Kids now dream of being professional YouTubers rather than astronauts, study finds

A young boy wears an astronaut costume in the parking lot of the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum April 17, 2012. Today’s kids are three times more likely to aspire toward a career as a YouTuber rather than an astronaut, according to a new study. Almost a third of the kids in the survey said they wanted to be a YouTuber when they grew up, while 11% said they wanted to be an astronaut. More than half of those in China said they wanted to be an astronaut, making it the most popular career


A young boy wears an astronaut costume in the parking lot of the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum April 17, 2012. Today’s kids are three times more likely to aspire toward a career as a YouTuber rather than an astronaut, according to a new study. Almost a third of the kids in the survey said they wanted to be a YouTuber when they grew up, while 11% said they wanted to be an astronaut. More than half of those in China said they wanted to be an astronaut, making it the most popular career
Kids now dream of being professional YouTubers rather than astronauts, study finds Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, young, kids, uk, wears, finds, youtubers, youtuber, children, china, professional, astronaut, dream, wanted, career, astronauts, study


Kids now dream of being professional YouTubers rather than astronauts, study finds

A young boy wears an astronaut costume in the parking lot of the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum April 17, 2012.

Today’s kids are three times more likely to aspire toward a career as a YouTuber rather than an astronaut, according to a new study.

Toy production firm Lego surveyed 3,000 children between the ages of eight and 12 from the U.S., the U.K. and China, as well as 326 parents who had children aged between five and 12.

Almost a third of the kids in the survey said they wanted to be a YouTuber when they grew up, while 11% said they wanted to be an astronaut.

However, the responses varied depending where children were from. More than half of those in China said they wanted to be an astronaut, making it the most popular career aspiration.

In the U.S. and the U.K., that number fell to just over 10%, with vlogger (video blogger) or YouTuber ranked as the top aspiration in both countries.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, young, kids, uk, wears, finds, youtubers, youtuber, children, china, professional, astronaut, dream, wanted, career, astronauts, study


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Suzy Welch: A simple quiz can help you determine if your ego is hurting your success at work

To sum up this dilemma, bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch quotes her husband, former GE CEO Jack Welch: “Success makes some people grow, and it makes some people swell.” To help you determine which category you fall into, Welch developed the following quiz:1. How annoying”Self-confident people love being around those who expand their thinking and up the performance bar for everyone,” says Welch. Though this type of personal analysis can be challenging, Welch emphasize


To sum up this dilemma, bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch quotes her husband, former GE CEO Jack Welch: “Success makes some people grow, and it makes some people swell.” To help you determine which category you fall into, Welch developed the following quiz:1. How annoying”Self-confident people love being around those who expand their thinking and up the performance bar for everyone,” says Welch. Though this type of personal analysis can be challenging, Welch emphasize
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thinking, work, hurting, welch, simple, help, youre, team, arrogant, suzy, career, quiz, success, type, ego, determine


Suzy Welch: A simple quiz can help you determine if your ego is hurting your success at work

Meanwhile, Welch says, “people who swell — all they are is arrogant, which gets old fast, and thus, is usually a one-way ticket to self-destruction.”

“Stars, you must make sure you’re in the former category,” she tells CNBC Make It . “People who grow exude a healthy self-confidence. They’re learners, builders and team players, and because of that, their career tends to keep soaring.”

But others respond differently to a taste of success. They act exclusively in their own interest, talk over people, and curtail others’ advancement. To sum up this dilemma, bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch quotes her husband, former GE CEO Jack Welch: “Success makes some people grow, and it makes some people swell.”

Maybe you’ve seen this unfold in your workplace. Some people, given more responsibility, rise to the challenge. They build new skills, take on bigger projects, and stretch themselves to meet the demands of their new role.

To help you determine which category you fall into, Welch developed the following quiz:

1. Do you spend more time thinking about…

A. Your next promotion

B. The career growth of the people who work with you

“Answer A,” says Welch, “is for arrogant in this case, because arrogant people are so me, me, me.” On the other hand, she says, “self-confident people are you, you, you, which, for every reason under the sun, including trust and loyalty, is better, better, better.”

