How Amazon moved into the business of US elections

The expansion by Amazon Web Services into state and local elections has quietly gathered pace since the 2016 U.S. presidential vote. Amazon’s cloud computing arm is making an aggressive push into one of the most sensitive technology sectors: U.S. elections. Elections at AWS, told prospective government clients in February via a presentation on a webinar, which was viewed by Reuters. Still, Amazon’s growing presence in the elections business could undermine what many officials view as a strength


The expansion by Amazon Web Services into state and local elections has quietly gathered pace since the 2016 U.S. presidential vote. Amazon’s cloud computing arm is making an aggressive push into one of the most sensitive technology sectors: U.S. elections. Elections at AWS, told prospective government clients in February via a presentation on a webinar, which was viewed by Reuters. Still, Amazon’s growing presence in the elections business could undermine what many officials view as a strength
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, systems, aws, amazon, security, voting, election, amazons, elections, moved, according, cloud, business


How Amazon moved into the business of US elections

In the fullest public picture yet of Amazon’s strategic move into U.S. election infrastructure, Reuters reviewed previously unreported company presentations and documents, and conducted more than two dozen interviews with lawmakers, election administrators, and heads of election security and technology in nearly a dozen states and counties that use Amazon’s cloud.

While it does not handle voting on election day, AWS — along with a broad network of partners — now runs state and county election websites, stores voter registration rolls and ballot data, facilitates overseas voting by military personnel and helps provide live election-night results, according to company documents and interviews.

So do America’s two main political parties, the Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden and the U.S. federal body charged with administering and enforcing federal campaign finance laws.

The expansion by Amazon Web Services into state and local elections has quietly gathered pace since the 2016 U.S. presidential vote. More than 40 states now use one or more of Amazon’s election offerings, according to a presentation given by an Amazon executive this year and seen by Reuters.

Amazon’s cloud computing arm is making an aggressive push into one of the most sensitive technology sectors: U.S. elections.

Amazon pitches itself as a low-cost provider of secure election technology at a time when local officials and political campaigns are under intense pressure to prevent a repeat of 2016 presidential elections, which saw cyberattacks on voting systems and election infrastructure.

“The fact that we have invested heavily in this area, it helps to attest to the fact that in over 40 states, the Amazon cloud is being trusted to power in some way, some aspect of elections,” Michael Jackson, leader, Public Health & U.S. Elections at AWS, told prospective government clients in February via a presentation on a webinar, which was viewed by Reuters.

The company’s efforts are welcomed by election administrators, who in interviews said they often struggle with keeping outdated systems up to date at the local level.

In Oregon, for example, the state’s in-house servers that support election services shut down every time there is a power outage – an often occurrence as Oregon updates its electric grid, according to Peter Threlkel, chief information officer at the Oregon Secretary of State. A move to the cloud fixes that problem, and Oregon ran a pilot with AWS to move its voter registration system to the cloud, he said.

Some security experts like David O’Berry, co-founder, Precog Security, said moving to AWS is “a good option for campaigns, who do not have the resources to protect themselves.”

Still, Amazon’s growing presence in the elections business could undermine what many officials view as a strength of the U.S. voting system: decentralization.

Most security experts Reuters spoke to said that while Amazon’s cloud is likely much harder to hack than systems it is replacing, putting data from many jurisdictions on a single system raises the prospect that a single major breach could prove damaging.

“It makes Amazon a bigger target” for hackers, “and also increases the challenge of dealing with an insider attack,” said Chris Vickery, director of cyberrisk research at cybersecurity startup Upguard.

A recent hack into Capital One Financial’s data stored on Amazon’s cloud service was perpetrated by a former Amazon employee. The breach affected more than 100 million customers, underscoring how rogue employees or untrained workers can create security risks even if the underlying systems are secure.

Amazon says its systems are reliable. “Over time, states, counties, cities, and countries will leverage AWS services to ensure modernization of their elections for increased security, reliability, and analytics for an efficient and more effective use of taxpayer dollars,” an AWS spokesperson told Reuters.

Amazon’s push into the election business comes as the company faces criticism from politicians, labor unions and privacy advocates over its business practices and growing influence. President Donald Trump has accused the company of competing unfairly and repeatedly attacked the Washington Post, owned by Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, for alleged bias, a charge Bezos and the paper deny.

Amazon is forging ahead. It now powers the websites for the Federal Election Commission (FEC), the Republican National Committee (RNC) and the Democratic National Committee (DNC), according to a source and election security experts.

The FEC, DNC and RNC declined comment. A person familiar with the DNC’s plans said the committee has recently moved some data from AWS to Alphabet-owned Google cloud but did not explain the reason for the shift.

Amazon has also won over major individual candidates, the executive leading the company’s election push said earlier this year.

“Some of the largest presidential, congressional and gubernatorial campaigns are also trusted to AWS,” Amazon’s Jackson told clients in the February webinar viewed by Reuters.

For example, Democratic Presidential frontrunner Joe Biden’s online fundraising operations rely on AWS, a source with knowledge of the matter said. The Biden campaign did not respond to requests for comment. In the past, AWS powered the Obama for America campaign in 2012, the source added.

