwise available.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: tucker higgins
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SCOTUS Justice Brett Kavanaugh: State laws blocking taxpayer-funded church repairs are discrimination

Regulatory agencies will have a lot less power with Kavanaugh on SCOTUS, says expert 10:31 AM ET Tue, 9 Oct 2018 | 01:24″At some point, this Court will need to decide whether governments that distribute historic preservation funds may deny funds to religious organizations simply because the organizations are religious,” Kavanaugh wrote. Kavanaugh, who voted to deny the cases on technical grounds, wrote that preventing preservation funds from going to religious organizations “simply because the o


Regulatory agencies will have a lot less power with Kavanaugh on SCOTUS, says expert 10:31 AM ET Tue, 9 Oct 2018 | 01:24″At some point, this Court will need to decide whether governments that distribute historic preservation funds may deny funds to religious organizations simply because the organizations are religious,” Kavanaugh wrote. Kavanaugh, who voted to deny the cases on technical grounds, wrote that preventing preservation funds from going to religious organizations “simply because the o
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-04  Authors: tucker higgins, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, playground, court, brett, historic, repairs, scotus, laws, kavanaugh, church, religious, cases, funds, simply, wrote, taxpayerfunded, justice, preservation, organizations, state, discrimination


SCOTUS Justice Brett Kavanaugh: State laws blocking taxpayer-funded church repairs are discrimination

Regulatory agencies will have a lot less power with Kavanaugh on SCOTUS, says expert 10:31 AM ET Tue, 9 Oct 2018 | 01:24

“At some point, this Court will need to decide whether governments that distribute historic preservation funds may deny funds to religious organizations simply because the organizations are religious,” Kavanaugh wrote.

Kavanaugh, who voted to deny the cases on technical grounds, wrote that preventing preservation funds from going to religious organizations “simply because the organizations are religious” raised “serious questions.”

“Barring religious organizations because they are religious from a general historic preservation grants program is pure discrimination against religion,” he wrote.

The nation’s top court last addressed the matter in 2017, when it found that it was discriminatory for states to block taxpayer funds to religious schools, but limited their opinion in a footnote to the very specific case of playground resurfacing. Justices Clarence Thomas and Gorsuch at the time took issue with that limitation.

In its ruling, New Jersey’s top court declined to extend the Supreme Court’s reasoning to historic preservation grants, saying the cases are distinct because playground resurfacing is not a religious use, but church repairs are.

“The Churches are not being denied grant funds because they are religious institutions; they are being denied public funds because of what they plan to do — and in many cases have done: use public funds to repair church buildings so that religious worship services can be held there,” wrote Stuart Rabner, the top judge on the New Jersey court.

Kavanaugh seemed to take issue with that interpretation, decrying what he called the “No religious organizations need apply” rule that he said “appears similar” to the playground case.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-04  Authors: tucker higgins, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
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The grand Super Bowl tradition of soaking coaches with Gatorade

Gatorade’s big day: Gatorade’s Brett O’Brien on the business impact of the Super Bowl 16 Hours Ago | 03:55Nothing says victory like a coach getting dunked with Gatorade. A tradition that started in 1987, the Gatorade dunk has evolved into an iconic event that has put the PepsiCo’s sport drink brand on center stage. While not the biggest day for Gatorade retail sales, the Super Bowl is the biggest day of the year “in terms of exposure and showcase of what we do,” said Brett O’Brien, General Manag


Gatorade’s big day: Gatorade’s Brett O’Brien on the business impact of the Super Bowl 16 Hours Ago | 03:55Nothing says victory like a coach getting dunked with Gatorade. A tradition that started in 1987, the Gatorade dunk has evolved into an iconic event that has put the PepsiCo’s sport drink brand on center stage. While not the biggest day for Gatorade retail sales, the Super Bowl is the biggest day of the year “in terms of exposure and showcase of what we do,” said Brett O’Brien, General Manag
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-02  Authors: jessica golden, eric chemi, source
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The grand Super Bowl tradition of soaking coaches with Gatorade

Gatorade’s big day: Gatorade’s Brett O’Brien on the business impact of the Super Bowl 16 Hours Ago | 03:55

Nothing says victory like a coach getting dunked with Gatorade.

