Don’t make this common rookie mistake during a job interview, says career expert

“Tell me about yourself” is one of the most common interview questions, yet lots of job candidates draw a blank when trying to come up with a strong answer. Through practice and preparation, though, you can avoid common mistakes and make a good impression on your potential employer. Chelsea Goodman, president and career elevation expert at Got The Job, says one rookie mistake candidates make when asked about yourself is giving away too much. Start by thinking about how your current role has help


“Tell me about yourself” is one of the most common interview questions, yet lots of job candidates draw a blank when trying to come up with a strong answer.
Through practice and preparation, though, you can avoid common mistakes and make a good impression on your potential employer.
Chelsea Goodman, president and career elevation expert at Got The Job, says one rookie mistake candidates make when asked about yourself is giving away too much.
Start by thinking about how your current role has help
Don’t make this common rookie mistake during a job interview, says career expert Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-14  Authors: ivana pino, tim stobierski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, job, dont, start, mistake, common, career, interview, expert, weaknesses, strengths, rookie, set, goals, role, goodman, question


Don't make this common rookie mistake during a job interview, says career expert

“Tell me about yourself” is one of the most common interview questions, yet lots of job candidates draw a blank when trying to come up with a strong answer. Though the question may seem straightforward, it’s open-ended, and responding concisely and effectively is hard. Through practice and preparation, though, you can avoid common mistakes and make a good impression on your potential employer. Chelsea Goodman, president and career elevation expert at Got The Job, says one rookie mistake candidates make when asked about yourself is giving away too much. “More often than not, people are prepared with answers about their strengths and weaknesses, references from prior roles, yet when asked this question, they’ll start talking about their kids or the activities they enjoy doing outside of work, and that’s not the point of this question,” says Goodman. Instead, stay focused. Here are three points you want to cover when answering this question in an interview.

1. What are you doing now?

Goodman says your response should be a brief, like an elevator pitch. Avoid telling your entire life story. Instead, take a minute to pick out the most relevant details about you and your professional life. Start by thinking about how your current role has helped you improve your strengths and weaknesses. If you manage a team, describe your responsibilities and include specific examples of initiatives or projects that you oversee on a daily basis. You want to emphasize the experiences that make you qualified for the role, so try to be more selective about the information you share. “The impression that you make within the first couple of minutes during your interview is going to shape how that person thinks,” says Goodman. “There are many people who don’t start on the right foot and then they have to recover from that, all because they couldn’t answer the easiest question, which is not meant to be a 20 minute spiel about your life.”

2. What do you hope to do next?

Ideally, the role you’re applying for will take your career to the next level. Mention where you see yourself in the future and how, if given the opportunity, the role will set the stage to help you achieve those career goals. Come up with a few long-term goals and the time frame in which you hope to achieve them.

“You want to find out what you can about a company as it’s important to you,” says Berger. She suggests framing it your goals this way shows that this potential relationship could be mutually beneficial. Say the position is looking for a candidate who is willing to work flexible hours, rather than a set schedule, or to take on various projects at once. Mention how and why your situation has made you well-positioned, and excited, to rise to that challenge.

3. Why would you be good in this role?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-14  Authors: ivana pino, tim stobierski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, job, dont, start, mistake, common, career, interview, expert, weaknesses, strengths, rookie, set, goals, role, goodman, question


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What to do with your unused vacation days, according to a career expert

There are less than two full work weeks remaining in 2019, and it’s likely you haven’t taken all of your vacation days. But though you may be uneasy about taking time to unwind, “it’s important to use vacation days, because they’re there for a reason,” says Vicki Salemi, career expert for Monster. Cash out or roll over your unused PTO daysSome companies allow employees to cash out on unused vacation days. Start planning now to take time off next yearNearly 770 million vacation days went unused l


There are less than two full work weeks remaining in 2019, and it’s likely you haven’t taken all of your vacation days.
But though you may be uneasy about taking time to unwind, “it’s important to use vacation days, because they’re there for a reason,” says Vicki Salemi, career expert for Monster.
Cash out or roll over your unused PTO daysSome companies allow employees to cash out on unused vacation days.
Start planning now to take time off next yearNearly 770 million vacation days went unused l
What to do with your unused vacation days, according to a career expert Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-13  Authors: sofia pitt, tim stobierski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salemi, companies, career, roll, expert, important, days, youre, according, unused, money, cash, vacation


