Pebble Beach car week isn’t for budget travelers as prices get jacked for event tickets, hotel rooms, even gasoline

Attendees and judges gather around a 1966 Ferrari 330 P4 Drogo Spyder motor vehicle during the 2016 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in Pebble Beach, California, U.S., on Sunday, Aug. 21, 2016. Thousands of people descend on the normally quiet Monterey Peninsula coast for what has come to be known as “Pebble Beach car week,” but it is not an event for those on a tight budget. During car week, many hotels demand four-day minimum reservations while also punching up prices to astronomical levels. T


Attendees and judges gather around a 1966 Ferrari 330 P4 Drogo Spyder motor vehicle during the 2016 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in Pebble Beach, California, U.S., on Sunday, Aug. 21, 2016. Thousands of people descend on the normally quiet Monterey Peninsula coast for what has come to be known as “Pebble Beach car week,” but it is not an event for those on a tight budget. During car week, many hotels demand four-day minimum reservations while also punching up prices to astronomical levels. T
Pebble Beach car week isn’t for budget travelers as prices get jacked for event tickets, hotel rooms, even gasoline Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-17  Authors: paul a eisenstein
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, classic, california, prices, tickets, expensive, gasoline, monterey, events, jacked, rooms, travelers, hotel, isnt, week, concours, beach, car, pebble


Pebble Beach car week isn't for budget travelers as prices get jacked for event tickets, hotel rooms, even gasoline

Attendees and judges gather around a 1966 Ferrari 330 P4 Drogo Spyder motor vehicle during the 2016 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in Pebble Beach, California, U.S., on Sunday, Aug. 21, 2016. David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Routinely described as the world’s most popular, elegant and exclusive classic car show, the annual Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance has spawned a ten-day burst of events that are meant to appeal to antique auto fans, whatever their personal preferences. Thousands of people descend on the normally quiet Monterey Peninsula coast for what has come to be known as “Pebble Beach car week,” but it is not an event for those on a tight budget. Tickets for various events, such as “the Quail, a Motorsport Gathering,” can run into the hundreds, and even thousands, dollars. “It’s expensive to come to the Monterey Peninsula, any time of year, but especially during car week,” said Ken Gross, an author, classic car event organizer and a long-time judge at the Pebble Beach Concours. Simply getting to the Peninsula is expensive, whether you fly or drive. Gas in California is already among the most expensive in the country, and one stations along CA-1, the coastal highway leading up from Los Angeles, was commanding $5.89 for a gallon of the premium unleaded fuel that many high-performance models require. The average price for premium gas in California is $3.88 a gallon, according to AAA.

James Bond’s Aston Martin was auctioned by RM Sotheby’s. RM Sotheby’s

Finding a place to stay is the next headache. During car week, many hotels demand four-day minimum reservations while also punching up prices to astronomical levels. Quail Lodge Resort and Golf Club is getting as much as $1,800 a night for a standard room over the weekend, according to their reservations desk. Other times of the year that runs as little as $200 to $300. “A cheap hotel around Monterey will cost $300 and a good one close to $1,000,” said Charlie Vogelheim, a regular car week attendee who found the local Embassy Suites asked for $989 – before taxes and fees. Even then, it only had one room left, as of Friday morning. “People I know are staying as far as 60 miles away because they can’t find a room or because what they do find is just too expensive,” said Vogelheim, an automotive analyst. The good news is that there are plenty of things to see once you do arrive in Pebble Beach, with more than a dozen car shows, auctions, driving events and the four days of classic racing at the Laguna Seca Raceway. Family members who aren’t gearheads can find plenty of other things to keep themselves busy, whether driving down the coastal highway or going to the aquarium in nearby Monterey. But few things are free, especially for classic car fans. One of the smaller events, the Carmel Mission Classic, at Mission San Carlos Borromeo de Carmelo in Carmel-by-the-Sea costs $55 though it includes a wine tasting and souvenir glass. The Rolex Monterey Reunion starts at $170 for basic, four-day access, though the Flagroom pass jumps to $450. To get into the Pebble Beach Concours will cost $375 for advance tickets, more at the gate. Entry to the Quail start at $950, though there’s a more exclusive, $2,500 Patron ticket. “It’s worth it,” said Brenden Clay, of Dublin, California, who has been a regular attendee during Pebble Beach car week for a number of years. His own hotel, he noted, increases its price five-fold during the event, something he and friends cover by cramming into a single suite. “It’s a big jump,” Clay said, but something he would not miss.