A tradition that started in 1987, the Gatorade dunk has evolved into an iconic event that has put the PepsiCo’s sport drink brand on center stage.

While not the biggest day for Gatorade retail sales, the Super Bowl is the biggest day of the year “in terms of exposure and showcase of what we do,” said Brett O’Brien, General Manager of Gatorade.

“It’s such a massive sporting event, there’s no better time to see Gatorade powering the athlete,” he told CNBC recently, noting that Gatorade’s actual sales peak during the warmer months.

“This would be there biggest dunk of the year,” said Eric Smallwood, president of APEX Marketing Group, who estimates that Gatorade has received over $18 million worth of publicity after appearing in 22 of 33 Super Bowls.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-02  Authors: jessica golden, eric chemi, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, super, tradition, sales, bowl, gatorade, day, obrien, event, gatorades, dunk, grand, coaches, brett, soaking, biggest


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Days before he resigned, US envoy Brett McGurk warned that ISIS will take years to defeat

Just days before submitting his resignation, U.S. special envoy Brett McGurk, who heads the global coalition to defeat the Islamic State, told CNBC in an exclusive interview that putting an end to ISIS will be a long-term, multiyear effort. “We’re on track now over the coming months to defeat what used to be the physical space that ISIS controlled,” McGurk told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble. CNBC spoke with McGurk on Dec. 15 on the sidelines of a security forum in Doha, Qatar. “Nobody is naive,” McGurk t


Just days before submitting his resignation, U.S. special envoy Brett McGurk, who heads the global coalition to defeat the Islamic State, told CNBC in an exclusive interview that putting an end to ISIS will be a long-term, multiyear effort. “We’re on track now over the coming months to defeat what used to be the physical space that ISIS controlled,” McGurk told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble. CNBC spoke with McGurk on Dec. 15 on the sidelines of a security forum in Doha, Qatar. “Nobody is naive,” McGurk t
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-23  Authors: hadley gamble, nbc newswire, nbcuniversal, getty images
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Days before he resigned, US envoy Brett McGurk warned that ISIS will take years to defeat

Just days before submitting his resignation, U.S. special envoy Brett McGurk, who heads the global coalition to defeat the Islamic State, told CNBC in an exclusive interview that putting an end to ISIS will be a long-term, multiyear effort.

“We’re on track now over the coming months to defeat what used to be the physical space that ISIS controlled,” McGurk told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble. “That will not be the end of ISIS.”

CNBC spoke with McGurk on Dec. 15 on the sidelines of a security forum in Doha, Qatar. Just 4 days later, President Donald Trump would declare the Islamic State defeated and announce the withdrawal of all U.S. forces fighting ISIS from Syria.

“Nobody is naive,” McGurk told CNBC less than a week before Trump’s decision. “The small clandestine cells, the individual terrorist attacks, will remain a threat for some time. That is why we have to remain together as a global coalition to keep the pressure on.”

McGurk submitted his resignation on Friday, effective Dec. 31, a State Department official said on Saturday. A person familiar with the matter said McGurk quit because he objected to President Donald Trump’s decision to pull out U.S. troops from Syria, a decision followed by the resignation of U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis a day later.

The former envoy’s departure — along with that of Mattis — has sparked much internal hand-wringing in Washington, as many lawmakers worry who will fill the gap America leaves behind.

“Anytime you see vacuums open up you see extremist groups fill the vacuum,” McGurk told CNBC. “We’ve seen it in Libya, in Yemen, and in Iraq and Syria. One of the first principal questions is try to not get into that situation in the first place.”

