Sterling hits fresh seven-month high against dollar on UK election polls

Sterling reached a fresh seven-month high against the dollar Thursday, apparently propelled upward by a belief that the upcoming U.K. general election will result in a majority for Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservative Party. The pound has risen 1.5% against the greenback over the past three trading days and on Thursday morning reached a high of $1.3146 — the strongest level since early May. Commodity Futures Trading Commission data, released each Friday, reveals that net shorts against th


Sterling reached a fresh seven-month high against the dollar Thursday, apparently propelled upward by a belief that the upcoming U.K. general election will result in a majority for Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservative Party.
The pound has risen 1.5% against the greenback over the past three trading days and on Thursday morning reached a high of $1.3146 — the strongest level since early May.
Commodity Futures Trading Commission data, released each Friday, reveals that net shorts against th
Sterling hits fresh seven-month high against dollar on UK election polls Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hits, pound, dollar, brexit, early, sevenmonth, high, election, conservative, traders, shorts, polls, fresh, sterling, reached, trading


Sterling hits fresh seven-month high against dollar on UK election polls

Sterling reached a fresh seven-month high against the dollar Thursday, apparently propelled upward by a belief that the upcoming U.K. general election will result in a majority for Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservative Party.

The pound has risen 1.5% against the greenback over the past three trading days and on Thursday morning reached a high of $1.3146 — the strongest level since early May. Sterling is now above its 200-week moving average against its U.S. counterpart.

Against the euro, the pound firmed to 84.31 pence, the most since May 2017.

Global Fixed Income Strategist at Societe Generale, Kit Juckes, said sterling was going up “to the sound of shorts capitulating” in a reference to the growing number of traders who were removing bets against the currency.

Commodity Futures Trading Commission data, released each Friday, reveals that net shorts against the pound have been steadily falling since early August.

Currency traders appear to believe that a Conservative Party government, with a commitment to enact Brexit, will prove less damaging to the U.K. economy than a Labour-led government with a pledge to tax and spend.

With just one week until the election, poll-tracking data suggests that the Conservative Party is maintaining a 10-percentage point advantage over Labour. At least one political analyst has estimated that any number above 6% should translate to a Conservative majority in the U.K. Parliament.

U.K Finance Minister Sajid Javid told BBC radio on Thursday that there was not “a single doubt in my mind” that an “ambitious, deep, comprehensive, free-trade agreement” could be agreed with the EU after Brexit within a matter of months.

On Wednesday, the former House of Commons Speaker John Bercow argued that it was “utter nonsense” that any new government could complete Brexit quickly.

In a note emailed to clients Thursday, Swiss bank UBS said that if the Conservatives win and a Brexit deal is completed in early 2020, then the pound should rise to $1.35 against the U.S. dollar.

It warned that gains beyond this level would likely be capped by potential “pitfalls” in subsequent negotiations between London and Brussels.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hits, pound, dollar, brexit, early, sevenmonth, high, election, conservative, traders, shorts, polls, fresh, sterling, reached, trading


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There’s absolutely no escape from the Brexit issue, UK lawmaker says

There’s absolutely no escape from the Brexit issue, UK lawmaker saysBritish lawmaker Chuka Umunna discusses how Brexit is playing into the U.K.’s election debate.


There’s absolutely no escape from the Brexit issue, UK lawmaker saysBritish lawmaker Chuka Umunna discusses how Brexit is playing into the U.K.’s election debate.
There’s absolutely no escape from the Brexit issue, UK lawmaker says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theres, absolutely, uks, lawmaker, issue, brexit, umunna, saysbritish, escape, playing


There's absolutely no escape from the Brexit issue, UK lawmaker says

There’s absolutely no escape from the Brexit issue, UK lawmaker says

British lawmaker Chuka Umunna discusses how Brexit is playing into the U.K.’s election debate.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theres, absolutely, uks, lawmaker, issue, brexit, umunna, saysbritish, escape, playing


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Brexit and Jeremy Corbyn big issues in UK election, former trade minister says


Brexit and Jeremy Corbyn big issues in UK election, former trade minister says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, issues, election, corbyn, minister, brexit, big, jeremy, trade


Brexit and Jeremy Corbyn big issues in UK election, former trade minister says


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, issues, election, corbyn, minister, brexit, big, jeremy, trade


