Companies won’t get away with forcing 9-to-5 workdays in the future

This means companies who want access to them need to allow remote work. They will find new work with companies more open to remote work. What type of companies do you see getting disrupted if they don’t soon embrace remote work? It’s easier for smaller, younger companies to evolve so it’s even more critical for F500s to embrace remote work if they want to prolong their lifespan. Had you already started seeing the shift toward remote work back then?


This means companies who want access to them need to allow remote work. They will find new work with companies more open to remote work. What type of companies do you see getting disrupted if they don’t soon embrace remote work? It’s easier for smaller, younger companies to evolve so it’s even more critical for F500s to embrace remote work if they want to prolong their lifespan. Had you already started seeing the shift toward remote work back then?
Companies won’t get away with forcing 9-to-5 workdays in the future Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: barbara booth, jose luis pelaez inc, blend images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, younger, change, team, future, forcing, workdays, way, talent, away, wont, work, workers, 9to5, companies, remote, technology


Companies won't get away with forcing 9-to-5 workdays in the future

What is the largest factor that is fueling remote work globally?

As a World Economic Forum member and recent co-chair of the Future Council on Education, Gender and Work, I have the honor of participating in conversations about what the WEF calls the Fourth Industrial Revolution. The first two revolutions were about mass production. The third turned us into knowledge workers bound in offices. This revolution is about breaking free of geography. It is being driven by the technology to help us do that.

Fourth industrial revolution change is coming from both sides: People want better lifestyles, and businesses are in hiring pain.

People know that place-bound work no longer makes sense. Collaboration technologies, like Microsoft’s Office 365, Slack, Google Hangouts and Atlassian, along with the ability to find work online via sites like ours, make it possible to work anywhere. The number of U.S. freelancers who found projects online increased 22 points in the past five years — from 42 percent in 2014 to 64 percent in 2018.

While technology is the main enabler, another major force is hiring pain and huge talent shortages. The most talented professionals are increasingly used to being able to call the shots and shape their lives as they want to live them rather than as traditional 9-to-5 work requires. This means companies who want access to them need to allow remote work.

What is your view on Yahoo, Bank of America, Aetna and IBM eliminating their work-from-home policy?

These remote-work policy reversals are extremely shortsighted. Forcing workers back into offices is archaic and a great way to lower the quality of your team. Top professionals will not trade the way they want to live to fit a company’s policy. They will find new work with companies more open to remote work. The team members who are less motivated, lower performers are more likely to stay.

Companies that revoke remote work privileges not only risk talent loss, they signal that they are not a fit for future top talent, especially among younger generations coming of age at a time when flexible work is an option they’re well aware of.

Reversing remote work policies is also the wrong thing for America. Big companies have social responsibilities. With so many areas of our country struggling, it’s backward-looking for companies to make decisions that take away jobs from regions that need them most. That is exactly what these remote-work reversals do.

You had mentioned that the concept of the workplace is “dead,” yet organizations in this country haven’t changed how they operate inside their four walls since Henry Ford created the 9-to-5 workday. Why are they so slow to change?

This brings to my mind the fable of the boiling frog. If a frog is suddenly put into boiling water, it will jump out. It senses danger immediately and takes action to save itself. But if a frog is put into water that is slowly brought up to a boil, it will perish because the change is so gradual, the frog doesn’t perceive danger until it’s too late.

This is the situation we are in with organizational change. Without having reached a boiling point, it’s easier for companies to do more of the same than to revisit their assumptions. So they keep conducting painful searches to find people who can drive into their offices and sit, unnecessarily, bound by four walls. Meanwhile, local costs of living are going up. Commutes are increasingly painful. And every year, things keep getting a little bit worse. But because there hasn’t been a major crisis, organizations having trouble finding the people complain but don’t jump into action. Just because something is gradual does not mean it’s okay not to rethink it. People need to wake up.

When do you think companies across America will finally embrace this change?

