How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary

After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. H


After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. H
How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, learning, switched, experience, program, single, work, salary, mom, coding, land, careers, job, didnt, career, lance, sixfigure


How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary

After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. “I have a teaching degree but (teaching) won’t pay the bills for a family of five – it’s just not an option,” she told CNBC. “I thought about nursing, but the biggest drawback was that it required going back to school for two years to get another degree – I didn’t have two years, I have kids and bills to pay.” Despite being a self-confessed technophobe, Lance decided to learn computer coding after a suggestion from her brother-in-law, taking the plunge into an entirely new career path. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. In an interview with CNBC, she shared her tips on achieving success in a new career.

Value your ‘soft skills’

Although a career change can set you back in terms of direct industry experience, Lance urged others not to underestimate the value of basic core capabilities that appeal to employers — like strong communication or leadership skills. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. “(That was) combined with having just coming out of a great program which gave me all the right tech skills.”

Be willing to learn

As well as considering how your skillset could be transferred to a new industry, Lance told CNBC that having the right attitude was a real asset when it came to landing a job with no direct experience. She said she was upfront about what she could and couldn’t do, taking the approach: “I don’t know a lot about it, but I do know a little bit – and I’m willing to learn more.” According to Lance, embracing those knowledge gaps and showcasing a desire for self-improvement could be just as valuable as experience to some employers. “For the job I got, the company was starting a new team that would be using new technology, so we’d all be learning whether they hired somebody with experience or not,” she said. “They wanted people who were capable of learning quickly and who could work and learn under pressure. Going through Coding Dojo proved I had those capabilities and that desire to keep learning.”

Work your own way

Although Lance didn’t feel intellectually limited while learning to code, she said comparing her own pace of work to others’ sometimes led to unnecessary frustration and could impact her confidence. “One challenge was the amount of time it took to get through everything. I don’t think I had trouble with the actual program, but I didn’t have any tech background, so every assignment would take me one and a half times as long as everyone else,” she told CNBC. “Some of the people in my group had played on computers since they were 12 — so the assignments only took 20 to 30 minutes for them to complete.” She said it was important to find your own way to get work done, rather than sticking to the chronological or seemingly “correct” method. Her coding program was organized into three sections, and when she initially attempted to do each assignment in order, Lance found herself falling behind. “I’d have to skip forward and go back again – that’s not a good strategy,” she said. Instead, she got through all of the reading and learning materials for each topic before attempting to complete an assignment. “Make sure you do the reading and homework way before you start struggling with (graded assignments and technical work),” she said. “And make sure you allow yourself enough time outside of class to get stuff done.” Lance also advised those considering a career change not to overestimate their own academic ability. “I was pretty good in school and didn’t have to study a lot,” she said. “I went into Coding Dojo thinking I could get it done quicker, underestimating how much time it would consume. (You have to let it) take as long as it takes.”

Seek support to switch career


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, learning, switched, experience, program, single, work, salary, mom, coding, land, careers, job, didnt, career, lance, sixfigure


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Need to switch careers? These 5 things can get you there without spending a dime

You’re ready for a job change, but you’re concerned about the cost of retraining. Wilding says she likes thinking of a career change as an opportunity to reset and be intentional about crafting your career to fit who you are. In fact, Wilding said, just knowing she had a parachute made her determined to try to make things work at her current job. “You never want to make a career change from a place of desperation,” Wilding said. Be willing to talk to anyone and everyone in the industry you’re in


You’re ready for a job change, but you’re concerned about the cost of retraining. Wilding says she likes thinking of a career change as an opportunity to reset and be intentional about crafting your career to fit who you are. In fact, Wilding said, just knowing she had a parachute made her determined to try to make things work at her current job. “You never want to make a career change from a place of desperation,” Wilding said. Be willing to talk to anyone and everyone in the industry you’re in
Need to switch careers? These 5 things can get you there without spending a dime Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: jill cornfield, megan rogers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, career, youd, dime, switch, contact, things, need, job, spending, start, dont, careers, wilding, change, youre, work