“I think that policies that try to change regimes — obviously something that President Trump ran on — is not something that we’re trying to do,” McGurk said. “What we’re trying to do is to make sure that we can work as best we can with governments in the region to protect their borders, to protect their homelands, share information with us so we can protect ourselves.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-23  Authors: hadley gamble, nbc newswire, nbcuniversal, getty images
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Ethics complaints against Brett Kavanaugh have not been resolved yet

A number of ethics complaints filed against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh have yet to be resolved and will be transferred to a new jurisdiction, Chief Justice John Roberts wrote in a letter Wednesday. In recent weeks members of the public had filed multiple judicial misconduct complaints against Kavanaugh with the D.C. Kavanaugh was a member of that court until his elevation to the Supreme Court over the weekend. The chief judge on the D.C. appeals court, Merrick Garland, whom President


A number of ethics complaints filed against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh have yet to be resolved and will be transferred to a new jurisdiction, Chief Justice John Roberts wrote in a letter Wednesday. In recent weeks members of the public had filed multiple judicial misconduct complaints against Kavanaugh with the D.C. Kavanaugh was a member of that court until his elevation to the Supreme Court over the weekend. The chief judge on the D.C. appeals court, Merrick Garland, whom President
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-10  Authors: tucker higgins, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, appeals, court, justice, 10th, kavanaugh, ethics, circuit, dc, brett, roberts, complaints, resolved, supreme


Ethics complaints against Brett Kavanaugh have not been resolved yet

A number of ethics complaints filed against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh have yet to be resolved and will be transferred to a new jurisdiction, Chief Justice John Roberts wrote in a letter Wednesday.

The complaints, which concern public comments that Kavanaugh made during his confirmation process, will be reviewed by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, according to the letter. The 10th Circuit has jurisdiction over several district courts in the western United States.

In recent weeks members of the public had filed multiple judicial misconduct complaints against Kavanaugh with the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals. Kavanaugh was a member of that court until his elevation to the Supreme Court over the weekend.

The chief judge on the D.C. appeals court, Merrick Garland, whom President Barack Obama nominated to the Supreme Court in 2016, recused himself from reviewing those complaints. After his recusal, Karen Henderson, another judge on the D.C. appeals court, then passed them on to Roberts, The Washington Post reported earlier this month.

It is unclear what the 10th Circuit will do with the complaints. Kavanaugh, as a Supreme Court justice, is not subject to the lower court’s judicial misconduct procedures.

The complaints concern Kavanaugh’s answers to questions lawmakers posed about his work in the George W. Bush administration, the Post reported, citing people familiar. Some of the complaints, the paper said, involve partisan comments that Kavanaugh made about Democrats during the confirmation process.

The complaints do not relate to Christine Blasey Ford’s accusation that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her decades ago. Kavanaugh has categorically denied the allegation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-10  Authors: tucker higgins, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
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Democrats blame Michael Avenatti for Brett Kavanaugh confirmation

Kavanaugh categorically denied both allegations, and agreed to testify along with Ford in a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Sept. 25. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., Kavanaugh’s most passionate defender throughout the confirmation process, slammed Avenatti in a statement while expressing extreme skepticism toward Swetnick. Collins’ announcement was followed minutes later by Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of deep-red West Virginia who said he, too, would vote to confirm Kavanaugh. Avenatti slamme


Kavanaugh categorically denied both allegations, and agreed to testify along with Ford in a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Sept. 25. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., Kavanaugh’s most passionate defender throughout the confirmation process, slammed Avenatti in a statement while expressing extreme skepticism toward Swetnick. Collins’ announcement was followed minutes later by Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of deep-red West Virginia who said he, too, would vote to confirm Kavanaugh. Avenatti slamme
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-08  Authors: kevin breuninger, jennifer s altman, for the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, allegations, allegation, statement, ford, brett, vote, confirmation, kavanaugh, graham, democrats, collins, michael, yes, blame, avenatti


Democrats blame Michael Avenatti for Brett Kavanaugh confirmation

Kavanaugh’s seemingly obstacle-free path to a seat on the high court suffered a major setback in mid-September, when California psychology professor Christine Blasey Ford went public with her allegation that an intoxicated Kavanaugh tried to rape her in the early 1980s when they both were teenagers.

Shortly after, The New Yorker published an allegation from Kavanaugh’s former Yale University classmate Deborah Ramirez, who said he had exposed himself to her while drunk at a college party in the ’80s.