Within the next 10 to 15 years, because of generational shift. Millennials will be the next CEOs and CXOs. Gen Z is going to take all of this as a natural way of working. They are flexible work natives. Many baby boomers will be out of the workforce, and Gen X will be starting to move out as well. Younger generations will see the trade-offs in quality of life and think traditional models are ridiculous. This is similar to how digital natives changed the way we use technology. As younger generations take management reins, remote-work and flexible-work models will just be the norm to them. They’ll hire more remote people and empower their teams to work that way. Research points in this direction, too. Five times more hiring managers expect more of their team to work remotely in the next 10 years than expect less.

What type of companies do you see getting disrupted if they don’t soon embrace remote work?

Fortune 500s are seen as somewhat invincible — they’re far from it. When the F500 list first came out in 1955, they had an average lifespan of 75 years. The average lifespan of an F500 company today is less than one third that — 15 years. Only 12 percent of the original F500s remain on today’s list. It’s easier for smaller, younger companies to evolve so it’s even more critical for F500s to embrace remote work if they want to prolong their lifespan.

Agencies and traditional staffing firms are also ripe for disruption. Companies that hire via online marketplaces or build flexible remote teams can access the same quality talent at much faster speeds and usually with lower overall costs than they’d get via these traditional sources since they’re going direct to the talent. The majority (90%) of hiring managers are open to working with freelancers rather than through a staffing firm, according to Future Workforce Report. Staffing firms that evolve will do better than the ones avoiding change and agencies themselves can move online to create a more distributed model.

What are some tips you could offer giant companies about how to best manage a remote workforce?

The single most effective change a company can make is to take a remote-friendly approach. Don’t just tolerate remote team members as add-ons. Assume everyone is or may be remote at any time. Kill conference calls. Prefer video calls. And on video calls, allow the remote folks to interrupt.

One extreme is to ask the local folks to also take the video call from their desks rather than a conference room, this way everyone gets the same remote experience. Every company should support its most productive workers in living where they want. If you need a place to start, start with your most proven people who have the strongest voice in the company so that they can help effect further change.

You should also train your managers on remote team management. It will be the key management skill of the 21st century. Create consistency with communication and context setting. Establish processes and support tools for remote teams. And rely on collaborative technology but invest in in person time still, which will always be important.

You joined Upwork, formerly oDesk, in 2012. That was a big leap for you after PayPal. Had you already started seeing the shift toward remote work back then?

I’ve had to move a lot in my life. Moving is a major change and forces trade-off decisions. oDesk’s vision to free work from geographic boundaries resonated deeply with me when I heard there was an opportunity to join. I reflected on the fact that I had moved twice from Paris to California for job opportunities (and the second time, with a family, which is even more challenging), when the jobs that I was hired for could really be done from anywhere. It struck me that most people would not be willing to physically move to another location, and as a result, great talent was being underutilized everywhere, while at the same time great companies were struggling to find talent locally. I saw that eventually more and more work would be done remotely as technology was clearly evolving to make it possible.

More from At Work:

A Google parental leave idea that can help all workers avoid office burnout

The future of work won’t be about college degrees, it will be about job skills

Why work friendships are critical for long-term happiness


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: barbara booth, jose luis pelaez inc, blend images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, younger, change, team, future, forcing, workdays, way, talent, away, wont, work, workers, 9to5, companies, remote, technology


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North American trade deal must change to pass Congress, Democrat Bill Pascrell says

PresidentDonald Trump’s trade deal with Canada and Mexico can’t pass Congress in its current state, Rep. Bill Pascrell, D-N.J., said on Wednesday, according to Bloomberg News. The agreement needs changes not only “in the legislation but more enforcement” if House Democrats are going to pass the deal, Pascrell said. Pascrell has been a vocal critic of Trump’s trade deal, known as the United States Mexico Canada Agreement, or USMCA, which is intended to replace the North American Free Trade Agreem


