Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp suffer hours-long outage in US, Europe

Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp were down Sunday. All three social media platforms, including Facebook Messenger, were not loading as of early Sunday morning. Downdetector.com, a site that monitors site outages, shows Facebook was down since 6:30 a.m. EST in much of the world, with thousands of reported outages concentrated in northeastern U.S., Europe and the Philippines. An email requesting comment about the outage was sent to Facebook and Instagram. There are more than 1.52 billion daily act


Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp were down Sunday. All three social media platforms, including Facebook Messenger, were not loading as of early Sunday morning. Downdetector.com, a site that monitors site outages, shows Facebook was down since 6:30 a.m. EST in much of the world, with thousands of reported outages concentrated in northeastern U.S., Europe and the Philippines. An email requesting comment about the outage was sent to Facebook and Instagram. There are more than 1.52 billion daily act
Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp suffer hours-long outage in US, Europe Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, site, hourslong, platforms, europe, social, media, suffer, outage, whatsapp, instagram, facebook, users, outages


Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp suffer hours-long outage in US, Europe

Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp were down Sunday.

All three social media platforms, including Facebook Messenger, were not loading as of early Sunday morning.

Downdetector.com, a site that monitors site outages, shows Facebook was down since 6:30 a.m. EST in much of the world, with thousands of reported outages concentrated in northeastern U.S., Europe and the Philippines.

Facebook appeared to be back up and running for most users by 9 a.m. EST.

It was not immediately clear what caused the outage or how long the platforms would be down.

An email requesting comment about the outage was sent to Facebook and Instagram.

#FacebookDown, #instagramdown and #whatsappdown were all trending on Twitter globally.

Facebook acquired Instagram in 2012 and WhatsApp in 2014.

There are more than 1.52 billion daily active Facebook users, according to the social media network’s website.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, site, hourslong, platforms, europe, social, media, suffer, outage, whatsapp, instagram, facebook, users, outages


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Tech firms could face EU fines for failing to remove terrorist content within one hour

Each morning, the “Beyond the Valley” newsletter brings you all the latest from the vast, dynamic world of tech – outside the Silicon Valley. The legislation targets any material — such as text, images, sound recordings or videos — that incites or solicits terrorist offences, provides instructions for the carrying out of terrorist offences, or solicits participation in the activities of a terrorist group. It will also apply to content providing guidance on how to make and use explosives, firearm


Each morning, the “Beyond the Valley” newsletter brings you all the latest from the vast, dynamic world of tech – outside the Silicon Valley. The legislation targets any material — such as text, images, sound recordings or videos — that incites or solicits terrorist offences, provides instructions for the carrying out of terrorist offences, or solicits participation in the activities of a terrorist group. It will also apply to content providing guidance on how to make and use explosives, firearm
Tech firms could face EU fines for failing to remove terrorist content within one hour Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: chloe taylor, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, offences, failing, authorities, firms, platforms, face, tech, content, hour, terrorist, eu, legislation, solicits, removal, remove, fines


Tech firms could face EU fines for failing to remove terrorist content within one hour

By signing up for newsletters, you are agreeing to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy .

Each morning, the “Beyond the Valley” newsletter brings you all the latest from the vast, dynamic world of tech – outside the Silicon Valley.

Companies that have been issued a substantial number of removal orders may also be asked by authorities to take further measures, such as regular reporting to authorities or increasing staff numbers. Lawmakers also agreed that additional measures ordered by authorities should take a company’s financial capabilities into account, as well as “the freedom to receive and impart information and ideas in an open and democratic society.”

Smaller platforms would be given a slight advantage, with a 12-hour window to remove content after their first removal order, as well as an explanation from authorities about their obligations under the law.

The legislation targets any material — such as text, images, sound recordings or videos — that incites or solicits terrorist offences, provides instructions for the carrying out of terrorist offences, or solicits participation in the activities of a terrorist group. It will also apply to content providing guidance on how to make and use explosives, firearms and other weapons for terrorist purposes.

The law would protect content that was being distributed for educational, journalistic or research purposes. The expression of controversial views on sensitive political matters would not be subject to the legislation.

Daniel Dalton, member of the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs, said in a press release Monday there was a clear problem with terrorist material being circulated unchecked — but he added the legislation would not prohibit free speech.