What to do with your unused vacation days, according to a career expert

There are less than two full work weeks remaining in 2019, and it’s likely you haven’t taken all of your vacation days. More than half of Americans had seven days of paid time remaining ahead of the holiday season, according to the work-life balance survey by vacation and travel site Priceline, which polled more than 1,000 adults in October. That’s more days than most workers can, or will, use by the end of the year. The poll cited a few reasons why workers fail to use their days off. Some have a hard time unplugging, while others are nervous about the stigma that can often accompany taking a vacation. But though you may be uneasy about taking time to unwind, “it’s important to use vacation days, because they’re there for a reason,” says Vicki Salemi, career expert for Monster. If you’re stuck with lots of unused time at the end of the year, you may still have options.

Cash out or roll over your unused PTO days

Some companies allow employees to cash out on unused vacation days. To find out if you’re eligible, start by researching the laws in your state. Some states don’t require companies to pay employees for time off, while others do. Consult your companies benefits website or schedule time to meet with human resources and see if you’re able to rollover your unused vacation days, or get compensated for them. Keep in mind that when you roll over days, there’s sometimes an expiration date on when you can use them by, so be sure to ask ahead of time. Another important thing to remember when considering a vacation time cash-out is that you’re taxed on that time, Salemi says. Lump sum payments are considered supplemental wages and are subject to Social Security and Medicare taxes even if your maximum contribution limit is greater than your vacation payout, according to the IRS. “If you really need the cash, go ahead and cash out on days if you can’t roll those days over, but you should think of those days as part of your compensation package. Time is money. Let’s say you have five days and if you don’t use is you lose it, you’re losing out on money, even if it’s not necessarily money in your pocket,” Salemi says.

Start planning now to take time off next year

Nearly 770 million vacation days went unused last year. Of those, 236 million were completely forfeited, which comes out to nearly $66 billion in lost benefits, according to research from the U.S. Travel Association, Oxford Economics, and Ipsos. It’s important to take personal time throughout the year to recharge. “The policies are there for a reason. If you take your vacation days, even if it’s not to go on a vacation, you’re actually more productive when you are in the office,” Salemi says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-13  Authors: sofia pitt, tim stobierski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salemi, companies, career, roll, expert, important, days, youre, according, unused, money, cash, vacation


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The fastest-growing job in the US pays $136,000 a year—here are the other 14

LinkedIn’s 2020 Emerging Jobs Report names artificial intelligence specialist as the job that saw the most growth in the the past five years. The career site looked at each job’s growth rate in hiring every year, averaged over the past five years, to determine the emerging jobs list. For example, hiring growth for AI specialists, which pays a national average of $136,000 per year according to LinkedIn salary data, has grown 74% each year, on average, since 2015. Artificial intelligence is a subs


LinkedIn’s 2020 Emerging Jobs Report names artificial intelligence specialist as the job that saw the most growth in the the past five years.
The career site looked at each job’s growth rate in hiring every year, averaged over the past five years, to determine the emerging jobs list.
For example, hiring growth for AI specialists, which pays a national average of $136,000 per year according to LinkedIn salary data, has grown 74% each year, on average, since 2015.
Artificial intelligence is a subs
The fastest-growing job in the US pays $136,000 a year—here are the other 14 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-11  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jobs, intelligence, fastestgrowing, career, emerging, artificial, yearhere, job, workforce, work, report, growth, 136000, pays


The fastest-growing job in the US pays $136,000 a year—here are the other 14

As automation changes the way people live and work every day, jobs in artificial intelligence are proving to be some of the biggest career opportunities of our time.

LinkedIn’s 2020 Emerging Jobs Report names artificial intelligence specialist as the job that saw the most growth in the the past five years. The career site looked at each job’s growth rate in hiring every year, averaged over the past five years, to determine the emerging jobs list.

For example, hiring growth for AI specialists, which pays a national average of $136,000 per year according to LinkedIn salary data, has grown 74% each year, on average, since 2015. These jobs are primarily concentrated in the San Francisco Bay Area, New York City, Boston, Seattle and Los Angeles.

Artificial intelligence is a subset of automation and refers to machines learning to use judgment and logic to complete tasks that require planning, reasoning, problem-solving and predicting.

While AI specialists tend to work in the tech industry, the report notes that many also work in higher education. One reason why: There is a so-called tech talent shortage in the U.S., so schools may be seeking out more AI experts to teach these skills.

