Singles Day was ‘amazing’ for Lazada, says CEO

Singles Day was ‘amazing’ for Lazada, says CEOPierre Poignant of Lazada Group says there’s “very strong e-commerce” demand in Southeast Asia in many different consumer segments, including for babies and kids categories during the 11.11 shopping event.


Singles Day was ‘amazing’ for Lazada, says CEOPierre Poignant of Lazada Group says there’s “very strong e-commerce” demand in Southeast Asia in many different consumer segments, including for babies and kids categories during the 11.11 shopping event.
Singles Day was ‘amazing’ for Lazada, says CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, southeast, theres, singles, including, kids, strong, day, segments, ceo, shopping, poignant, lazada, amazing


Singles Day was 'amazing' for Lazada, says CEO

Singles Day was ‘amazing’ for Lazada, says CEO

Pierre Poignant of Lazada Group says there’s “very strong e-commerce” demand in Southeast Asia in many different consumer segments, including for babies and kids categories during the 11.11 shopping event.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, southeast, theres, singles, including, kids, strong, day, segments, ceo, shopping, poignant, lazada, amazing


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WeWork’s chairman once called John Legere a ‘con artist’ — now they may be running WeWork together

Step one of his fix was to name Marcelo Claure , SoftBank’s operating chief, to be WeWork’s executive chairman. Claure is in charge of hiring a new CEO and has begun talks with T-Mobile CEO John Legere on taking the job, sources told CNBC on Monday. Yet, that’s exactly what he tweeted about Legere in 2016, when T-Mobile and Sprint were heated rivals in wireless. Now, the two executives are on the same wireless team, and Legere is among several candidates being considered for the top WeWork job.


Step one of his fix was to name Marcelo Claure , SoftBank’s operating chief, to be WeWork’s executive chairman.
Claure is in charge of hiring a new CEO and has begun talks with T-Mobile CEO John Legere on taking the job, sources told CNBC on Monday.
Yet, that’s exactly what he tweeted about Legere in 2016, when T-Mobile and Sprint were heated rivals in wireless.
Now, the two executives are on the same wireless team, and Legere is among several candidates being considered for the top WeWork job.

WeWork’s chairman once called John Legere a ‘con artist’ — now they may be running WeWork together Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, marcelo, wireless, thats, sprint, weworks, legere, twitter, tmobile, chairman, wework, ceo, artist, claure, called, john, running


WeWork's chairman once called John Legere a 'con artist' — now they may be running WeWork together

T-Mobile CEO John Legere (L) and Executive Director of Sprint Marcelo Claure pose for photographs before testifying to the House Judiciary Committee’s Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law Subcommittee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill March 12, 2019 in Washington, DC.

SoftBank has an $18 billion-plus investment to protect in a company that’s now valued at a fraction of that amount, following the Japanese conglomerate’s bailout financing of WeWork last month. With that much at stake, and given the laundry list of problems that accumulated under Neumann’s leadership, you’d think the last type of person Claure would pursue is a “con artist.”

Step one of his fix was to name Marcelo Claure , SoftBank’s operating chief, to be WeWork’s executive chairman. Claure is in charge of hiring a new CEO and has begun talks with T-Mobile CEO John Legere on taking the job, sources told CNBC on Monday.

SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son blamed himself last week for overlooking glaring corporate governance lapses and other warnings signs about WeWork co-founder and CEO Adam Neumann.

Yet, that’s exactly what he tweeted about Legere in 2016, when T-Mobile and Sprint were heated rivals in wireless. Claure was CEO of Sprint at the time.

Claure and Legere have quite a history of insulting each other on Twitter, a spat CNBC covered in 2018 as the longtime competitors were preparing to merge. Legere has often been the attacker, going after Sprint’s struggling business.

But Claure has clapped back at Legere, in particular calling out T-Mobile’s “uncarrier” moniker.

That prompted some trolling action from Legere.

Those tweets were all published before Sprint and T-Mobile engaged in the merger discussions that culminated in a deal announced last year, though it’s still being challenged by a number of state attorneys general who are concerned the combination will hurt competition.

Now, the two executives are on the same wireless team, and Legere is among several candidates being considered for the top WeWork job.