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‘They don’t know we’re here’: In Britain’s most pro-Brexit town, voters are still angry and disillusioned

Shoppers walk past an empty commercial unit in the central market square of Boston, England, Nov. 8, 2019. The River Witham and St. Botolph’s Church, known locally as the ‘Boston Stump’, in Boston, England, Nov. 8, 2019. A Union Jack flies from an apartment block against the backdrop of the ‘Boston Stump’ in Boston, England, Nov. 8, 2019. A vacant furnishing store in Boston, England, Nov. 8, 2019. A commercial unit sits empty beside a pawn shop in Boston, England, Nov. 8, 2019.


Shoppers walk past an empty commercial unit in the central market square of Boston, England, Nov. 8, 2019.
The River Witham and St. Botolph’s Church, known locally as the ‘Boston Stump’, in Boston, England, Nov. 8, 2019.
A Union Jack flies from an apartment block against the backdrop of the ‘Boston Stump’ in Boston, England, Nov. 8, 2019.
A vacant furnishing store in Boston, England, Nov. 8, 2019.
A commercial unit sits empty beside a pawn shop in Boston, England, Nov. 8, 2019.
‘They don’t know we’re here’: In Britain’s most pro-Brexit town, voters are still angry and disillusioned Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-28  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, angry, nov, know, dont, town, probrexit, voters, boston, man, local, european, britains, smith, brexit, england, disillusioned


'They don't know we're here': In Britain's most pro-Brexit town, voters are still angry and disillusioned

Shoppers walk past an empty commercial unit in the central market square of Boston, England, Nov. 8, 2019. Elliot Smith | CNBC

BOSTON, England — With Britain facing its second general election since the historic vote to leave the European Union in June 2016, voters in the nation’s most pro-Brexit town are even more angry and disillusioned than they were three years ago. More than three quarters of the people of Boston, in the county of Lincolnshire in the East Midlands of England, voted to leave the EU. According to the most recent U.K. census in 2011, Boston also has the highest proportion of eastern European immigrants of anywhere in the U.K., after an influx of EU workers to the area’s agricultural sector, earning it the label of Britain’s “most divided town.” Between 2004 and 2014, the town’s migrant population grew by 460%, and the proportion of residents of the Borough of Boston born in EU accession countries such as Lithuania, Poland and Latvia, stands at around 12%. The center of the quaint English farming town is a melting pot of local and eastern European chatter as residents work, shop, visit the bank, the drug store, the pub, and co-exist seemingly without incident. Yet the first word out of the mouth of every local when asked about the difficulties facing the town is “immigration.” St. Botolph’s Church, known in typically blunt local parlance as the “Boston Stump,” formerly served as a landmark to sailors arriving at the town’s docks. In its neighboring Stump & Candle pub, cries of “sh-t”, “fed up” and “p—-d off” ring out when the current state of British politics is mentioned.

Brexit, immigration and the death of hope

Slogans like “will of the people” and “leave means leave” still dominate the local lexicon, and almost to a man, the regulars will be voting for Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservative Party next month in the hope of getting Brexit over the line before the extended deadline of January 31. The simmering frustration with opposition lawmakers for their successful attempts to block a “no-deal” Brexit in Parliament is palpable. The constituency of Boston and Skegness has been a safe Conservative seat since its inception in 1997, and the party is almost certain to retain it in December after Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage announced that he would not stand candidates in seats carried by the Conservatives in 2017.

The River Witham and St. Botolph’s Church, known locally as the ‘Boston Stump’, in Boston, England, Nov. 8, 2019. Elliot Smith | CNBC

This notwithstanding, nobody in Boston seems to believe that the upcoming general election will resolve the country’s political divisions, and the tone is one of exasperation. “I’m not bothered if there’s a deal or no deal,” one regular says indignantly. “Everybody’s frightened to death about what might happen, but nobody knows what will happen. We should just go with the deal, but the opposition are always going to block it.” Some of the patrons accuse migrants of “coming over here to claim benefits” while others simultaneously allege that they have taken jobs and opportunity away from low-skilled workers in the area. Migrants from the eastern European countries which joined the EU after 2004 are more likely to be in work than British born working-age adults, according to the Migration Advisory Committee. Boston’s employment rate is comfortably higher than the U.K. average and its percentage of out-of-work benefits claimants sits at 2.7% compared to a national average of 2.9%, according to the latest figures from the Office of National Statistics.