Kavanaugh categorically denied both allegations, and agreed to testify along with Ford in a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Sept. 25. He angrily defended himself, telling the committee, “I’ve never sexually assaulted anyone.”

Just a day before the hearing, however, Avenatti dropped a bombshell in the form of a sworn declaration from Swetnick, who made jaw-dropping claims against Kavanaugh and others in his group of friends from the early 1980s.

Swetnick said she “became aware of efforts” by Kavanaugh and other boys to “‘spike’ the ‘punch’ at house parties” to get girls to “lose their inhibitions and their ability to say ‘no.'” Swetnick’s statement also claimed she had been “the victim of one of these ‘gang’ or ‘train’ rapes.”

Republicans immediately pounced on her allegations. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., Kavanaugh’s most passionate defender throughout the confirmation process, slammed Avenatti in a statement while expressing extreme skepticism toward Swetnick.

“The lawyer to porn stars has just taken this debacle to an even lower level,” Graham said in the statement, which used Avenatti’s name six times.

“I’m not going to have my intelligence insulted by the Michael Avenattis of the world. I will not be a participant in wholesale character assassination that defies credibility,” Graham said.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, also questioned Avenatti’s motives and his past. “It seems to me he wants to protect people that are involved in pornography and that he’s running for president,” Grassley said.

Grassley and Graham had both signaled support for Kavanaugh early in the process. But Avenatti was also rebuked by Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, a moderate Republican and crucial swing vote, in her lengthy speech Friday announcing that she would vote to confirm the embattled judge:

“Some of the allegations levied against Judge Kavanaugh illustrate why the presumption of innocence is so important. I am thinking in particular not of the allegations raised by Professor Ford, but of the allegation that, when he was a teenager, Judge Kavanaugh drugged multiple girls and used their weakened state to facilitate gang rape. “This outlandish allegation was put forth without any credible supporting evidence and simply parroted public statements of others. That such an allegation can find its way into the Supreme Court confirmation process is a stark reminder about why the presumption of innocence is so ingrained in our American consciousness.”

A few days earlier, Collins, in a statement to the Portland Press-Herald, called for the FBI to look into the claims brought against Kavanaugh, including “the allegations that were brought by Julie Swetnick.” But Trump’s “limited in scope” order did not permit the FBI to interview Swetnick or a number of other witnesses.

Collins’ office did not immediately respond to CNBC’s inquiries.

Collins’ announcement was followed minutes later by Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of deep-red West Virginia who said he, too, would vote to confirm Kavanaugh. The late-breaking tallies in the “yes” column effectively ensured that Kavanaugh had clinched the seat.

Avenatti slammed Collins in a statement to CNBC at the time. “I have no idea what she is talking about and evidently neither does she,” he said. “How the hell did Susan Collins make a credibility determination related to my client’s allegations when she never did any investigation whatsoever?”

A slew of Democratic senators and aides told CNN’s Manu Raju that Swetnick’s allegations provided cover for them to vote for Kavanaugh without having to specifically question Blasey Ford, who was widely viewed as being a credible figure.

“Not helpful at all,” one Democratic senator who requested anonymity told CNN. “I think Susan was always yes, but Avenatti was a useful foil.”

Some media figures also pointed to Avenatti as a liability in the confirmation battle.

Avenatti’s use of social media and his willingness to call out his political enemies has drawn parallels to Trump, who is praised on the right and damned on the left for always “fighting back” against his critics.

Like Trump, Avenatti “is quite good at securing coverage and leveraging the media for coverage and it shows in both social virality and news stories/interviews,” said Barbara Kittridge, founder of progressive strategy group Motive.

Kittridge told CNBC in an email that Avenatti did shift the conversation, thought it was unclear if he affected the outcome.