PresidentDonald Trump’s trade deal with Canada and Mexico can’t pass Congress in its current state, Rep. Bill Pascrell, D-N.J., said on Wednesday, according to Bloomberg News. The agreement needs changes not only “in the legislation but more enforcement” if House Democrats are going to pass the deal, Pascrell said. Pascrell has been a vocal critic of Trump’s trade deal, known as the United States Mexico Canada Agreement, or USMCA, which is intended to replace the North American Free Trade Agreem
North American trade deal must change to pass Congress, Democrat Bill Pascrell says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: michael sheetz, tom williams, cq roll call, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, change, pass, democrat, american, congress, neal, nafta, bill, trade, north, agreement, usmca, deal, ways, pascrell


North American trade deal must change to pass Congress, Democrat Bill Pascrell says

PresidentDonald Trump’s trade deal with Canada and Mexico can’t pass Congress in its current state, Rep. Bill Pascrell, D-N.J., said on Wednesday, according to Bloomberg News.

The agreement needs changes not only “in the legislation but more enforcement” if House Democrats are going to pass the deal, Pascrell said.

Pascrell softened his tone in a statement to CNBC:

“I continue to review the USMCA and consult with stakeholders. I and many of my colleagues have called for higher standards in a revised NAFTA, or USMCA. A continuing concern remains stronger enforcement mechanisms, particularly in the areas of labor and the environment. These concerns are neither new nor novel.”

Pascrell has been a vocal critic of Trump’s trade deal, known as the United States Mexico Canada Agreement, or USMCA, which is intended to replace the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA. In line to become chair of the Ways and Means trade subcommittee, Pascrell has been one of the members most willing to directly challenge Trump’s executive powers on trade and tariffs.

The expected leader of the Ways and Means committee, Rep. Richard Neal, D-Mass., was also a vocal opponent of the original NAFTA deal in 1994. Neal has also said that the USMCA deal has a very high bar set to pass Congress.

Pascrell and Neal did not immediately respond to CNBC’s requests for comment.

— CNBC’s Ylan Mui contributed to this report.

Read the full story from Bloomberg here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: michael sheetz, tom williams, cq roll call, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, change, pass, democrat, american, congress, neal, nafta, bill, trade, north, agreement, usmca, deal, ways, pascrell


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The current threat of a slowdown is not enough to change our outlook, ECB member says

Concerns over a potential slowdown in Europe are currently not great enough for the European Central Bank (ECB) to change any economic forecasts for the region, a key member of the bank told CNBC Wednesday. “At this point in time, the impact is not such that it would take us to sort of fundamentally change our outlook,” Klaas Knot, the governor of the Dutch central bank and a member of the ECB’s Governing Council, told CNBC’s Joumanna Bercetche. Knot accepted that there were risks on the horizon


Concerns over a potential slowdown in Europe are currently not great enough for the European Central Bank (ECB) to change any economic forecasts for the region, a key member of the bank told CNBC Wednesday. “At this point in time, the impact is not such that it would take us to sort of fundamentally change our outlook,” Klaas Knot, the governor of the Dutch central bank and a member of the ECB’s Governing Council, told CNBC’s Joumanna Bercetche. Knot accepted that there were risks on the horizon
The current threat of a slowdown is not enough to change our outlook, ECB member says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: matt clinch, hannelore foerster, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, war, threat, wednesdayat, central, change, told, member, bank, trade, slowdown, ecb, risks, region, current, outlook


The current threat of a slowdown is not enough to change our outlook, ECB member says

Concerns over a potential slowdown in Europe are currently not great enough for the European Central Bank (ECB) to change any economic forecasts for the region, a key member of the bank told CNBC Wednesday.

“At this point in time, the impact is not such that it would take us to sort of fundamentally change our outlook,” Klaas Knot, the governor of the Dutch central bank and a member of the ECB’s Governing Council, told CNBC’s Joumanna Bercetche.