Boston’s total population did grow by nearly 16% between 2001 and 2011, double the national average, but around 42% of the town’s workforce is employed in the categories of “process plant and machine operatives” or “elementary occupations,” versus a national average of just below 17%. Its proportion of workers employed in managerial, professional or technical occupations is 18.4% versus 47.1% across Great Britain. Median wages are well below the national average. The bottom 10% of earners are more detrimentally affected by EU migration, but the change is comparatively small compared to overall wage growth for U.K.-born workers. So while low income U.K.-born workers experience more of the negative impact of increased unskilled migration compared to higher earners, this is outstripped by the average increase to their wages over that same period. An Oxford Economics study in 2018 estimated that EU migrants’ annual net tax contributions are approximately £2,300 ($2,960) more than the average U.K. adult.

A Union Jack flies from an apartment block against the backdrop of the ‘Boston Stump’ in Boston, England, Nov. 8, 2019. Elliot Smith | CNBC

One man in his sixties who spoke to CNBC in the Stump & Candle attributed the disgruntlement not to the migrants themselves, but to a lack of U.K. government spending to enable public services to deal with the surging population. “Did they give us more police, more doctors, more hospitals, more schools, better roads? Did they give us anything to cope with it? No. We got dumped on,” he says, adding that Boston used to be a “beautiful little town and still could be,” but has been reduced to an “empty shell.”

‘We’ve been robbed blind’

Contrary to his peers, he welcomes the presence of migrant workers as a positive for the area, but claims the presence of large supermarkets at the expense of local businesses has “drawn the lifeblood” out of Boston. “In the old days, that money used to circulate in Boston, we all got a bit of it. It would go round and round and round — now the money flies, it’s gone, we never see anything,” he says. The group paints a dystopian picture of Boston’s decline, describing a wasteland of boarded up windows, businesses closing down to be replaced by charity stores. There are indeed an increasing number of empty commercial units dotted throughout the central shopping district, but as locals greet one another gleefully on the sidewalk on a wintry Friday morning, it evokes greater likeness to the archetypal sleepy, post-industrial East Midlands town than the nightmare they are depicting.

A vacant furnishing store in Boston, England, Nov. 8, 2019. Elliot Smith | CNBC

Much of the anger which fueled the Brexit vote seems to stem from a sense of neglect by consecutive British governments, rather than any long-running gripe with the EU itself. “When you come up from London and you see the roads in London, and then you see from Peterborough to here, they don’t spend any money on any of it,” the man points out indignantly. “We’re stuck out here in the Wash, nearly in the North Sea, and they don’t even know we’re here. That’s what it’s all about.”

Responses vary with regards to what Brexit will achieve, however. “We don’t want to be dictated to!” one elderly gentlemen yells from across the room, which by now has escalated from a quiet midday hum to a bellowing cacophony. “I’m not bothered, as long as we’re out!” a gaunt, wild-eyed man shouts, adding that “it’ll get rid of the foreigners.” “It’s not going to solve anything,” the first man sighs, “because we’ve got no pull on government, we’ve got no voice, we’ve got nothing to help us.” He points out to his friend that Boston will still need EU migrant labor on the farms and in the packhouses, but says the money which once circulated within the local economy will still “fly away” and the town will continue to be “robbed blind.”

Strained public services

Financial pressures on the U.K.’s national health service (NHS) are, aside from Brexit, one of the pre-eminent battlegrounds in British politics. A burly man in his late fifties says the local NHS is “overwhelmed” and “you can’t get a doctor’s appointment,” while the gaunt man angrily claims that he has been waiting over a year for a pacemaker. Out in the central market square, Pat, a 74-year-old former secretary at Boston’s flagship Pilgrim Hospital, claims it is no longer “fit for purpose.” “We can’t blame the foreigners for everything but our services are stretched to the limit and have been for a good few years due to the influx of people coming here,” she says, adding that the “schools are packed to capacity” and “English children are having to be held back” due to the growing proportion of non-English speaking pupils. NHS trusts across the country are spending more than they are bringing in, and the NHS was asked several years ago to find £22 billion in savings by 2020, prompting further cuts.

