Toys R Us built a kingdom and the world’s biggest toy store. Then, they lost it.

Toys R Us’ status as the most important toy store in town left it cavalier, if cocky at times, according to conversations with former employees, executives and industry insiders, who spoke to CNBC on the condition of anonymity. The story begins with Lazarus, the store’s visionary who wanted the “R” written backward — an ode to childlike scrawl. Lazarus, who has been described as one of the great merchants of his time, expanded a baby furniture store he owned into a toy store. In its heyday in th


Toys R Us’ status as the most important toy store in town left it cavalier, if cocky at times, according to conversations with former employees, executives and industry insiders, who spoke to CNBC on the condition of anonymity. The story begins with Lazarus, the store’s visionary who wanted the “R” written backward — an ode to childlike scrawl. Lazarus, who has been described as one of the great merchants of his time, expanded a baby furniture store he owned into a toy store. In its heyday in th
Toys R Us built a kingdom and the world’s biggest toy store. Then, they lost it. Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-26  Authors: lauren hirsch, eduardo munoz, jacques m chenet, corbis, getty images, scott mlyn, peter foley, bloomberg, jason alden
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, written, toy, biggest, toys, worlds, built, went, store, lost, stores, lazarus, world, week, kingdom, important


Toys R Us built a kingdom and the world's biggest toy store. Then, they lost it.

The toy emporium that Charles P. Lazarus envisioned has been reduced to dusty floors and empty shelves.

Much has been said about the demise of the toy empire, which this week announced its plan to liquidate. There have been fingers pointed at corporate raiders, Amazon and big-box stores. All contributed to its undoing.

Ultimately, though, Toys R Us’ collapse is a story of loyalty run dry. The store in its early days fostered devotion from customers and toymakers. In the end, it lost hold on both.

Toys R Us’ status as the most important toy store in town left it cavalier, if cocky at times, according to conversations with former employees, executives and industry insiders, who spoke to CNBC on the condition of anonymity. It didn’t invest in its stores, even as it was adding to the fleet, leaving it vulnerable when new competition moved in.

The story begins with Lazarus, the store’s visionary who wanted the “R” written backward — an ode to childlike scrawl. Lazarus, who has been described as one of the great merchants of his time, expanded a baby furniture store he owned into a toy store. By 1978, he had created a toy superstore large enough to become a public company.

In its heyday in the 1980s and 1990s, it was the most important toy store in the country, if not the world. Its strength grew as competitors Kiddie City and Child World went out of business.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-26  Authors: lauren hirsch, eduardo munoz, jacques m chenet, corbis, getty images, scott mlyn, peter foley, bloomberg, jason alden
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, written, toy, biggest, toys, worlds, built, went, store, lost, stores, lazarus, world, week, kingdom, important


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Meet the 28-year-old who wants building computers and coding to be as easy as playing with Lego

Alex Klein is not your everyday tech entrepreneur. The 28-year-old founder of start-up Kano Computing started out as a journalist interested in politics and economics, writing for the likes of The Daily Beast, New York Magazine, The New Republic and The Times of London. That experience of unearthing stories hidden in the underbelly of politics, business and finance, he says, was equally applicable to the obfuscated world of technology. Klein set up London-headquartered Kano, which sells do-it-yo


Alex Klein is not your everyday tech entrepreneur. The 28-year-old founder of start-up Kano Computing started out as a journalist interested in politics and economics, writing for the likes of The Daily Beast, New York Magazine, The New Republic and The Times of London. That experience of unearthing stories hidden in the underbelly of politics, business and finance, he says, was equally applicable to the obfuscated world of technology. Klein set up London-headquartered Kano, which sells do-it-yo
Meet the 28-year-old who wants building computers and coding to be as easy as playing with Lego Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-04  Authors: ryan browne, -alex klein, chief executive of kano
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meet, politics, built, york, building, lego, coding, easy, 28yearold, kano, hunger, wants, computers, devices, daily, klein, computer, apps, playing


Meet the 28-year-old who wants building computers and coding to be as easy as playing with Lego

Alex Klein is not your everyday tech entrepreneur.

The 28-year-old founder of start-up Kano Computing started out as a journalist interested in politics and economics, writing for the likes of The Daily Beast, New York Magazine, The New Republic and The Times of London.