Knot accepted that there were risks on the horizon that could potentially cause growth to stall, including Brexit, Italy’s budget row with the EU and the U.S. trade war with China. He said it was “inevitable” to conclude that there were downside risks for the region.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: matt clinch, hannelore foerster, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, war, threat, wednesdayat, central, change, told, member, bank, trade, slowdown, ecb, risks, region, current, outlook


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GE CEO Culp’s quick comments about health spinoff could mean an ‘outright sale’

General Electric CEO Larry Culp’s latest comments to CNBC about GE Healthcare could indicate an “outright sale” is among the options under consideration, according to a leading industry analyst. Culp called GE Healthcare a “tremendous” franchise, which has “flexibility” in terms of the planned spinoff. “We could preserve our tax-free spin status while selling up to 49.9 percent,” Culp told CNBC’s David Faber on Monday. Danaher, where Culp was CEO from 2000 to 2014, would “love” to own the life s


General Electric CEO Larry Culp’s latest comments to CNBC about GE Healthcare could indicate an “outright sale” is among the options under consideration, according to a leading industry analyst. Culp called GE Healthcare a “tremendous” franchise, which has “flexibility” in terms of the planned spinoff. “We could preserve our tax-free spin status while selling up to 49.9 percent,” Culp told CNBC’s David Faber on Monday. Danaher, where Culp was CEO from 2000 to 2014, would “love” to own the life s
GE CEO Culp’s quick comments about health spinoff could mean an ‘outright sale’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unit, outright, ge, change, general, ceo, spinoff, culp, culps, quick, health, comments, mean, healthcare, davis, told, sale


GE CEO Culp's quick comments about health spinoff could mean an 'outright sale'

General Electric CEO Larry Culp’s latest comments to CNBC about GE Healthcare could indicate an “outright sale” is among the options under consideration, according to a leading industry analyst.

Culp called GE Healthcare a “tremendous” franchise, which has “flexibility” in terms of the planned spinoff. “We could preserve our tax-free spin status while selling up to 49.9 percent,” Culp told CNBC’s David Faber on Monday.

“I think [Culp] is weighing all options including the outright sale of the business or parts of it,” Scott Davis, chairman and CEO of Melius Research, told CNBC. Davis, who personally owns GE shares, maintains a buy rating on the stock with a $21 per share price target.

Danaher, where Culp was CEO from 2000 to 2014, would “love” to own the life sciences business of GE Healthcare, Davis added. “As for the diagnostic equipment, that is less clear,” he said, stressing it would be “a very large deal.”

When asked for further comment, GE directed CNBC to Culp’s comments earlier. On the Oct. 30 postearnings call, Culp indicated flexibility around GE Healthcare.

GE Healthcare is a cash cow, throwing off $3.4 billion in profit last year. The unit accounted for 15.8 percent of General Electric’s total 2017 sales and contributed 43.2 percent to GE’s operating profit last year.

Culp, 55, replaced John Flannery as chairman and CEO on Oct. 1 after the board reportedly became frustrated with the slow pace of change at the struggling industrial conglomerate.

Shortly after the leadership change, both GE and GE Healthcare had told CNBC they were “committed to establishing Healthcare as a separate independent entity.”

A spokeswoman for GE Healthcare said at the time that the unit “plans to continue working toward separation,” and Flannery’s departure “does not change what’s happening.”

GE Healthcare, under CEO Kieran Murphy, plans to become independent by the end of 2019. General Electric has said the spinoff makes sense because it allows the company to double down on its core industrial and energy businesses.

Shares of GE were under more pressure on Monday, trading around $8 per share around midday. GE is on pace for its worst year since 2008 when it lost 56.3 percent.

WATCH: CNBC’s full interview with General Electric’s Larry Culp


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unit, outright, ge, change, general, ceo, spinoff, culp, culps, quick, health, comments, mean, healthcare, davis, told, sale


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Yelp craters 30% as advertisers abandon the site

Yelp cratered as much as 32 percent Friday, a day after releasing third-quarter earnings that revealed advertisers are abandoning the site and denting revenue. Yelp earlier this year switched from long-term advertising contracts in local markets to more flexible, nonterm contracts. The company reported revenue of $241 million for the quarter, just shy of analyst projections of $245 million. In light of lower-than-expected net adds and corresponding advertising revenue, Yelp slashed its full-year