Need to switch careers? These 5 things can get you there without spending a dime

You’re ready for a job change, but you’re concerned about the cost of retraining. Switching careers doesn’t have to mean a new degree and a lot of debt. Depending on your goal, you might be able to train for a new industry and save a bundle. “There’s so much to tackle, and so many options,” said Melody Wilding, a licensed social worker whose New York practice is career and executive coaching. Wilding is the author of an upcoming book on high-achieving, highly perceptive individuals in the workplace. Wilding says she likes thinking of a career change as an opportunity to reset and be intentional about crafting your career to fit who you are. Start creating a plan. Sketch out a calendar of how many people you will reach out to each week. How many people will you ask for coffee? Start with LinkedIn messages asking how people are and what they are up to. Instead of going in and asking immediately for a direct introduction, start with some relationship building. Be sure to get your finances in order. Pay down debt and build up an emergency cushion. When a client of Wilding’s saw she had a solid six months of financial room, it gave her tremendous peace of mind. In fact, Wilding said, just knowing she had a parachute made her determined to try to make things work at her current job. “You never want to make a career change from a place of desperation,” Wilding said.

1. Look inward

A good place to start is with a thorough self-assessment. “Get clear on what you want,” Wilding said. Here’s some good news. That inner assessment can be free. No need to pay for therapy or coaching, Wilding says. Do a mental run-through of your current job as well as some previous positions. Take stock of what you enjoyed most — and definitely pay attention to what you hope never to do again. Go through your perfect work day step by step, and add plenty of detail. “Most of us never take that time,” Wilding said. “Instead, we react to a career we fall into.”

2. It’s who you know

Start with a list of people you know from college, past jobs, networking events and family friends and relatives. “Don’t be afraid to contact someone you don’t know well,” Wilding said. Be willing to talk to anyone and everyone in the industry you’re interested in, says Win Sheffield, a New York work coach who specializes in career change. An easy way to find people: Check your own college’s LinkedIn page. On the left is a link to alumni, which lets you search by title, keyword or name of company.

Don’t be afraid to contact someone you don’t know well. Melody Wilding Careers coach

“It’s sometimes better to contact people from out of town,” Sheffield said, “so they don’t assume you are just asking them for a job or a referral.” Simply tell them you’d like to find out what it’s like to be a whatever, and ask for some pointers. Read blogs by people in the field to see what excites them, what’s new and trending, what frustrates them. Before you commit to joining a professional organization, see if you can attend one of the meetings, says Sheffield. It’s a good way to make contacts and learn something about the industry.

3. Take a test drive

Find out if the vision in your head matches the reality, Wilding says. It’s a great idea to shadow someone throughout their work day. You may already have someone in your circle, either a direct or indirect contact, who can introduce you to a person who holds the role you’d like to be in. Hanging out with this person for a work day or even the morning can give you a taste of the company or of a specific job. You might want to offer to pick up their lunch tab as a thank-you. More from Invest in You:

The magic strategy that can save retirement for people in their 40s

Here’s what it takes to become a 401(k) millionaire at any age

Do these five things to get to your first $10,000 even if you’re broke

4. Find a guiding light

It may not be easy to find a mentor, but give it a shot. “The best mentors are invested in your growth,” Wilding said. You want someone you can meet with regularly. Make it clear you’re going to put as little work as possible on their plate.

One of Wilding’s clients regularly brought a deck of design work, so all the mentor had to do was show up and give a critique. Try expanding your skills in your current job. Wilding recommends initiating new ideas for stretch projects and new challenges you’d like to take on with your supervisor. These can be tailored to the job and industry you’d like to work in. “A new initiative, a new client project, new skills, such as coding,” she said. “Come to them with a proposal and make it an easy yes or no.” Be specific. Say something along the lines of, “I’ve got this idea for XYZ. How can we make it work?” Make sure you ask for feedback. What areas need improvement, and what areas showed the most growth? “It’s so valuable,” Wilding said. “We can’t see everything ourselves.”