Bugatti Centodieci Source: Bugatti


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-17  Authors: paul a eisenstein
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, classic, california, prices, tickets, expensive, gasoline, monterey, events, jacked, rooms, travelers, hotel, isnt, week, concours, beach, car, pebble


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Car-crazy Californians slow their purchases of new vehicles

New car sales in the largest U.S. auto market have slowed this year as more and more drivers opt for less-expensive used cars. One reason could be that cars make up a bigger percentage of new model sales in California than around the rest the country. Californians, who have long been known for their love of cars and trucks, are still buying vehicles. But they are increasingly turning to the used market. In addition, the California car group now estimates sales of fully electric vehicles will top


New car sales in the largest U.S. auto market have slowed this year as more and more drivers opt for less-expensive used cars. One reason could be that cars make up a bigger percentage of new model sales in California than around the rest the country. Californians, who have long been known for their love of cars and trucks, are still buying vehicles. But they are increasingly turning to the used market. In addition, the California car group now estimates sales of fully electric vehicles will top
Car-crazy Californians slow their purchases of new vehicles Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-15  Authors: phil lebeau
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, purchases, sales, carcrazy, vehicles, california, slow, model, half, used, car, state, cars, californians, market


Car-crazy Californians slow their purchases of new vehicles

New car sales in the largest U.S. auto market have slowed this year as more and more drivers opt for less-expensive used cars.

New vehicles sales in California dropped 5.6% in the first half of 2019, setting the state on track for full-year sales to fall short of 2 million vehicles for the first time since 2014, according to the California New Car Dealers Association.

“It is not a huge surprise that after years of increased sales, we are seeing the market level off, reflecting the broader economic and political climates,” Ted Nicholas, the association’s chairman, said in a release Wednesday announcing sales for the first half of the year.

The drop in new vehicle sales in California is greater than the 1.5% decline seen in the U.S. from January through June. One reason could be that cars make up a bigger percentage of new model sales in California than around the rest the country. Sales of new cars, which include sedans and compacts, dropped by 10.8% during the first half of the year across the state while sales of new pickups, SUV’s, crossover utility vehicles and other light trucks fell by 1.1%.

Californians, who have long been known for their love of cars and trucks, are still buying vehicles. But they are increasingly turning to the used market. Sales of preowned models in California climbed more than 5% in the first half of the year.

Sales of new electric and hybrid vehicles continue to climb in a state where green transportation is in demand. In fact, the trade group says EVs and hybrids made up 13% of all new models sold. In addition, the California car group now estimates sales of fully electric vehicles will top 100,000 this year.

Much of the rise in EV sales in the Golden State is due largely to the popularity of the Tesla Model 3, which is built in Fremont, just outside of San Francisco. In the first half of this year, Californians bought 33,005 Model 3s. That means 1 in 4 Model 3s sold worldwide in the first half of this year was purchased in California.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-15  Authors: phil lebeau
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, purchases, sales, carcrazy, vehicles, california, slow, model, half, used, car, state, cars, californians, market


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One California police officer killed, two injured in Riverside gun battle

China fixes its yuan midpoint at 7.0326 per dollar, stronger than…Analysts were predicting the midpoint to be set at 7.0421 per dollar after the yuan last traded at 7.0578 in Monday’s session, according to Reuters estimates. China Economyread more


China fixes its yuan midpoint at 7.0326 per dollar, stronger than…Analysts were predicting the midpoint to be set at 7.0421 per dollar after the yuan last traded at 7.0578 in Monday’s session, according to Reuters estimates. China Economyread more
One California police officer killed, two injured in Riverside gun battle Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: joanna tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mondays, riverside, yuan, midpoint, dollar, set, officer, injured, gun, killed, traded, thananalysts, stronger, session, predicting, battle, california


One California police officer killed, two injured in Riverside gun battle

China fixes its yuan midpoint at 7.0326 per dollar, stronger than…

Analysts were predicting the midpoint to be set at 7.0421 per dollar after the yuan last traded at 7.0578 in Monday’s session, according to Reuters estimates.