Yelp cratered as much as 32 percent Friday, a day after releasing third-quarter earnings that revealed advertisers are abandoning the site and denting revenue. Yelp earlier this year switched from long-term advertising contracts in local markets to more flexible, nonterm contracts. The company reported revenue of $241 million for the quarter, just shy of analyst projections of $245 million. In light of lower-than-expected net adds and corresponding advertising revenue, Yelp slashed its full-year
Yelp craters 30% as advertisers abandon the site Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: sara salinas, michael nagle, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, craters, yelp, company, site, advertising, million, stock, 30, change, abandon, sales, revenue, price, business, advertisers


Yelp craters 30% as advertisers abandon the site

Yelp cratered as much as 32 percent Friday, a day after releasing third-quarter earnings that revealed advertisers are abandoning the site and denting revenue.

The company added zero net new advertising customers during the quarter. Yelp earlier this year switched from long-term advertising contracts in local markets to more flexible, nonterm contracts. That change resulted in significant contract cancellations.

Though the cancellations were expected, Yelp failed to compensate with lower-than-expected gross customer adds. The company reported revenue of $241 million for the quarter, just shy of analyst projections of $245 million.

“We do not believe that there was any one single factor behind the new sales shortfall relative to our expectations. Instead, a number of smaller, compounding issues arose, including slower-than-expected sales head count growth, a change in advertising promotions, a technical issue in flowing leads to our reps and a lower success rate in contacting business decision-makers by our outbound sales calls,” Chief Financial Officer Charles Baker said on the company’s earnings call.

In light of lower-than-expected net adds and corresponding advertising revenue, Yelp slashed its full-year revenue guidance to a range of $938 million to $942 million, down from a previously stated range of $952 million to $967 million.

“One of the reasons we’ve expressed this year some caution about the transition to non-term contract is a recognition that the business is operating at a bit of a different clock speed today than it was before. And so one of the things we’ve learned is that the business is now more sensitive to the short-term productivity issues that probably were there in the past as well,” CEO Jeremy Stoppelman said on the call.

Yelp also saw negative impacts resulting from changes in Google’s search algorithm and sales representatives leaving the company in higher-than-normal numbers, executives said.

At least three Wall Street firms downgraded their ratings or lowered their price targets for the stock following the report.

“Unfortunately, to compete more effectively against digital platforms like Google, Facebook, Twitter, and Snap (among others) for local ad budgets, Yelp may need to eventually make more dramatic changes to its self-service ad platform,” Stifel analysts wrote in a note. “We have seen how disruptive this type of change can be for a publicly traded company from watching Snap over the past several quarters; however, we think Yelp will face challenges in penetrating its paying advertiser [total addressable market] without this level of ad platform flexibility.”

Stifel maintained its hold rating on the stock but lowered its price target to $34. Friday morning, the stock price was $31.26, down 28 percent from Thursday’s closing.

Friday’s plunge earlier had sent Yelp to a 52-week low of $29.33 and put the stock on pace for its worst day of trading since going public in 2012.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: sara salinas, michael nagle, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, craters, yelp, company, site, advertising, million, stock, 30, change, abandon, sales, revenue, price, business, advertisers


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Harley-Davidson’s electric motorcycle signals a big change for the legendary, but troubled, company

But the company has signaled it is time for a a change as the market for bikes continues to age, literally. Almost half of all motorcycle riders are 50 or older. Most recently, the motorcycle maker released third quarter earnings that beat expectations, but showed the company actually lost market share. “The expanded lineup may have greater appeal for women customers than the company’s traditional motorcycles,” Coleman said. “We also believe that this wider range of models will help to attract c


But the company has signaled it is time for a a change as the market for bikes continues to age, literally. Almost half of all motorcycle riders are 50 or older. Most recently, the motorcycle maker released third quarter earnings that beat expectations, but showed the company actually lost market share. “The expanded lineup may have greater appeal for women customers than the company’s traditional motorcycles,” Coleman said. “We also believe that this wider range of models will help to attract c
Harley-Davidson’s electric motorcycle signals a big change for the legendary, but troubled, company Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: robert ferris, source, harley davidson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, signals, big, legendary, troubled, motorcycles, market, company, tough, customers, motorcycle, electric, change, coleman, attract, riders, harleydavidsons, research


Harley-Davidson's electric motorcycle signals a big change for the legendary, but troubled, company

But the company has signaled it is time for a a change as the market for bikes continues to age, literally. Almost half of all motorcycle riders are 50 or older.