Reuters could not verify what cloud service the Trump campaign is using. It had no comment.

The privatization of voting infrastructure is part of a broader trend that has swept across nearly every aspect of government activities in America — from parking tickets to prisons — and continues under the Trump administration.

Microsoft’s Azure, the biggest rival to AWS, has a sizeable government business and offers some election services but it has not focused on them and lags Amazon, according to companies that partner with both firms for government contracts. Microsoft declined to comment.

Amazon is also competing with traditional election technology vendors including Elections Systems & Software (ES&S) and Dominion Voting Systems Corp, which offer some similar services such as election night reporting and data storage, according to consultants.

An ES&S spokeswoman said the company has not seen any impact from Amazon’s efforts. Dominion did not respond to requests for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, systems, aws, amazon, security, voting, election, amazons, elections, moved, according, cloud, business


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Bezos will ‘break up his own company’ before regulators do, Atlantic writer who profiled the CEO predicts

Jeff Bezos, founder and chief executive officer of Amazon.com Inc., speaks during a discussion at the Air Force Association’s Air, Space and Cyber Conference in National Harbor, Maryland, U.S., on Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos could break up his own company before regulators do so themselves, Atlantic writer Franklin Foer predicts. “I think that eventually Bezos, who is seeing around corners, is going to break up his own company,” Foer said. Andy Jassy, CEO of AWS, said in an


Jeff Bezos, founder and chief executive officer of Amazon.com Inc., speaks during a discussion at the Air Force Association’s Air, Space and Cyber Conference in National Harbor, Maryland, U.S., on Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos could break up his own company before regulators do so themselves, Atlantic writer Franklin Foer predicts. “I think that eventually Bezos, who is seeing around corners, is going to break up his own company,” Foer said. Andy Jassy, CEO of AWS, said in an
Bezos will ‘break up his own company’ before regulators do, Atlantic writer who profiled the CEO predicts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, atlantic, amazon, regulators, company, profiled, business, jeff, break, data, big, predicts, ceo, writer, amazons, aws, bezos


Bezos will 'break up his own company' before regulators do, Atlantic writer who profiled the CEO predicts

Jeff Bezos, founder and chief executive officer of Amazon.com Inc., speaks during a discussion at the Air Force Association’s Air, Space and Cyber Conference in National Harbor, Maryland, U.S., on Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018.

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos could break up his own company before regulators do so themselves, Atlantic writer Franklin Foer predicts.

Foer, who wrote the Atlantic’s November cover story entitled “Jeff Bezos’s Master Plan,” said in an interview Tuesday on CNBC’s “Squawk Box” that people close to the CEO believe spinning off Amazon Web Services from the e-commerce business “would be the obvious thing for [Bezos] to do in the face of this.”

“I think that eventually Bezos, who is seeing around corners, is going to break up his own company,” Foer said. “AWS exists as its own fantastically profitable business. There’s no reason that it needs to be connected to Amazon the e-retailer. And as he looks at what’s happening in politics, where there’s this increasing bipartisan consensus that Big Tech is a problem, I’m pretty sure he’s going to say, ‘OK fine.'”

An Amazon spokesperson declined to comment.

Andy Jassy, CEO of AWS, said in an interview in June that Amazon would comply if regulators required a spinoff. But Jassy said there was no benefit to separating AWS now.

AWS accounted for 13% of Amazon’s total revenue in the second quarter of 2019, but a whopping 52% of its $3.1 billion in operating income for the quarter.

So far, Google and Facebook have received the lion’s share of antitrust speculation. But Amazon still faces headwinds in the form of an antitrust inquiry from the House Judiciary Committee and a reported probe by the Federal Trade Commission. The U.S. Justice Department has also announced a broad review of the tech industry, though it did not call out specific companies.

Lawmakers have previously focused on the data Amazon collects from third-party sellers on its e-commerce platform, where it also sells its own goods, questioning whether Amazon uses data from other merchants to its own advantage. In its recent request for information from the company, the House Judiciary Committee leaders asked how AWS and other areas of Amazon’s business share data with one another.

Foer speculated that AWS sees working with the federal government as a big opportunity that could have been a factor in Amazon’s decision to choose an area near Washington, D.C., for its second headquarters. AWS has been fighting for a $10 billion cloud contract with the Pentagon and has sold its facial recognition software to law enforcement agencies.

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WATCH: Amazon is so much more than online shopping — here’s how big its become


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, atlantic, amazon, regulators, company, profiled, business, jeff, break, data, big, predicts, ceo, writer, amazons, aws, bezos


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How the NBA-China controversy compares to the NFL’s anthem protests

How the NBA-China controversy compares to the NFL’s anthem protests2 Hours AgoPatrick Rishe, director of the sports business program at Washington University in St. Louis and professor of practice in Sports Business, joins “Squawk Box” to discuss the ongoing conflict between the NBA and the Chinese government.