“This propaganda can be linked to actual terrorist incidents and national authorities must be able to act decisively,” he said. “Any new legislation must be practical and proportionate if we are to safeguard free speech. Without a fair process we risk the over-removal of content as businesses would understandably take a safety-first approach to defend themselves. It also absolutely cannot lead to a general monitoring of content by the back door.”

Big Tech has faced intensified scrutiny since a video of last month’s attacks on two New Zealand mosques was shared repeatedly on several social media sites.

U.K. lawmakers published a proposal for new legislation on Monday that would slap companies with hefty fines, block websites and hold executives personally liable if their platforms host harmful content.

Last week, Australia passed a similar law that could see tech firms and their executives fined or jailed for failing to remove harmful content from their platforms.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: chloe taylor, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, offences, failing, authorities, firms, platforms, face, tech, content, hour, terrorist, eu, legislation, solicits, removal, remove, fines


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Cramer Remix: A trade deal could push this stock even higher

CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Monday noted that shares of 3M, the company that makes Scotch tape and Post-it notes, have been soaring since the Federal Reserve ended plans to raise interest rates in 2019. He gave two sell calls on the stock, including one that cut his price target. Shares of 3M closed Monday north of $215, even after the company gave a disappointing guidance in its most recent earnings report, Cramer pointed out. “3M could get hit again when it reports on [April] 25th,” the “Mad Money” h


CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Monday noted that shares of 3M, the company that makes Scotch tape and Post-it notes, have been soaring since the Federal Reserve ended plans to raise interest rates in 2019. He gave two sell calls on the stock, including one that cut his price target. Shares of 3M closed Monday north of $215, even after the company gave a disappointing guidance in its most recent earnings report, Cramer pointed out. “3M could get hit again when it reports on [April] 25th,” the “Mad Money” h
Cramer Remix: A trade deal could push this stock even higher Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: tyler clifford, sebastien bozon, afp, getty images, chesnot, source, scott mlyn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deal, gave, cramer, push, reports, weakness, stock, wall, remix, trade, earnings, company, higher, 3m, weaknesses


Cramer Remix: A trade deal could push this stock even higher

CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Monday noted that shares of 3M, the company that makes Scotch tape and Post-it notes, have been soaring since the Federal Reserve ended plans to raise interest rates in 2019.

After falling from $193 to about $178 in December, Cramer said the equity has rebounded from apparent weaknesses, which the notable J. P. Morgan analyst Steve Tusa highlighted last year. He gave two sell calls on the stock, including one that cut his price target.

Shares of 3M closed Monday north of $215, even after the company gave a disappointing guidance in its most recent earnings report, Cramer pointed out.

“3M could get hit again when it reports on [April] 25th,” the “Mad Money” host said. “They have auto exposure and a lot of Chinese business, so the tariffs hurt. But if we get a trade deal with China, then people will overlook the current weakness and buy the stock hand over fist.”

On top of 3M, Cramer also gave his thoughts on Walgreens and FedEx in response to a Wall Street Journal article that claims the bull market would face volatility as corporations begin to deliver earnings reports of the first three months of 2019.

Click here for Cramer’s insight


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: tyler clifford, sebastien bozon, afp, getty images, chesnot, source, scott mlyn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deal, gave, cramer, push, reports, weakness, stock, wall, remix, trade, earnings, company, higher, 3m, weaknesses


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Zuckerberg resists pressure to alter Facebook’s livestream feature after Christchurch attacks

Mark Zuckerberg has expressed reluctance to alter the Facebook feature that hosted video footage of the deadly terror attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand. The tech giant came under criticism after video of the attack, which killed 50 people, was livestreamed and widely circulated on its platform. “One of the things that’s magical about livestreaming is that it’s bi-directional, … you’re not just broadcasting, you’re communicating, and people are commenting back. Although reluctant


Mark Zuckerberg has expressed reluctance to alter the Facebook feature that hosted video footage of the deadly terror attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand. The tech giant came under criticism after video of the attack, which killed 50 people, was livestreamed and widely circulated on its platform. “One of the things that’s magical about livestreaming is that it’s bi-directional, … you’re not just broadcasting, you’re communicating, and people are commenting back. Although reluctant
Zuckerberg resists pressure to alter Facebook’s livestream feature after Christchurch attacks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-04  Authors: chloe taylor, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, christchurch, video, zuckerberg, feature, livestreaming, attacks, content, tech, facebooks, remove, platforms, resists, livestream, alter, facebook, youre, pressure, thats


Zuckerberg resists pressure to alter Facebook's livestream feature after Christchurch attacks

Mark Zuckerberg has expressed reluctance to alter the Facebook feature that hosted video footage of the deadly terror attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand.