China Economy

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: joanna tan
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4 companies pay California $70 million for delaying drug rollouts to keep prices high

An employee collects newly-manufactured pills at the tablet production plant at Teva Pharmaceutical Industries headquarters in Jerusalem, Israel. Four pharmaceutical companies collectively are agreeing to pay California nearly $70 million to settle allegations that they delayed drugs to keep prices high, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said Monday. The bulk of the money will come from Teva Pharmaceutical Industries and its affiliates for paying to delay a generic narcolepsy drug, Prov


An employee collects newly-manufactured pills at the tablet production plant at Teva Pharmaceutical Industries headquarters in Jerusalem, Israel. Four pharmaceutical companies collectively are agreeing to pay California nearly $70 million to settle allegations that they delayed drugs to keep prices high, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said Monday. The bulk of the money will come from Teva Pharmaceutical Industries and its affiliates for paying to delay a generic narcolepsy drug, Prov
4 companies pay California $70 million for delaying drug rollouts to keep prices high Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29  Authors: meg tirrell
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, paying, market, prices, pharmaceutical, agreements, nearly, settlement, drug, million, companies, 70, california, teva, generic, rollouts, pay, high, delaying


4 companies pay California $70 million for delaying drug rollouts to keep prices high

An employee collects newly-manufactured pills at the tablet production plant at Teva Pharmaceutical Industries headquarters in Jerusalem, Israel.

Four pharmaceutical companies collectively are agreeing to pay California nearly $70 million to settle allegations that they delayed drugs to keep prices high, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said Monday.

The bulk of the money will come from Teva Pharmaceutical Industries and its affiliates for paying to delay a generic narcolepsy drug, Provigil, from entering the market for nearly six years.

Teva is paying $69 million, which Becerra says is the largest pay-for-delay settlement received by any state.

Such agreements let the developer of brand name drugs keep their monopolies over the drugs after their patents expire, thereby letting them continue to charge consumers higher prices. The drug developer pays the generic manufacturer to keep the cheaper version of the drug from entering the marketplace for an agreed period of time.

Teva said the money will come from a pre-existing fund that was created in 2015 as part of the company’s settlement with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission over similar claims, and it will not make any additional payments.

Becerra said such agreements can force consumers and the health care market to pay as much as 90% more than if there were generic alternatives. More than $25 million of the settlement will go to a consumer fund for California residents who purchased Provigil, Nuvigil or Modafinil between 2006 and 2012.

“No one in America should be forced to skip or ration doses of medicine that they need … and certainly not because a drug company is colluding to keep the price of your drug artificially high even when cheaper options could be available. But that’s what’s happening,” Becerra said.

The second, $760,000 settlement is with Teva, Endo Pharmaceuticals and Teikoku Pharma USA over keeping a genetic alternative to the pain patch Lidoderm from entering the market for nearly two years.

Teva said it is paying $200,000 to cover the state’s legal costs after settling similar federal claims earlier this year.

Both settlements bar the companies from pay-for-delay agreements for several years. Teva is agreeing to not to enter any such agreements for 10 years, while Endo Pharmaceuticals has an eight-year agreement and Teikoku a 20-year injunction.

Teva said the restriction is identical to its federal consent decree.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29  Authors: meg tirrell
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, paying, market, prices, pharmaceutical, agreements, nearly, settlement, drug, million, companies, 70, california, teva, generic, rollouts, pay, high, delaying


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Four dead, including suspected gunman, in shooting at California garlic festival

Police stay focused on a target after a shooting at the Gilroy Garlic Festival in Gilroy, California on July 28, 2019. Scot Smithee, Gilroy’s chief of police, said the four dead included the suspected gunman. Footage uploaded to social media appeared to show festival attendees scattering in fear and confusion as loud popping sounds could be heard in the background. “Who’d shoot up a garlic festival?” On Sunday night following the reported shooting, U.S. President Donald Trump tweeted: “Reports a


Police stay focused on a target after a shooting at the Gilroy Garlic Festival in Gilroy, California on July 28, 2019. Scot Smithee, Gilroy’s chief of police, said the four dead included the suspected gunman. Footage uploaded to social media appeared to show festival attendees scattering in fear and confusion as loud popping sounds could be heard in the background. “Who’d shoot up a garlic festival?” On Sunday night following the reported shooting, U.S. President Donald Trump tweeted: “Reports a
Four dead, including suspected gunman, in shooting at California garlic festival Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29
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Four dead, including suspected gunman, in shooting at California garlic festival

Police stay focused on a target after a shooting at the Gilroy Garlic Festival in Gilroy, California on July 28, 2019.