A commercial unit sits empty beside a pawn shop in Boston, England, Nov. 8, 2019. Elliot Smith | CNBC

United Lincolnshire Hospitals Trust, which runs the Pilgrim, has racked up almost £4 million in fines for missing key waiting time targets over the last four years. Meanwhile, EU immigrants make up about 5% of English NHS staff and about 5% of the English population, according to the best available data. Across the U.K., EU immigrants make up 10% of registered doctors and 4% of registered nurses. Pat does not think the election will help to heal the nation’s divisions, and suggests lawmakers on both sides of the aisle need to “get round the table and work together.” She empathizes with ousted former Prime Minister Theresa May and complains that under Johnson, the country is “two steps back from where we were” on Brexit. “We’ve become the laughing stock of the world,” she says, adding that she is unsure which way she’ll vote in December. A young woman nearby confirms that she will vote Conservative, but is not sure how it will help, or whether anything will change in Boston, regardless of the result.

‘Everyone is going home’

Contrary to the bleak representation of the town given in the Stump & Candle, the Bulgarian grocery store neighboring it is bustling with activity, and the two female clerks chat jovially in native dialect to customers and a group of men congregated by the store room. Beside them are a string of Western Union posters headlined “Know Your Rights” and containing a string of advice for migrants on how to avoid exploitation and discrimination. “It is your right to be treated honestly and fairly,” the top bullet point reads.

Graffiti on the wall of a private car park in Boston, England. Nov. 8, 2019 Elliot Smith | CNBC

Interaction between Bostonian and Eastern European residents seems minimal at best. One 28-year-old employee at a Romanian butchers has lived here for six years and says that while she has found the locals to be generally friendly, her community very much keeps to itself. Over on the less postcard-worthy side of the River Witham, West Street, a long, straight road toward the railway station, is lined on both sides with Eastern European stores, in an area which once hosted more empty units than occupied ones. Romas Latvenas, a grocery and protein supplement store owner who moved to Boston from Lithuania in 2004, says despite the relative prosperity they have enjoyed in Boston, Brexit is forcing EU migrants to consider relocating, while already driving up food prices for businesses.

Eastern European shops on West Street, Boston, England, Nov. 8, 2019. Elliot Smith


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-28  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, angry, nov, know, dont, town, probrexit, voters, boston, man, local, european, britains, smith, brexit, england, disillusioned


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Fiscal rules and Brexit will be big topics for incoming European Commission


Fiscal rules and Brexit will be big topics for incoming European Commission Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fiscal, incoming, commission, rules, big, topics, brexit, european


Fiscal rules and Brexit will be big topics for incoming European Commission


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fiscal, incoming, commission, rules, big, topics, brexit, european


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UK PM Boris Johnson on course to win parliamentary majority

Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson (C) waves as he leaves the Conservative Party headquarters in London on November 4, 2019. Britain goes to the polls on December 12 to vote in a pre-Christmas general election. BEN STANSALL | AFP | Getty ImagesBritish Prime Minister Boris Johnson is on course to win a majority of 68 in parliament at the Dec. 12 election, according to a model from pollsters YouGov that accurately predicted the 2017 election. The Labour Party is on track to secure 211 seats, d


Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson (C) waves as he leaves the Conservative Party headquarters in London on November 4, 2019.
Britain goes to the polls on December 12 to vote in a pre-Christmas general election.
BEN STANSALL | AFP | Getty ImagesBritish Prime Minister Boris Johnson is on course to win a majority of 68 in parliament at the Dec. 12 election, according to a model from pollsters YouGov that accurately predicted the 2017 election.
The Labour Party is on track to secure 211 seats, d
UK PM Boris Johnson on course to win parliamentary majority Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-27  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boris, yougov, win, seats, brexit, political, majority, according, parliamentary, party, johnson, election, conservative, course, model


UK PM Boris Johnson on course to win parliamentary majority

Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson (C) waves as he leaves the Conservative Party headquarters in London on November 4, 2019. – British MPs will select the new speaker of the House of Commons, once an unremarkable event but one now charged with significance following the previous occupant’s role in Brexit. Britain goes to the polls on December 12 to vote in a pre-Christmas general election. BEN STANSALL | AFP | Getty Images