That experience of unearthing stories hidden in the underbelly of politics, business and finance, he says, was equally applicable to the obfuscated world of technology.

“There’s always this hunger to look inside and this hunger to get the real story and peel back the layers of the onion and get the truth, even when people might obscure and throw buzzwords at you,” Klein told CNBC in an interview.

His line of thinking is that the devices and apps we use on a daily basis — from Apple’s iPhone to Facebook’s social media platform — are built with the intention that a consumer will use them, instead of giving someone the chance to have a say about how those devices and apps work and what functions are built into them.

Klein set up London-headquartered Kano, which sells do-it-yourself computer kits, in January 2013, alongside his cousin Saul Klein and fellow entrepreneur Yonatan Raz-Fridman. Its products are primarily targeted at children, the idea being that anyone — whether they’re five years old or 50 — can learn how to put together their own computer and code.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-04  Authors: ryan browne, -alex klein, chief executive of kano
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meet, politics, built, york, building, lego, coding, easy, 28yearold, kano, hunger, wants, computers, devices, daily, klein, computer, apps, playing


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How Azza Fahmy built an Islamic jewelry brand Hollywood divas love

CAIRO – Azza Fahmy’s latest collection includes a ring crafted in the image of a mud house found in the south of Egypt, in Nubia. “See the house here, and the steps leading down, and this stone is the lake,” says Fahmy, arranging the ring on the hand of a visitor. Fahmy, the driving force behind one of the most unlikely success stories in modern design, likes to have things just so. Over the past 50 years, she’s built an internationally known family-owned jewelry brand, one of only a handful of


CAIRO – Azza Fahmy’s latest collection includes a ring crafted in the image of a mud house found in the south of Egypt, in Nubia. “See the house here, and the steps leading down, and this stone is the lake,” says Fahmy, arranging the ring on the hand of a visitor. Fahmy, the driving force behind one of the most unlikely success stories in modern design, likes to have things just so. Over the past 50 years, she’s built an internationally known family-owned jewelry brand, one of only a handful of
How Azza Fahmy built an Islamic jewelry brand Hollywood divas love Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: elizabeth macbride, source, azza fahmy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, million, jewelers, hollywood, brand, jewelry, fahmy, love, price, divas, built, islamic, azza, company, hand, house, success, ring, pieces


How Azza Fahmy built an Islamic jewelry brand Hollywood divas love

CAIRO – Azza Fahmy’s latest collection includes a ring crafted in the image of a mud house found in the south of Egypt, in Nubia.

“See the house here, and the steps leading down, and this stone is the lake,” says Fahmy, arranging the ring on the hand of a visitor. “It’s up to you. But put it this way on your hand, it’s surrounded more by the white of your skin, and I like that.”

Fahmy, the driving force behind one of the most unlikely success stories in modern design, likes to have things just so. In 1969 she apprenticed with a goldsmith in Cairo’s bazaar district, the first woman ever to do so.

Over the past 50 years, she’s built an internationally known family-owned jewelry brand, one of only a handful of medium-sized artisanal jewelers in the world. The company today produces 40,000 pieces a year, ranging in price from several hundred to thousands of dollars, and her brand is a model not only for jewelers and designers worldwide but for Egyptian women: Fahmy is so famous in the country of more than 90 million that she is often recognized on the streets.

The company won’t disclose revenues, but an average price per piece of $2,000 would put revenue at $80 million. She expects sales to increase this year by 30 percent to 35 percent. The company employs about 285 people.

Her two daughters have even more ambitions for the company, which this year opened its first store in the Mayfair district of London, adding to a network of 14 branded stores, as well as retail agreements with galleries in global cities such as Washington, D.C., and Dubai, and an online shop.