Police and ambulances raced to a shooting at a food festival in California on Sunday, with four people reported dead and 15 injured, and video posted on social media showing people at the event running for cover as shots rang out.

Scot Smithee, Gilroy’s chief of police, said the four dead included the suspected gunman.

The shooting took place on the last day of the Gilroy Garlic Festival, an annual three-day event south of San Jose, where the gunman appeared to have cut through the fence to get into the festival, according to Smithee, who added that there may be one accomplice.

Aerial footage showed the festival grounds apparently deserted but with many emergency and police vehicles on surrounding streets and police in bullet-proof gear.

Footage uploaded to social media appeared to show festival attendees scattering in fear and confusion as loud popping sounds could be heard in the background.

“What’s going on?” a woman can be heard asking on one video. “Who’d shoot up a garlic festival?”

California Governor Gavin Newsom said his office was monitoring the situation closely. “This is nothing short of horrific,” Newsom wrote on Twitter.

On Sunday night following the reported shooting, U.S. President Donald Trump tweeted: “Reports are that shooter has not yet been apprehended. Be careful and safe!”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, media, shooting, suspected, including, garlic, festival, california, video, smithee, dead, newsom, social, gunman, reported, gilroy


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How tech-infused primary care centers turned One Medical into a $2 billion business

Two years after leaving the traditional health-care world to lead primary care upstart One Medical, Amir Dan Rubin now faces a clear challenge. With competition heating up, he needs to rapidly expand the business into new areas without sacrificing the luxe service that patients have come to expect. One Medical has 72 clinics in seven states, and Rubin said he’s focused on pushing into new areas. The company is opening locations in Portland, Oregon, as well as Orange County, California, and Atlan


Two years after leaving the traditional health-care world to lead primary care upstart One Medical, Amir Dan Rubin now faces a clear challenge. With competition heating up, he needs to rapidly expand the business into new areas without sacrificing the luxe service that patients have come to expect. One Medical has 72 clinics in seven states, and Rubin said he’s focused on pushing into new areas. The company is opening locations in Portland, Oregon, as well as Orange County, California, and Atlan
How tech-infused primary care centers turned One Medical into a $2 billion business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-28  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rubin, centers, billion, medical, san, patients, primary, california, orange, needs, turned, business, portland, locations, care, techinfused


How tech-infused primary care centers turned One Medical into a $2 billion business

Two years after leaving the traditional health-care world to lead primary care upstart One Medical, Amir Dan Rubin now faces a clear challenge. With competition heating up, he needs to rapidly expand the business into new areas without sacrificing the luxe service that patients have come to expect.

Founded in 2007 by physician-turned-entrepreneur Tom X Lee, One Medical has become popular in and around its hometown of San Francisco by providing on-demand care and easy mobile booking and by selling its services to big companies who offer access as a perk to employees. Google and SpaceX are among those employers, according to a person familiar with the matter who asked not to be named because the relationships are confidential.

One Medical is taking on a chunk of the $3.5 trillion health-care industry, which is riddled with inefficiencies, impersonal care and old technologies that don’t talk to each other and leave patients struggling to find and track their medical records. The company is trying to modernize the whole process, and asks patients to pay a $199 annual membership fee.

“The vision and the focus is to delight millions,” said Rubin, in a recent interview at One Medical’s San Francisco headquarters. “In health care, almost every stakeholder group is frustrated and so we looked to solve a lot of these needs simultaneously by starting from scratch and putting the member at the center of the experience.”