Workers also have been trying to learn AI skills online, leading to fast growth in the multibillion-dollar e-learning industry. As a result, online learning platforms may have also hired AI experts to teach their students.

“At this stage, most of the workforce doesn’t work in the emerging field of artificial intelligence, but that doesn’t mean it won’t impact everyone,” Guy Berger, LinkedIn’s principal economist, says in the report. “Artificial intelligence will require the entire workforce to learn new skills, whether it’s to keep up to date with an existing role, or pursuing a new career as a result of automation.”

Here are the top 15 emerging jobs of 2020, what they pay and where the most jobs are, according to LinkedIn.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-11  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jobs, intelligence, fastestgrowing, career, emerging, artificial, yearhere, job, workforce, work, report, growth, 136000, pays


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I had my identity stolen as a kid — it shaped my money and career choices as an adult

I had a credit report with pages of accounts and debts that weren’t mine and a credit score of 380. I had a credit report with pages of accounts and debts that weren’t mine and a credit score of 380. I became an academic, focusing my Master’s degree research and doctoral dissertation on identity theft. My credit report was not clear of fraudulent entries until 2009, eight years after I started trying to clear it. Another of Mom’s friends said she never mentioned the identity theft to her, though


I had a credit report with pages of accounts and debts that weren’t mine and a credit score of 380.
I had a credit report with pages of accounts and debts that weren’t mine and a credit score of 380.
I became an academic, focusing my Master’s degree research and doctoral dissertation on identity theft.
My credit report was not clear of fraudulent entries until 2009, eight years after I started trying to clear it.
Another of Mom’s friends said she never mentioned the identity theft to her, though
I had my identity stolen as a kid — it shaped my money and career choices as an adult Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-10  Authors: axton betz-hamilton, david bach, stephanie bergeron kinch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, identity, shaped, credit, theft, stolen, kid, mom, report, card, thief, adult, career, choices, family, money, dad


I had my identity stolen as a kid — it shaped my money and career choices as an adult

“There’s nothing in Portland for you.” That was a refrain I heard from Mom often about our Indiana hometown. It was one of the many ways she disparaged where we lived, where she worked, and where I went to school. The complaints became more frequent and more forceful after she, Dad, and I first had our identities stolen when I was 11 years old. The thief opened credit card accounts in my name, charged them up to and over the limit, and did not pay them off. According to my mom, the people who surrounded us were not to be trusted. Mom had theories for why several of them, including extended relatives and family friends, could be the scammer who had stolen our identities — who, in one case, was bold enough to walk into the Portland Wal-Mart and write bad checks in my mother’s name. We lost relationships with extended family members and family friends, and I left Portland as soon as I could, seven days after I turned 18. A year later, when I moved to my first apartment, I learned how much the theft had affected my finances. I had a credit report with pages of accounts and debts that weren’t mine and a credit score of 380. My first credit card had a limit of only $300.

I had a credit report with pages of accounts and debts that weren’t mine and a credit score of 380. My first credit card had a limit of only $300. Axton Betz-Hamilton Professor, South Dakota State University

In response to what I felt was a lack of response from creditors, credit reporting agencies, and law enforcement, I decided to try and become part of the solution. I became an academic, focusing my Master’s degree research and doctoral dissertation on identity theft. I wanted to use what I learned to help other victims — and hopefully learn something that would help me solve my own case along the way.

Putting my financial life together after identity theft took years

Starting when I was 19, I contacted original creditors, obtained copies of my credit reports and disputed fraudulent charges through the credit bureaus. I also filed a police report. I got one credit card and began to establish credit, but the damage from the identity theft meant I paid exorbitant rates for what I was able to obtain. Because the annual percentage rates (APRs) were so high, I seldom used the card. It was only for emergencies and I paid it off promptly. The APR on my car loan was 18.23% and that made the payment high enough that I scrimped on groceries. Back in 2005, my grocery budget was $15 a week. My credit report was not clear of fraudulent entries until 2009, eight years after I started trying to clear it.

One of the most challenging parts of the experience was dealing with the customer service representatives of the original creditors who didn’t listen. The representative at the first original creditor I called told me I was not a victim of identity theft because someone had made two payments on the card before stopping and “identity thieves don’t do that.” Identity theft is a crime where you are often treated as guilty, because it’s your name and Social Security number, until you’re proven innocent. The frustration with this process is the equivalent of screaming into a well — you’re loud but yet it doesn’t seem like you’re heard.