The heart of the brand’s success is its unique designs, drawn from Egyptian history and Islamic culture. From pharaconic collars to twisting serpents, Azza Fahmy pieces have been spotted on celebrities from Naomi Campbell and Rihanna to Queen Rania of Jordan.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: elizabeth macbride, source, azza fahmy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, million, jewelers, hollywood, brand, jewelry, fahmy, love, price, divas, built, islamic, azza, company, hand, house, success, ring, pieces


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How an ex-lawyer built Halo Top into an ice cream sensation with $347 million in sales

“Halo Top is the first-ever ice cream, first and foremost, that’s actually good for you and actually tastes good, so it’s kind of an oxymoron,” says Bouton. In that case, having one serving of regular ice cream might be a better choice. “Encouraging anyone to eat an entire pint of ice cream, low calorie or not, is encouraging binge eating,” says Ott. “It’s meant to be something you can eat every day if you love ice cream,” says Bouton. “[I]n the best way possible it tastes like a peanut butter a


“Halo Top is the first-ever ice cream, first and foremost, that’s actually good for you and actually tastes good, so it’s kind of an oxymoron,” says Bouton. In that case, having one serving of regular ice cream might be a better choice. “Encouraging anyone to eat an entire pint of ice cream, low calorie or not, is encouraging binge eating,” says Ott. “It’s meant to be something you can eat every day if you love ice cream,” says Bouton. “[I]n the best way possible it tastes like a peanut butter a
How an ex-lawyer built Halo Top into an ice cream sensation with $347 million in sales Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-01  Authors: catherine clifford, kirk mckoy, cnbc make it
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, halo, exlawyer, built, vanilla, taste, 347, pint, sales, sugar, sensation, grams, million, ice, eat, bouton, cream


How an ex-lawyer built Halo Top into an ice cream sensation with $347 million in sales

Today, the ingredient list for a pint of vanilla reads as follows: “Skim milk, eggs, erythritol [a low-calorie sugar alcohol], prebiotic fiber, milk protein concentrate, cream, organic cane sugar, vegetable glycerin [an additive that can help maintain moisture levels or act as a sweetener], natural flavor, sea salt, vanilla beans, organic carob gum, organic guar gum [both stabilizers], organic stevia leaf extract.”

Much of that is pretty recognizable, but it’s also a bit more complicated than what’s in vanilla Haagen-Dazs: “cream, skim milk, cane sugar, egg yolks, vanilla extract.”

There are more ingredients in a pint of Halo Top, but fewer calories, fat and sugar. For comparison, one pint of vanilla Halo Top has 280 calories, 8 grams of fat, 24 grams of sugar, 20 grams of sugar alcohol and 20 grams of protein. One pint of vanilla Haagen-Dazs has 1,000 calories, 68 grams of fat, 80 grams of sugar and 16 grams of protein.

Therein lies the sell. “Halo Top is the first-ever ice cream, first and foremost, that’s actually good for you and actually tastes good, so it’s kind of an oxymoron,” says Bouton.

Whether Halo Top is “healthier” than regular ice cream depends on how much you’re eating, according to Lisa Moskovitz, a registered dietitian and the CEO of The NY Nutrition Group, a Manhattan-based nutrition counseling practice.

“If you can stick with the appropriate ¼ pint (or ½ serving) then it can make for a much healthier alternative than regular ice cream,” she says.

But the lower calorie count and sugar content (and arguably less satisfying taste) can cause people to eat more Halo Top than they would regular ice cream, she says. In that case, having one serving of regular ice cream might be a better choice.

Lauren Ott, a registered dietitian who calls herself “The Dessert Dietitian” for her love of sweets, agrees. She doesn’t like that Halo Top’s marketing encourages consumers to eat the whole pint. (The pint’s foil topper says “stop when you hit the bottom.”)

“Encouraging anyone to eat an entire pint of ice cream, low calorie or not, is encouraging binge eating,” says Ott. (Bouton says Halo Top certainly doesn’t want to encourage bad eating habits but that many people eat a certain number of calories a day and structure their meals to allow for half or a full pint of Halo Top, which he says is not binge eating.)

Plus, in large amounts the sugar alcohols in Halo Top can “wreak havoc on the digestive tract,” Moskovitz says, but they are “completely fine in moderation.”

So what’s the bottom line? “As long as the consumer is eating Halo Top in appropriate servings, I think it’s a great way to cut back on calories and sugar to curb your sweet craving,” says Ott.

As for the taste, there are dissenting opinions. One Reddit thread from April starts with a bold claim: “I’m sorry but I think I’d rather have half of a serving of regular ice cream as opposed to an entire pint of halo top. Weirdest taste and texture EVER.” The redditor was not alone: “I hate it too! So much. And i wanted to like it badly. I’ve tried at least 20 flavors, but still nope,” another person writes.

Others love it.