How the NBA-China controversy compares to the NFL’s anthem protests2 Hours AgoPatrick Rishe, director of the sports business program at Washington University in St. Louis and professor of practice in Sports Business, joins “Squawk Box” to discuss the ongoing conflict between the NBA and the Chinese government.
How the NBA-China controversy compares to the NFL’s anthem protests Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, squawk, professor, anthem, business, university, rishe, washington, program, nfls, nbachina, compares, practice, controversy, protests2, protests


How the NBA-China controversy compares to the NFL's anthem protests

How the NBA-China controversy compares to the NFL’s anthem protests

2 Hours Ago

Patrick Rishe, director of the sports business program at Washington University in St. Louis and professor of practice in Sports Business, joins “Squawk Box” to discuss the ongoing conflict between the NBA and the Chinese government.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, squawk, professor, anthem, business, university, rishe, washington, program, nfls, nbachina, compares, practice, controversy, protests2, protests


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Trade, capitalism, money in politics: These are the business issues to watch in the fourth Democratic debate

Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks with Senator Elizabeth Warren during the 2020 Democratic U.S. presidential debate in Houston, Texas, September 12, 2019. Mike Blake | ReutersThe impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump is heating up Capitol Hill, but disagreements over fiscal issues could create just as much friction at the Democratic primary debate Tuesday night. Billionaire Tom Steyer, a late entry in the crowded primary field, will be making his debut debate appearance. Here are


Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks with Senator Elizabeth Warren during the 2020 Democratic U.S. presidential debate in Houston, Texas, September 12, 2019. Mike Blake | ReutersThe impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump is heating up Capitol Hill, but disagreements over fiscal issues could create just as much friction at the Democratic primary debate Tuesday night. Billionaire Tom Steyer, a late entry in the crowded primary field, will be making his debut debate appearance. Here are
Trade, capitalism, money in politics: These are the business issues to watch in the fourth Democratic debate Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, primary, issues, president, trade, money, business, candidates, capitalism, trump, watch, democratic, state, sanders, sen, fourth, politics, debate


Trade, capitalism, money in politics: These are the business issues to watch in the fourth Democratic debate

Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks with Senator Elizabeth Warren during the 2020 Democratic U.S. presidential debate in Houston, Texas, September 12, 2019. Mike Blake | Reuters

The impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump is heating up Capitol Hill, but disagreements over fiscal issues could create just as much friction at the Democratic primary debate Tuesday night. The fourth debate of the primary season is guaranteed to be the biggest yet, with 12 candidates set to appear at Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio — including Sen. Bernie Sanders, who recently suffered a heart attack. Former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Elizabeth Warren will hold court in the center of the stage, flanked by Sanders and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg. Billionaire Tom Steyer, a late entry in the crowded primary field, will be making his debut debate appearance. They’ll have plenty to talk about in the debate, which is being hosted by CNN and The New York Times from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. ET. Some of the widest divisions among the Democrats relate to trade, where some candidates see tariffs — a tool condemned by free-marketeers but championed by Trump — as a viable option. Expect to see Democrats respond with skepticism to Trump’s recent announcement that he’s reached a “phase one deal” with China.

On the domestic front, many of the candidates recently released their third-quarter fundraising totals — all of which fell far short of Trump’s massive war chest. The numbers coming in have stoked tensions within the party about the role of money in politics, which could be further hashed out at the debate. Biden — who remains the front-runner in the race, according to the RealClearPolitics polling average — has the most to lose at the debate. And he’s likely to be hit with some tough and unflattering questions about his son Hunter’s business dealings, which Trump has latched onto amid the increasingly popular impeachment inquiry. Sen. Kamala Harris, entrepreneur Andrew Yang, Sen. Cory Booker, former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro, former Rep. Beto O’Rourke, Sen. Amy Klobuchar and Rep. Tulsi Gabbard will also share the stage. Here are the business issues to watch going into the fourth debate:

Trade

The fourth debate is taking place in Ohio, widely viewed as a swing state and a bellwether for the national presidential election. Trump won the state in 2016 with about 51% of the vote. It’s also a Midwest industrial state that has struggled with the loss of manufacturing jobs and agricultural uncertainty, said Melissa Miller, an associate professor of American politics at Ohio’s Bowling Green State University. That puts the long-running U.S.-China trade negotiations into sharp focus for the debate. Democrats have previously gone after Trump over trade, but the White House’s apparent recent progress in the trade talks could complicate their criticisms. Still, the first “phase” of the deal has yet to be put on paper, and new worries about the negotiations started to emerge Monday. “The president does have a way of undermining little steps forward with big steps backward on Twitter and the like,” Miller said. “The Democrat who can really simplify and make clear to voters what’s at stake and the extent to which actual households will feel the impacts, that’s the candidate who can break through,” she added.