The thief was a relative, I found out: My mom

When I was 31, Mom died of a rare form of leukemia. Less than two weeks later, Dad and I discovered she was the perpetrator of our identity theft case. She was the scammer. Her identity had never been stolen. She destroyed her own credit and moved on to Dad’s, then mine, and then her father-in-law’s. Those bad checks at Wal-Mart? She wrote them. The sheriff’s department had attempted to arrest her for this years earlier, but Dad explained that we were victims of identity theft and the sheriff’s department backed off. Once it was known she was the identity thief, I began questioning everything she ever said to me, including her negative assessments of friends and family members. I set out to find the truth for myself, talking to many of the people Mom had told Dad and me to suspect as the identity thief, some of whom I hadn’t seen in over 20 years. Many of those conversations are documented in my new book, “The Less People Know About Us: A Mystery of Betrayal, Family Secrets, and Stolen Identity.” Relatives felt that Mom “had taken Dad away from” his side of the extended family and that they never cared for her. They thought something was “odd” about Mom but could never put their finger on what. One said he felt that Mom thought “she was better than everyone else” and that he didn’t like her for that reason. Another of Mom’s friends said she never mentioned the identity theft to her, though it plagued our daily lives for 20 years.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-10  Authors: axton betz-hamilton, david bach, stephanie bergeron kinch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, identity, shaped, credit, theft, stolen, kid, mom, report, card, thief, adult, career, choices, family, money, dad


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Uber CEO: This is the subject young people should study in college, no matter their career goals

Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi has a recommendation for graduating high school seniors on what to study in college. “Go study CIS [computer information systems] and engineering,” Khosrowshahi, 50, said at the Economic Club in New York City on Wednesday. That’s because it can teach you how to solve problems. It’s part of the computer science mindset,” he said. Engineering and computer science ranked as the highest paying college majors in 2019, according to the PayScale college salary report.


Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi has a recommendation for graduating high school seniors on what to study in college.
“Go study CIS [computer information systems] and engineering,” Khosrowshahi, 50, said at the Economic Club in New York City on Wednesday.
That’s because it can teach you how to solve problems.
It’s part of the computer science mindset,” he said.
Engineering and computer science ranked as the highest paying college majors in 2019, according to the PayScale college salary report.
Uber CEO: This is the subject young people should study in college, no matter their career goals Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-10  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, young, science, solve, goals, problems, study, report, computer, safety, ceo, engineering, matter, career, uber, college, subject


Uber CEO: This is the subject young people should study in college, no matter their career goals

Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi has a recommendation for graduating high school seniors on what to study in college.

“Go study CIS [computer information systems] and engineering,” Khosrowshahi, 50, said at the Economic Club in New York City on Wednesday.

Khosrowshahi himself studied engineering at Brown University, and he recommends it to all students regardless of whether they plan to pursue engineering as a career. That’s because it can teach you how to solve problems.

“Even though I went from engineering to finance, engineering taught me how to break down problems and how to build them back up again,” he said. “I think that it can help, not only if that becomes your specialty, but with anything you do in life.”

It’s helped him at Uber and other companies, including Expedia, where he was CEO, he said.

“For me, to take these complex business problems, societal problems, and take the complexity and break them down into their component parts and then rebuild them, it’s part of the engineering mindset. It’s part of the computer science mindset,” he said.

(Khosrowshahi has had many problems to help solve in recent years: He took over at a troubled Uber after Travis Kalanick was ousted, and recently Uber has faced criticism over rider sexual assaults revealed in its U.S. Safety Report, which also outlined new safety measures.)

Engineering and computer science ranked as the highest paying college majors in 2019, according to the PayScale college salary report. And some of the world’s most successful billionaires started out as software engineers, including Jack Dorsey, Mark Zuckerberg and Elon Musk.