But Bouton is realistic about the experience. “When it comes to the taste, I would never sit here with a straight face and tell somebody it’s going to taste as good as a full-calorie, full-sugar, full-fat version. No chance,” he says.

“It’s meant to be something you can eat every day if you love ice cream,” says Bouton. “But it’s not meant to replace your full-calorie, your indulgent ice creams. I still eat full-calorie ice cream. Not every day but every couple weeks for sure.”

So what’s Bouton’s favorite flavor? That changes every week he says, but when he spoke with CNBC Make It, it was peanut butter and jelly, a seasonal flavor. “[I]n the best way possible it tastes like a peanut butter and jelly sandwich in ice cream form.”

Whatever its place in customers’ diets, Halo Top has already become more than a couple of lawyers could have ever imagined.

The brand launched internationally, first in Australia in January 2016 and this year in the United Kingdom, Canada, the Netherlands and New Zealand. Woolverton and Bouton have also opened three scoop shops in Los Angeles since November 2017.

In the beggining, “We were probably a little more tunnel vision of you know it’s a niche market … a ‘Skinny Cow’ or something like that,” says Bouton. (Skinny Cow makes diet frozen desserts.) “We couldn’t have dreamed of what it has become and how big it has become.”

And it could get bigger.

“At one point in time, Coca-Cola was a start-up company that sold a soda and now it’s this iconic centuries-old brand,” Bouton says. “Why can’t we be the next Coca-Cola? And that’s not in an arrogant way, but that’s kind of the opportunity in front of us if we can execute on it.”

— Video by Mary Stevens

See also:

What it’s like to travel to space, from a tourist who spent $30 million to live there for 12 days

How this ex Sudanese child soldier was inspired by P. Diddy to become a successful hip-hop artist

How the ‘Lady Gaga of Vietnam’ was effectively banned from singing in her own country


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-01  Authors: catherine clifford, kirk mckoy, cnbc make it
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, halo, exlawyer, built, vanilla, taste, 347, pint, sales, sugar, sensation, grams, million, ice, eat, bouton, cream


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How this self-made millionaire and Instagram star built her billion-dollar beauty brand

Huda Kattan is a self-made millionaire with a beauty company Forbes recently valued at $1 billion. In fact, nearly a decade ago she was like a lot of recent grads, working hard at jobs that didn’t always reflect her true passion. As she made her way, she would make an important realization: Success wasn’t just about working hard, which she had always done. I’m going to be working from 6 in the morning until 10 p.m., so I need to make sure I like it.” I was definitely struggling financially, but


Huda Kattan is a self-made millionaire with a beauty company Forbes recently valued at $1 billion. In fact, nearly a decade ago she was like a lot of recent grads, working hard at jobs that didn’t always reflect her true passion. As she made her way, she would make an important realization: Success wasn’t just about working hard, which she had always done. I’m going to be working from 6 in the morning until 10 p.m., so I need to make sure I like it.” I was definitely struggling financially, but
How this self-made millionaire and Instagram star built her billion-dollar beauty brand Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-29  Authors: zameena mejia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, built, selfmade, wasnt, going, instagram, brand, billiondollar, love, working, hard, im, kattan, beauty, millionaire, world, makeup, star


How this self-made millionaire and Instagram star built her billion-dollar beauty brand

Huda Kattan is a self-made millionaire with a beauty company Forbes recently valued at $1 billion. At this writing, she has more than 2 million subscribers on YouTube and 28 million followers on Instagram.

This founder and beauty influencer never planned to become a businesswoman. In fact, nearly a decade ago she was like a lot of recent grads, working hard at jobs that didn’t always reflect her true passion.

As she made her way, she would make an important realization: Success wasn’t just about working hard, which she had always done. Success was about finding fulfillment.

Kattan was a good student who studied finance in college. She chose the major when her parents urged her to study “something serious.” At the University of Michigan-Dearborn, she joined a host of activities, became an honors student and was a speaker at graduation. Still, she knew something was missing.

After graduating in 2007, her fiance sensed a financial downturn would hit Michigan hard. He suggested the couple move to Dubai where he’d be starting a new job. Kattan asked the recruitment company she worked for to transfer her to its Dubai office.