2. In meetings do you usually…

A. Urge subordinates or colleagues to jump in and answer questions

B. Jump in and answer every question yourself

If you’re someone who loves the sound of your own voice, Welch says, “that’s a surefire red flag that you are too focused on yourself.”

3. If someone on your team is smarter than you are, do you think…

A. How great!

B. How annoying

“Self-confident people love being around those who expand their thinking and up the performance bar for everyone,” says Welch. Meanwhile, arrogant people “don’t think anyone is smarter than they are, and it bugs them that other people do.”

As a result, she says, “instead of listening to their intelligent teammates, they try to shut them down or shove them out,” which is, ultimately, “team killing and self-defeating.”

Though this type of personal analysis can be challenging, Welch emphasizes that it’s essential to your future professional success. And arrogance, she says, isn’t actually all that difficult to unlearn.

After all, “it’s all in your head.”

Suzy Welch is the co-founder of the Jack Welch Management Institute and a noted business journalist, TV commentator and public speaker. Think you need Suzy to fix your career? Email her at gettowork@cnbc.com.

Video by Helen Zhao

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More from Suzy Welch:

There’s a specific type of employee that always gets the promotion—here’s why

Why working from home can be terrible for your career

3 signs it’s time to quit a bad boss


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thinking, work, hurting, welch, simple, help, youre, team, arrogant, suzy, career, quiz, success, type, ego, determine


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How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary

After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. H


After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. H
How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, learning, switched, experience, program, single, work, salary, mom, coding, land, careers, job, didnt, career, lance, sixfigure


How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary

After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. “I have a teaching degree but (teaching) won’t pay the bills for a family of five – it’s just not an option,” she told CNBC. “I thought about nursing, but the biggest drawback was that it required going back to school for two years to get another degree – I didn’t have two years, I have kids and bills to pay.” Despite being a self-confessed technophobe, Lance decided to learn computer coding after a suggestion from her brother-in-law, taking the plunge into an entirely new career path. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. In an interview with CNBC, she shared her tips on achieving success in a new career.

Value your ‘soft skills’

Although a career change can set you back in terms of direct industry experience, Lance urged others not to underestimate the value of basic core capabilities that appeal to employers — like strong communication or leadership skills. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. “(That was) combined with having just coming out of a great program which gave me all the right tech skills.”

Be willing to learn

As well as considering how your skillset could be transferred to a new industry, Lance told CNBC that having the right attitude was a real asset when it came to landing a job with no direct experience. She said she was upfront about what she could and couldn’t do, taking the approach: “I don’t know a lot about it, but I do know a little bit – and I’m willing to learn more.” According to Lance, embracing those knowledge gaps and showcasing a desire for self-improvement could be just as valuable as experience to some employers. “For the job I got, the company was starting a new team that would be using new technology, so we’d all be learning whether they hired somebody with experience or not,” she said. “They wanted people who were capable of learning quickly and who could work and learn under pressure. Going through Coding Dojo proved I had those capabilities and that desire to keep learning.”

Work your own way

Although Lance didn’t feel intellectually limited while learning to code, she said comparing her own pace of work to others’ sometimes led to unnecessary frustration and could impact her confidence. “One challenge was the amount of time it took to get through everything. I don’t think I had trouble with the actual program, but I didn’t have any tech background, so every assignment would take me one and a half times as long as everyone else,” she told CNBC. “Some of the people in my group had played on computers since they were 12 — so the assignments only took 20 to 30 minutes for them to complete.” She said it was important to find your own way to get work done, rather than sticking to the chronological or seemingly “correct” method. Her coding program was organized into three sections, and when she initially attempted to do each assignment in order, Lance found herself falling behind. “I’d have to skip forward and go back again – that’s not a good strategy,” she said. Instead, she got through all of the reading and learning materials for each topic before attempting to complete an assignment. “Make sure you do the reading and homework way before you start struggling with (graded assignments and technical work),” she said. “And make sure you allow yourself enough time outside of class to get stuff done.” Lance also advised those considering a career change not to overestimate their own academic ability. “I was pretty good in school and didn’t have to study a lot,” she said. “I went into Coding Dojo thinking I could get it done quicker, underestimating how much time it would consume. (You have to let it) take as long as it takes.”