The more friendly nature of their current relationship has also made its way to Twitter. When Claure announced the arrival of his new baby girl last year, Legere was there for him.

WATCH: T-Mobile shares drop on talk that CEO could become the next WeWork CEO


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, marcelo, wireless, thats, sprint, weworks, legere, twitter, tmobile, chairman, wework, ceo, artist, claure, called, john, running


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John Legere would be up for the ‘crazy challenge’ of running WeWork, says Yale’s Jeffrey Sonnenfeld

T-Mobile CEO John Legere could handle the top WeWork job because he’s shown that he’s not afraid of tough situations, Yale School of Management’s Jeffrey Sonnenfeld told CNBC on Monday. Sonnenfeld’s appearance on “Power Lunch” came after reports surfaced Monday that Legere was in talks with WeWork to become CEO of the troubled coworking company. “Wherever John Legere goes, that’s the place to buy,” Sonnenfeld said. “I thought that WeWork was circling the drain until this kind of news, but I woul


T-Mobile CEO John Legere could handle the top WeWork job because he’s shown that he’s not afraid of tough situations, Yale School of Management’s Jeffrey Sonnenfeld told CNBC on Monday.
Sonnenfeld’s appearance on “Power Lunch” came after reports surfaced Monday that Legere was in talks with WeWork to become CEO of the troubled coworking company.
“Wherever John Legere goes, that’s the place to buy,” Sonnenfeld said.
“I thought that WeWork was circling the drain until this kind of news, but I woul
John Legere would be up for the ‘crazy challenge’ of running WeWork, says Yale’s Jeffrey Sonnenfeld Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, challenge, yales, buy, legere, crazy, tmobile, hes, jeffrey, wework, ceo, legeres, sonnenfeld, john, company, running


John Legere would be up for the 'crazy challenge' of running WeWork, says Yale's Jeffrey Sonnenfeld

T-Mobile CEO John Legere could handle the top WeWork job because he’s shown that he’s not afraid of tough situations, Yale School of Management’s Jeffrey Sonnenfeld told CNBC on Monday.

“He likes a crazy challenge,” said Sonnenfeld, who founded the nonprofit Chief Executive Leadership Institute.

Sonnenfeld’s appearance on “Power Lunch” came after reports surfaced Monday that Legere was in talks with WeWork to become CEO of the troubled coworking company. The Wall Street Journal first reported the news.

It’s not the first time Sonnenfeld has floated Legere’s name in reference to WeWork. In September, he suggested on CNBC hat Legere would be a “perfect” replacement for Adam Neumann, who had just stepped down as CEO following controversy over WeWork’s governance and valuation ahead of its expected IPO.

“He’s been very good at revivals and resuscitations,” Sonnenfeld said at the time. WeWork withdrew its IPO filing at the end of September.

In Monday’s appearance, Sonnenfeld referenced Legere’s tenure as CEO of Global Crossing after the telecommunications company was rocked by an accounting scandal in the early 2000s. He’s also praised Legere’s work at T-Mobile following AT&T’s decision to drop its bid to buy the wireless provider.

“There is nobody else on the planet that has the same experience going into over-hyped environments and having the financial wherewithal to tease it out, but also the energy,” Sonnenfeld said.

WeWork is in need of a leader to pull it out of its current crisis. SoftBank Group, struck a deal in October to take control of the company as part of a new $5 billion financing package. On Friday, WeWork said it would be divesting all “non-core” businesses.

“Wherever John Legere goes, that’s the place to buy,” Sonnenfeld said. “I thought that WeWork was circling the drain until this kind of news, but I would believe in WeWork with John Legere there.”

Legere is a known commodity at SoftBank, which is the majority owner of Sprint and previously installed Marcelo Claure to run the mobile phone company. Last year, T-Mobile and Sprint agreed to a $26 billion merger, which has been approved by federal regulators but is still being opposed by various states.

Claure, who’s now executive chairman of WeWork, once called Legere a “con artist” on Twitter, part of a heated spat between the two when they were rivals in wireless.

– CNBC’s Annie Palmer contributed to this report.