One Medical has 72 clinics in seven states, and Rubin said he’s focused on pushing into new areas. The company is opening locations in Portland, Oregon, as well as Orange County, California, and Atlanta. It’s also partnering with health systems Providence St. Joseph (in Portland and Orange County) and Advocate Aurora (in Chicago), which should lead to more referrals from doctors at those hospitals. Three more Southern California locations are slated to open this month in close collaboration with the University of California San Diego.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-28  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rubin, centers, billion, medical, san, patients, primary, california, orange, needs, turned, business, portland, locations, care, techinfused


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Southwest Airlines yanks Boeing 737 Max from schedules through early November with no end in sight to grounding

A number of Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are parked at Southern California Logistics Airport on March 27, 2019 in Victorville, California. Southwest Airlines is waiting out a global grounding of MAX 8 and MAX 9 aircraft at the airport. Uncertainty over when regulators will allow the Boeing 737 Max to fly again following two deadly crashes prompted Southwest Airlines, the largest U.S. operator of the jets, to remove them from its schedules through early November — a month longer tha


A number of Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are parked at Southern California Logistics Airport on March 27, 2019 in Victorville, California. Southwest Airlines is waiting out a global grounding of MAX 8 and MAX 9 aircraft at the airport. Uncertainty over when regulators will allow the Boeing 737 Max to fly again following two deadly crashes prompted Southwest Airlines, the largest U.S. operator of the jets, to remove them from its schedules through early November — a month longer tha
Southwest Airlines yanks Boeing 737 Max from schedules through early November with no end in sight to grounding Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, schedule, yanks, boeing, month, flights, schedules, end, early, california, airlines, crashes, max, planes, sight, grounding, southwest


Southwest Airlines yanks Boeing 737 Max from schedules through early November with no end in sight to grounding

A number of Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are parked at Southern California Logistics Airport on March 27, 2019 in Victorville, California. Southwest Airlines is waiting out a global grounding of MAX 8 and MAX 9 aircraft at the airport.

Uncertainty over when regulators will allow the Boeing 737 Max to fly again following two deadly crashes prompted Southwest Airlines, the largest U.S. operator of the jets, to remove them from its schedules through early November — a month longer than it estimated in late June.

Southwest’s move follows similar schedule changes announced over the last week by American and United.

Southwest said Thursday it will cancel about 180 flights a day out of about 4,000 flights because of the schedule change. Last month, the Dallas-based airline said it was targeting October for the planes’ return, which would have meant 150 daily flight cancellations.

The planes have been grounded since mid-March after two fatal crashes within five months killed 346 people.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, schedule, yanks, boeing, month, flights, schedules, end, early, california, airlines, crashes, max, planes, sight, grounding, southwest


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Billion-dollar natural disasters rising. These states better prepare

In 2018 the United States experienced 14 disasters that cost the economy as much or more than $1 billion dollars each. That said, these are the riskiest states for extreme weather in America, according to the NOAA’s analysys of its storm events database. Texas has the highest frequency of extreme weather events over the period of analysis, and it also has the highest inflation-adjusted costs related to extreme weather. LouisianaLike Texas, Louisiana also experiences “a very high frequency” of ex


In 2018 the United States experienced 14 disasters that cost the economy as much or more than $1 billion dollars each. That said, these are the riskiest states for extreme weather in America, according to the NOAA’s analysys of its storm events database. Texas has the highest frequency of extreme weather events over the period of analysis, and it also has the highest inflation-adjusted costs related to extreme weather. LouisianaLike Texas, Louisiana also experiences “a very high frequency” of ex
Billion-dollar natural disasters rising. These states better prepare Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: kat eschner, daniel bukszpan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rising, prepare, billiondollar, extreme, california, texas, states, weather, smith, natural, better, emergency, events, disasters, state


Billion-dollar natural disasters rising. These states better prepare

A bomb cyclone developing over the Midwest Source: NASA

From the heat wave currently sweeping the Midwest to the oncoming ravages of hurricane season in the south, extreme and volatile weather impacts every state in the nation. But some states are more at risk than others as global warming changes the entire landscape of the country. In 2018 the United States experienced 14 disasters that cost the economy as much or more than $1 billion dollars each. But the total cost of these hurricanes, wildfires, floods and other disasters that struck the U.S. last year is about $91 billion, according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which tracks U.S. weather and climate events that have great economic and societal impacts. Some studies speculate that a warming climate may be making these disasters more frequent and more intense, and the areas they hit will change over time. The trend has people in the U.S. wondering which state is the safest place to live and work. More from America’s Top States for Business:

These are America’s top 10 states to live in 2019

Amazon had it right: Virginia is America’s Top State for Business in 2019

Why Rhode Island is the worst state for business in 2019 “As natural and man-made hazards become increasingly complex and difficult to predict, the need for forward-leaning action is greater than ever before,” Michael Hart, news desk manager of FEMA’s Office of External Affairs, told CNBC via email. Natural disasters are also taking a toll on the U.S. economy, and it is spurring migration shifts. The catastrophes of 2018 weren’t an anomaly: Over each of the past three years, an average of 15 billion-dollar disasters have occurred, while the average for 1980–2018 was just 6.2 events per year. The number of billion-dollar disasters is clearly trending upward, writes Adam B. Smith, a climate scientist with the NOAA. Since 1980 weather and climate disasters have cost the US $1.6 trillion in damages, the agency reports. According to a 2018 study by Anthony Oliver-Smith the displacement of increasing numbers of people due to natural disasters has become a major challenge to states — and the federal government. FEMA pushes for a “culture of preparedness” at the national and local levels, Hart said. Being prepared at every level reduces death and injury as well as helping to lower the cost of a natural disaster. An independent study co-funded by FEMA in 2018 found that every $1 spent by the federal government on mitigation efforts saves an average of $6 in spending in the future. “This return on investment shows that investing now is an opportunity to reduce future disaster costs and accelerate recovery,” he said. That said, these are the riskiest states for extreme weather in America, according to the NOAA’s analysys of its storm events database.

Texas

One state really stands head and shoulders above the rest, and that would be Texas, ” says Smith. Over NOAA’s 40 years of analysis, the Lone Star State has experienced more than 100 separate $1 billion disasters, from the Houston floods and hurricanes of 2017 to flooding and even winter storms, which are more usually associated with the Eastern Seaboard. Texas has the highest frequency of extreme weather events over the period of analysis, and it also has the highest inflation-adjusted costs related to extreme weather. The government estimate of more than $250 billion in damage is a conservative one, Smith says. The real number is likely much higher. “Texas takes an all-hazards approach to disaster management and preparedness, whether it is hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, extreme heat or cold,” Chuck Phinney, chief of staff for the Texas Division of Emergency Management, told CNBC. That means the basic plan for dealing with disasters is the same no matter what comes: Local jurisdictions lead the emergency response push, with the state organization providing support for response and recovery.

The devastation after a tornado touches down in Texas. Photo: Getty Images

“Other than using the private sector and nonprofit organizations in our response efforts, we do not work directly with businesses,” he writes. “However, one of our objectives following a disaster is to restore critical infrastructure as quickly as possible so that businesses can open. Because disasters begin and end locally, we suggest that businesses work with the local emergency managers.”

Florida

Florida doesn’t experience anything like the frequency of billion-dollar disasters, but the ones it does experience — mostly hurricanes — are among the most costly to deal with, Smith says, making it a risky place for business. “As a result of all that hurricane impact, Florida has the second highest total damage cost only behind Texas since 1980,” he says, “about $225 billion in cumulative damage, using present dollars.” Hurricane Michael slammed into Florida, killing nearly four dozen people and destroying entire coastal communities. The storm broke records as the first of its size to strike the Florida Panhandle since records began in 1851. Coastal hurricanes bring storm surge with them, causing flooding and much other damage to property and loss of life. Flooding causes more deaths than any other kind of natural disaster the state experiences, according to state resources, and can slow regional recovery significantly. “A vital piece of an individual’s recovery is insurance,” FEMA’s Hart told CNBC. Recent historic flooding throughout the country, including in Florida, highlights the importance of flood insurance.

Local residents make their way across a washed-out road after category 4 Hurricane Michael made landfall along the Florida panhandle on Oct. 12, 2018, in Mexico Beach. Jabin Botsford | The Washington Post | Getty Images

“Certain areas of Florida are doing a pretty good job at making sure our landscapes are sufficiently intact to withstand extreme events,” said Brett Scheffers, a global change ecologist at the University of Florida. As an example, Alachua County, whose county seat is Gainesville, has an active program for land conservation, he said. “This maintains healthy forested and wetland ecosystems, which in turn maintain freshwater supply and builds and maintains resilience into the landscape.” In other areas of the state, however, “there is extensive development and building along coastlines, which makes communities at risk of extreme events such as hurricanes but also long-term events such as sea-level rise.”