Seek support to switch career


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, learning, switched, experience, program, single, work, salary, mom, coding, land, careers, job, didnt, career, lance, sixfigure


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Here’s an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts

Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache. But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience. Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource CenterDon’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the es


Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache. But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience. Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource CenterDon’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the es
Here’s an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unique, heres, resume, perfect, harvard, example, according, writing, try, truth, experts, university, written, career


Here's an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts

Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache.

But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience.

Certainly, they aren’t exactly the same (resumes shouldn’t be written in a narrative style), but both share a few similarities: They tell the truth, differentiate you from others, highlight your most unique qualities and capture readers’ attention.

Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):

IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource Center

Don’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the essential tips below:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unique, heres, resume, perfect, harvard, example, according, writing, try, truth, experts, university, written, career


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How working from home can actually hurt your career

7 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. “I get the very real upsides of working remotely. But the downsides are also very real.”


7 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. “I get the very real upsides of working remotely. But the downsides are also very real.”
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How working from home can actually hurt your career

7 Hours Ago

To view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again.

“I get the very real upsides of working remotely. But the downsides are also very real.”


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Suzy Welch: Why working from home can be terrible for your career

The flexibility to work remotely is a perk many workers dream of having. But according to bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch, working from the comfort of your home or coffee shop can easily become “a career killer.” “I understand that as an employee, sometimes remote work is the only way work is possible,” Welch tells CNBC Make It. However, she says, though working remotely has a few “very real upsides,” it has serious drawbacks as well. CNBC contributor Suzy Welch”Her


The flexibility to work remotely is a perk many workers dream of having. But according to bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch, working from the comfort of your home or coffee shop can easily become “a career killer.” “I understand that as an employee, sometimes remote work is the only way work is possible,” Welch tells CNBC Make It. However, she says, though working remotely has a few “very real upsides,” it has serious drawbacks as well. CNBC contributor Suzy Welch”Her
Suzy Welch: Why working from home can be terrible for your career Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, contributor, welch, working, suzy, work, remotely, understand, career, terrible, trust, remote


Suzy Welch: Why working from home can be terrible for your career

The flexibility to work remotely is a perk many workers dream of having. But according to bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch, working from the comfort of your home or coffee shop can easily become “a career killer.” “I understand that as an employee, sometimes remote work is the only way work is possible,” Welch tells CNBC Make It. “And I understand as a boss, sometimes remote work is the only way to get the person you need.” However, she says, though working remotely has a few “very real upsides,” it has serious drawbacks as well.

CNBC contributor Suzy Welch

“Here’s the truth,” says Welch. “The best work in an organization, the important work, it never gets done on the phone, or over email or on Slack.” Instead, she says, “it is almost always facilitated by relationships and understandings that only happen when people are together physically.” Great teams are built on “the banter, the lunches, the late nights, the jokes, the asides, the shared ah-has!” That type of bonding, she says, “builds layers of trust, and trust is a career’s rocket fuel. You can fly without it, but you can’t soar.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: courtney connley
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If you want success, ‘be unapologetic about your ambitions’: Career advice from top marketing chiefs

This approach helped her become chief marketing officer at Mondelez, before joining media and marketing consultancy MediaLink in 2017. Discussing her personal life in the office has only helped her, but like de Pablos, she initially shied away from doing so. “And now I’ve gone completely the other direction, which is to continually refer to my personal life, to reference my home life, the things that I value that matter. Lisa Utzschneider, chief executive officer, Integral Ad Science’Be unapolog


This approach helped her become chief marketing officer at Mondelez, before joining media and marketing consultancy MediaLink in 2017. Discussing her personal life in the office has only helped her, but like de Pablos, she initially shied away from doing so. “And now I’ve gone completely the other direction, which is to continually refer to my personal life, to reference my home life, the things that I value that matter. Lisa Utzschneider, chief executive officer, Integral Ad Science’Be unapolog
If you want success, ‘be unapologetic about your ambitions’: Career advice from top marketing chiefs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, diverse, chiefs, pablos, success, ambitions, officer, chief, marketing, personal, ad, unapologetic, career, advice, told, life, work


If you want success, 'be unapologetic about your ambitions': Career advice from top marketing chiefs

Dana Anderson, chief transformation officer at MediaLink, speaks at an event in New York in September 2014, in her former role as a senior vice president at Mondelez.