The couple moved in 2008 but could not escape the crisis’ global reach. She lost her job within a few months of moving. While she briefly worked in PR, she soon realized that that wasn’t her passion either, quitting in the first two weeks.

“I was like, screw this,” she told USA Today. “I’m not doing anything unless I love it, because I’ve already given my life to so many jobs. I need to love what I do, because I’m going to give 110 percent. I’m going to be working from 6 in the morning until 10 p.m., so I need to make sure I like it.”

By 2009, Kattan reached a turning point. Michael Jackson died and she realized, “He did what he was passionate about,” she said in Harper’s Bazaar Arabia in 2016. It was one of several moments that prompted Kattan to think about her impact on the world. “If I do something I’m not passionate about, how am I going to impact the world? And if I am not changing the world in some way then what the hell am I doing?”

Not sure what direction to take, her sister urged her to study makeup, a longtime interest. Kattan returned to school for a certificate in makeup artistry and began practicing her craft at Revlon. Soon she began Huda Beauty as a blog, working as a makeup artist by day and a blogger by night, growing a following by creating makeup tutorials and sharing expert tips.

Her beauty empire was just starting, but even then she knew she was closer to finding that sense of fulfillment she’d been missing. As she explained at a TedXDubai Woman talk in 2010, “The minute you decide to do what you love to do, you have made a life plan for yourself and a career choice.”

Still, she didn’t see herself selling products. When her sister Mona suggested that she start her own beauty company, Kattan blew off the idea. “I wasn’t making any money out of [the blog] I was really more of a makeup artist. I was definitely struggling financially, but I just did not want to start a beauty brand,” said Kattan to CNBC Make It. “I thought I wasn’t the person to have a business.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-29  Authors: zameena mejia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, built, selfmade, wasnt, going, instagram, brand, billiondollar, love, working, hard, im, kattan, beauty, millionaire, world, makeup, star


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This NY farmhouse was built in 1687 and is now listed for $1.3M: Take a look inside


This NY farmhouse was built in 1687 and is now listed for $1.3M: Take a look inside Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ny, listed, built, farmhouse, look, inside, 1687, 13m



Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ny, listed, built, farmhouse, look, inside, 1687, 13m


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Ford pokes fun at tech visionaries in new Bryan Cranston ad campaign

Ford, which is wrestling with slowing sales and a stock price at its lowest level in nine years, is trying to overhaul its image and juice its sales with a new ad campaign. “Breaking Bad” star Bryan Cranston anchors the new “Built Ford Proud” ad campaign that kicks off with a series of television commercials set to air during college football games this weekend. “Talk doesn’t get things done, building does … like we have for the last 115 years,” Cranston says against a variety of scenes that p


Ford, which is wrestling with slowing sales and a stock price at its lowest level in nine years, is trying to overhaul its image and juice its sales with a new ad campaign. “Breaking Bad” star Bryan Cranston anchors the new “Built Ford Proud” ad campaign that kicks off with a series of television commercials set to air during college football games this weekend. “Talk doesn’t get things done, building does … like we have for the last 115 years,” Cranston says against a variety of scenes that p
Ford pokes fun at tech visionaries in new Bryan Cranston ad campaign Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-18  Authors: phil lebeau, source, ford motor co
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ad, pokes, ford, stock, tech, wrestling, bryan, built, sales, campaign, building, fun, cranston, weekendtalk, visionaries


Ford pokes fun at tech visionaries in new Bryan Cranston ad campaign

Ford, which is wrestling with slowing sales and a stock price at its lowest level in nine years, is trying to overhaul its image and juice its sales with a new ad campaign.

“Breaking Bad” star Bryan Cranston anchors the new “Built Ford Proud” ad campaign that kicks off with a series of television commercials set to air during college football games this weekend.

“Talk doesn’t get things done, building does … like we have for the last 115 years,” Cranston says against a variety of scenes that poke fun at today’s high-tech visionaries while touching on the company’s historical American roots and “Built Ford Tough” slogan of past campaigns. “Let the other guys keep dreaming about the future. We’ll be the ones building it.”