WATCH: Wherever T-Mobile’s John Legere goes, that’s the place to buy, Sonnenfeld says


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, challenge, yales, buy, legere, crazy, tmobile, hes, jeffrey, wework, ceo, legeres, sonnenfeld, john, company, running


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JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon, who made $31 million last year, thinks wealth inequality is a problem

His remarks come amid increased criticism of the rich by certain U.S. presidential hopefuls, particularly Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren from Massachusetts. “I think it’s a huge problem,” Dimon said. I think you should vilify Nazis, but you shouldn’t vilify people who’ve worked hard to accomplish things. I think that most people are good; not all of them,” Dimon said in the Sunday interview. “I think you should vilify Nazis, but you shouldn’t vilify people who’ve worked hard to accomplish thin


His remarks come amid increased criticism of the rich by certain U.S. presidential hopefuls, particularly Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren from Massachusetts.
“I think it’s a huge problem,” Dimon said.
I think you should vilify Nazis, but you shouldn’t vilify people who’ve worked hard to accomplish things.
I think that most people are good; not all of them,” Dimon said in the Sunday interview.
“I think you should vilify Nazis, but you shouldn’t vilify people who’ve worked hard to accomplish thin
JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon, who made $31 million last year, thinks wealth inequality is a problem Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warren, whove, thinks, dimon, jamie, particularly, problem, good, coopermans, ceo, jpmorgan, think, vilify, wealth, worked, inequality, million


JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon, who made $31 million last year, thinks wealth inequality is a problem

His remarks come amid increased criticism of the rich by certain U.S. presidential hopefuls, particularly Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren from Massachusetts.

Dimon added that people at the lower end of the spectrum have “particularly been left behind,” noting: “We haven’t done a good job growing our economy. That would’ve fixed a lot of that problem.”

“I think it’s a huge problem,” Dimon said. “I think the wealthy have been getting wealthier too much in many ways, so middle class incomes have been kind of flat for maybe 15 years or so, and that’s not particularly good in America.”

I think you should vilify Nazis, but you shouldn’t vilify people who’ve worked hard to accomplish things.

On Oct. 23, Warren called in a tweet for billionaire investor Leon Cooperman to “pitch in a bit more so everyone else has a chance at the American dream.” The tweet drew the Cooperman’s ire.

Cooperman sent a letter to Warren’s office in late October, saying “your tweet demonstrated a fundamental misunderstanding of who I am, what I stand for, and why I believe so many of your economic policy initiatives are misguided.”

He then told CNBC’s “Halftime Report” on Nov. 4 the “vilification of billionaires makes no sense to me.” When asked why he spoke out against Warren, a tearful Cooperman said, “I care.”

Warren responded to Cooperman’s remarks by tweeting: “One thing I know he cares about—his fortune.” She then criticized Cooperman’s investments in student-loan company Navient and said she cares “about an entire generation of students being crushed by student loan debt.”

But while J.P. Morgan’s Dimon is worried about growing wealth inequality — a Credit Suisse report from last month said millionaires now hold 44% of the world’s total wealth — he reprimanded Warren and others for their criticisms of the wealthy.

“Anything that vilifies people, I just don’t like. I think that most people are good; not all of them,” Dimon said in the Sunday interview. “I think you should vilify Nazis, but you shouldn’t vilify people who’ve worked hard to accomplish things.”

Dimon also deflected questions about him making $31 million in 2018. He said J.P. Morgan Chase’s board of directors sets his salary and “I have nothing to do with it.”

He reiterated, however, that there are solutions to wealth inequality, such as changing the U.S. miniumum wage and lowering taxes for the poor and the middle class. “The problems are real, it does not mean free enterprise [is] bad.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warren, whove, thinks, dimon, jamie, particularly, problem, good, coopermans, ceo, jpmorgan, think, vilify, wealth, worked, inequality, million


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Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella says this piece of advice impacted him profoundly

Microsoft’s 52-year-old chief executive officer, Satya Nadella, has proven himself a formidable leader, pushing the company to an extra $500 billion in market capitalization since he taking the helm five years ago. “(Burgum) said, look, you’re going to work … at Microsoft more time than you are going to even spend with your kids,” Nadella recalled at a Stanford University Graduate School of Business speech in October. “I take great pride in these people whom I’ve mentored or go on to do great th