The world’s top marketing executives gathered at the Cannes Lions ad conference last week to discuss where they were spending their advertising dollars and compete to win a coveted Lion award. They also issued a few words of career advice, from the benefits of being yourself at work to showing your ambition off. CNBC took time to talk with some of the world’s leading marketing executives.

Berta de Pablos, chief category officer, Mars Wrigley

‘If everybody else is thinking like you, then they don’t need you’ M&M’s, Snickers and Skittles make up part of the multi-billion-dollar business that Berta de Pablos helps to oversee at Mars. She’s an advocate for bringing her personality to work, having written about how, as a young woman, she hid her Spanish heritage after a manager told her she would never “make it” because of how she spoke and dressed. De Pablos was 25 at the time and took it to heart, changing her appearance and restricting her views because she wanted to fit in. Three years later, a woman she was supposed to be mentoring suggested that she was hard to get to know, causing de Pablos to have a rethink.

Berta de Pablos, chief category officer at Mars Wrigley Mars

“It’s about making sure that you really know yourself … and find your inner strength,” she told CNBC. This links to having a diverse team around you, she added. “The other thing that has worked for me — and when I have not done it, it has gone horribly wrong — is when I don’t listen to others. So when I think that I have all the answers … I actually found that the best answers are from talking to people, from talking to the experts and having a very diverse group of people that are surrounding me, diverse in thinking, diverse in origin, diverse in culture, upbringing.” “So again, just to surround yourself with people that are not like you … If everybody else is thinking like you, then they don’t need you.”

Dana Anderson, chief transformation officer, MediaLink

‘The value of what you bring is not always connected to your billings or your revenue’ Dana Anderson has had “so many different jobs,” from writing scripts for commercials to being a project manager in ad agencies, where she had responsibility for bringing money in. But it was her switch to the role of “planner,” a job that involves thinking about marketing strategy, which set her up for the rest of her career.

Dana Anderson, chief transformation officer at MediaLink, speaks at an event in New York in September 2014, in her former role as a senior vice president at Mondelez. Paul Zimmerman | Getty Images

Working at ad agency J Walter Thompson (now Wunderman Thompson), a colleague convinced her to become a planner, but she was “petrified” because she would no longer have financial responsibility, she told CNBC. “(Strategic) planning … taught me that the value of what you bring is not always connected to your billings or your revenue … you can bring incredible value … if you make your company and your client make strides and have insights,” she said. This approach helped her become chief marketing officer at Mondelez, before joining media and marketing consultancy MediaLink in 2017. Her second piece of advice is to be generous with your time. “A woman came up to me … that I did not remember. And she said I just want to thank you for the time that you spent with me three years ago and you told me, don’t let your job decide if you’re going to have children. She said, I had a child, I’m so happy and I just want you to know … We spent time together and had that conversation (and) I didn’t expect anything back.”

Andrea Mallard, chief marketing officer, Pinterest

‘I continually refer to my personal life and that’s only made me more successful at work’ In 2013, Andrea Mallard posted a very personal essay on Medium, titled “Death. Dying. Design. What I Learned Watching My Mother Die.” In it, she wrote about her mother’s last days and how her care could have been improved. She referred to IDEO, the Palo Alto design consultancy she worked for at the time, and how healthcare could be better designed for the dying and their families.

Andrea Mallard, Chief Marketing Officer at Pinterest Pinterest

Speaking to CNBC about her current role as CMO of Pinterest (she joined in November 2018) Mallard said she increasingly brought her personal self to work. “The decision to take the job at Pinterest was a decision to go even deeper and trying to link my personal life with my work life … The only currency that matters to me — and I think should matter to most people — are time and meaning, ” she said. Discussing her personal life in the office has only helped her, but like de Pablos, she initially shied away from doing so. “And now I’ve gone completely the other direction, which is to continually refer to my personal life, to reference my home life, the things that I value that matter. And that’s only made me more successful at work.”