Fundraising

Health care

As in the previous debates, health care is set to be a major sticking point. Most politicians support finding ways to expand health coverage while avoiding spiraling costs. But there are chasms of differences among the candidates about how to achieve that goal. Sanders has long advocated a government-run program — “Medicare for All” — that applies to everyone. His proposal, currently a bill that has no chance of passing the Republican-controlled Senate, would widen the types of coverage available, as well as push private insurers out of the Medicare mix in favor of a single-payer model.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, primary, issues, president, trade, money, business, candidates, capitalism, trump, watch, democratic, state, sanders, sen, fourth, politics, debate


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‘Shark Tank’: Why Mark Cuban invested $600,000 into a business that turns human ashes into diamonds

Billionaire Mark Cuban is known for his tech investments — but on Sunday’s “Shark Tank,” Cuban diversified in a unique way. Cuban invested six figures in Eterneva, a business that turns human or animal ashes or hair into diamonds. “What we do is grow real diamonds from the carbon in someone’s ashes,” Garrett Ozar, who co-founded the company with Adelle Archer, said during the episode. According to Archer and Ozar, customers receive a “welcome kit,” which includes a small container for a half-cup


Billionaire Mark Cuban is known for his tech investments — but on Sunday’s “Shark Tank,” Cuban diversified in a unique way. Cuban invested six figures in Eterneva, a business that turns human or animal ashes or hair into diamonds. “What we do is grow real diamonds from the carbon in someone’s ashes,” Garrett Ozar, who co-founded the company with Adelle Archer, said during the episode. According to Archer and Ozar, customers receive a “welcome kit,” which includes a small container for a half-cup
‘Shark Tank’: Why Mark Cuban invested $600,000 into a business that turns human ashes into diamonds Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, business, human, invested, ashes, shark, archer, ozar, hair, turns, diamonds, cuban, tank, mark, customers, carbon, high, eterneva


'Shark Tank': Why Mark Cuban invested $600,000 into a business that turns human ashes into diamonds

Billionaire Mark Cuban is known for his tech investments — but on Sunday’s “Shark Tank,” Cuban diversified in a unique way.

Cuban invested six figures in Eterneva, a business that turns human or animal ashes or hair into diamonds.

“What we do is grow real diamonds from the carbon in someone’s ashes,” Garrett Ozar, who co-founded the company with Adelle Archer, said during the episode. “But really, we’re in the business of celebrating remarkable people. Our diamonds give you something positive to look forward to.”

According to Archer and Ozar, customers receive a “welcome kit,” which includes a small container for a half-cup of ashes or hair. Customers then send that back to Eterneva. Customers also pick the diamond of their liking.

Then “we extract carbon from a half a cup of ashes or hair,” Ozar said during the episode. “Once we have carbon, we then use high pressure, high temperature to grow a diamond.”

The prices of these diamonds range from $3,000 to $20,000, according to Archer. She said the average order value is $8,000, and customers “pay upfront, in full.”

“That’s smart,” Cuban said.

It takes 10 months to make the diamond, and it costs Eterneva between $3,000 to $5,000 to make.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, business, human, invested, ashes, shark, archer, ozar, hair, turns, diamonds, cuban, tank, mark, customers, carbon, high, eterneva


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Billionaire Salesforce co-founder Marc Benioff says capitalism is dead and needs a reboot

Marc Benioff, Co-CEO of SalesForce speaking at the WEF in Davos, Switzerland on Jan. 22, 2019. “But now everybody, including the tech companies and even those CEOs who initially were disagreeing with me, agree. “Over 20 years ago, when we started Salesforce, this was our idea,” Benioff said. “We’d start a company with a new technology model, a new business model, and a new capitalism model.” He was hinting at some of the problems big tech companies are already seeing.


Marc Benioff, Co-CEO of SalesForce speaking at the WEF in Davos, Switzerland on Jan. 22, 2019. “But now everybody, including the tech companies and even those CEOs who initially were disagreeing with me, agree. “Over 20 years ago, when we started Salesforce, this was our idea,” Benioff said. “We’d start a company with a new technology model, a new business model, and a new capitalism model.” He was hinting at some of the problems big tech companies are already seeing.
Billionaire Salesforce co-founder Marc Benioff says capitalism is dead and needs a reboot Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: matt rosoff, https, wwwlinkedincom in mattrosoff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, cofounder, company, theyre, companies, ive, going, business, capitalism, reboot, needs, salesforce, billionaire, marc, benioff, dead


Billionaire Salesforce co-founder Marc Benioff says capitalism is dead and needs a reboot

Marc Benioff, Co-CEO of SalesForce speaking at the WEF in Davos, Switzerland on Jan. 22, 2019. Adam Galica | CNBC

Marc Benioff rubs some people the wrong way. He’s too much. Too loud and too opinionated. The company he co-founded, Salesforce, has grown from two people in a San Francisco house in 1999 to a $130 billion company with more than $13 billion in annual revenue, making it one of the great triumphs of modern capitalism and turning Benioff into a billionaire six times over. And yet, he has the nerve to criticize the tech industry for being too powerful, and the gall to say that today’s version of capitalism is too focused on profits. At Davos in January 2018, Benioff made some enemies in the room by saying that if CEOs don’t take action to restore trust in their companies, regulators must jump in. “People were shocked that a tech CEO would say such a thing, that we need more regulation in technology,” Benioff told CNBC in a recent interview. “But now everybody, including the tech companies and even those CEOs who initially were disagreeing with me, agree. Because the reality is, if these companies don’t step into these new values proactively, then the government’s going to have to shift them into those values.” Benioff’s new book, “Trailblazer,” will be similarly polarizing. While portions of it read like a typical business book, with insidery anecdotes, like the story of why he decided not to buy Twitter, and hard-won bits of wisdom, other parts read like an Elizabeth Warren speech: Modern capitalism is dead, companies are too focused on shareholder returns and sometimes higher taxes are necessary. It’s quite a shift for a former Republican turned independent.