Microsoft’s 52-year-old chief executive officer, Satya Nadella, has proven himself a formidable leader, pushing the company to an extra $500 billion in market capitalization since he taking the helm five years ago.
“(Burgum) said, look, you’re going to work … at Microsoft more time than you are going to even spend with your kids,” Nadella recalled at a Stanford University Graduate School of Business speech in October.
“I take great pride in these people whom I’ve mentored or go on to do great th
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella says this piece of advice impacted him profoundly Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meaning, microsoft, advice, going, nadella, ceo, work, great, think, thats, satya, profoundly, impact, impacted, piece


Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella says this piece of advice impacted him profoundly

Microsoft’s 52-year-old chief executive officer, Satya Nadella, has proven himself a formidable leader, pushing the company to an extra $500 billion in market capitalization since he taking the helm five years ago.

But it was during his 30s that he received some advice from Doug Burgum, the current governor of North Dakota, which he says helped shape him into the businessman he is today.

“(Burgum) said, look, you’re going to work … at Microsoft more time than you are going to even spend with your kids,” Nadella recalled at a Stanford University Graduate School of Business speech in October.

“I said wow, that sounds pretty harsh,” Nadella added.

Still, there’s some truth to Burgum’s statement. Since work takes up so much of our lives, Nadella said he realized it’s important to think about a deeper meaning to work — one that’s more than transactional.

For the engineer, that comes down to relating to the people he works with, he said.

“I take great pride in these people whom I’ve mentored or go on to do great things,” Nadella said.

“The technologies will all be passed in time, but the people, what you did, how you behave … that’s the relationship that I think you seek out while being true to yourself, and what makes you happy.”

Governor Burgum’s advice to find meaning at work also made Nadella think about his purpose at Microsoft, he said in a May 2018 interview with CNBC.

It forced him to question: “Why am I at Microsoft? What is it that gives me the energy at Microsoft, day in and day after?” Nadella told CNBC’s Jon Fortt.

That motivation came, he said, from being able to connect his passions to work, and see its impact on the world.

“What defines me, I think, is curiosity, love of ideas, and the ability to translate that into impact,” he said.

Don’t miss: Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on the 3 qualities that make a great leader

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meaning, microsoft, advice, going, nadella, ceo, work, great, think, thats, satya, profoundly, impact, impacted, piece


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Health-care leaders mourn Kaiser Permanente CEO Bernard Tyson, who unexpectedly died at age 60

Kaiser Permanente chairman and CEO Bernard Tyson died unexpectedly in his sleep Sunday, the health care giant announced. One of the nation’s leading health care executives, Tyson was 60. He rose through the ranks during a 30-year career at Kaiser to become CEO in 2013. Over his tenure, the integrated health care system and health insurance giant grew from 9 million members, with more than 174,000 employees, to serve more than 12 million members with a workforce of 218,000. “His loss is a loss fo


Kaiser Permanente chairman and CEO Bernard Tyson died unexpectedly in his sleep Sunday, the health care giant announced.
One of the nation’s leading health care executives, Tyson was 60.
He rose through the ranks during a 30-year career at Kaiser to become CEO in 2013.
Over his tenure, the integrated health care system and health insurance giant grew from 9 million members, with more than 174,000 employees, to serve more than 12 million members with a workforce of 218,000.
“His loss is a loss fo
Health-care leaders mourn Kaiser Permanente CEO Bernard Tyson, who unexpectedly died at age 60 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: bertha coombs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, affordable, system, tyson, quality, kaiser, ceo, social, healthcare, leaders, bernard, permanente, mourn, died, health, care, million, unexpectedly


Health-care leaders mourn Kaiser Permanente CEO Bernard Tyson, who unexpectedly died at age 60

Kaiser Permanente chairman and CEO Bernard Tyson died unexpectedly in his sleep Sunday, the health care giant announced. One of the nation’s leading health care executives, Tyson was 60.

He rose through the ranks during a 30-year career at Kaiser to become CEO in 2013. Over his tenure, the integrated health care system and health insurance giant grew from 9 million members, with more than 174,000 employees, to serve more than 12 million members with a workforce of 218,000. Under his leadership, the nation’s largest non-profit health system became a leading advocate in the movement to improve the delivery on care and benefits in the U.S.

His sudden passing elicited an outpouring of remembrances from fellow health-care leaders.