Lisa Utzschneider, chief executive officer, Integral Ad Science

‘Be unapologetic about your career ambitions and the more success you will have’ Lisa Utzschneider has a tough job. She is the chief executive of Integral Ad Science (IAS), one of the companies tasked with making sure advertising does not appear next to inappropriate content on YouTube and other sites, and that online ads are seen by humans rather than bots.

Lisa Utzschneider, Yahoo’s former chief revenue officer, and current CEO of Integral Ad Science, at an event in New York, September 2016 John Lamparski | Getty Images

Earlier in her career, Utzschneider spent six years at Amazon when advertising on the site was in its infancy. What she learnt at Amazon was to get comfortable with ambiguity, because everything was new. “At IAS … there’s a hunger for being able to build the business together and being comfortable with ambiguity and not having a playbook and comfort with being handed a marker, going to (a) whiteboard and figuring out how to build our verification business together,” she told CNBC. Her advice for someone starting out? “Be unapologetic about your career ambitions and the more success you will have.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, diverse, chiefs, pablos, success, ambitions, officer, chief, marketing, personal, ad, unapologetic, career, advice, told, life, work


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Media icon Arianna Huffington faced 37 rejections before kick-starting her career

Arianna Huffington is celebrated for her publishing prowess. The Greek American businesswoman is the founder of international news and opinion site The Huffington Post. However, her path to success wasn’t without its hurdles, as Huffington keenly revealed in a recent LinkedIn post. The 68-year-old wrote of how, as a young, aspiring author living in London, she faced 37 rejections before finally securing a publishing contract for her second book. “One of the low points in my life was when my seco


Arianna Huffington is celebrated for her publishing prowess. The Greek American businesswoman is the founder of international news and opinion site The Huffington Post. However, her path to success wasn’t without its hurdles, as Huffington keenly revealed in a recent LinkedIn post. The 68-year-old wrote of how, as a young, aspiring author living in London, she faced 37 rejections before finally securing a publishing contract for her second book. “One of the low points in my life was when my seco
Media icon Arianna Huffington faced 37 rejections before kick-starting her career Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, young, journalist, 37, author, faced, arianna, publishing, book, kickstarting, icon, wroteby, wrote, rejections, second, huffington, media, career


Media icon Arianna Huffington faced 37 rejections before kick-starting her career

Arianna Huffington is celebrated for her publishing prowess.

The Greek American businesswoman is the founder of international news and opinion site The Huffington Post. She is also a renowned journalist and author of 15 books.

However, her path to success wasn’t without its hurdles, as Huffington keenly revealed in a recent LinkedIn post.

The 68-year-old wrote of how, as a young, aspiring author living in London, she faced 37 rejections before finally securing a publishing contract for her second book.

“One of the low points in my life was when my second book was rejected by 37 publishers,” Huffington wrote.

“By rejection 25, you would have thought I might have said, ‘Hey, you know, there’s something wrong here. Maybe I should be looking at a different career,'” she noted.

But, instead, Huffington chose to persevere with her dream.

At the time, she had one published book under her belt and was working as a journalist. So she walked into a local Barclays bank — “armed with nothing but a lot of chutzpah” — and asked for a loan to tide her over until her writing aspirations were realized.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: karen gilchrist
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The best career and financial advice we got from our dads

With Father’s Day coming up this Sunday, the staff at CNBC Make It took some time to reflect on life lessons from our dads. Kathleen Elkins”I remember distinctly the first time I heard my dad’s, ‘Is that a want or a need?’ speech: I was in kindergarten and tried to order a chocolate milk at a restaurant. Most of the talk went over my head, but the conclusion of his message stuck: There are ‘wants’ and ‘needs’ in life, and chocolate milk classifies as a ‘want.’ Of course, there’s always a time an


With Father’s Day coming up this Sunday, the staff at CNBC Make It took some time to reflect on life lessons from our dads. Kathleen Elkins”I remember distinctly the first time I heard my dad’s, ‘Is that a want or a need?’ speech: I was in kindergarten and tried to order a chocolate milk at a restaurant. Most of the talk went over my head, but the conclusion of his message stuck: There are ‘wants’ and ‘needs’ in life, and chocolate milk classifies as a ‘want.’ Of course, there’s always a time an
The best career and financial advice we got from our dads Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, best, doesnt, money, life, career, dad, words, dads, say, financial, chocolate, advice, milk


The best career and financial advice we got from our dads

With Father’s Day coming up this Sunday, the staff at CNBC Make It took some time to reflect on life lessons from our dads. Here’s the best advice we ever got from them.