New models

But Benioff insists that he hasn’t really changed. Rather, he’s simply trying to spread the same values that he instilled in Salesforce two decades ago — and the ones that have worked both for the company and communities where it operates. “Over 20 years ago, when we started Salesforce, this was our idea,” Benioff said. “We’d start a company with a new technology model, a new business model, and a new capitalism model.” He was referring to Salesforce’s practice of donating 1% of its profits, product value and employees’ time to nonprofits. When you look beyond shareholders, “Your customer’s not a product, they’re a stakeholder,” Benioff said. “Your employee’s not a cog in your wheel, they’re a stakeholder. And kids aren’t people you’re driving by on your way to work, they’re a stakeholder. And homeless aren’t people you’re walking by, they’re your stakeholders.” Benioff’s point is that corporate executives must recognize this in order for their companies to survive. He has little patience for the argument that this approach only works when business is good, but harder to justify during a recession or when times are rough. “I didn’t just become a CEO last year, I’ve ridden through a few recessions, I’ve been through economic downturns, I’ve had tough moments,” he said. “I’ve been through everything you can go through as a CEO. You have to do it this way. If you don’t, you’re not going to survive.” He was hinting at some of the problems big tech companies are already seeing. “Their employees are going to walk out, and they are” walking out, he said. “Customers will walk out, and they are. That’s where you have to say, OK, I’m going to have to hold myself to a new standard and create a company where people want to work, that people want to do business with, a company that the community wants them to be doing business with.”

The narrative has started to play out over the last two years. Until about 2017, tech could do no wrong. Silicon Valley was full of innovators making the world a better place, and any bad patches were dismissed as exceptions. Of late, public sentiment has turned, regulators are circling and presidential candidates are campaigning on breaking up tech giants like Facebook, Google and Amazon. “There was a halo left over from people like Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard, and other very good people in the tech industry who did very good things,” Benioff said. “A lot of people went to Packard Children’s Hospital or the Monterey Bay Aquarium and said, ‘Wow, he’s really left a big halo on our community.’ But then all of a sudden they’re like, ‘Hold on, you did what with my data? You did what with that election? You did what with your profits?’ That’s when all of a sudden people said, ‘Wow, maybe this is not Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard running these companies.’ Maybe this is a different generation of leader that is prioritizing power, and control, and sheer profitability, and capitalism without guardrails over the communities they’re participating in.” He also says that a broader view of value is vital for recruiting and retaining millennials and younger workers. “We are moving into a world where they understand that and certainly the generation after them that’s been educated that we’re going to have more plastic in the ocean than fish in 2050,” he said. “That our homeless situation is increasing, and that there’s more inequality, and that our public schools need to be supported.”

‘We have to do it now’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: matt rosoff, https, wwwlinkedincom in mattrosoff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, cofounder, company, theyre, companies, ive, going, business, capitalism, reboot, needs, salesforce, billionaire, marc, benioff, dead


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Hunter Biden resigns from Chinese firm following Trump attacks

Hunter Biden is stepping down from the board of a Chinese-backed private equity company and committing to not working for a foreign-owned company if his father, former Vice President Joe Biden, is elected president in 2020. Hunter’s vows to forgo any foreign work follow a slew of unsubstantiated attacks by President Donald Trump accusing him of corruption. Shortly after the revelations of the Ukraine call, Trump publicly called on China to investigate the Bidens. “When Hunter engaged in his busi


Hunter Biden is stepping down from the board of a Chinese-backed private equity company and committing to not working for a foreign-owned company if his father, former Vice President Joe Biden, is elected president in 2020. Hunter’s vows to forgo any foreign work follow a slew of unsubstantiated attacks by President Donald Trump accusing him of corruption. Shortly after the revelations of the Ukraine call, Trump publicly called on China to investigate the Bidens. “When Hunter engaged in his busi
Hunter Biden resigns from Chinese firm following Trump attacks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-13  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, biden, chinese, attacks, statement, following, company, business, resigns, president, trump, ukraine, father, firm, hunter


Hunter Biden resigns from Chinese firm following Trump attacks

Hunter Biden is stepping down from the board of a Chinese-backed private equity company and committing to not working for a foreign-owned company if his father, former Vice President Joe Biden, is elected president in 2020.

Hunter’s vows to forgo any foreign work follow a slew of unsubstantiated attacks by President Donald Trump accusing him of corruption.