The ads come at a crucial time for Ford. Its overall U.S. sales are down 2.4 percent this year and Ford brand sales have fallen 11.3 percent. By comparison, it’s being outperformed by the rest of the auto industry’s sales, which are down by an average of less than 1 percent. GM’s sales are down 1.2 percent this year and Fiat Chrysler’s are up 6.4 percent. Morgan Stanley analyst Adam Jonas downgraded Ford’s stock Friday, saying its earnings and cash flow are under pressure and its dividend is at risk.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-18  Authors: phil lebeau, source, ford motor co
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ad, pokes, ford, stock, tech, wrestling, bryan, built, sales, campaign, building, fun, cranston, weekendtalk, visionaries


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Parts of a virtual border wall built with tech behind driverless cars

A virtual wall would not offer a physical deterrence, but some people believe it would be cheaper to build and maintain. In June, after more than 4,000 employees protested the project, Google withdrew from an effort to build artificial intelligence for the Defense Department. Joe Martinez, Val Verde County’s sheriff, has helped test the Quanergy sensors. What’s more, lidar sensors are expensive. But Mr. Aguilar said he believed that demands on the border for new sensors and new artificial intell


A virtual wall would not offer a physical deterrence, but some people believe it would be cheaper to build and maintain. In June, after more than 4,000 employees protested the project, Google withdrew from an effort to build artificial intelligence for the Defense Department. Joe Martinez, Val Verde County’s sheriff, has helped test the Quanergy sensors. What’s more, lidar sensors are expensive. But Mr. Aguilar said he believed that demands on the border for new sensors and new artificial intell
Parts of a virtual border wall built with tech behind driverless cars Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-18  Authors: cade metz, tamir kalifa, the new york times
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cars, technology, tech, valley, intelligence, sensors, artificial, quanergy, technologies, parts, virtual, lidar, driverless, wall, border, built, rio


Parts of a virtual border wall built with tech behind driverless cars

DEL RIO, Tex. — In this tiny town at the edge of South Texas brush country, a black steel fence runs along the Mexican border. About 15 feet high and topped by small metal spires that bend toward Mexico, it stretches west from a Border Patrol checkpoint for about a mile and a half. Then it stops.

Where the fence ends, a creek snakes off the Rio Grande, up through a private ranch where cattle wander between the mesquite trees. There, beside the creek gully, a small black cylinder sits atop a metal pole, looming over the small trees. It is a lidar sensor, the same laser-based technology that gives sight to self-driving cars. From its perch, it captures a three-dimensional image of anyone who walks into the area.

The sensor belongs to a Silicon Valley start-up called Quanergy, one of a number of companies trying to land business along the Mexican border. While President Trump still vows to build a physical border wall, these companies hope to help build a “virtual wall” that some policymakers believe would be more effective than miles of concrete and metal. A virtual wall would not offer a physical deterrence, but some people believe it would be cheaper to build and maintain.

More from The New York Times:

Border patrol agent arrested in connection with murders of 4 women

Trump says hispanic-american border patrol agent ‘speaks perfect english’

Trump has it backward: many migrants are victims of crime

“The only way to have operational control of the border is to look at all 2,000 miles of it at the same time,” said Representative Will Hurd, a Republican who represents Val Verde County, west of San Antonio. “And the only way to do that is through technology.”

Founded in 2012 and backed by more than $160 million in funding, Quanergy was one of the many lidar makers created amid a rush to develop driverless cars. Over the last year, that investment boom started to feel like a glut as autonomous vehicle technology improved more slowly than some had hoped. Border control is another potential market for lidar, which can spot objects and people in all sorts of conditions, day or night.

Working with the Val Verde County Sheriff’s Office, Quanergy has spent the past year testing its lidar sensors on the ranch in Del Rio, angling for a contract with United States Customs and Border Protection.

A range of technologies being developed in Silicon Valley is well suited to border control. When combined with recent advances in artificial intelligence, digital cameras, lidar and other sensors can identify and track people and objects with considerable accuracy.

But many tech workers have made it clear in recent months that they don’t want to work on military or government surveillance projects. In June, after more than 4,000 employees protested the project, Google withdrew from an effort to build artificial intelligence for the Defense Department. Border and immigration enforcement is even more controversial. Microsoft and Salesforce employees, for example, have protested the companies’ contracts with Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Still, where some see a moral quandary, others see a business opportunity. More than 20 companies have worked on the Pentagon project that Google pulled out of.