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is on course to win a majority of 68 in parliament at the Dec. 12 election, according to a model from pollsters YouGov that accurately predicted the 2017 election. Johnson has pledged to deliver Brexit by Jan. 31 if he wins the election after nearly four years of political crisis that has shocked allies of what was once considered one of the pillars of Western economic and political stability. His Conservative Party could win 359 seats out of 650, up from 317 in the 2017 general election and the best result for the party since Margaret Thatcher’s 1987 victory, according to the YouGov model, called Multilevel Regression and Post-stratification – or ‘MRP’ for short.

“Our first MRP model projection for the 2019 election suggests that this time round the Conservatives are set for a majority,” said Anthony Wells, director of political and social research at YouGov. “The swing to the Conservative party is bigger in areas that voted to Leave in 2016, with the bulk of the projected Tory gains coming in the North and the urban West Midlands, as well as former mining seats in the East Midlands.” The Labour Party is on track to secure 211 seats, down from 262, according to the model. The SNP were on 43, the Lib Dems on 13 and the Brexit Party winning no seats. Sterling, which rose earlier when rumours of the poll circulated, shot up when the poll was published, rising half a cent in minutes to hit a day’s high of $1.2948.

Heading for Brexit


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-27  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boris, yougov, win, seats, brexit, political, majority, according, parliamentary, party, johnson, election, conservative, course, model


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A no-deal Brexit in January 2020 is still possible: DBS

A no-deal Brexit in January 2020 is still possible: DBSPhilip Wee of DBS Bank says he is skeptical that the U.K. will be able to form a majority government following the elections in December, and he foresees the pound moving toward 1.20 against the U.S. dollar. If there is a hung parliament, the risk of a no-deal Brexit still remains, he says.


A no-deal Brexit in January 2020 is still possible: DBSPhilip Wee of DBS Bank says he is skeptical that the U.K. will be able to form a majority government following the elections in December, and he foresees the pound moving toward 1.20 against the U.S. dollar.
If there is a hung parliament, the risk of a no-deal Brexit still remains, he says.
A no-deal Brexit in January 2020 is still possible: DBS Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-25
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brexit, parliament, wee, remains, risk, pound, skeptical, nodeal, 2020, possible, dbs


A no-deal Brexit in January 2020 is still possible: DBS

A no-deal Brexit in January 2020 is still possible: DBS

Philip Wee of DBS Bank says he is skeptical that the U.K. will be able to form a majority government following the elections in December, and he foresees the pound moving toward 1.20 against the U.S. dollar. If there is a hung parliament, the risk of a no-deal Brexit still remains, he says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-25
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brexit, parliament, wee, remains, risk, pound, skeptical, nodeal, 2020, possible, dbs


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A sterling surge after the UK election could be short-lived as Brexit gets even more complicated

Sterling will move in accordance with the likelihood of a win for Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservative Party at the U.K. general election, analysts are anticipating. Analysts are now setting a majority of seats for the Conservatives as their base case, with many projecting that this will offer a sharp boost for U.K. risk assets and the sterling-dollar trade. A Conservative majority and an orderly Brexit at the turn of the year could see the pound trade as high as $1.35, according to UBS U


Sterling will move in accordance with the likelihood of a win for Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservative Party at the U.K. general election, analysts are anticipating.
Analysts are now setting a majority of seats for the Conservatives as their base case, with many projecting that this will offer a sharp boost for U.K. risk assets and the sterling-dollar trade.
A Conservative majority and an orderly Brexit at the turn of the year could see the pound trade as high as $1.35, according to UBS U
A sterling surge after the UK election could be short-lived as Brexit gets even more complicated Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-25  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, surge, election, likely, negotiations, shortlived, parliament, gets, ubs, referendum, prime, trade, brexit, party, pound, sterling, complicated


A sterling surge after the UK election could be short-lived as Brexit gets even more complicated

Sterling will move in accordance with the likelihood of a win for Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservative Party at the U.K. general election, analysts are anticipating.

The pound has reacted positively to the Conservatives’ growing lead in the polls over the main opposition Labour party, and seemingly balked at the radical economic proposals the latter put forward in its manifesto last week alongside the promise of a confirmatory referendum on Brexit.