5. Say yes to free classes


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: jill cornfield, megan rogers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, career, youd, dime, switch, contact, things, need, job, spending, start, dont, careers, wilding, change, youre, work


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Careers advice: When to go from employee to start-up entrepreneur

Joanna Wong had been stuck in the same corporate job for years, becoming more and more disillusioned, when she decided one day that things had to change. “I was frustrated, I think, working in a large organization,” said Wong. So, she quit her 9-to-5 job as a womenswear buyer in Australia, and set out to find what she hoped would be a more fulfilling path as an entrepreneur. I felt like I could enter entrepreneurship by solving a real problem for real women,” continued Wong, founder and CEO of A


Joanna Wong had been stuck in the same corporate job for years, becoming more and more disillusioned, when she decided one day that things had to change. “I was frustrated, I think, working in a large organization,” said Wong. So, she quit her 9-to-5 job as a womenswear buyer in Australia, and set out to find what she hoped would be a more fulfilling path as an entrepreneur. I felt like I could enter entrepreneurship by solving a real problem for real women,” continued Wong, founder and CEO of A
Careers advice: When to go from employee to start-up entrepreneur Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, startup, business, youve, careers, advice, job, entrepreneur, working, things, real, wong, yearsso, women, employee, quit


Careers advice: When to go from employee to start-up entrepreneur

Joanna Wong had been stuck in the same corporate job for years, becoming more and more disillusioned, when she decided one day that things had to change.

“I was frustrated, I think, working in a large organization,” said Wong. “I wanted to be able to make a bigger impact.”

So, she quit her 9-to-5 job as a womenswear buyer in Australia, and set out to find what she hoped would be a more fulfilling path as an entrepreneur.

“The fashion industry wasn’t being inclusive enough and didn’t cater to plus-sized women … I felt like I could enter entrepreneurship by solving a real problem for real women,” continued Wong, founder and CEO of All Woman Co.

Wong is not alone in her vision. Indeed, almost half (49 percent) of U.S. millennials say they’d like to start their own business, according to a study by America’s SBDC (small business development center).

Only it’s easier said than done: Estimates suggest anywhere from 50 to 90 percent of new start-ups fail within the first few years.

So, just what is it that sets apart the successful few, and how do you know if you’ve got what it takes to follow their lead? CNBC Make It spoke to three entrepreneurs — each with different stories but all of whom quit employee life to pursue the entrepreneurial dream — and found three key things united them all.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, startup, business, youve, careers, advice, job, entrepreneur, working, things, real, wong, yearsso, women, employee, quit


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The rise of A.I. could hurt women’s careers in a major way

Developments in artificial intelligence and automation have been heralded as a major leap forward in human advancement. But they could also adversely affect another important measure of societal progress: The gender pay gap. That’s according to a new report from the World Economic Forum, which indicated that the growth of jobs in emerging industries, such as IT and engineering, is set to disproportionately hurt women and, by consequence, progress made in reducing pay inequality. The gender pay g


Developments in artificial intelligence and automation have been heralded as a major leap forward in human advancement. But they could also adversely affect another important measure of societal progress: The gender pay gap. That’s according to a new report from the World Economic Forum, which indicated that the growth of jobs in emerging industries, such as IT and engineering, is set to disproportionately hurt women and, by consequence, progress made in reducing pay inequality. The gender pay g
The rise of A.I. could hurt women’s careers in a major way Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-20  Authors: karen gilchrist, blutgruppe, corbis, getty images, hero images, -saadia zahidi, managing director at the world economic forum, -steve leonard, founding ceo of sginnovate
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ai, progress, pay, gender, world, major, workforce, rise, societal, hurt, set, careers, way, wef, womens, women


The rise of A.I. could hurt women's careers in a major way

Developments in artificial intelligence and automation have been heralded as a major leap forward in human advancement. But they could also adversely affect another important measure of societal progress: The gender pay gap.

That’s according to a new report from the World Economic Forum, which indicated that the growth of jobs in emerging industries, such as IT and engineering, is set to disproportionately hurt women and, by consequence, progress made in reducing pay inequality.

The gender pay gap, the difference between average earnings for men and women, has been narrowing over recent years, yet there remains a long way to go until compensation parity is reached — 202 years to be exact. And that estimate could grow even lengthier if progress is not made in bringing more women into the workforce, the WEF found


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-20  Authors: karen gilchrist, blutgruppe, corbis, getty images, hero images, -saadia zahidi, managing director at the world economic forum, -steve leonard, founding ceo of sginnovate
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ai, progress, pay, gender, world, major, workforce, rise, societal, hurt, set, careers, way, wef, womens, women


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Suzy Welch: Ask these 3 questions before changing careers