There’s a difference between a ‘want’ and a ‘need’

Every Christmas, my dad takes me shopping for a “go-to gift.” Kathleen Elkins

“I remember distinctly the first time I heard my dad’s, ‘Is that a want or a need?’ speech: I was in kindergarten and tried to order a chocolate milk at a restaurant. Most of the talk went over my head, but the conclusion of his message stuck: There are ‘wants’ and ‘needs’ in life, and chocolate milk classifies as a ‘want.’ I promptly changed my order to an ice water. As I got older, I learned how to separate larger potential purchases into those two categories and developed a frugal lifestyle, much like my dad’s, centered around needs, rather than wants. Of course, there’s always a time and place for a chocolate milk: The occasional splurge keeps you sane. I just make sure to weigh the pros and cons before splurging and ensure that I’m spending on things that truly matter to me. — Kathleen Elkins, senior money reporter

‘If you have a passion that doesn’t pay, it’s called a hobby’

Courtesy of Megan Leonhardt

“My dad has always been very practical about his approach to life, especially when it comes to finding and building a successful career. He always told me and my sister growing up that we should find careers that we found interesting because we were going to spend the rest of our lives doing it. But when it came to a job within that career, he always stressed that it was important to keep learning. You should constantly be learning new things or you become stagnant. If that happens, it’s time for a new job. “That said, he encouraged both his girls to choose college majors and careers in which we could earn enough to comfortably afford to eat and have a roof over our heads. If you have a passion that doesn’t pay, it’s called a hobby. He wanted us to be able to stand on our own, and thanks to his little lessons along the way, we’re both doing just that!” — Megan Leonhardt, senior money reporter

Talk less and listen more

“My dad isn’t a man of many words, but he did teach me every lyric to Alison Krauss’ ‘When You Say Nothing At All’ by the time I was three years old. I still keep the lyrics with me since it is a song that means so much to us. “One line says: ‘You say it best when you say nothing at all.’ Those words have always reminded me of the power of listening (rather than talking) and the impact one’s actions (rather than their words) can have on those around them.” — Anna Hecht, money reporter

Passion is important, but so is your paycheck

Courtesy of Lindsey Stanberry

“My dad always says, ‘The reason you get paid to work is because it’s work.’ He’s always been very passionate about his career, and I think I get a lot of my drive from him. But when work gets tough for whatever reason — a project doesn’t go as planned, office politics are complicated, you’re putting in a lot of overtime — I always remind myself, This is why I’m getting a paycheck. ” — Lindsey Stanberry, deputy managing editor Don’t miss: This is the No. 1 money lesson Shaquille O’Neal learned from his drill sergeant dad Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, best, doesnt, money, life, career, dad, words, dads, say, financial, chocolate, advice, milk


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Need to switch careers? These 5 things can get you there without spending a dime

You’re ready for a job change, but you’re concerned about the cost of retraining. Wilding says she likes thinking of a career change as an opportunity to reset and be intentional about crafting your career to fit who you are. In fact, Wilding said, just knowing she had a parachute made her determined to try to make things work at her current job. “You never want to make a career change from a place of desperation,” Wilding said. Be willing to talk to anyone and everyone in the industry you’re in


You’re ready for a job change, but you’re concerned about the cost of retraining. Wilding says she likes thinking of a career change as an opportunity to reset and be intentional about crafting your career to fit who you are. In fact, Wilding said, just knowing she had a parachute made her determined to try to make things work at her current job. “You never want to make a career change from a place of desperation,” Wilding said. Be willing to talk to anyone and everyone in the industry you’re in
Need to switch careers? These 5 things can get you there without spending a dime Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: jill cornfield, megan rogers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, career, youd, dime, switch, contact, things, need, job, spending, start, dont, careers, wilding, change, youre, work