The tech giant came under criticism after video of the attack, which killed 50 people, was livestreamed and widely circulated on its platform.

Speaking to ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos on Thursday, the Facebook founder and CEO admitted that the artificial intelligence it uses to filter harmful content failed to flag the video, adding that its reach may have been limited if livestreams were subject to a broadcast delay.

“But it would also fundamentally break what livestreaming is for people. Most people are livestreaming a birthday party or hanging out with friends when they can’t be together,” he said. “One of the things that’s magical about livestreaming is that it’s bi-directional, … you’re not just broadcasting, you’re communicating, and people are commenting back. So if you had a delay [it] would break that.”

Although reluctant to introduce a delay on Facebook’s livestream feature, Zuckerberg accepted that the company needed to work harder to “mitigate and remove as much of the negative (content) as possible.”

He also told ABC that the way the company was run had significantly changed in recent years, with the policing of harmful content among the major issues Facebook was focusing on.

“Ninety-nine percent of the ISIS and Al-Qaeda content that we take down are AI systems identifying the move before any person sees it — so that’s a good example of being proactive, and I think what we should hold all companies to account [for],” he said.

Footage of last month’s mosque massacre was livestreamed on Facebook by the shooter last month.

Facebook, Twitter and Google rushed to remove the content from their platforms, but users were still able to find versions of the video hours after the tech giants said they had taken it down.

On Thursday, Australian lawmakers passed legislation that could see social media executives face jail time and hefty fines if their platforms fail to remove violent content.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-04  Authors: chloe taylor, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, christchurch, video, zuckerberg, feature, livestreaming, attacks, content, tech, facebooks, remove, platforms, resists, livestream, alter, facebook, youre, pressure, thats


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Zuckerberg resists pressure to alter Facebook’s livestream feature after Christchurch attacks

Mark Zuckerberg has expressed reluctance to alter the Facebook feature that hosted video footage of the deadly terror attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand. The tech giant came under criticism after video of the attack, which killed 50 people, was livestreamed and widely circulated on its platform. “One of the things that’s magical about livestreaming is that it’s bi-directional, … you’re not just broadcasting, you’re communicating, and people are commenting back. Although reluctant


Mark Zuckerberg has expressed reluctance to alter the Facebook feature that hosted video footage of the deadly terror attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand. The tech giant came under criticism after video of the attack, which killed 50 people, was livestreamed and widely circulated on its platform. “One of the things that’s magical about livestreaming is that it’s bi-directional, … you’re not just broadcasting, you’re communicating, and people are commenting back. Although reluctant
Zuckerberg resists pressure to alter Facebook’s livestream feature after Christchurch attacks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-04  Authors: chloe taylor, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, christchurch, video, zuckerberg, feature, livestreaming, attacks, content, tech, facebooks, remove, platforms, resists, livestream, alter, facebook, youre, pressure, thats


Zuckerberg resists pressure to alter Facebook's livestream feature after Christchurch attacks

Mark Zuckerberg has expressed reluctance to alter the Facebook feature that hosted video footage of the deadly terror attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand.

The tech giant came under criticism after video of the attack, which killed 50 people, was livestreamed and widely circulated on its platform.

Speaking to ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos on Thursday, the Facebook founder and CEO admitted that the artificial intelligence it uses to filter harmful content failed to flag the video, adding that its reach may have been limited if livestreams were subject to a broadcast delay.

“But it would also fundamentally break what livestreaming is for people. Most people are livestreaming a birthday party or hanging out with friends when they can’t be together,” he said. “One of the things that’s magical about livestreaming is that it’s bi-directional, … you’re not just broadcasting, you’re communicating, and people are commenting back. So if you had a delay [it] would break that.”

Although reluctant to introduce a delay on Facebook’s livestream feature, Zuckerberg accepted that the company needed to work harder to “mitigate and remove as much of the negative (content) as possible.”

He also told ABC that the way the company was run had significantly changed in recent years, with the policing of harmful content among the major issues Facebook was focusing on.

“Ninety-nine percent of the ISIS and Al-Qaeda content that we take down are AI systems identifying the move before any person sees it — so that’s a good example of being proactive, and I think what we should hold all companies to account [for],” he said.