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Don’t miss: The 10 highest-paying college majors of 2019, according to PayScale


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-10  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, young, science, solve, goals, problems, study, report, computer, safety, ceo, engineering, matter, career, uber, college, subject


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Golden State Warriors’ Klay Thompson says this is the top financial mistake he made his rookie year

Eventually, Thompson says, he got rid of his hoarding habit and started to make purchases that he knew would outlast the style trends of the NBA. Looking back, the 29-year-old says he remembers making some common financial mistakes at the start of his career. “It was great to see that check, but I lived such a great life in Pullman, [Washington] at the time on my $1,100 a month stipend. In fact, Thompson’s teammate Draymond Green says one of his biggest financial regrets is spending $21,000 in o


Eventually, Thompson says, he got rid of his hoarding habit and started to make purchases that he knew would outlast the style trends of the NBA.
Looking back, the 29-year-old says he remembers making some common financial mistakes at the start of his career.
“It was great to see that check, but I lived such a great life in Pullman, [Washington] at the time on my $1,100 a month stipend.
In fact, Thompson’s teammate Draymond Green says one of his biggest financial regrets is spending $21,000 in o
Golden State Warriors’ Klay Thompson says this is the top financial mistake he made his rookie year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-08  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warriors, hes, pullman, thompson, financial, relationships, spending, money, state, mistake, golden, rookie, career, nba, klay, washington


Golden State Warriors' Klay Thompson says this is the top financial mistake he made his rookie year

Eventually, Thompson says, he got rid of his hoarding habit and started to make purchases that he knew would outlast the style trends of the NBA.

“I made some mistakes like hoarding, especially with the clothes,” he tells host Maverick Carter on a recent episode of the podcast ” Kneading Dough .” “I mean I would just have a full closet and I would only wear about 5% of the closet, and I’m like, ‘What am I going to do with all of these extra clothes?'”

Since entering the NBA in 2011, he’s not only earned millions in his career through contract money and endorsement deals, but he’s also won three championship rings and made it to the NBA All-Star game five times. Looking back, the 29-year-old says he remembers making some common financial mistakes at the start of his career.

“It’s not like money made me happy,” he says, while talking about using his first big paycheck to buy a pool table that he still has to this day. “It was great to see that check, but I lived such a great life in Pullman, [Washington] at the time on my $1,100 a month stipend. That went so far in Pullman. I could get as much Taco Del Mar as I wanted or I could go to Target and have a field day.”

Though his NBA career has afforded him a more lavish lifestyle than his upbringing in Portland, Oregon, or his time at Washington State University, Thompson says he’s learned that wealth is nothing more than a mindset. “If you have relationships and experiences around you, those are priceless,” he says. “You know, it’s better than any car you can get or any big house. It’s just about those relationships to me.”

Thompson, who made Forbes’ “World Highest-Paid Athlete” list in 2019 with an earning of $34.3 million for the year, isn’t the only NBA player who’s admitted to carelessly spending money early in their career. In fact, Thompson’s teammate Draymond Green says one of his biggest financial regrets is spending $21,000 in one night at the club.

“That’s $21,000 that I can never get back,” he said on previous episode of “Kneading Dough.” “People say: ‘That isn’t nothing to you.’ $20,000 is still $20,000. I don’t care how much money you have, it’s still $20,000.”

Green, who has since changed his frivolous spending habits, says he’s now pursuing a new financial goal of becoming a billionaire by 40. The 29-year-old, who agreed to a four-year, $100 million extension with the Warriors earlier this year, says that joining the billion-dollar club will be “a tough task for sure.” But, he says, “I think I can reach it.”

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Don’t miss: Patriots’ Joejuan Williams lives off 10% of his income and says a high school finance class taught him how to save


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-08  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warriors, hes, pullman, thompson, financial, relationships, spending, money, state, mistake, golden, rookie, career, nba, klay, washington


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Lyft’s VP of design shares the book that’s impacted her career the most: ‘It’s a book that I feel we all need to read’

Katie Dill is a long-time executive in Silicon Valley who currently serves as the vice president of design at Lyft. As someone who has successfully climbed the ranks in her career, Dill says there is one book that has impacted her professional life the most. I’ve read it three times, and it’s a book that I feel we all need to read.” “When I was interviewing, they told me that the design team was not in a very good state,” she says. That experience, Dill says, taught her the value in listening to


Katie Dill is a long-time executive in Silicon Valley who currently serves as the vice president of design at Lyft.
As someone who has successfully climbed the ranks in her career, Dill says there is one book that has impacted her professional life the most.
I’ve read it three times, and it’s a book that I feel we all need to read.”
“When I was interviewing, they told me that the design team was not in a very good state,” she says.
That experience, Dill says, taught her the value in listening to
Lyft’s VP of design shares the book that’s impacted her career the most: ‘It’s a book that I feel we all need to read’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, executive, werent, read, change, book, good, need, lyfts, feel, impacted, design, team, dill, experience, career, thats, shares


Lyft's VP of design shares the book that's impacted her career the most: 'It's a book that I feel we all need to read'

Katie Dill is a long-time executive in Silicon Valley who currently serves as the vice president of design at Lyft.