“In the sense that Avenatti has the ability to take a great deal of the oxygen out of a room, yes we saw a quick and marked shift of the spotlight,” Kittridge said, “from the credible testimony of Dr. Blasey Ford, to Avenatti and his client’s claims against Kavanaugh.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-08  Authors: kevin breuninger, jennifer s altman, for the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, allegations, allegation, statement, ford, brett, vote, confirmation, kavanaugh, graham, democrats, collins, michael, yes, blame, avenatti


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Brett Kavanaugh confirmed by Senate in 50-48 vote

The week-long investigation revealed nothing new in the allegations against Kavanaugh, but was met with furious criticism by many Democrats. After the narrow vote, Trump phoned Kavanaugh in a congratulatory call, and signed his commission on Air Force One, the White House said. “The White House applauds the Senate for confirming President Trump’s nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. A celebratory event will reportedly be held for Kavanaugh in the White House’s East Room on Monday


The week-long investigation revealed nothing new in the allegations against Kavanaugh, but was met with furious criticism by many Democrats. After the narrow vote, Trump phoned Kavanaugh in a congratulatory call, and signed his commission on Air Force One, the White House said. “The White House applauds the Senate for confirming President Trump’s nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. A celebratory event will reportedly be held for Kavanaugh in the White House’s East Room on Monday
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-06  Authors: kevin breuninger, mike calia, supreme court of the united states
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Brett Kavanaugh confirmed by Senate in 50-48 vote

Brett Kavanaugh was sworn in on Saturday as the 114th Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, after the Senate voted largely along party lines to confirm his nomination amid an emotional, weeks-long debate characterized by explosive allegations of sexual assault.

With one senator voting present, Kavanaugh officially ascended to the nation’s highest court, and in doing so solidified a conservative-leaning bloc of justices that will deliberate on some the country’s most polarizing legal questions. His confirmation followed an unusually partisan process that united Republicans, but divided the population in an era defined by the public’s reckoning with sexual misconduct.

Kavanaugh, 53, a federal appeals court judge who investigated President Bill Clinton and worked for his successor, President George W. Bush, is President Donald Trump’s second high court nominee in two years, following Justice Neil Gorsuch, who was confirmed in 2017.

Kavanaugh’s confirmation became all but assured on Friday, after a wavering group of senators made their preferences public in the wake of a supplemental Federal Bureau of Investigations probe. The week-long investigation revealed nothing new in the allegations against Kavanaugh, but was met with furious criticism by many Democrats.

After the narrow vote, Trump phoned Kavanaugh in a congratulatory call, and signed his commission on Air Force One, the White House said.

“The White House applauds the Senate for confirming President Trump’s nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. Later today, the president will sign his commission of appointment and he will be officially sworn in,” said Raj Shah, a White House spokesman.

A celebratory event will reportedly be held for Kavanaugh in the White House’s East Room on Monday night.

Republicans and Democrats grappled for weeks over Kavanaugh’s views on controversial legal rulings and the disclosure of hundreds of thousands of pages of documents related to the nominee. But in September, the judge’s seemingly clear path toward a winning vote in the GOP-controlled Senate became obstructed by a decades old accusation of sexual assault, which mushroomed into multiple allegations that sparked weeks of agonizing debate.

California professor Christine Blasey Ford sent a letter to California Democrat Rep. Anna Eshoo alleging that, in the 1980s, an intoxicated Kavanaugh and his classmate, Mark Judge, had pinned her down on a bed, covered her mouth and attempted to take her clothes off. Ford, Kavanaugh and Judge were all in high school at the time.

For his part, Kavanaugh vehemently denied the allegations, which culminated in an emotionally pitched testimony on the same day Ford appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee to discuss the incident in question.

The soft-spoken accuser was widely viewed as credible and sympathetic, while the judge’s fiery, combative performance inspired conservatives, including the president, to ramp up their support for him.

Beforehand, Democrats’ chances of successfully stopping Kavanaugh’s confirmation were broadly viewed as slim throughout the majority of the confirmation process. Kavanaugh’s record and character were extolled by conservative judicial groups, as well as some prominent figures on the left, including self-described “liberal feminist lawyer” Lisa Blatt.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had set in motion the process to quickly confirm Kavanaugh after the hearing, but retiring Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., pushed for a week-long delay so the FBI could re-open its background investigation into the judge to specifically look into the allegations against him. The brief probe, which was limited in scope, wrapped up before the one-week deadline.

Tensions between Republicans desperate to confirm Kavanaugh before the November midterm elections, and Democrats determined to slow down the process, boiled over in Senate Judiciary Committee hearings earlier in September.