It’s easy to get overwhelmed by the non-stop competition, never-ending changes and the intense pace of today’s professional world. The emotional toll can be significant, says Welch, and as a result, “it’s not uncommon to hear an ‘I just can’t do this anymore’ voice drumming in our heads.” But before you put in your two weeks’ notice, you want to be absolutely certain that that voice isn’t just a sign of burnout. “Don’t get me wrong,” Welch says, “burnout is real and can feel awful. “Maybe you re


It’s easy to get overwhelmed by the non-stop competition, never-ending changes and the intense pace of today’s professional world. The emotional toll can be significant, says Welch, and as a result, “it’s not uncommon to hear an ‘I just can’t do this anymore’ voice drumming in our heads.” But before you put in your two weeks’ notice, you want to be absolutely certain that that voice isn’t just a sign of burnout. “Don’t get me wrong,” Welch says, “burnout is real and can feel awful. “Maybe you re
Suzy Welch: Ask these 3 questions before changing careers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-26  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, careers, vacation, toll, ask, welch, suzy, wrong, todays, changing, weeks, questions, uncommon, voice, world, change


Suzy Welch: Ask these 3 questions before changing careers

It’s easy to get overwhelmed by the non-stop competition, never-ending changes and the intense pace of today’s professional world. The emotional toll can be significant, says Welch, and as a result, “it’s not uncommon to hear an ‘I just can’t do this anymore’ voice drumming in our heads.”

But before you put in your two weeks’ notice, you want to be absolutely certain that that voice isn’t just a sign of burnout.

“Don’t get me wrong,” Welch says, “burnout is real and can feel awful. But it’s curable with an extended vacation or change in assignment, both of which your boss may be glad to accommodate, if it means not losing you forever.”

“Maybe you really do want to change careers,” she says, “but a break of some kind may be a good first step — just to make sure.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-26  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, careers, vacation, toll, ask, welch, suzy, wrong, todays, changing, weeks, questions, uncommon, voice, world, change


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These careers have the biggest gender pay gaps, and here’s what you can do about it

A woman makes about 80 cents for every dollar a man does, on average, but that shortfall can vary widely depending on what you do. “As much as we’ve kept the light on this issue, it’s been essentially stagnant for two decades,” said Kim Churches, CEO of the American Association of University Women, a Washington-based nonprofit dedicated to advancing equity for women. Although women experience a persistent pay gap in nearly every occupation, the professions with the most significant income discre


A woman makes about 80 cents for every dollar a man does, on average, but that shortfall can vary widely depending on what you do. “As much as we’ve kept the light on this issue, it’s been essentially stagnant for two decades,” said Kim Churches, CEO of the American Association of University Women, a Washington-based nonprofit dedicated to advancing equity for women. Although women experience a persistent pay gap in nearly every occupation, the professions with the most significant income discre
These careers have the biggest gender pay gaps, and here’s what you can do about it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-06  Authors: jessica dickler, -kim churches, ceo of the american association of university wome
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, womenalthough, careers, vary, widely, university, stagnant, washingtonbased, heres, woman, gender, weve, women, gaps, biggest, significant


These careers have the biggest gender pay gaps, and here's what you can do about it

A woman makes about 80 cents for every dollar a man does, on average, but that shortfall can vary widely depending on what you do.

“As much as we’ve kept the light on this issue, it’s been essentially stagnant for two decades,” said Kim Churches, CEO of the American Association of University Women, a Washington-based nonprofit dedicated to advancing equity for women.

Although women experience a persistent pay gap in nearly every occupation, the professions with the most significant income discrepancies are largely in the finance and medical industries, according to a new report by the AAUW.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-06  Authors: jessica dickler, -kim churches, ceo of the american association of university wome
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, womenalthough, careers, vary, widely, university, stagnant, washingtonbased, heres, woman, gender, weve, women, gaps, biggest, significant


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The 10 highest-paying college majors

Going to college is a serious investment. Over 44 million Americans collectively hold nearly $1.5 trillion in student debt because they know that earning a college degree is crucial in getting ahead in the modern economy. Fortunately, there are resources that students can refer to that indicate what majors are paying off right now. Salary comparison site PayScale recently surveyed 2.3 million graduates from over 2,700 colleges across the country. Here are the 10 highest-paying college majors rig


Going to college is a serious investment. Over 44 million Americans collectively hold nearly $1.5 trillion in student debt because they know that earning a college degree is crucial in getting ahead in the modern economy. Fortunately, there are resources that students can refer to that indicate what majors are paying off right now. Salary comparison site PayScale recently surveyed 2.3 million graduates from over 2,700 colleges across the country. Here are the 10 highest-paying college majors rig
The 10 highest-paying college majors Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-21  Authors: abigail hess, maskot, getty images, serts, hero images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, right, million, college, trillion, investment, highestpaying, surveyed, tomorrow, majors, careers, students


The 10 highest-paying college majors

Going to college is a serious investment. Over 44 million Americans collectively hold nearly $1.5 trillion in student debt because they know that earning a college degree is crucial in getting ahead in the modern economy.