Analysts are now setting a majority of seats for the Conservatives as their base case, with many projecting that this will offer a sharp boost for U.K. risk assets and the sterling-dollar trade.

The focal point of Johnson’s campaign so far has been the slogan “get Brexit done,” and should he succeed at the ballot box, the prime minister will attempt to drive his renegotiated exit deal through Parliament before the extended deadline of January 31.

A Conservative majority and an orderly Brexit at the turn of the year could see the pound trade as high as $1.35, according to UBS U.K. Economist Dean Turner.

“However, further gains are likely to be capped as the next phase of the negotiations ensues. These talks will likely be as drawn out and fractious as their predecessors, and the prospect of the U.K. reverting to a WTO trade relationship with the EU will loom large once again, with the next critical deadline possibly arriving by July 2020,” Turner said in a note Monday.

He predicted that in the event of a hung parliament, Article 50, the mechanism triggering negotiations for the U.K.’s departure from the European Union, will likely be extended again, followed by a second referendum. This would keep GBPUSD contained in the 1.25 to 1.30 range, UBS is anticipating.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-25  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, surge, election, likely, negotiations, shortlived, parliament, gets, ubs, referendum, prime, trade, brexit, party, pound, sterling, complicated


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Euro zone economy can grow up to 2.5% if US-China tensions and Brexit are resolved, economist says


Euro zone economy can grow up to 2.5% if US-China tensions and Brexit are resolved, economist says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economist, uschina, tensions, euro, resolved, economy, brexit, zone, grow


Euro zone economy can grow up to 2.5% if US-China tensions and Brexit are resolved, economist says


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economist, uschina, tensions, euro, resolved, economy, brexit, zone, grow


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British public stuck with two ‘dreadful’ candidates for prime minister, economist says

In this handout image supplied by ITV, Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Leader of the Labour Party Jeremy Corbyn shake hands during the ITV Leaders Debate at Media Centre on November 19, 2019 in Salford, England. The British electorate faces a “terrible choice” at the ballot box next month, according to the chief economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics. Prime Minister Boris Johnson vowed to end ongoing “national misery” by delivering Brexit by the end of January. In contrast, Jeremy Corbyn, leader


In this handout image supplied by ITV, Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Leader of the Labour Party Jeremy Corbyn shake hands during the ITV Leaders Debate at Media Centre on November 19, 2019 in Salford, England.
The British electorate faces a “terrible choice” at the ballot box next month, according to the chief economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics.
Prime Minister Boris Johnson vowed to end ongoing “national misery” by delivering Brexit by the end of January.
In contrast, Jeremy Corbyn, leader
British public stuck with two ‘dreadful’ candidates for prime minister, economist says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economist, stuck, union, public, prime, corbyn, dreadful, johnson, leave, party, leader, deal, brexit, end, minister, candidates, british


British public stuck with two 'dreadful' candidates for prime minister, economist says

In this handout image supplied by ITV, Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Leader of the Labour Party Jeremy Corbyn shake hands during the ITV Leaders Debate at Media Centre on November 19, 2019 in Salford, England.

The British electorate faces a “terrible choice” at the ballot box next month, according to the chief economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics.

His comments come shortly after the leaders of Britain’s two biggest political parties clashed in their first televised debate of the election campaign on Tuesday evening.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson vowed to end ongoing “national misery” by delivering Brexit by the end of January.

The Conservative Party leader, who had previously promised to deliver Brexit “do or die, come what may” by the end of October, sought to reinforce a pledge that his party would be able to resolve the Brexit crisis quickly, saying his government had a divorce deal that is “oven-ready.”

In contrast, Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the opposition Labour party, said he would “get Brexit sorted by giving you, the people, the final say.”

Labour wants to negotiate a new deal with the European Union, with a customs union and a closer relationship with the single market. Corbyn has said this deal would be put to a public vote, with citizens choosing either to leave on Labour’s terms or to remain.

Corbyn, who was asked nine times by Johnson to say whether his party would then campaign to stay in the bloc or leave, said he would respect the decision of the people.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economist, stuck, union, public, prime, corbyn, dreadful, johnson, leave, party, leader, deal, brexit, end, minister, candidates, british


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