Democrats grilled Kavanaugh on topics including the constitutionality of abortion, the possibility of indicting a sitting president and the limits of a president’s pardon power. Kavanaugh, often citing the precedent set by prior nominees’ judicial hearings, generally declined to discuss his views.

The two parties appeared mostly unified in support or opposition of Kavanaugh. But with Republicans holding a razor-thin majority in the Senate, a handful of politically moderate or electorally vulnerable senators on either side of the aisle quickly gained the most attention.

Among them was Collins, a moderate Republican who had spoken positively of Kavanaugh and said he had told her that he considered the consequential 1973 Roe v. Wade case, which legalized abortion, as “settled law.”

Three red-state Democratic senators — North Dakota’s Heidi Heitkamp, Joe Donnelly of Indiana and Manchin — who voted for Gorsuch in 2017 had also come under intense scrutiny from journalists and advocacy groups. Heitkamp and Donnelly announced their opposition to Kavanaugh. On the other hand, Manchin announced his support for the nominee quickly after Collins made her announcement.

–CNBC’s Javier E. David contributed to this article.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-06  Authors: kevin breuninger, mike calia, supreme court of the united states
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, court, confirmed, senate, confirmation, 5048, judge, process, white, brett, kavanaugh, president, allegations, nominee, vote


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Susan Collins and Joe Manchin will vote to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to Supreme Court

Republican Sen. Susan Collins on Friday said she would vote to confirm Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, ending months of speculation from the crucial swing senator. “Mr. President, I will vote to confirm Judge Kavanaugh,” Collins said at the very end of a nearly 45-minute-long speech on the Senate floor. Minutes after Collins’ speech concluded, Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., said that he, too, would vote for Kavanaugh. Collins voted to advance Kavanaugh’s nomination in the 51-49 vote, which sa


Republican Sen. Susan Collins on Friday said she would vote to confirm Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, ending months of speculation from the crucial swing senator. “Mr. President, I will vote to confirm Judge Kavanaugh,” Collins said at the very end of a nearly 45-minute-long speech on the Senate floor. Minutes after Collins’ speech concluded, Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., said that he, too, would vote for Kavanaugh. Collins voted to advance Kavanaugh’s nomination in the 51-49 vote, which sa
Susan Collins and Joe Manchin will vote to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to Supreme Court Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-05  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brett, susan, collins, protesters, manchin, senate, speech, republican, supreme, voted, sen, joe, court, kavanaugh, vote, confirm


Susan Collins and Joe Manchin will vote to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to Supreme Court

Republican Sen. Susan Collins on Friday said she would vote to confirm Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, ending months of speculation from the crucial swing senator.

“Mr. President, I will vote to confirm Judge Kavanaugh,” Collins said at the very end of a nearly 45-minute-long speech on the Senate floor.

Minutes after Collins’ speech concluded, Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., said that he, too, would vote for Kavanaugh.

“Based on all of the information I have available to me, including the recently completed FBI report, I have found Judge Kavanaugh to be a qualified jurist who will follow the Constitution and determine cases based on the legal findings before him,” Manchin said in a statement.

“I had to deal with the facts I had in front of me,” Manchin told reporters over shouts of “Shame!” from protesters in the hallway.

Collins revealed her decision Friday afternoon, hours after a key procedural vote in the confirmation process.

Collins voted to advance Kavanaugh’s nomination in the 51-49 vote, which saw divisions largely along party lines. The only exceptions were Alaska Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski, who voted no, and Manchin, who voted yes.

“I believe he is a good man,” Murkowski said afterward. “It just may be that, in my view, he’s not the right man for the court at this time.”