“Bernie was a good friend and trusted peer, and I am so saddened by his passing,” said Larry Merlo, CVS Health CEO, adding, “I’ll miss Bernie’s keen mind and good nature, as well as his unique ability to rally people from all walks of life around a singular goal of making health care better for all Americans.”

“Bernie was a visionary leader with a passion for health equity, quality care and serving those in need,” said Ceci Connolly, president and CEO of the Alliance of Community Health Plans. “His loss is a loss for all who strive to improve the quality of care and coverage in the American health care system.”

“He truly ‘walked the talk’ in his concern for making health care not just a right, but something that is affordable and centered on the great diversity of patients,” said Peter Lee, executive director of Covered California, the agency that runs the Affordable Care Act exchange in the golden state.

Tyson’s most recent push has been in the area of social determinants of health, economic and social issues in lower income communities which have negative impact the health patients. Last spring, Kaiser launched a $200 million fund to help address some of those issues in the Bay Area, half of which would address affordable housing and homelessness.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: bertha coombs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, affordable, system, tyson, quality, kaiser, ceo, social, healthcare, leaders, bernard, permanente, mourn, died, health, care, million, unexpectedly


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T-Mobile CEO John Legere is a candidate to become new CEO of WeWork

WeWork has spoken to T-Mobile CEO John Legere about possibly taking over the embattled coworking company, sources told CNBC’s David Faber on Monday. WeWork is conducting a search for a CEO and Legere is among several candidates being considered, Faber reported. A source close to SoftBank confirmed Legere is one of many candidates being considered for the role, but he’s not the leading candidate. Representatives from T-Mobile and WeWork were not immediately available for comment. SoftBank represe


WeWork has spoken to T-Mobile CEO John Legere about possibly taking over the embattled coworking company, sources told CNBC’s David Faber on Monday.
WeWork is conducting a search for a CEO and Legere is among several candidates being considered, Faber reported.
A source close to SoftBank confirmed Legere is one of many candidates being considered for the role, but he’s not the leading candidate.
Representatives from T-Mobile and WeWork were not immediately available for comment.
SoftBank represe
T-Mobile CEO John Legere is a candidate to become new CEO of WeWork Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tmobile, wework, considered, ceo, search, faber, comment, reported, softbank, sources, legere, john, candidate


T-Mobile CEO John Legere is a candidate to become new CEO of WeWork

WeWork has spoken to T-Mobile CEO John Legere about possibly taking over the embattled coworking company, sources told CNBC’s David Faber on Monday.

The Wall Street Journal first reported that the talks had taken place.

Shares of T-Mobile slid 3% on the news.

WeWork is conducting a search for a CEO and Legere is among several candidates being considered, Faber reported. The search is ongoing and no decision has been made, sources said. A source close to SoftBank confirmed Legere is one of many candidates being considered for the role, but he’s not the leading candidate.

Representatives from T-Mobile and WeWork were not immediately available for comment. SoftBank representatives declined to comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tmobile, wework, considered, ceo, search, faber, comment, reported, softbank, sources, legere, john, candidate


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Airbnb CEO: These are 2 things that caused WeWork’s fall

Speaking at The New York Times DealBook conference in New York City on Wednesday, Chesky said he believes two main things contributed to WeWork’s fall. According to Chesky, the first lesson here is that not all tech companies are the same. “We now realize that is not that they aren’t a tech company, it is that tech companies live on a continuum,” he said. And I think that’s the first lesson of WeWork,” Chesky said. (Additionally, skeptics of WeWork have defined it more as a real estate company t


Speaking at The New York Times DealBook conference in New York City on Wednesday, Chesky said he believes two main things contributed to WeWork’s fall.
According to Chesky, the first lesson here is that not all tech companies are the same.
“We now realize that is not that they aren’t a tech company, it is that tech companies live on a continuum,” he said.
And I think that’s the first lesson of WeWork,” Chesky said.
(Additionally, skeptics of WeWork have defined it more as a real estate company t
Airbnb CEO: These are 2 things that caused WeWork’s fall Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billion, caused, fall, need, weworks, things, airbnb, companies, chesky, ipo, business, wework, ceo, tech, company