Prior to starting this role in 2017, she worked as an executive at several other companies, including at Airbnb, where she was the director of experience design for three years.

As someone who has successfully climbed the ranks in her career, Dill says there is one book that has impacted her professional life the most.

“It’s such an oldie, but goodie,” she says. “‘How to Win Friends and Influence People’ has probably had the most impact on my career. I’ve read it three times, and it’s a book that I feel we all need to read.”

Dill says the book, written by Dale Carnegie, focuses on the power of building and nurturing relationships. “What he talks about honestly is just understanding people,” she says. “The reality is that everybody you know, first and foremost, cares about themselves. That’s what they need to do. It’s just human nature. But once you know that, you can then do a lot better at being a good partner, a good colleague, a good husband or wife.”

Dill explains how the book has helped her to become a better leader at work, particularly when she first started working at Airbnb and was tasked with fixing the culture of the design team.

“When I was interviewing, they told me that the design team was not in a very good state,” she says. “People weren’t getting along very well, there were designers who weren’t happy, and there were people who weren’t happy working with them.”

Dill says she immediately started implementing changes to the team’s structure and culture in an effort to improve the experience of her staff. Though she thought she was making a positive impact, Dill says she learned through a two-hour meeting with HR and her team that several people were frustrated by her leadership.

“I had been there for one month, and they had written it all out, and they were reading from this stack of papers the reasons why they were frustrated with me,” she says. “It was super hard to hear. I thought that things were going in a good direction, so I was totally surprised.”

That experience, Dill says, taught her the value in listening to your team first before delivering directions on how to change. It also taught her the power of building trust with people, which is a crucial lesson that ties into Carnegie’s advice book.

“It was a real good wake-up call,” she says. “I went too fast into action. I came in swinging when I really should have come in listening. I should have showed them that I was taking in their interest and understanding their needs, what they wanted, what their goals were and what they were capable of. Then, when I would have set out to make change, they would have felt that I was there with them.”

In Carnegie’s bestselling book, he details how creating change as a leader should not include offending people or causing resentment. Instead, he explains how owning your mistakes and not delivering strict orders to your team are key ways to get people to like you.

Dill, who eventually implemented these changes to her leadership style, says that within a six-month time frame her team went from having the worst engagement scores in the company to having the best scores. “It definitely worked out, and I ended up improving things,” she says. “And that lesson I of course took with me when I came to Lyft.”

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Don’t miss: The No.1 piece of advice this Lyft executive wishes she received at the start of her career


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, executive, werent, read, change, book, good, need, lyfts, feel, impacted, design, team, dill, experience, career, thats, shares


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Stacey Abrams’ advice for dealing with career setbacks and using failure to inspire new goals

That pain, Abrams says, is something she wants everyone to recognize whenever they experience a career setback or failure. “I still feel pain,” the 45-year-old politician told a crowd at The Riveter Summit earlier this month regarding her loss. When Abrams was 18, the pain from a failed relationship helped her learn to process the meaning behind her emotions. Now, years after starting that spreadsheet, Abrams is channeling the pain from her 2018 election loss into another goal: combating voter s


That pain, Abrams says, is something she wants everyone to recognize whenever they experience a career setback or failure.
“I still feel pain,” the 45-year-old politician told a crowd at The Riveter Summit earlier this month regarding her loss.
When Abrams was 18, the pain from a failed relationship helped her learn to process the meaning behind her emotions.
Now, years after starting that spreadsheet, Abrams is channeling the pain from her 2018 election loss into another goal: combating voter s
Stacey Abrams’ advice for dealing with career setbacks and using failure to inspire new goals Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-26  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spreadsheet, goals, think, failure, dealing, pain, abrams, try, setbacks, career, shes, using, stacey, told, need, real, inspire, teacher, advice


Stacey Abrams' advice for dealing with career setbacks and using failure to inspire new goals

“It’s not about pushing past [the pain],” she tells CNBC Make It. “It’s actually about embracing it, acknowledging it …. When you let yourself feel all of the emotions, you can then contextualize them, and you can use them to galvanize you.”

That pain, Abrams says, is something she wants everyone to recognize whenever they experience a career setback or failure.