Collins’ remarks on the Senate floor Friday afternoon, scheduled for 3:05 p.m. ET, were initially delayed after protesters began shouting in the Senate gallery, chanting “Vote No! Show up for Maine women!”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-05  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brett, susan, collins, protesters, manchin, senate, speech, republican, supreme, voted, sen, joe, court, kavanaugh, vote, confirm


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Watch: Judiciary Committee hears allegation against Brett Kavanaugh

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh addressed lawmakers on the Senate Judiciary Committee Thursday to deny an allegation that he sexually assaulted a woman decades ago at a high school gathering in Maryland. He told the committee Thursday that he “my family and my name have been totally and permanently destroyed by vicious and false accusations.” Democrats have also pointed to captions in his high school yearbook, in which he wrote that he was “treasurer” of “keg city club.” The California pro


Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh addressed lawmakers on the Senate Judiciary Committee Thursday to deny an allegation that he sexually assaulted a woman decades ago at a high school gathering in Maryland. He told the committee Thursday that he “my family and my name have been totally and permanently destroyed by vicious and false accusations.” Democrats have also pointed to captions in his high school yearbook, in which he wrote that he was “treasurer” of “keg city club.” The California pro
Watch: Judiciary Committee hears allegation against Brett Kavanaugh Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-27  Authors: tucker higgins, dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ford, hears, high, school, allegation, hearing, judiciary, questions, committee, political, kavanaugh, watch, brett


Watch: Judiciary Committee hears allegation against Brett Kavanaugh

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh addressed lawmakers on the Senate Judiciary Committee Thursday to deny an allegation that he sexually assaulted a woman decades ago at a high school gathering in Maryland.

In a tearfully-delivered statement he said he had not shared with anyone except for one of his former law clerks, Kavanaugh denied the allegations against him with more forceful terms than he has used since the accusations first surfaced this month.

He told the committee Thursday that he “my family and my name have been totally and permanently destroyed by vicious and false accusations.”

Read more:

Furious Brett Kavanaugh rips accusation controversy as ‘a national disgrace’

Kavanaugh accuser Ford describes her alleged attackers’ ‘laughter’ in gripping testimony

Kavanaugh sexual assault hearing begins with political sniping between Grassley and Feinstein

President Donald Trump’s 53-year-old nominee to the high court has said that in high school and college he was focused on athletics and his academic career, though some of his former classmates have cast doubt on his account. Democrats have also pointed to captions in his high school yearbook, in which he wrote that he was “treasurer” of “keg city club.”

Kavanaugh called the confirmation process a “national disgrace” Thursday.

“You have replaced advise and consent with search and destroy,” he said.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., later matched Kavanaugh’s tone, accusing Democrats of orchestrating an “unethical sham.”

“What you want to do is destroy this guy’s life, hold this seat open and hope you win [the presidency] in 2020. You said that! Not me,” the South Carolina Republican shouted at Democrats.

Christine Blasey Ford addressed lawmakers earlier in the day. The California professor teared up and emotionally said “I am terrified” as she began telling the committee about her claim of being sexually attacked as a 15-year-old high school girl.

“I am here today not because I want to be. I am terrified. I am here because I believe it is my civic duty to tell you what happened to me while Brett Kavanaugh and I were in high school,” said Ford, a professor at Palo Alto University.

Ford then detailed her allegation against Kavanaugh, which dates to the early 1980s, but was first made public less than two weeks ago in an interview with The Washington Post.

Her voice often cracked as she described the encounter and its aftermath.

“I have been accused of acting out of partisan political motives,” Ford said. “Those who say that do not know me.”

Democratic senators asked questions directly to Ford. Questions on behalf of Republican committee members were handled by Arizona sex-crimes prosecutor Rachel Mitchell.

Mitchell sought to poke holes in Ford’s testimony, asking her about who paid for her polygraph exam about her allegation, and raising questions about Ford’s fear of flying. Ford had said that she was nervous about flying to Washington from California for the hearing, though she acknowledged Thursday that she had previously taken planes for vacation.

When Mitchell asked Ford if she had ever had discussions about how to take a polygraph, Ford said “never.”

Republicans have sought to avoid the spectacle of an all-male panel of GOP senators questioning a woman who claims to be a victim of sexual assault. In tapping an experienced female prosecutor, Republicans have also said they plan to avoid turning the hearing into a “political sideshow.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-27  Authors: tucker higgins, dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ford, hears, high, school, allegation, hearing, judiciary, questions, committee, political, kavanaugh, watch, brett


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