Need to switch careers? These 5 things can get you there without spending a dime

You’re ready for a job change, but you’re concerned about the cost of retraining. Switching careers doesn’t have to mean a new degree and a lot of debt. Depending on your goal, you might be able to train for a new industry and save a bundle. “There’s so much to tackle, and so many options,” said Melody Wilding, a licensed social worker whose New York practice is career and executive coaching. Wilding is the author of an upcoming book on high-achieving, highly perceptive individuals in the workplace. Wilding says she likes thinking of a career change as an opportunity to reset and be intentional about crafting your career to fit who you are. Start creating a plan. Sketch out a calendar of how many people you will reach out to each week. How many people will you ask for coffee? Start with LinkedIn messages asking how people are and what they are up to. Instead of going in and asking immediately for a direct introduction, start with some relationship building. Be sure to get your finances in order. Pay down debt and build up an emergency cushion. When a client of Wilding’s saw she had a solid six months of financial room, it gave her tremendous peace of mind. In fact, Wilding said, just knowing she had a parachute made her determined to try to make things work at her current job. “You never want to make a career change from a place of desperation,” Wilding said.

1. Look inward

A good place to start is with a thorough self-assessment. “Get clear on what you want,” Wilding said. Here’s some good news. That inner assessment can be free. No need to pay for therapy or coaching, Wilding says. Do a mental run-through of your current job as well as some previous positions. Take stock of what you enjoyed most — and definitely pay attention to what you hope never to do again. Go through your perfect work day step by step, and add plenty of detail. “Most of us never take that time,” Wilding said. “Instead, we react to a career we fall into.”

2. It’s who you know

Start with a list of people you know from college, past jobs, networking events and family friends and relatives. “Don’t be afraid to contact someone you don’t know well,” Wilding said. Be willing to talk to anyone and everyone in the industry you’re interested in, says Win Sheffield, a New York work coach who specializes in career change. An easy way to find people: Check your own college’s LinkedIn page. On the left is a link to alumni, which lets you search by title, keyword or name of company.

Don’t be afraid to contact someone you don’t know well. Melody Wilding Careers coach

“It’s sometimes better to contact people from out of town,” Sheffield said, “so they don’t assume you are just asking them for a job or a referral.” Simply tell them you’d like to find out what it’s like to be a whatever, and ask for some pointers. Read blogs by people in the field to see what excites them, what’s new and trending, what frustrates them. Before you commit to joining a professional organization, see if you can attend one of the meetings, says Sheffield. It’s a good way to make contacts and learn something about the industry.

3. Take a test drive

Find out if the vision in your head matches the reality, Wilding says. It’s a great idea to shadow someone throughout their work day. You may already have someone in your circle, either a direct or indirect contact, who can introduce you to a person who holds the role you’d like to be in. Hanging out with this person for a work day or even the morning can give you a taste of the company or of a specific job. You might want to offer to pick up their lunch tab as a thank-you. More from Invest in You:

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Do these five things to get to your first $10,000 even if you’re broke

4. Find a guiding light

It may not be easy to find a mentor, but give it a shot. “The best mentors are invested in your growth,” Wilding said. You want someone you can meet with regularly. Make it clear you’re going to put as little work as possible on their plate.

One of Wilding’s clients regularly brought a deck of design work, so all the mentor had to do was show up and give a critique. Try expanding your skills in your current job. Wilding recommends initiating new ideas for stretch projects and new challenges you’d like to take on with your supervisor. These can be tailored to the job and industry you’d like to work in. “A new initiative, a new client project, new skills, such as coding,” she said. “Come to them with a proposal and make it an easy yes or no.” Be specific. Say something along the lines of, “I’ve got this idea for XYZ. How can we make it work?” Make sure you ask for feedback. What areas need improvement, and what areas showed the most growth? “It’s so valuable,” Wilding said. “We can’t see everything ourselves.”

5. Say yes to free classes


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: jill cornfield, megan rogers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, career, youd, dime, switch, contact, things, need, job, spending, start, dont, careers, wilding, change, youre, work


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