“I still feel pain,” the 45-year-old politician told a crowd at The Riveter Summit earlier this month regarding her loss. “The pain is real, and I hold it close.”

After running a highly publicized campaign that included the support of celebrities such as Oprah Winfrey and Will Ferrell , Abrams lost her race by a narrow margin to Republican Brian Kemp.

In her book, “Lead from the Outside: How to Build Your Future and Make Real Change,” Abrams touches on some of the setbacks she experienced as a young person and says she’s always made herself think about the meaning behind her emotions.

“I’ve made myself really think through: Why did it hurt? But, more importantly, what can I do with that hurt?” she writes. “Does it galvanize me, or does it serve as a warning that this isn’t for you? And sometimes that’s the answer. Sometimes pain is a teacher that says, ‘Don’t do that again.’ And sometimes it’s a teacher that says, ‘This is for you. You just need to try it a different way and try harder.'”

When Abrams was 18, the pain from a failed relationship helped her learn to process the meaning behind her emotions. It also led her to map out her life goals in an Excel spreadsheet so she would never lose sight of her ambitions.

“I wrote the spreadsheet because I was like, ‘I’ll show him,'” she recalls of the experience. “But, No. 1, I didn’t need to show him anything. I needed to show me. And while he may have been the catalyst, what I know for myself is that when I was 18, when I was 28 and when I was 38, I was fully capable of being who I am and laying my own course.”

Now, years after starting that spreadsheet, Abrams is channeling the pain from her 2018 election loss into another goal: combating voter suppression through her organization, Fair Fight. She’s using her platform to encourage more 2020 presidential candidates to discuss this issue as a major point of concern during upcoming debates.

“I hope to hear, one, an acknowledgment from the moderators that this is a national scourge and deserves the same degree of attention as any other topic,” she told Politico earlier this month. “Because all of the progress we speak of as Democrats rests on the ability of voters to be heard and to participate in our process.”

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Don’t miss: Stacey Abrams has used an Excel spreadsheet to track life her goals since she was 18—why it’s been crucial to her success


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-26  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spreadsheet, goals, think, failure, dealing, pain, abrams, try, setbacks, career, shes, using, stacey, told, need, real, inspire, teacher, advice


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Harvard Law School’s first deafblind graduate Haben Girma shares her biggest piece of career advice

Haben Girma became the first deafblind graduate of Harvard Law School in 2013 and has gone on to build a career as a disability rights lawyer, author and public speaker. Her biggest piece of advice to young people is to create their own career. Realizing her own talents in advocacy led Girma to study at Harvard Law School, in order to gain the litigation skills to “remove more barriers” for those with disabilities. She applied this mantra to her personal life, learning to dance, surf and rock cl


Haben Girma became the first deafblind graduate of Harvard Law School in 2013 and has gone on to build a career as a disability rights lawyer, author and public speaker.
Her biggest piece of advice to young people is to create their own career.
Realizing her own talents in advocacy led Girma to study at Harvard Law School, in order to gain the litigation skills to “remove more barriers” for those with disabilities.
She applied this mantra to her personal life, learning to dance, surf and rock cl
Harvard Law School’s first deafblind graduate Haben Girma shares her biggest piece of career advice Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-22  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shares, harvard, young, build, parents, law, willing, world, girma, school, create, schools, deafblind, haben, piece, graduate, career


Harvard Law School's first deafblind graduate Haben Girma shares her biggest piece of career advice

Haben Girma became the first deafblind graduate of Harvard Law School in 2013 and has gone on to build a career as a disability rights lawyer, author and public speaker.

Her biggest piece of advice to young people is to create their own career.

“Don’t wait for somebody else to tell you what to do,” she told CNBC’s Make It, saying young people should identify and develop their talents.

Realizing her own talents in advocacy led Girma to study at Harvard Law School, in order to gain the litigation skills to “remove more barriers” for those with disabilities.

Girma’s parents wanted her to become a teacher for the blind because she said it was “hard for them to imagine what exactly I could do and what my opportunities were, but I chose to create my own opportunities.”

A “curiosity” to physically experience the world also drove Girma’s ambition, as she said she was “not willing to sit on the sidelines.”

She applied this mantra to her personal life, learning to dance, surf and rock climb, as well as traveling the world. This included convincing her parents to let her go to Mali in West Africa to help build a school.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-22  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shares, harvard, young, build, parents, law, willing, world, girma, school, create, schools, deafblind, haben, piece, graduate, career


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