In a statement released from his lawyer George Mesires, Biden vowed to step down by the end of the month from a management company of a private equity fund backed by Chinese state-owned entities, and said he hasn’t discussed his own business activities with his father.

Trump in a July phone call encouraged the leader of Ukraine to investigate Hunter and his father, which led to the launch of an impeachment inquiry by Democrats last month. Shortly after the revelations of the Ukraine call, Trump publicly called on China to investigate the Bidens.

“Hunter always understood that his father would be guided, entirely and unequivocally, by established U.S. policy, irrespective of its effects on Hunter’s professional interests,” the statement read. “When Hunter engaged in his business pursuits, he believed that he was acting appropriately and in good faith. He never anticipated the barrage of false charges against both him and his father by the president of the United States.”

“Under a Biden Administration, Hunter will readily comply with any and all guidelines or standards a President Biden may issue to address purported conflicts of interest, or the appearance of such conflicts, including any restrictions related to overseas business interests,” the statement continues. “In any event, Hunter will agree not to serve on boards of, or work on behalf of, foreign owned companies.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-13  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, biden, chinese, attacks, statement, following, company, business, resigns, president, trump, ukraine, father, firm, hunter


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San Francisco business trip? How to make the most of those off-duty hours

Source: San Francisco Travel AssociationSan Francisco is not only one of the country’s most visited cities, since the days of the Gold Rush, it’s been a major center for innovation. “Known for a time as ‘Wall Street of the West,’ San Francisco was and is also a financial powerhouse.” arah Cain, We Will Walk Right Up To The Sun, courtesy City and County of San Francisco. Day-use rooms: start at $125 for six hours between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m.Head to townFerry Plaza Farmers Market Source: San Francisc


Source: San Francisco Travel AssociationSan Francisco is not only one of the country’s most visited cities, since the days of the Gold Rush, it’s been a major center for innovation. “Known for a time as ‘Wall Street of the West,’ San Francisco was and is also a financial powerhouse.” arah Cain, We Will Walk Right Up To The Sun, courtesy City and County of San Francisco. Day-use rooms: start at $125 for six hours between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m.Head to townFerry Plaza Farmers Market Source: San Francisc
San Francisco business trip? How to make the most of those off-duty hours Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-13  Authors: harriet baskas
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San Francisco business trip? How to make the most of those off-duty hours

Source: San Francisco Travel Association

San Francisco is not only one of the country’s most visited cities, since the days of the Gold Rush, it’s been a major center for innovation. “This is the city that inspired the creation of television, the Murphy bed and more,” said Joe D’Alessandro, president and CEO, San Francisco Travel. “Known for a time as ‘Wall Street of the West,’ San Francisco was and is also a financial powerhouse.” Much of that financial power is now wrapped up in technology, with companies such as Twitter, Uber, Airbnb, Pinterest, Dropbox, Salesforce and others calling San Francisco home. “Medicine and technology also thrive and intertwine in the city’s Mission Bay neighborhood and throughout the region,” D’Alessandro added. “Taking on the biggest challenges to the human condition.” If you find yourself in town to meet with one of these companies or a tiny start-up poised to disrupt, here are few ways to make the most of your off-duty hours in the City by the Bay.

Fresh fly-in convenience

Grand Hyatt at SFO Source: SFO Airport

With the recent opening of the 12-story Grand Hyatt at SFO, San Francisco International Airport joins the ranks of major airports with a luxury hotel on property. It’s at least a half-hour journey from the airport to downtown SFO, so this new hotel is ideal for fly-in meetings and conferences and those times when you’ve got an in-town meeting and an early flight out the next day.

arah Cain, We Will Walk Right Up To The Sun, courtesy City and County of San Francisco. Photo: Randi Malkin Steinberger

The 351-room hotel has its own stained glass-adorned stop on the SFO AirTrain and tech-loaded meeting rooms with aviation-inspired names such as Supersonic, Stratocruiser and Astrojet. For on-site dining, Twin Crafts Market & Bar offers casual dining and a 24-hour market, while the Quail & Crane restaurant has a menu blending Northern California and Asian cuisine. Thanks to San Francisco’s 2% for Art program, the hotel is home to 16 major new works of art, including “Ether” by Japanese artist Kohei Nawa, a 35-foot outdoor sculpture that references weightlessness and the movement of airplanes.

Grand Hyatt at SFO. A room overlooking the SFO airfield. Source: Harriet Baskas

All rooms at the Grand Hyatt at SFO have soundproof, floor-to-ceiling windows. Rooms on one side of the hotel face the airfield of the International Terminal and each of those rooms is equipped with a handy airplane spotting guide and a loaner pair of binoculars. Rates: start at $329/night. Day-use rooms: start at $125 for six hours between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m.