California

California’s historic wildfires and struggles with related air pollution have been in the news over the past few years, and those factors do make it among the riskiest places to live and work, Smith says. The fire that wiped out the northern California community of Paradise and killed 85 people in November 2018 was the deadliest wildfire in the state’s history. It was also California’s most destructive wildfire, destroying nearly 14,000 homes. Its death toll far surpassed that of the devastating fires in Sonoma and Napa counties last year, which left 44 people dead.

Couple hugs after they manage to recover a keepsake bracelet in the rubble of their destroyed home, destroyed by the wildfire in Paradise, California, on Nov. 15, 2018. Marcus Yam | Los Angeles Times | Getty Images

From late July into August, the Mendocino Complex fire burned over 450,000 acres in Northern California, becoming the largest wildfire in state history. It surpassed last December’s Thomas fire, which previously held the record by burning over 280,000 acres in Southern California. As of early December, California’s wildfires had burned more than 2 1/2 times as much area as they did by the same time last year. They’ve scorched more than 875,000 acres this year ― eclipsing the five-year average of about 230,000 acres burned. But Smith says there’s also another disaster-related factor that his work doesn’t account for but which could potentially have a devastating effect on the state economy: earthquakes. The U.S. Geological Survey contends that California has the most damaging earthquakes because of its greater population and extensive infrastructure. Last week’s two massive earthquakes — a magnitude 6.4 that rocked southern California an July 4 and a 7.1 just a day later, the strongest one to hit the region in 20 years — is just a reminder that the Big One is coming. “It’s just a matter of time,” says Smith. Yet residents are worried about how prepared they will be when it does come: The nation’s first publicly available earthquake early warning mobile app, called ShakeAlert, was launched earlier this year as part of a pilot program designed to give Los Angeles County residents a few seconds of warning before the shaking. ShakeAlerts are issued for all quakes, including aftershocks, of magnitude 5.0 or greater in Los Angeles County. But the warning never came. That’s because the Independence Day earthquake was centered to the north in the Mojave Desert in Kern County and did not reach the shaking threshold in Los Angeles County. Funding has been secured to complete the network in California in the next two years.

Bottles scatter the floor of a convenience store, following a 7.1 magnitude earthquake that struck on July 6, 2019, in Ridgecrest, California. Mario Tama | Getty Images News | Getty Images

“It is imperative that Californians remain vigilant in preparing for the next disaster,” a government spokesperson told CNBC. “Having an emergency plan and following evacuation orders is vital to making our communities more resilient and able to recover quickly from a disaster.”

Louisiana

Like Texas, Louisiana also experiences “a very high frequency” of extreme weather events, Smith says. “So you get hit over and over.” For Louisiana, a place with historically low economic growth, “it’s never really made whole,” he says. “It feels like it’s always playing catch-up.” Like Texas, Louisiana practices an all-hazards approach, and it includes business in its public-facing emergency planning information. “We were one of the first states to establish a business Emergency Operations Center,” says Mike Steele, spokesperson for the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness. “It’s a way for our business and industry partners to see what needs are coming in, to deal with that particular event.” Businesses in the region, including big-box stores and industrial concerns, work with the state and with local emergency response to help Louisiana recover from extreme weather.

Safest states — for now

“The United States is pretty much loaded for so many [weather] extremes in so many places,” the NOAA’s Smith tells CNBC. But in terms of risk, all places aren’t created equal when it comes to the types, severity and numbers of disasters they experience. Some places face hurricanes, while others face wildfires and others face extreme winter storms. Others are spared almost completely. Yet while no state is completely safe, there are some that are not really prone to natural disasters of any kind. One of these is Utah, according to the NOAA. “Utah is a pretty benign place as far as extreme weather and climate events,” Smith says. Located inland, the state can experience drought and extreme winter storms that include blizzards and freezing rain, but nothing like what the other four states named here deal with.