Harley-Davidson has especially struggled. Most recently, the motorcycle maker released third quarter earnings that beat expectations, but showed the company actually lost market share.

“Harley is in a tough spot here, where their core constituency is getting older and they are having a tough time attracting new people to the sport,” said Raymond James analyst Joe Altobello. Many view motorcycles as dangerous and difficult to operate, for example.

In recent years, the company has made an all out effort to attract more riders overall, including younger ones. The company unveiled a 10-year plan in 2017 to attract 2 million new riders by 2027. In addition to investing in electric bikes, the company has set up schools around the country to teach neophytes how to ride.

Electric motorcycles are expected to be a significant part of this strategy, but the company has also indicated it may expand into scooters and even bicycles, Argus Research analyst David Coleman said in an Oct. 26 research note.

“The expanded lineup may have greater appeal for women customers than the company’s traditional motorcycles,” Coleman said. “We also believe that this wider range of models will help to attract customers who might otherwise prefer to purchase a ‘fully custom’ motorcycle.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: robert ferris, source, harley davidson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, signals, big, legendary, troubled, motorcycles, market, company, tough, customers, motorcycle, electric, change, coleman, attract, riders, harleydavidsons, research


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Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her


When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her
Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made.

She had fantasized her whole life about working in fashion and, suddenly, she had a job that allowed her to do that, organizing some of the industry’s biggest events across Asia.

But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed.

“I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. “But about three and a half years in, I just became really disconnected with the work I was doing.”

It was then 2015, and climate change was gaining increasing attention on the international stage. To Dickson’s surprise, she found there was one industry lurking at the center of the issue: Her own.

In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters.

“I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her to start watching documentaries and reading up on the issue. “I’d been working in this industry and I had no idea what actually was going on.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


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Democrats’ expanded control of state governments could change the 2020 political landscape

Democrats picked up full control of a half dozen statehouses Tuesday, while Republicans lost full control of four others. Democrats picked up full control of state government in Colorado, Illinois, Maine, New Mexico, New York and Nevada. After Tuesday’s vote, Minnesota is now the only state where the legislature is divided — the Senate remains in Republican control, while the House flipped to Democrats. Voters elected Democrats to succeed Republican governors in Illinois, Kansas, Maine, Michigan


Democrats picked up full control of a half dozen statehouses Tuesday, while Republicans lost full control of four others. Democrats picked up full control of state government in Colorado, Illinois, Maine, New Mexico, New York and Nevada. After Tuesday’s vote, Minnesota is now the only state where the legislature is divided — the Senate remains in Republican control, while the House flipped to Democrats. Voters elected Democrats to succeed Republican governors in Illinois, Kansas, Maine, Michigan
Democrats’ expanded control of state governments could change the 2020 political landscape Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-07  Authors: john w schoen, emma newburger, scott olson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, landscape, michigan, democrat, governors, states, republican, democrats, state, 2020, lost, change, republicans, political, control, governments, governor, expanded


Democrats' expanded control of state governments could change the 2020 political landscape

Democrats picked up full control of a half dozen statehouses Tuesday, while Republicans lost full control of four others.

The outcome could also affect the presidential election of 2020 and future control of the U.S. House of Representatives.

Most governors and many of the state legislators elected this year will be in office when congressional districts are redrawn after the 2020 Census. In some states, a governor’s power to sign or veto congressional maps could decide the partisan balance.

State party control will also play an important role in the 2020 presidential campaign, especially in traditional battleground states like Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin.

Congress now becomes split between Republican and Democratic control, and many keys issues like health-care reform may be decided in state capitols instead of Washington.

Democrats picked up full control of state government in Colorado, Illinois, Maine, New Mexico, New York and Nevada. Republicans lost full control to a divided government in Kansas, Michigan, New Hampshire and Wisconsin.