Footage of last month’s mosque massacre was livestreamed on Facebook by the shooter last month.

Facebook, Twitter and Google rushed to remove the content from their platforms, but users were still able to find versions of the video hours after the tech giants said they had taken it down.

On Thursday, Australian lawmakers passed legislation that could see social media executives face jail time and hefty fines if their platforms fail to remove violent content.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-04  Authors: chloe taylor, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, christchurch, video, zuckerberg, feature, livestreaming, attacks, content, tech, facebooks, remove, platforms, resists, livestream, alter, facebook, youre, pressure, thats


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Facebook Oops: Special employee hotline for faster customer support

Facebook has a special internal email hotline commonly referred to as “Oops@,” where employees can submit any support queries they have for priority treatment, multiple former Facebook employees told CNBC. These channels serve as routers that get employee requests where they need to go in a speedier fashion than the company’s external support systems, employees said. Primarily, employees submit requests when a friend gets suspended from their account or forgets their password. However, some empl


Facebook has a special internal email hotline commonly referred to as “Oops@,” where employees can submit any support queries they have for priority treatment, multiple former Facebook employees told CNBC. These channels serve as routers that get employee requests where they need to go in a speedier fashion than the company’s external support systems, employees said. Primarily, employees submit requests when a friend gets suspended from their account or forgets their password. However, some empl
Facebook Oops: Special employee hotline for faster customer support Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: salvador rodriguez, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, support, customer, used, content, employees, companys, friends, hotline, facebook, requests, submit, told, oops, special, faster, employee


Facebook Oops: Special employee hotline for faster customer support

If your support query to Facebook is taking longer than you expected, it might be because the company’s employees and their friends and family are cutting to the front of the line.

Facebook has a special internal email hotline commonly referred to as “Oops@,” where employees can submit any support queries they have for priority treatment, multiple former Facebook employees told CNBC. There is also an internal online form that can be used for similar purposes.

“It’s good to know people in Facebook,” one former sales employee told CNBC.

These channels serve as routers that get employee requests where they need to go in a speedier fashion than the company’s external support systems, employees said.

The channels can be used for a variety of requests. Primarily, employees submit requests when a friend gets suspended from their account or forgets their password. They can also be used to help friends who run businesses submit an appeal to Facebook if their business submits an ad that gets rejected by the company. The tool can also be used to flag questionable content employees come across that they believe should not be on the company’s services.

Facebook built the tools because employees were taking too much time working on helping solve issues for their friends, one advertiser with friends at the company told CNBC.

“So that’s good for us, but bad for other folks,” the advertiser said.

However, some employees said the channels were not that helpful, and it is more helpful to submit requests to specific teams or employees.

A Facebook representative confirmed the existence of the hotline, but noted, “Oops is not the best way to report content issues,” such as inappropriate posts. “The best way is through the Report link that appears next to the content.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: salvador rodriguez, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, support, customer, used, content, employees, companys, friends, hotline, facebook, requests, submit, told, oops, special, faster, employee


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Facebook rejects Australian regulator’s push for scrutiny of news feeds

Facebook has rejected an Australian regulator’s recommendation for greater scrutiny over the social network’s advertising market power and the ranking of news articles in customers’ feeds. “People, not regulators, should decide what they see in their news feeds,” Facebook said in a 76-page submission in reply dated March 3 and emailed to Reuters on Wednesday. “Creating a news ranking regulator for Facebook is not a proportionate regulatory solution that will be effective to address the longstand


Facebook has rejected an Australian regulator’s recommendation for greater scrutiny over the social network’s advertising market power and the ranking of news articles in customers’ feeds. “People, not regulators, should decide what they see in their news feeds,” Facebook said in a 76-page submission in reply dated March 3 and emailed to Reuters on Wednesday. “Creating a news ranking regulator for Facebook is not a proportionate regulatory solution that will be effective to address the longstand
Facebook rejects Australian regulator’s push for scrutiny of news feeds Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, feeds, push, regulator, regulators, companies, publishers, rejects, accc, ranking, seek, facebook, technology, australian, scrutiny, competition


Facebook rejects Australian regulator's push for scrutiny of news feeds

Facebook has rejected an Australian regulator’s recommendation for greater scrutiny over the social network’s advertising market power and the ranking of news articles in customers’ feeds.

The proposal by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) in December, along with a new regulator to police technology giants, is being watched closely in other countries as governments seek to check their power.