Head to town

Ferry Plaza Farmers Market Source: San Francisco Travel Association

It is easy to get from the airport to downtown San Francisco. The 14-mile trip takes about 30 minutes via BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit) and the reloadable plastic Clipper Card you’ll need to board can also be used on city buses, streetcars and cable cars and on the Golden Gate Transit ferries. Due to highway traffic, the trip between SFO and downtown can take longer by car, van or limo. The San Francisco Travel Association has a handy guide that lists attractions within walking distance from major BART stations in the city. A good place to start is the landmark Ferry Building, which is along the Embarcadero at the foot of Market Street. To get there, get off BART at the Embarcadero Station. The marketplace inside the Ferry Building has coffee shops and wine bars, shops and restaurants, including Hog Island Oyster Company, Acme Bread Company, Cowgirl Creamery and Humphry Slocombe ice cream, among others. Grab a table or head outside to watch ferries come and go to Sausalito and other destinations. A farmers’ market operates adjacent to the building three days a week (Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays). Well-known attractions and tourist destinations are further up the Embarcadero, including Pier 39 (the Aquarium of the Bay, sea lions and more) and Fisherman’s Wharf, but less touristly options can be found nearby in the 24-block Chinatown neighborhood and the Sourth of Market/Yerba Buena neighborhood.

Chinatown Gate in San Francisco. Courtesy: SF Travel

Enter Chinatown through the ornate Dragon Gate (at Bush Street and Grant Avenue) and wander through shops, restaurants and the Chinese Historical Society of America Museum as you make your way to Ross Alley, home of the tiny Golden Gate Fortune Cookie Factory. Here you can watch as one or two cookie-makers snatch freshly baked flat cookie rounds off the cast-iron rotating griddle wheel and quickly fold in a paper fortune for one of the 10,000 hand-assembled fortune cookies made each day. Want a great souvenir? For $1 ($1.50 for 2) you can have your own message folded into a fortune cookie. In the South of Market/Yerba Buena neighborhood, home to the Moscone Convention Center and Yerba Buena Gardens, you’ll find more than two dozen museums and cultural attractions. Through Jan. 20, 2020, the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing is the inspiration for an art, architecture and designed-centered exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA; admission: $25) titled “Far Out: Suits, Habs, and Labs for Outer Space.” Nearby, at the California Historical Society (admission $10), “From the Gold Rush to the Earthquake: Selections from the Collection” opens Oct. 26 with paintings, photographs, manuscripts and ephemera, exploring everything from the growth of agriculture and industry in the state to the history of San Francisco’s Chinatown district and the devasting 1906 earthquake and fires.

Source: Henrik Kam | SFMOMA

A few blocks away is one of the San Francisco’s newest public spaces: Salesforce Park. The 5.4-acre fourth-story rooftop oasis sits on top of the Salesforce Transit Center and adjacent to the Salesforce Tower, which is currently San Francisco’s tallest building.

Free gondola rides to and from Salesforce Park Source: Saleforce Transit Center

Four blocks long, the park has a lush walking path, tables and benches, play areas and a dancing fountain with 247 geysers triggered by the transit center’s bus traffic below. You can get to the park by stairs, escalators or elevators, but it’s far more entertaining to take the free gondola from the street.

Salesforce Park in San Francisco. Courtesy: Salesforce Transit Center

Eat and drink


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-13  Authors: harriet baskas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hotel, sfo, rooms, market, offduty, hours, transit, source, trip, francisco, park, san, business, salesforce


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Cyberattacks cost small companies $200K, putting many out of business

Equally worrying for modern executives, it’s also set to cost businesses $5.2 trillion worldwide within five years, according to Accenture. “Modern IT infrastructures are more complex and sophisticated than ever, and the amount of virtual ground that we’ve got to safeguard has also grown exponentially,” explains Jesse Rothstein, CTO of online security provider ExtraHop. “From mobile to desktop interactions, cybercriminals can launch thousands of digital attacks designed to compromise your operat


Equally worrying for modern executives, it’s also set to cost businesses $5.2 trillion worldwide within five years, according to Accenture. “Modern IT infrastructures are more complex and sophisticated than ever, and the amount of virtual ground that we’ve got to safeguard has also grown exponentially,” explains Jesse Rothstein, CTO of online security provider ExtraHop. “From mobile to desktop interactions, cybercriminals can launch thousands of digital attacks designed to compromise your operat
Cyberattacks cost small companies $200K, putting many out of business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-13  Authors: scott steinberg, special to cnbccom, christopher west davis, tom connor, rohit arora, ceo, co-founder of
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, attacks, small, 200k, putting, security, online, according, thousands, cost, companies, incidents, hightech, businesses, business, cyberattacks, digital


Cyberattacks cost small companies $200K, putting many out of business

In an age of ongoing digital transformation, cybercrime has quickly become today’s fastest-growing form of criminal activity. Equally worrying for modern executives, it’s also set to cost businesses $5.2 trillion worldwide within five years, according to Accenture.

With 43% of online attacks now aimed at small businesses, a favorite target of high-tech villains, yet only 14% prepared to defend themselves, owners increasingly need to start making high-tech security a top priority, according to network security leaders.

“Modern IT infrastructures are more complex and sophisticated than ever, and the amount of virtual ground that we’ve got to safeguard has also grown exponentially,” explains Jesse Rothstein, CTO of online security provider ExtraHop. “From mobile to desktop interactions, cybercriminals can launch thousands of digital attacks designed to compromise your operations at every turn, only one of which ever needs to connect to cause serious disruption.”