Airbnb CEO: These are 2 things that caused WeWork's fall

Airbnb co-founder and CEO Brian Chesky says he has made it clear to his employees and investors that he plans to take the company public in 2020, despite the varying levels of success with tech IPOs this year. But Chesky says he won’t make the same mistakes that co-working company WeWork and its co-founder Adam Neumann made with the company’s ill-fated IPO. After WeWork withdrew its IPO filing in September, SoftBank agreed to take a majority stake in the company, resulting in Neumann’s exit, layoffs and the unicorn start-up once valued at $47 billion, is now worth less than $5 billion, reports Markets Insider. WeWork also said Friday there will be changes to the business, including the company divesting “non-core businesses” (including its investment in The Wing) and reducing its head count. Speaking at The New York Times DealBook conference in New York City on Wednesday, Chesky said he believes two main things contributed to WeWork’s fall.

Not all tech companies are created equal

Shortly after WeWork filed its IPO in August, the company faced intense scrutiny about its finances and its inflated valuation of $47 billion. For instance, The Financial Times reported July that despite WeWork’s high valuation and growth, the 9-year-old start-up was losing cash fast — roughly $219,000 an hour to be exact. What’s more, in 2018, the company disclosed that its losses and revenues both doubled from the year before to $1.9 billion and $1.8 billion, respectively. According to FT, while WeWork projected $3 billion in revenue in March, it lost $700 million in the first quarter of 2019. According to Chesky, the first lesson here is that not all tech companies are the same. Some are good businesses, and some are not. He says historically, investors would value companies at a one or a zero — meaning its either a tech company or its not a tech company “I think that people used to believe that every company was a tech company,” Chesky said at the DealBook conference. “We now realize that is not that they aren’t a tech company, it is that tech companies live on a continuum,” he said. “The best way to understand the continuum is your gross margins or what is your gross profit. Some [companies] like Microsoft and these really big tech firms have really high margins and other companies [have] really low margins. And I think that’s the first lesson of WeWork,” Chesky said. In this case, WeWork — whose main business model is to lease or buy office space and transform it into smaller offices to rent to small business owners or start-ups — is a low margin business, meaning its service sells for very close to the price that it costs the company to get the real estate it leases out. (Additionally, skeptics of WeWork have defined it more as a real estate company than a tech company. This despite WeWork’s attempt to position itself as a tech company: As far back as 2014, Neumann has been on the record saying that the company “happens to need buildings just like Uber happens to need cars, just like Airbnb happens to need apartments.” And in its S-1 IPO paperwork WeWork used the word “tech” 123 times, according to CBInsights.)

Founders need to be thoughtful about their actions early on


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billion, caused, fall, need, weworks, things, airbnb, companies, chesky, ipo, business, wework, ceo, tech, company


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Fender’s CEO learned this product lesson from Steve Jobs

Fender CEO Andy Mooney poses for a photo at the firm’s Hollywood office ribbon-cutting ceremony on September 22, 2016 in Hollywood, California. And it was during his time at Disney that he met iconic entrepreneur Steve Jobs. Jobs joined the entertainment giant’s board as a result of its acquisition of animation studio Pixar in 2006. According to Mooney, Jobs agreed with his perspective that “great brands are the accumulative effect of great products,” but there was a “but.” Online music ‘nothing


Fender CEO Andy Mooney poses for a photo at the firm’s Hollywood office ribbon-cutting ceremony on September 22, 2016 in Hollywood, California.
And it was during his time at Disney that he met iconic entrepreneur Steve Jobs.
Jobs joined the entertainment giant’s board as a result of its acquisition of animation studio Pixar in 2006.
According to Mooney, Jobs agreed with his perspective that “great brands are the accumulative effect of great products,” but there was a “but.”
Online music ‘nothing
Fender’s CEO learned this product lesson from Steve Jobs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, jobs, metal, fender, guitar, iconic, lesson, fenders, mooney, music, learned, product, brand, bankruptcy, steve


Fender's CEO learned this product lesson from Steve Jobs

Fender CEO Andy Mooney poses for a photo at the firm’s Hollywood office ribbon-cutting ceremony on September 22, 2016 in Hollywood, California. Matt Winkelmeyer | Getty Images