“People, not regulators, should decide what they see in their news feeds,” Facebook said in a 76-page submission in reply dated March 3 and emailed to Reuters on Wednesday.

“Creating a news ranking regulator for Facebook is not a proportionate regulatory solution that will be effective to address the longstanding monetisation challenges facing some Australian publishers,” Facebook said.

It said the commission underestimated the level of competition in online advertising markets in Australia, and was mistaken in its belief that Facebook’s aggregation and analysis of users’ data made it powerful.

Facebook’s response follows a similar rebuttal from Alphabet Inc’s Google as the companies seek to head off a crackdown that could form a template for curtailing their growing influence in public life around the world.

The ACCC had said the enormous market power of firms such as Google, which has a 94 percent share of web searches in Australia, and their opaque methods for ranking advertisements, gave them the ability and incentive to favor their businesses over advertisers.

In its preliminary recommendations that are subject to change, the ACCC said the new regulator should have powers to investigate how the companies rank advertisements and news articles.

That was welcomed by NewsMediaWorks, a group representing Australian news publishers, which said that online platforms unfairly profit from distributing their stories. Facebook suggested its opponents feared competition.

“The preliminary report’s near-exclusive focus on protecting certain publishers from disruption and competition is at odds with the ACCC’s mandate to promote competition,” Facebook said.

Australia, which has passed laws forcing technology companies to help police access user data amid growing concerns about the distribution of so-called “fake news,” ordered the ACCC inquiry as part of wider media reforms in 2017.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, feeds, push, regulator, regulators, companies, publishers, rejects, accc, ranking, seek, facebook, technology, australian, scrutiny, competition


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Twitter is working on a feature that lets you hide replies to your tweets

Twitter is developing a feature that would let users hide replies to their tweets. The new feature, first uncovered by coder Jane Manchun Wong, gives a user a “Hide Tweet” option to hide replies from other users, instead of blocking or muting them. Other users would then be able to click a “View Hidden Tweets” tool to look at the concealed tweets. Michelle Yasmeen Haq, senior product manager at Twitter, confirmed that the “Hide Tweet” and “View Hidden Tweets” controls were in development, as par


Twitter is developing a feature that would let users hide replies to their tweets. The new feature, first uncovered by coder Jane Manchun Wong, gives a user a “Hide Tweet” option to hide replies from other users, instead of blocking or muting them. Other users would then be able to click a “View Hidden Tweets” tool to look at the concealed tweets. Michelle Yasmeen Haq, senior product manager at Twitter, confirmed that the “Hide Tweet” and “View Hidden Tweets” controls were in development, as par
Twitter is working on a feature that lets you hide replies to your tweets Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: ryan browne, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, feature, tweets, view, lets, replies, users, working, mute, twitter, report, wong, hide


Twitter is working on a feature that lets you hide replies to your tweets

Twitter is developing a feature that would let users hide replies to their tweets.

The new feature, first uncovered by coder Jane Manchun Wong, gives a user a “Hide Tweet” option to hide replies from other users, instead of blocking or muting them.

Other users would then be able to click a “View Hidden Tweets” tool to look at the concealed tweets.

Michelle Yasmeen Haq, senior product manager at Twitter, confirmed that the “Hide Tweet” and “View Hidden Tweets” controls were in development, as part of its drive to promote “healthy” conversations on the platform.

“We already see people trying (to) keep their conversations healthy by using block, mute, and report, but these tools don’t always address the issue,” she said in a tweet late Thursday.

“Block and mute only change the experience of the blocker, and report only works for the content that violates our policies.”

Commenters raised concerns that the new feature could be abused, noting it could shut down a debate or prevent people from holding politicians on the platform to account.

But Wong said the move appeared to be about “moderation,” while Twitter’s Haq noted that it would let users “notice and call out situations where people use the feature to hide content they disagree with.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: ryan browne, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, feature, tweets, view, lets, replies, users, working, mute, twitter, report, wong, hide


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Facebook’s Zuckerberg to meet with UK culture minister to discuss regulation

Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg is meeting with a British official Thursday to discuss internet regulation and fake news. Zuckerberg will speak with U.K. Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright at the firm’s headquarters in Menlo Park, California, about a U.K. government plan to regulate tech companies over how they tackle harmful content online. “I look forward to meeting Mr. Zuckerberg to discuss what more Facebook can do to help keep people safe on their platforms, as we prepare a new regula


Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg is meeting with a British official Thursday to discuss internet regulation and fake news. Zuckerberg will speak with U.K. Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright at the firm’s headquarters in Menlo Park, California, about a U.K. government plan to regulate tech companies over how they tackle harmful content online. “I look forward to meeting Mr. Zuckerberg to discuss what more Facebook can do to help keep people safe on their platforms, as we prepare a new regula
Facebook’s Zuckerberg to meet with UK culture minister to discuss regulation Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-21  Authors: ryan browne, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zuckerberg, regulation, discuss, firms, social, facebook, facebooks, tech, meet, meeting, wright, uk, minister, culture, media, safe


Facebook's Zuckerberg to meet with UK culture minister to discuss regulation

Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg is meeting with a British official Thursday to discuss internet regulation and fake news.

Zuckerberg will speak with U.K. Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright at the firm’s headquarters in Menlo Park, California, about a U.K. government plan to regulate tech companies over how they tackle harmful content online.

Another topic high on the agenda will be the spread of disinformation on the web, a government spokesperson said, an issue the social network has faced heightened scrutiny over globally.

“I look forward to meeting Mr. Zuckerberg to discuss what more Facebook can do to help keep people safe on their platforms, as we prepare a new regulatory framework that will reinforce Facebook’s and other tech firms’ responsibility to keep us safe,” Wright said in a statement Thursday.

Britain’s Home Office and the culture department are due to release a white paper where they will lay out their strategy to counter issues like cyberbullying and child abuse content online. Reports have said the report could include a proposed regulator similar to Ofcom, the media watchdog, to monitor social media.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-21  Authors: ryan browne, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zuckerberg, regulation, discuss, firms, social, facebook, facebooks, tech, meet, meeting, wright, uk, minister, culture, media, safe


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‘Fortnite’ is not the only problem that major video game firms are facing, analysts say

“Fortnite” — a free-to-play online video game — has shaken up the gaming industry in recent years, catapulting itself beyond the sector into the wider socio-cultural landscape. Its runaway success has led some to question the future of top video game companies such as Electronic Arts (EA) and Take-Two Interactive, as intense competition in the gaming space dents sales of industry heavyweights. Analysts say the problems faced by these top gaming firms go beyond the rising competition from Fortnit


“Fortnite” — a free-to-play online video game — has shaken up the gaming industry in recent years, catapulting itself beyond the sector into the wider socio-cultural landscape. Its runaway success has led some to question the future of top video game companies such as Electronic Arts (EA) and Take-Two Interactive, as intense competition in the gaming space dents sales of industry heavyweights. Analysts say the problems faced by these top gaming firms go beyond the rising competition from Fortnit
‘Fortnite’ is not the only problem that major video game firms are facing, analysts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-18  Authors: eustance huang, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fortnite, reason, major, firms, industry, gaming, analysts, electronic, shares, video, facing, game, taketwo, say, problem, interactive


'Fortnite' is not the only problem that major video game firms are facing, analysts say

“Fortnite” — a free-to-play online video game — has shaken up the gaming industry in recent years, catapulting itself beyond the sector into the wider socio-cultural landscape.

Its runaway success has led some to question the future of top video game companies such as Electronic Arts (EA) and Take-Two Interactive, as intense competition in the gaming space dents sales of industry heavyweights.

Earlier in February, shares of EA and Take-Two were hammered after they released third quarter earnings. Activision Blizzard also saw major declines for its shares that day.

Analysts say the problems faced by these top gaming firms go beyond the rising competition from Fortnite, which is made by Epic Games.

“I think the problem is … not just Fortnite,” said Tom Wijman, senior market analyst at Newzoo, a marketing analytics firm specializing in games and esports. “The main reason is that expectations are too high and Fortnite is an easy thing to point your finger at — but it’s not the cause of the problem.”

Wijman said that every game is now being compared to Fortnite, “but the way Fortnite exploded in terms of popularity, there is no comparison.”

It would be “foolish” to assume that Fortnite is “the one and only reason” for the troubles that the top gaming companies are facing, said Daniel Ahmad, an analyst at Niko Partners.

Take-Two Interactive declined to comment for this story, while Electronic Arts and Activision Blizzard did not respond to CNBC’s requests for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-18  Authors: eustance huang, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fortnite, reason, major, firms, industry, gaming, analysts, electronic, shares, video, facing, game, taketwo, say, problem, interactive


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