As a result, he says, it’s guaranteed that virtually every modern organization’s high-tech perimeters will eventually be breached. This being the case, for small business owners, it’s no longer a matter of considering if security threats will arise, but rather thinking in terms of when.

Worse, the consequences of cyberattacks continue to grow, with digital incidents now costing small businesses $200,000 on average, according to insurance carrier Hiscox, and 60% going out of business within six months of being victimized. The frequency with which these attacks are happening is also increasing, with more than half of all small businesses having suffered a breach within the last year and 4 in 10 having experienced multiple incidents, reveals Hiscox.

At the same time, though, according to Keeper Security’s 2019 SMB Cyberthreat Study, 66% of senior decision-makers at small businesses still believe they’re unlikely to be targeted by online criminals. Similarly, 6 in 10 have no digital defense plan in place whatsoever, underscoring the need for heightened industry awareness and education across the board.

“Attackers are getting smarter, attacks are occurring faster, and incidents are becoming more complex,” cautions Justin Fier, director of cyberintelligence and analytics at cyberdefense firm Darktrace. “The latest cyberattacks speedily exploit vulnerabilities in computer networks — which [can be infected] like human immune systems, changing thousands of times per second — and can overtake even major networks in an hour and a half.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-13  Authors: scott steinberg, special to cnbccom, christopher west davis, tom connor, rohit arora, ceo, co-founder of
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, attacks, small, 200k, putting, security, online, according, thousands, cost, companies, incidents, hightech, businesses, business, cyberattacks, digital


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Brewer Carlsberg wants to produce a ‘paper bottle’ for its beer

Carlsberg has released details of two new “paper bottle” research prototypes it’s working on. In an announcement made during the C40 World Mayors Summit in Copenhagen on Friday, the Danish brewing giant said the “Green Fibre Bottle” prototypes were produced from sustainably sourced wood fibres and “fully recyclable.” The business has been developing the idea since 2015, working with packaging experts and academics on the project. The prototypes will now be tested, with Carlsberg stating that its


Carlsberg has released details of two new “paper bottle” research prototypes it’s working on. In an announcement made during the C40 World Mayors Summit in Copenhagen on Friday, the Danish brewing giant said the “Green Fibre Bottle” prototypes were produced from sustainably sourced wood fibres and “fully recyclable.” The business has been developing the idea since 2015, working with packaging experts and academics on the project. The prototypes will now be tested, with Carlsberg stating that its
Brewer Carlsberg wants to produce a ‘paper bottle’ for its beer Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, produce, paper, prototypes, virgin, recycled, brewer, bottle, business, working, plastic, carlsberg, wants, beer, packaging


Brewer Carlsberg wants to produce a 'paper bottle' for its beer

Carlsberg has released details of two new “paper bottle” research prototypes it’s working on.

In an announcement made during the C40 World Mayors Summit in Copenhagen on Friday, the Danish brewing giant said the “Green Fibre Bottle” prototypes were produced from sustainably sourced wood fibres and “fully recyclable.”

The business has been developing the idea since 2015, working with packaging experts and academics on the project.

An “inner barrier” is used to ensure the bottles can carry beer. One prototype uses a recycled polyethylene terephthalate polymer film barrier, which acts as a thin internal lining. The other uses what Carlsberg described as a “100% bio-based” polyethylene furanoate polymer film barrier.

The prototypes will now be tested, with Carlsberg stating that its eventual aim was to produce a “100% bio-based bottle without polymers.”

In a statement Friday, Myriam Shingleton, the Carlsberg Group’s vice president, group development, said the firm was “pleased with the progress we’ve made on the Green Fibre Bottle so far.”

“While we are not completely there yet, the two prototypes are an important step towards realizing our ultimate ambition of bringing this breakthrough to market,” Shingleton added. The company would continue to work with experts to “overcome remaining technical challenges”, she said.

Carlsberg is one of many major international firms looking to change the way it packages products. Earlier this week consumer goods giant Unilever said it would halve its use of virgin plastic by 2025.

The business, whose brands include Dove, Ben & Jerry’s and Lipton, said it would achieve this by cutting its “absolute use of plastic packaging” by over 100,000 tonnes and “accelerating its use of recycled plastic.” Virgin plastics are produced using raw materials, rather than recycled ones.

“The way that we’ll reduce the virgin plastic in half is by, first, an absolute reduction in the amount of plastic that we use, and that’s going to require our best innovative capability to come up with different packaging formats,” Alan Jope, Unilever’s CEO, told CNBC’s Julianna Tatelbaum in an interview broadcast Monday.

“But also, we’re going to make much more use of recycled materials, stuff that the consumer has put into recycling streams and which we’re able to use,” Jope added. “And by doing that we hope to trigger the continued development of the recycled material business system.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, produce, paper, prototypes, virgin, recycled, brewer, bottle, business, working, plastic, carlsberg, wants, beer, packaging


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