The shift in control came through a combination of changes in governorships and control of legislative chambers, many of which have been split between Republicans and Democrats.

After Tuesday’s vote, Minnesota is now the only state where the legislature is divided — the Senate remains in Republican control, while the House flipped to Democrats. The last time there was only one divided state legislature was more than 100 years ago in 1914, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Voters elected Democrats to succeed Republican governors in Illinois, Kansas, Maine, Michigan, Nevada, New Mexico and Wisconsin. Alaskan voters flipped the other way, electing a Republican governor to succeed a Democrat.

That gave Republicans in Alaska full control of state government, the only such gain for the GOP.

Democrats also kept control of Connecticut, a traditionally Democratic state that Republicans had hoped to pick up.

Despite their statehouse gains, Democrats lost high-profile governor’s races in Florida and Ohio. A hotly contested governor’s race in Georgia, where Democrat Stacey Abrams was seeking to become the first black woman to be elected governor of a U.S. state, remained too close to call on Wednesday.

In Florida, Democrat Andrew Gillum lost his attempt to become the state’s first black governor, suffering a narrow defeat to Republican Ron DeSantis in a racially charged contest that drew national attention. Republicans also scored a major victory in Ohio’s governor race, where Mike DeWine, the state attorney general, defeated Democrat Richard Cordray, who served as the first director of the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

But in Wisconsin, Democrat Tony Evers pulled off a narrow win in unseating Republican incumbent Scott Walker, according to NBC News. The two-term governor, who also survived a Democratic-driven recall election in 2012 after ending collective bargaining for public workers, briefly ran for president in 2016.

Democratic victories in governor’s races in Michigan, Pennsylvania and Kansas — states that supported Trump in 2016 — bolstered the party’s hopes of capturing those states in the 2020 presidential election.

In Michigan, Democrat Gretchen Whitmer turned back Republican Bill Schuette in the contest to succeed Republican Gov. Rick Snyder, who could not run again due to term limits. In Kansas, Democrat Laura Kelly defeated Kris Kobach, a staunch Trump ally, where former Republican Gov. Sam Brownback suffered from low approval ratings.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-07  Authors: john w schoen, emma newburger, scott olson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, landscape, michigan, democrat, governors, states, republican, democrats, state, 2020, lost, change, republicans, political, control, governments, governor, expanded


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EU considering sanction procedure on Italy if no budget change: Dombrovskis

The Vice President of the European Commission for the euro Valdis Dombrovskis said on Tuesday the EU executive was considering possible sanctions proceedings against Italy if Rome did not change its budget by Nov. 13. “It is something we are looking at,” Dombrovskis told a news conference, adding that the procedure would concern Italy’s high debt and noting that Rome still had a week to change. Dombrovskis referred to a procedure that could lead to fines or the suspension of EU funds if Italy di


The Vice President of the European Commission for the euro Valdis Dombrovskis said on Tuesday the EU executive was considering possible sanctions proceedings against Italy if Rome did not change its budget by Nov. 13. “It is something we are looking at,” Dombrovskis told a news conference, adding that the procedure would concern Italy’s high debt and noting that Rome still had a week to change. Dombrovskis referred to a procedure that could lead to fines or the suspension of EU funds if Italy di
EU considering sanction procedure on Italy if no budget change: Dombrovskis Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-06  Authors: emmanuel dunand, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sanction, rome, eu, valdis, dombrovskis, week, considering, commission, vice, change, procedure, budget, italy


EU considering sanction procedure on Italy if no budget change: Dombrovskis

The Vice President of the European Commission for the euro Valdis Dombrovskis said on Tuesday the EU executive was considering possible sanctions proceedings against Italy if Rome did not change its budget by Nov. 13.

“It is something we are looking at,” Dombrovskis told a news conference, adding that the procedure would concern Italy’s high debt and noting that Rome still had a week to change.

Dombrovskis referred to a procedure that could lead to fines or the suspension of EU funds if Italy did not abide by EU requirements.