But it can be difficult to estimate the return on this investment, especially since the hottest jobs of tomorrow may not exist yet. Fortunately, there are resources that students can refer to that indicate what majors are paying off right now.

Salary comparison site PayScale recently surveyed 2.3 million graduates from over 2,700 colleges across the country. What they found is that students who studied a very specific list of majors had the highest median earnings within the first five years of their careers and 10 years into their careers. Computer science, surprisingly, did not make the cut.

Here are the 10 highest-paying college majors right now:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-21  Authors: abigail hess, maskot, getty images, serts, hero images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, right, million, college, trillion, investment, highestpaying, surveyed, tomorrow, majors, careers, students


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Saying these two words at work can build trust, teams and careers

If you’re like most people, your work day is a blur of tasks, goals and priorities. But when you’re caught up in your daily activities and focused just on your next meetings or emails, you’re missing an opportunity to reflect on the current moment. Only by stopping what you’re doing will you notice everyone else and how they’re making a difference. By demonstrating gratitude for your colleagues, direct-reports, and managers, you will sow the seeds of future success not just for others – but for


If you’re like most people, your work day is a blur of tasks, goals and priorities. But when you’re caught up in your daily activities and focused just on your next meetings or emails, you’re missing an opportunity to reflect on the current moment. Only by stopping what you’re doing will you notice everyone else and how they’re making a difference. By demonstrating gratitude for your colleagues, direct-reports, and managers, you will sow the seeds of future success not just for others – but for
Saying these two words at work can build trust, teams and careers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-20  Authors: deepak chopra, kabir sehgal, douglas gorenstein, nbc, nbcuniversal, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stopping, trust, gratitude, work, youre, careers, thank, success, build, teams, saying, sow, words, theyre, tasks, wellhere


Saying these two words at work can build trust, teams and careers

If you’re like most people, your work day is a blur of tasks, goals and priorities. But when you’re caught up in your daily activities and focused just on your next meetings or emails, you’re missing an opportunity to reflect on the current moment. Only by stopping what you’re doing will you notice everyone else and how they’re making a difference.

By demonstrating gratitude for your colleagues, direct-reports, and managers, you will sow the seeds of future success not just for others – but for yourself, as well.

Here are three reasons why you should say ‘thank you’ more and demonstrate gratitude at work:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-20  Authors: deepak chopra, kabir sehgal, douglas gorenstein, nbc, nbcuniversal, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stopping, trust, gratitude, work, youre, careers, thank, success, build, teams, saying, sow, words, theyre, tasks, wellhere


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Future of the workforce: Careers for work-life balance, four-day week

How would you like a four-day workweek? Research from job search site FlexJobs suggests that a wide range of industries, from finance to recruitment, are opening up to the idea of a shorter workweek. Fans of the four-day week have been espousing its benefits from a productivity and cost-cutting perspective since the 1970s. Indeed, in 1974, when the British government introduced a three-day workweek following an energy shortage, a national survey reported a 5 percent increase in productivity leve


How would you like a four-day workweek? Research from job search site FlexJobs suggests that a wide range of industries, from finance to recruitment, are opening up to the idea of a shorter workweek. Fans of the four-day week have been espousing its benefits from a productivity and cost-cutting perspective since the 1970s. Indeed, in 1974, when the British government introduced a three-day workweek following an energy shortage, a national survey reported a 5 percent increase in productivity leve
Future of the workforce: Careers for work-life balance, four-day week Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-24  Authors: karen gilchrist, paul bradbury, ojo images, getty images, eclipse_images, lwa, taxi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, employers, worklife, workweek, following, job, recruitment, productivity, balance, workforce, industries, fourday, future, careers, flexjobs, workweekit, week


Future of the workforce: Careers for work-life balance, four-day week

How would you like a four-day workweek?