Another start-up, Anduril, is testing technology in the Rio Grande Valley that uses things like digital cameras and artificial intelligence to track people coming across the border. Its founders included Palmer Luckey, who built the virtual reality company Oculus and sold it to Facebook for $2 billion in 2014.

Mr. Luckey left Facebook two years later after it was revealed that he supported a political action group that spread anti-Hillary Clinton memes. Not long after, he started working on his new company. Trae Stephens, the investor who founded Anduril with Mr. Luckey, tried to distance the company from Mr. Luckey’s history of political provocation when asked about it in an interview.

“It is a national security company,” he said.

Quanergy’s executives also hope to keep politics at arm’s length. In a recent interview, Louay Eldada, a founder and the chief executive of Quanergy, said the company always planned to expand beyond driverless cars. Border control, he said, was an obvious candidate.

Cogniac, another Silicon Valley start-up that offers technology for identifying people and objects in camera images, is exploring similar work.

Customs and Border Protection already uses a wide variety of technology on the border, including video cameras, flying drones, aerostat blimps, infrared goggles and pressure sensors. But these technologies are deployed in a piecemeal way, and officials have yet to use artificial intelligence that can automatically analyze data captured by cameras and other sensors.

In many areas along the Texas border, there is no technology in place — not even fences. Border Patrol agents still use trucks to drag old tires up and down the border, smoothing the dirt on roads and paths so they can spot footprints later. They call it “sign cutting.”

Mr. Hurd, the congressman, is advocating for a wider technological system. “The question is: How do you cut for sign in the digital age?” he said. “We should get to a point where we see absolutely everything coming across our border.”

That could include the kinds of sensors tested by Quanergy in Del Rio, which can capture activity across 360 degrees and a distance of about 100 meters. Using this three-dimensional view of an area, software can automatically pinpoint people moving past and alert border agents.

If lined up in large numbers and paired with cameras that snap images when movement is detected, these sensors could provide a more detailed picture of border activity and help agents organize their activities.

But the devices are limited. If left unprotected, they are easily vandalized. And they require both electrical power and a network connection. Quanergy has tested its sensors with solar panels, which eliminate the need for power lines. Still, along most parts of the border, the authorities would have to install new fiber lines or cell towers.

Joe Martinez, Val Verde County’s sheriff, has helped test the Quanergy sensors. He said he believed they could be a big help along some parts of the border. But if these sensors were used in the vast, rocky, undulating spaces in the western part of his county, he said, border and other law enforcement agents would have difficulty responding to alerts within any reasonable amount of time.

“The needs to the west are different,” Mr. Martinez said. “And the needs to the south are different.”

What’s more, lidar sensors are expensive. Quanergy charges a few thousand dollars per unit. Old tires are considerably cheaper.

Such sensors, Mr. Martinez and others said, are best used in tandem with a wide variety of other methods under development. “This is about a layering of technologies,” said David Aguilar, a former acting commissioner of Customs and Border Protection and a principal at Global Security and Innovative Strategies, a consulting firm in Washington. Current officials with the agency said it was testing many technologies with companies in Silicon Valley, with the goal of deploying new artificial intelligence techniques in the field.

Some question whether these technologies will eat away at the privacy of residents. Much of the land at the border is private.

Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera, a professor at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley who specializes in border protection issues, said authorities should concentrate on border checkpoints, where a large portion of illegal crossings occur.

“None of these things make sense to me,” said Ms. Correa-Cabrera, who is also a fellow at the Wilson Center, a think tank in Washington. “Why would we continue to spend on technology that is not solving the problem?”

But Mr. Aguilar said he believed that demands on the border for new sensors and new artificial intelligence would grow.

“We started talking about this many years ago,” he said. “But the technology wasn’t as mature as it is now.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-18  Authors: cade metz, tamir kalifa, the new york times
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cars, technology, tech, valley, intelligence, sensors, artificial, quanergy, technologies, parts, virtual, lidar, driverless, wall, border, built, rio


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From Spice Girl to fashion icon: How Victoria Beckham built her clothing empire

Victoria Beckham the fashion brand started off small, she told CNBC’s Tania Bryer, speaking at London Fashion Week on Sunday. “At the beginning, it was 10 dresses and I showed the dresses and then I sold the dresses and now it’s so much more complicated,” she said. So I’ve learnt a lot from my team and I’ve learnt a lot about the business. Beckham showed a collection for the first time at London Fashion Week on Sunday, having previously showed her clothing in New York. An art gallery next to her