It’s not the only place in the country, however. “Several northeastern states, such as New Hampshire, Vermont and even Maine, do not see as many of the damaging and costly extremes,” says Smith. What’s also true, though, is that places that are relatively stable now are likely to experience change over the coming decades, he says: “The bull’s-eye of risk is expanding.” That means that areas that are currently relatively stable will see changes, he says. The Northeast and North Central are likely to be the most stable places weather-wise in coming decades, while more southern states will continue to be hit by disasters at a disproportionate rate.

Several northeastern states, such as New Hampshire, Vermont and even Maine, do not see as many of the damaging and costly extremes … [but] the bull’s-eye of risk is expanding. Adam B. Smith climate scientist with the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: kat eschner, daniel bukszpan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rising, prepare, billiondollar, extreme, california, texas, states, weather, smith, natural, better, emergency, events, disasters, state


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Alphabet’s robotaxis get one step closer to commercial use in California

Cramer: Tech stocks are overvalued, but ‘it’s not like we’ve gone…”After a big run, you always hear that there are just too many bulls, too much excitement, too much optimism,” but Jim Cramer’s not buying it. Mad Money with Jim Cramerread more


Cramer: Tech stocks are overvalued, but ‘it’s not like we’ve gone…”After a big run, you always hear that there are just too many bulls, too much excitement, too much optimism,” but Jim Cramer’s not buying it. Mad Money with Jim Cramerread more
Alphabet’s robotaxis get one step closer to commercial use in California Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-02  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, commercial, stocks, overvalued, itmad, california, tech, step, alphabets, jim, run, optimism, weve, money, hear, closer, robotaxis


Alphabet's robotaxis get one step closer to commercial use in California

Cramer: Tech stocks are overvalued, but ‘it’s not like we’ve gone…

“After a big run, you always hear that there are just too many bulls, too much excitement, too much optimism,” but Jim Cramer’s not buying it.

Mad Money with Jim Cramer

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-02  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, commercial, stocks, overvalued, itmad, california, tech, step, alphabets, jim, run, optimism, weve, money, hear, closer, robotaxis


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After tax hike, gas in California is now a dollar higher than the national average

Gas prices over $4.00 a gallon are displayed at a gas station on May 24, 2019 in Mill Valley, California. California’s already-high gas prices jumped up again on July 1, with a new 5.6 cents per gallon gasoline tax hike. The increase brings the average price per gallon in California for regular gasoline to a national high of $3.755 per gallon, according to the American Automobile Association, more than a dollar a gallon more than the national average of $2.717 per gallon. The hike takes Californ


Gas prices over $4.00 a gallon are displayed at a gas station on May 24, 2019 in Mill Valley, California. California’s already-high gas prices jumped up again on July 1, with a new 5.6 cents per gallon gasoline tax hike. The increase brings the average price per gallon in California for regular gasoline to a national high of $3.755 per gallon, according to the American Automobile Association, more than a dollar a gallon more than the national average of $2.717 per gallon. The hike takes Californ
After tax hike, gas in California is now a dollar higher than the national average Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: marc rod, tom dichristopher
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, according, travel, gas, national, dollar, prices, california, nordhues, higher, tax, hike, cents, average, gallon, increase


After tax hike, gas in California is now a dollar higher than the national average

Gas prices over $4.00 a gallon are displayed at a gas station on May 24, 2019 in Mill Valley, California.

California’s already-high gas prices jumped up again on July 1, with a new 5.6 cents per gallon gasoline tax hike.

The increase brings the average price per gallon in California for regular gasoline to a national high of $3.755 per gallon, according to the American Automobile Association, more than a dollar a gallon more than the national average of $2.717 per gallon.

The hike takes California’s total statewide gas tax up to 47.3 cents per gallon, according to the state’s Department of Tax and Fee administration.

With the new tax in place, it will cost approximately 78 cents more to fill an average 14-gallon gas tank, according to Marie Montgomery Nordhues, a spokeswoman for the Auto Club of Southern California.

Although it comes just before the July 4 holiday, the tax increase is unlikely to suppress Independence Day travel because most people have already finalized their plans, Nordhues said. AAA is projecting a 4.1% increase in holiday car travel in California from to last year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: marc rod, tom dichristopher
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, according, travel, gas, national, dollar, prices, california, nordhues, higher, tax, hike, cents, average, gallon, increase


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