Dombrovskis repeated the Commission was open to a dialogue with Italy, but that changes to the budget had to be “substantial”.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-06  Authors: emmanuel dunand, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sanction, rome, eu, valdis, dombrovskis, week, considering, commission, vice, change, procedure, budget, italy


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Elon Musk: Tesla’s work ‘supersedes political parties, race, creed, religion’

It’s “very important for the future of the world,” Musk told Recode’s Kara Swisher in an interview Wednesday at Tesla’s Palo Alto, California headquarters. “This supersedes political parties, race, creed, religion, it doesn’t matter. “The other option would have been, Tesla dies,” Musk told Swisher. According to Musk, without Tesla there would still be a transition to sustainable energy, but it would take much longer. (“I did my absolute best,” Musk told Swisher of the councils.)


It’s “very important for the future of the world,” Musk told Recode’s Kara Swisher in an interview Wednesday at Tesla’s Palo Alto, California headquarters. “This supersedes political parties, race, creed, religion, it doesn’t matter. “The other option would have been, Tesla dies,” Musk told Swisher. According to Musk, without Tesla there would still be a transition to sustainable energy, but it would take much longer. (“I did my absolute best,” Musk told Swisher of the councils.)
Elon Musk: Tesla’s work ‘supersedes political parties, race, creed, religion’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-05  Authors: catherine clifford, david mcnew, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, elon, supersedes, teslas, world, work, religion, political, energy, musk, important, sustainable, tesla, creed, told, race, change, parties


Elon Musk: Tesla's work 'supersedes political parties, race, creed, religion'

The political divide between Democrats and Republicans in the United States has become particularly divisive ahead of the midterm elections Tuesday.

However, according to Elon Musk, the CEO of Tesla and SpaceX, the work he is doing with Tesla and its role in advancing sustainable transportation is more important than politics — or just about anything else.

It’s “very important for the future of the world,” Musk told Recode’s Kara Swisher in an interview Wednesday at Tesla’s Palo Alto, California headquarters. “It’s very important for all life on Earth.

“This supersedes political parties, race, creed, religion, it doesn’t matter. If we do not solve the environment, we’re all damned,” Musk said.

It is for that reason that Musk and his team have put forth an “excruciating effort,” he said, often working over a hundred hours a week in order to ramp up production of Tesla’s Model 3 vehicle, which had fallen behind.

“The other option would have been, Tesla dies,” Musk told Swisher.

“Tesla cannot die. Tesla is incredibly important for the future of sustainable transport and energy generation. The fundamental purpose, the fundamental good that Tesla provides, is accelerating the advent of sustainable transport and energy production.”

Electric vehicles reduce the emissions that contribute to climate change. In October, the United Nation’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a report saying that limiting global warming “would require rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society.”

According to Musk, without Tesla there would still be a transition to sustainable energy, but it would take much longer. “History will judge this, obviously, but I would say on the order of 10 years, maybe 20 years,” he said. “This could be all the difference in the world.”

Now, Tesla is “doing pretty well,” said Musk, despite its Model 3 production issues.

“Tesla’s not staring death in the face. We’re in, I think, a pretty good position,” Musk said. “Up until around September, we were really faced with … ‘We’re gonna die,’ constantly. I feel like we’re no longer in the staring-death-in-the-face situation.”

Musk himself previously stepped into the political arena when he joined three advisory councils on business, manufacturing jobs and infrastructure for President Donald Trump in December 2016. Musk withdrew from the councils in June 2017, however, when Trump backed out of the Paris climate accord, a 2015 agree among various world leaders to fight climate change. (“I did my absolute best,” Musk told Swisher of the councils.)

See also:

Elon Musk: ‘You’re gonna go a little bonkers if you work 120 hours a week’

Richard Branson’s Virgin Atlantic set to fly a 747 jet with fuel made from factory pollution

This 23-year-old founded a company with self-driving car tech that’s giving Tesla some competition


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-05  Authors: catherine clifford, david mcnew, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, elon, supersedes, teslas, world, work, religion, political, energy, musk, important, sustainable, tesla, creed, told, race, change, parties


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