Victoria Beckham the fashion brand started off small, she told CNBC’s Tania Bryer, speaking at London Fashion Week on Sunday. “At the beginning, it was 10 dresses and I showed the dresses and then I sold the dresses and now it’s so much more complicated,” she said. So I’ve learnt a lot from my team and I’ve learnt a lot about the business. Beckham showed a collection for the first time at London Fashion Week on Sunday, having previously showed her clothing in New York. An art gallery next to her
From Spice Girl to fashion icon: How Victoria Beckham built her clothing empire Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-17  Authors: lucy handley, tim roney, getty images, victoria beckham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dresses, beckham, icon, fashion, started, clothing, week, empire, told, london, victoria, team, showed, lot, girl, built, ive, spice


From Spice Girl to fashion icon: How Victoria Beckham built her clothing empire

Victoria Beckham the fashion brand started off small, she told CNBC’s Tania Bryer, speaking at London Fashion Week on Sunday. “At the beginning, it was 10 dresses and I showed the dresses and then I sold the dresses and now it’s so much more complicated,” she said.

She’s not a trained designer and has relied on her team to help build the brand, now stocked in more than 400 stores.

“There was two of us when I first started and it was just dresses, whereas now, we’ve grown. It’s not just dresses, it’s tailoring, it’s knitwear, it’s a complete wardrobe, plus accessories as well. So I’ve learnt a lot from my team and I’ve learnt a lot about the business. I’ve had to, I hadn’t done this before, so I’ve surrounded myself with the right people and the team has grown each season,” Beckham told Bryer.

Beckham showed a collection for the first time at London Fashion Week on Sunday, having previously showed her clothing in New York. An art gallery next to her Mayfair boutique was the location for the catwalk collection, shown to an audience of 250.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-17  Authors: lucy handley, tim roney, getty images, victoria beckham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dresses, beckham, icon, fashion, started, clothing, week, empire, told, london, victoria, team, showed, lot, girl, built, ive, spice


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This life-size, driveable Bugatti Chiron supercar is built entirely from Legos — take a look

The Lego Bugatti Chiron is fully functional and can fit two passengers inside. Lego says the car can accelerate to slightly over 12 miles per hour (theoretically up 18 miles per hour) and weighs over 3,000 pounds. It also boasts 5.3 horsepower, as well as real Bugatti Chiron wheels. Although there is no gas or acceleration pedal (as the car is driven by voltage level), there is a working pedal for the brake. “[F]rom 20 meters away it’s not obvious that you are looking at a Lego car.


The Lego Bugatti Chiron is fully functional and can fit two passengers inside. Lego says the car can accelerate to slightly over 12 miles per hour (theoretically up 18 miles per hour) and weighs over 3,000 pounds. It also boasts 5.3 horsepower, as well as real Bugatti Chiron wheels. Although there is no gas or acceleration pedal (as the car is driven by voltage level), there is a working pedal for the brake. “[F]rom 20 meters away it’s not obvious that you are looking at a Lego car.
This life-size, driveable Bugatti Chiron supercar is built entirely from Legos — take a look Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-31  Authors: sarah berger, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lifesize, built, entirely, yes, pedal, miles, lego, driveable, hour, car, wheels, working, supercar, chiron, legos, bugatti, look


This life-size, driveable Bugatti Chiron supercar is built entirely from Legos — take a look

The Lego Bugatti Chiron is fully functional and can fit two passengers inside. Lego says the car can accelerate to slightly over 12 miles per hour (theoretically up 18 miles per hour) and weighs over 3,000 pounds. It also boasts 5.3 horsepower, as well as real Bugatti Chiron wheels. Two batteries in the car serve as its overall power source. Although there is no gas or acceleration pedal (as the car is driven by voltage level), there is a working pedal for the brake.

And yes, it’s been taken for a spin — by former champion racer Andy Wallace.

“[F]rom 20 meters away it’s not obvious that you are looking at a Lego car. I can only imagine how much time and effort went into making this model,” says Wallace.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-31  Authors: sarah berger, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lifesize, built, entirely, yes, pedal, miles, lego, driveable, hour, car, wheels, working, supercar, chiron, legos, bugatti, look


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