It may sound like a trick question, but it could become an increasingly common one as employers look for alternative ways to attract staff and boost productivity.

Research from job search site FlexJobs suggests that a wide range of industries, from finance to recruitment, are opening up to the idea of a shorter workweek.

Based on analysis of more than 50,000 U.S. companies’ job postings, FlexJobs found that over the past year the following 10 industries were the most likely to hire for flexible positions, including those with four-day weeks:

Sales

Computer & IT

Medical & health

Customer service

Education & training

Account/project manager

Administrative

Accounting & finance

Marketing

HR & recruitment

Of course, the notion of a condensed workweek is nothing new. Fans of the four-day week have been espousing its benefits from a productivity and cost-cutting perspective since the 1970s. Indeed, in 1974, when the British government introduced a three-day workweek following an energy shortage, a national survey reported a 5 percent increase in productivity levels.

However, with job disruption on the up and employees demanding greater flexibility at work, its scope is growing. A lifestyle that was once limited to a select few now “fits with more industries and jobs than you might imagine,” Jim Link, chief human resources officer (North America) at global recruitment agency Randstad, told CNBC Make It.

And it appears some employers are keen to make the shift.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-24  Authors: karen gilchrist, paul bradbury, ojo images, getty images, eclipse_images, lwa, taxi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, employers, worklife, workweek, following, job, recruitment, productivity, balance, workforce, industries, fourday, future, careers, flexjobs, workweekit, week


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Ask yourself this question every six months to make sure your career’s on track

Instead, there’s one question you can ask yourself every six months to make sure you’re on track: Am I doing the same thing I was six months ago? “Every six months I look at what we’re doing and I ask, ‘Are we doing the same thing we did six to nine months ago?’ That doesn’t mean you have to see a huge change every six months. Depending on the size of your organization, it may take closer to a year or two to notice fundamental change. “If you are in a job and the job is growing at 25 percent yea


Instead, there’s one question you can ask yourself every six months to make sure you’re on track: Am I doing the same thing I was six months ago? “Every six months I look at what we’re doing and I ask, ‘Are we doing the same thing we did six to nine months ago?’ That doesn’t mean you have to see a huge change every six months. Depending on the size of your organization, it may take closer to a year or two to notice fundamental change. “If you are in a job and the job is growing at 25 percent yea
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-10  Authors: karen gilchrist, tinpixels, istock, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yearonyear, sure, doing, question, youre, careers, learning, work, change, months, track, ask, mahadevan


Ask yourself this question every six months to make sure your career's on track

In the hectic haze of daily life, it can be hard to see if your work is keeping pace with your long-term career goals.

That’s partly what your reviews with your line manager are for. But relying entirely on your employer might result in skewed guidance.

Instead, there’s one question you can ask yourself every six months to make sure you’re on track: Am I doing the same thing I was six months ago?

If the answer’s yes, it may be time to make a change, according to PayPal’s Rohan Mahadevan. In his role as senior vice president of international markets, he makes a point of asking that question of himself and his team twice a year to make sure they’re heading in the right direction.

“Every six months I look at what we’re doing and I ask, ‘Are we doing the same thing we did six to nine months ago?’ If we are, we haven’t changed enough,” Mahadevan told CNBC Make It.

“Especially since the market and the world around us is changing pretty significantly, for me, we need to at least make sure 30 percent of what we’re doing is different.”

That doesn’t mean you have to see a huge change every six months. Depending on the size of your organization, it may take closer to a year or two to notice fundamental change. Meanwhile, if you’re in a more junior position, you may struggle to see how your work impacts the overall company strategy at all.

But it’s about making incremental changes that allow you to keep learning and stay up-to-date with your industry as it evolves, said Mahadevan. Those changes could be anything from looking at a problem in a different way, to developing a new skill or interacting with different kinds of people.

“It’s really about: Are you learning fast enough?” he said. “If you are in a job and the job is growing at 25 percent year-on-year, say, the question is: Are you learning faster than 25 percent year-on-year or not?”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-10  Authors: karen gilchrist, tinpixels, istock, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yearonyear, sure, doing, question, youre, careers, learning, work, change, months, track, ask, mahadevan


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