LISBON, Portugal — Before Andy Mooney took the reins at guitar maker Fender, he was an executive at two other companies — Nike and Disney. And it was during his time at Disney that he met iconic entrepreneur Steve Jobs. Mooney says the Apple co-founder was “one of the first people” he met at Disney. Jobs joined the entertainment giant’s board as a result of its acquisition of animation studio Pixar in 2006. “He grilled me on our very first meeting about what my point of view on brands was,” Mooney told CNBC in an interview at the Web Summit technology conference. According to Mooney, Jobs agreed with his perspective that “great brands are the accumulative effect of great products,” but there was a “but.” Mooney recalls that Jobs told him: “Every single product that you make, that you put your brand on, is either a deposit or withdrawal from the bank of brand equity.” That is, the product has to speak to the success of a well-known brand by being an instantly recognizable part of the company’s lineup. Jobs, who died in 2011, was the face of Apple at a time when the company released some of its most iconic products, including the Macintosh family of computers and the iPhone.

“I’d say that every single guitar we’ve made over 70 years — and electric guitar amplifier — was pretty much a deposit in the bank of brand equity,” Mooney said — although he admitted the firm could “do more” in other categories like acoustic guitars and effects pedals.

‘I’m a heavy metal guy’

Fender has for decades been seen as one of the most iconic names in the guitar industry and — inevitably — rock music. Fender’s guitars have been used by everyone from rock pioneer Jimi Hendrix to Pink Floyd’s David Gilmour. When asked about what his favorite guitar was — whether from Fender or one of its rivals such as Gibson — Mooney began by stating: “I’m a heavy metal guy.” He admitted his current go-to guitar is the signature Telecaster used by Jim Root of U.S. metal outfit Slipknot, which Mooney said has a more “simplistic” setup in terms of electric components because “in his outfit, he sweats so much during every show that the guitar would short out and literally go quiet on stage.”

Jim Root of Slipknot performs on stage at Download Festival 2019 on June 15, 2019. Katja Ogrin | Redferns | Getty Images

But all has not been rosy in the guitar sector of late, with headlines around Gibson’s filing for bankruptcy protection last year adding to concerns the industry may be struggling due to changing musical tastes and technology. The firm has since appointed a new team of senior executives to help it return to financial health. Mooney, however, said Gibson’s bankruptcy was more of an isolated case. “Gibson’s bankruptcy had nothing to do with the guitar business,” he said. “The bankruptcy was brought about by ill-considered acquisitions in the consumer electronics space.” One notable acquisition was the firm’s $135 million deal to buy Philips’ audio unit in 2014. “The fretted instruments segment has been growing robustly for over a decade now,” Mooney claimed, adding 2019 “will be a record year for guitar sales worldwide.”

Online music ‘nothing but a positive’

The strategy for Fender more recently has been updating its product line to reflect a digital-native demographic. The company has been launching a handful of new apps, including one that lets people learn how to play and another for tuning guitars. Streaming services like Spotify and Apple Music have faced criticism from some musicians, who argue it’s squeezing artists’ income. But Mooney countered that school of thought, claiming the revenues from digital distribution have actually benefited music artists as well as record labels and publishers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, jobs, metal, fender, guitar, iconic, lesson, fenders, mooney, music, learned, product, brand, bankruptcy, steve


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SurveyMonkey CEO Zander Lurie on Q3 earnings results

SurveyMonkey CEO Zander Lurie on Q3 earnings resultsSurveyMonkey CEO Zander Lurie joins “Squawk Alley” to discuss the company’s earnings for Q3 as the stock dips despite positive numbers.


SurveyMonkey CEO Zander Lurie on Q3 earnings resultsSurveyMonkey CEO Zander Lurie joins “Squawk Alley” to discuss the company’s earnings for Q3 as the stock dips despite positive numbers.
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, squawk, resultssurveymonkey, ceo, lurie, positive, earnings, zander, surveymonkey, stock, results


SurveyMonkey CEO Zander Lurie on Q3 earnings results

SurveyMonkey CEO Zander Lurie on Q3 earnings results

SurveyMonkey CEO Zander Lurie joins “Squawk Alley” to discuss the company’s earnings for Q3 as the stock dips despite positive numbers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, squawk, resultssurveymonkey, ceo, lurie, positive, earnings, zander, surveymonkey, stock, results


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